Ms Amy Anderson

Post Doctoral Research Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
Antenatal health behaviours, particularly alcohol use Health behaviours Public health guideline adherence Predictors of negative health behaviours Women's health

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Health behaviour
  • Pregnancy
  • Women's health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 75
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified 25
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (31 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Cooles FAH, Anderson AE, Lendrem DW, Norris J, Pratt AG, Hilkens CMU, Isaacs JD, 'The interferon gene signature is increased in patients with early treatment-naive rheumatoid arthritis and predicts a poorer response to initial therapy', Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 141 445-448.e4 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.jaci.2017.08.026
2017 Loxton D, Dolja-Gore X, Anderson AE, Townsend N, 'Intimate partner violence adversely impacts health over 16 years and across generations: A longitudinal cohort study', PLOS ONE, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0178138
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore, Deborah Loxton
2017 Powers JR, Loxton D, Anderson AE, Dobson AJ, Mishra GD, Hockey R, Brown WJ, 'Changes in smoking, drinking, overweight and physical inactivity in young Australian women 1996-2013 (vol 28, pg 255, 2017)', HEALTH PROMOTION JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 28 266-266 (2017)
DOI 10.1071/HE16085_CO
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers
2017 Powers JR, Loxton D, Anderson AE, Dobson AJ, Mishra GD, Hockey R, Brown WJ, 'Changes in smoking, drinking, overweight and physical inactivity in young Australian women 1996-2013', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 28 255-259 (2017) [C1]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2017. Issue addressed Smoking, risky drinking, overweight and obesity, and physical inactivity are health-risk factors (HRFs) that contr... [more]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2017. Issue addressed Smoking, risky drinking, overweight and obesity, and physical inactivity are health-risk factors (HRFs) that contribute significantly to morbidity worldwide. Several initiatives have been introduced over the past two decades to reduce these HRFs. This paper examines changes in the prevalence of HRFs in young women (aged 18-23 years) between 1996 and 2013, overall and within demographic groups. Methods Data from two cohorts of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, born in 1973-78 (n=14247) and 1989-95 (n=17012) were weighted to provide national estimates. Prevalence ratios were used to compare HRFs in 2013 relative to 1996. Results In 1996, 32% were current smokers, 38% were risky drinkers, 22% were overweight or obese and 7% were physically inactive. In 2013, corresponding estimates were 19%, 35%, 33% and 6%. Between 1996 and 2013, overall smoking prevalence decreased, but remained over 43% among least educated women. Overweight and obesity increased in all demographic groups. Conclusions The findings suggest that only smoking, which has been the subject of changes in taxation, legislation and regulation, declined significantly, in all except the least educated women. In contrast, the prevalence of overweight and obesity, which has largely been addressed through awareness campaigns and voluntary actions by the food industry, increased markedly in all demographic sub-groups. So what? The findings show that comprehensive health promotion interventions, such as those for tobacco control, are successful (but may still be ineffective among less educated women). In contrast the measures to control population weight gain among young women have been futile so far.

DOI 10.1071/HE16085
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers
2017 Bell GM, Anderson AE, Diboll J, Reece R, Eltherington O, Harry RA, et al., 'Autologous tolerogenic dendritic cells for rheumatoid and inflammatory arthritis', Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 76 227-234 (2017)

Objectives: To assess the safety of intra-articular (IA) autologous tolerogenic dendritic cells (tolDC) in patients with inflammatory arthritis and an inflamed knee; to assess the... [more]

Objectives: To assess the safety of intra-articular (IA) autologous tolerogenic dendritic cells (tolDC) in patients with inflammatory arthritis and an inflamed knee; to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the approach and to assess potential effects on local and systemic disease activities. Methods: An unblinded, randomised, controlled, dose escalation Phase I trial. TolDC were differentiated from CD14+ monocytes and loaded with autologous synovial fluid as a source of autoantigens. Cohorts of three participants received 1×10 6 , 3×10 6 or 10×10 6 tolDC arthroscopically following saline irrigation of an inflamed (target) knee. Control participants received saline irrigation only. Primary outcome was flare of disease in the target knee within 5 days of treatment. Feasibility was assessed by successful tolDC manufacture and acceptability via patient questionnaire. Potential effects on disease activity were assessed by arthroscopic synovitis score, disease activity score (DAS)28 and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ). Immunomodulatory effects were sought in peripheral blood. Results: There were no target knee flares within 5 days of treatment. At day 14, arthroscopic synovitis was present in all participants except for one who received 10×10 6 tolDC; a further participant in this cohort declined day 14 arthroscopy because symptoms had remitted; both remained stable throughout 91 days of observation. There were no trends in DAS28 or HAQ score or consistent immunomodulatory effects in peripheral blood. 9 of 10 manufactured products met quality control release criteria; acceptability of the protocol by participants was high. Conclusion: IA tolDC therapy appears safe, feasible and acceptable. Knee symptoms stabilised in two patients who received 10×10 6 tolDC but no systemic clinical or immunomodulatory effects were detectable.

