Dr Alison Fielding

Dr Alison Fielding

Conjoint Lecturer

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

I am qualified dietitian and health researcher, with a diverse portfolio of research and practice experience, encompassing clinical dietetics (specialising in weight management), translational preventative health research and medical education research within the vocational general practice training setting. My underpinning vision is to achieve real-world health improvement for individuals and communities via the generation, synthesis and translation of high quality and pragmatic research.

I have expertise in research project management and support, where I have worked with leading researchers and institutions on projects including:
  • Development and evaluation of an innovative web-based obesity prevention research in childcare services (feedAustralia) as part of an NHMRC funded grant (led by Dr Serene Yooung, University of Newcastle/Hunter New England Population Health)
  • Evaluation of research translation strategies within the child care setting as part of Australia’s largest ever child obesity prevention program (Good for Kids. Good for Life.) (led by A/Prof Luke Wolfenden, University of Newcastle/Hunter New England Population Health)
  • Evaluation of Hunter Medicare Local's care co-ordination chronic disease management program and development of a primary-care based obesity prevention and management strategy (2013/2014)
I also have expertise in the conduct of systematic reviews, with highlights including a Cochrane review of preventive health implementation strategies in schools (2017), and contributing to the 2013 revision of the Australian Dietary Guidelinesas as part of the Dietitians Association of Australia systematic review team commissioned by the NHMRC.

I am currently working within the recently established Research and Evaluation Unit at GP Synergy, the largest provider of vocational general practice training in Australia, to better inform the education and training of GP registrars as an integral part of primary health care delivery. Key collaborators include Conjoint Professor Parker Magin (GP Synergy/University of Newcastle), Dr Linda Klein (GP Synergy/University of Sydney) and A/Prof Liz Holliday (Hunter Medical Research Institute).


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Primary health care
  • Implementation science
  • Preventative health
  • Education research
  • Nutrition and dietetics
  • systematic review
  • research translation
  • project management

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 100

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
NUDI2220 Food Science 2
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Academic Tutor 4/03/2008 - 1/06/2011
NUDI 3230 Clinical Nutrition 2
Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Academic Tutor 1/08/2009 - 30/11/2010
NUDI 3220 Clinical Nutrition 1
University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Academic Tutor 4/03/2009 - 1/06/2011
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Grady A, Seward K, Finch M, Fielding A, Stacey F, Jones J, et al., 'Barriers and Enablers to Implementation of Dietary Guidelines in Early Childhood Education Centers in Australia: Application of the Theoretical Domains Framework.', Journal of nutrition education and behavior, 50 229-237.e1 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jneb.2017.09.023
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2017 Wolfenden L, Nathan NK, Sutherland R, Yoong SL, Hodder RK, Wyse RJ, et al., 'Strategies for enhancing the implementation of school-based policies or practices targeting risk factors for chronic disease', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011677.pub2
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Flora Tzelepis, Rebecca Wyse, Rebecca Hodder, Nicole Nathan, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2017 Yoong SL, Grady A, Wiggers J, Flood V, Rissel C, Finch M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an online menu planning intervention to improve childcare service adherence to dietary guidelines: a study protocol', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017498
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Andrew Searles
2017 Jones J, Wyse R, Wiggers J, Yoong SL, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'Dietary intake and physical activity levels of children attending Australian childcare services.', Nutr Diet, 74 446-453 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12375
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Jenna Hollis, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2016 Clinton-McHarg T, Yoong SL, Tzelepis F, Regan T, Fielding A, Skelton E, et al., 'Psychometric properties of implementation measures for public health and community settings and mapping of constructs against the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research: a systematic review', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0512-5
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Flora Tzelepis
2016 Yoong SL, Jones J, Marshall J, Wiggers J, Seward K, Finch M, et al., 'A theory-based evaluation of a dissemination intervention to improve childcare cooks' intentions to implement nutritional guidelines on their menus', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0474-7
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Jones J, Wyse R, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, Wiggers J, Marshall J, et al., 'Effectiveness of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services: a randomised controlled trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 10 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-015-0340-z
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Patrick Mcelduff, Jenna Hollis, Luke Wolfenden, Megan Freund, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2015 Finch M, Yoong SL, Thomson RJ, Seward K, Cooney M, Jones J, et al., 'A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of an implementation intervention to increase healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies, and practices in centre-based childcare services: Study protocol', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C3]

© 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved. Background: Promotion of healthy eating and physical activity in early childhood is recommended as a global chronic disease prev... [more]

© 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved. Background: Promotion of healthy eating and physical activity in early childhood is recommended as a global chronic disease prevention strategy. Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to provide children with opportunities to improve healthy eating and physical activity. Evidence to inform implementation of childcare obesity prevention guidelines into routine practice in childcare, however, is lacking. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of an intervention, delivered to childcare staff, aiming to increasing service implementation of healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices. Methods and analysis: A pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial will be undertaken with 165 childcare services in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia. Services will be randomised to receive either a 10-month evidence-based performance review intervention with other resources to support practice change, or to a waitlist control group. The primary trial outcome is the proportion of services implementing all of the following recommended healthy eating and physical activity promoting practices: written nutrition, physical activity and small screen recreation policies; providing information to families regarding healthy eating (including breastfeeding), physical activity and small screen time; providing twice weekly healthy eating learning experiences to children; providing water and only plain milk to children; providing fundamental movement skills activities for children every day; and limiting and using electronic screen time more for educational purposes and learning experiences. Effectiveness will be assessed using a telephone interview of practice implementation with childcare staff at baseline and 12 months following baseline. Ethics and dissemination: The study was approved by the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee and the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee. Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000972628.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006706
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2013 Fielding AA, Warren-Forward H, Baines SK, 'A snapshot of eating behavior, food tolerance, and dietary intake after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding', Bariatric Surgical Patient Care, 8 99-107 (2013) [C1]

Background: This study aimed to describe eating behaviors, food tolerance, and dietary intake after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB); explore associations between th... [more]

Background: This study aimed to describe eating behaviors, food tolerance, and dietary intake after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB); explore associations between these variables; and examine the relationship between diet-related factors and percentage weight loss and quality of life after surgery. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to subjects who had previously undergone LAGB in Newcastle, Australia. Results: Sixty-seven subjects responded (55 females; mean age 49±11.5 years; postoperative body mass index [BMI] 34.5±5.4 kg/m2). Reported average weight loss since surgery was 20.5±9.2% (26.6±13.0 kg). Restraint (including flexible and rigid control) and disinhibition were higher than community norms and hunger trended toward being lower. The majority of respondents rated their eating ability as good (n=27, 40.3%) or excellent (n=15, 22.4%). Median reported energy intake was 4,833 kJ (3,823-5,961) per day. Protein and fat intake as a percentage of daily energy intake was within acceptable distribution ranges, although saturated fat intake exceeded recommendations. Fiber and several micronutrients were below estimated average requirements. BMI at time of surgery and satisfaction with eating ability were significantly associated with reported weight loss after surgery (adjusted R2=0.32, p<0.001), and satisfaction with eating ability and rigid control were significantly associated with physical well-being (adjusted R2=0.19, p=0.001). Conclusions: This study highlights that potential remains to improve aspects of eating behavior, food tolerance, and diet quality in some individuals who have undergone LAGB, and endorses the need for further development of multifactorial interventions to help optimize a range of diet-related factors after LAGB. © 2013 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

DOI 10.1089/bari.2013.9979
Co-authors Surinder Baines, Helen Warren-Forward
2012 Dodsworth AA, Warren-Forward H, Baines SK, 'Feasibility of a protein-enriched diet after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding: Results from a pilot intervention', e-SPEN Journal, 7 e57-e63 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.clnme.2012.02.004
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Surinder Baines, Helen Warren-Forward
2011 Dodsworth AA, Warren-Forward H, Baines SK, 'A systematic review of dietary intake after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 24 327-341 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-277X.2011.01155.x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward, Surinder Baines
2010 Dodsworth AA, Warren-Forward H, Baines SK, 'Changes in eating behavior after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding: A systematic review of the literature', Obesity Surgery, 20 1579-1593 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11695-010-0270-4
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward, Surinder Baines
Show 9 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Tzelepis F, Kingsland M, Fielding A, Skelton E, 'Reliable and valid measures for evaluating public health research implementation', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER, Sydney, NSW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2013 Fielding A, Baines SK, Warren-Forward H, 'Is food tolerance after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) associated with eating behaviour, dietary intake, weight loss and quality of life after surgery?', Australian and New Zealand Obesity Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Surinder Baines, Helen Warren-Forward
2010 Dodsworth AA, Warren-Forward H, Baines SK, 'Eating behaviour and early weight loss after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Surinder Baines, Helen Warren-Forward
2010 Dodsworth AA, Warren-Forward H, Baines SK, 'Protein intake and weight loss after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding: Preliminary findings from a pilot dietary intervention', 23rd Scientific Meeting of the Obesity Surgery Society of Australia and New Zealand: Abstracts, Hobart, TAS (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Surinder Baines, Helen Warren-Forward
2009 Dodsworth AA, Warren-Forward H, Callister R, James B, Wright T, Baines SK, 'Nutrition after gastric banding: Is there a role for high protein diets? Baseline characteristics and early changes in anthropometry and biochemistry after surgery', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Surinder Baines, Helen Warren-Forward, Robin Callister
2008 Dodsworth AA, Baines SK, Palmer M, Capra SM, 'Three factor eating questionnaire scores do not identify behaviours associated with clinically significant weight loss in obese individuals', Nutrition & Dietetics, Gold Coast, QLD (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Surinder Baines
Show 3 more conferences

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Probst Y, Ralston R, Riley M, Sutherland RL, Truby H, Walker K, et al., 'A review of the evidence to address targeted questions to inform the revision of the Australian Dietary Guidelines', National Health and Medical Research Council, 1078 (2011) [R1]
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Melinda Hutchesson, Lesley Wicks, Lauren Williams, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows, Surinder Baines, Amanda Patterson
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Dr Alison Fielding

Position

Conjoint Lecturer
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

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