DOI 10.1136/annrheumdis-2015-208456
Citations Scopus - 25
2017 Anderson AE, Swan DJ, Wong OY, Buck M, Eltherington O, Harry RA, et al., 'Tolerogenic dendritic cells generated with dexamethasone and vitamin D-3 regulate rheumatoid arthritis CD4(+) T cells partly via transforming growth factor-beta(1)', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL IMMUNOLOGY, 187 113-123 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/cei.12870
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 6
2017 Khamri W, Abeles RD, Hou TZ, Anderson AE, El-Masry A, Triantafyllou E, et al., 'Increased Expression of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein 4 by T Cells, Induced by B7 in Sera, Reduces Adaptive Immunity in Patients With Acute Liver Failure', Gastroenterology, 153 263-276.e8 (2017)

© 2017 AGA Institute Background & Aims Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) have defects in innate immune responses to microbes (immune paresis) and are susceptible to s... [more]

© 2017 AGA Institute Background & Aims Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) have defects in innate immune responses to microbes (immune paresis) and are susceptible to sepsis. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4), which interacts with the membrane receptor B7 (also called CD80 and CD86), is a negative regulator of T-cell activation. We collected T cells from patients with ALF and investigated whether inhibitory signals down-regulate adaptive immune responses in patients with ALF. Methods We collected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with ALF and controls from September 2013 through September 2015 (45 patients with ALF, 20 patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure, 15 patients with cirrhosis with no evidence of acute decompensation, 20 patients with septic shock but no cirrhosis or liver disease, and 20 healthy individuals). Circulating CD4 + T cells were isolated and analyzed by flow cytometry. CD4 + T cells were incubated with antigen, or agonist to CD3 and dendritic cells, with or without antibody against CTLA4; T-cell proliferation and protein expression were quantified. We measured levels of soluble B7 molecules in supernatants of isolated primary hepatocytes, hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells, and biliary epithelial cells from healthy or diseased liver tissues. We also measured levels of soluble B7 serum samples from patients and controls, and mice with acetaminophen-induced liver injury using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results Peripheral blood samples from patients with ALF had a higher proportion of CD4 + CTLA4 + T cells than controls; patients with infections had the highest proportions. CD4 + T cells from patients with ALF had a reduced proliferative response to antigen or CD3 stimulation compared to cells from controls; incubation of CD4 + T cells from patients with ALF with an antibody against CTLA4 increased their proliferative response to antigen and to CD3 stimulation, to the same levels as cells from controls. CD4 + T cells from controls up-regulated expression of CTLA4 after 24-48 hours culture with sera from patients with ALF; these sera were found to have increased concentrations of soluble B7 compared to sera from controls. Necrotic human primary hepatocytes exposed to acetaminophen, but not hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells and biliary epithelial cells from patients with ALF, secreted high levels of soluble B7. Sera from mice with acetaminophen-induced liver injury contained high levels of soluble B7 compared to sera from mice without liver injury. Plasma exchange reduced circulating levels of soluble B7 in patients with ALF and expression of CTLA4 on T cells. Conclusions Peripheral CD4 + T cells from patients with ALF have increased expression of CTLA4 compared to individuals without ALF; these cells have a reduced response to antigen and CD3 stimulation. We found sera of patients with ALF and from mice with liver injury to have high concentrations of soluble B7, which up-regulates CTLA4 expression by T cells and reduces their response to antigen. Plasma exchange reduces levels of B7 in sera from patients with ALF and might be used to restore antimicrobial responses to patients.

DOI 10.1053/j.gastro.2017.03.023
2016 Coles J, Anderson A, Loxton D, 'Breastfeeding Duration after Childhood Sexual Abuse: An Australian Cohort Study.', Journal of human lactation : official journal of International Lactation Consultant Association, 32 NP28-NP35 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0890334415590782
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2016 McGovern A, Schoenfelder S, Martin P, Massey J, Duffus K, Plant D, et al., 'Capture Hi-C identifies a novel causal gene, IL20RA, in the pan-autoimmune genetic susceptibility region 6q23', Genome Biology, 17 (2016)

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: The identification of causal genes from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) is the next important step for the translation of genetic finding... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: The identification of causal genes from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) is the next important step for the translation of genetic findings into biologically meaningful mechanisms of disease and potential therapeutic targets. Using novel chromatin interaction detection techniques and allele specific assays in T and B cell lines, we provide compelling evidence that redefines causal genes at the 6q23 locus, one of the most important loci that confers autoimmunity risk. Results: Although the function of disease-associated non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q23 is unknown, the association is generally assigned to TNFAIP3, the closest gene. However, the DNA fragment containing the associated SNPs interacts through chromatin looping not only with TNFAIP3, but also with IL20RA, located 680 kb upstream. The risk allele of the most likely causal SNP, rs6927172, is correlated with both a higher frequency of interactions and increased expression of IL20RA, along with a stronger binding of both the NF¿B transcription factor and chromatin marks characteristic of active enhancers in T-cells. Conclusions: Our results highlight the importance of gene assignment for translating GWAS findings into biologically meaningful mechanisms of disease and potential therapeutic targets; indeed, monoclonal antibody therapy targeting IL-20 is effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis, both with strong GWAS associations to this region.

DOI 10.1186/s13059-016-1078-x
Citations Scopus - 10
2016 Cooles FAH, Anderson AE, Drayton T, Harry RA, Diboll J, Munro L, et al., 'Immune reconstitution 20years after treatment with alemtuzumab in a rheumatoid arthritis cohort: Implications for lymphocyte depleting therapies', Arthritis Research and Therapy, 18 (2016)

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Alemtuzumab, an anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody, was administered to patients with RA between 1991 and 1994. We have followed a cohort of recipien... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Alemtuzumab, an anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody, was administered to patients with RA between 1991 and 1994. We have followed a cohort of recipients since that time and previously reported significant delays in immune reconstitution. Here we report > 20years of follow-up data from this unique cohort. Method: Surviving alemtuzumab recipients were age, sex and disease duration matched with RA controls. Updated mortality and morbidity data were collected for alemtuzumab recipients. For both groups antigenic responses were assessed following influenza, Pneumovax II and combined diphtheria/tetanus/poliovirus vaccines. Circulating cytokines and lymphocyte subsets were also quantified. Results: Of 16 surviving alemtuzumab recipients, 13 were recruited: 9 recipients underwent a full clinical assessment and 4 had case notes review only. Since our last review 10 patients had died from causes of death consistent with long-standing RA, and no suggestion of compromised immune function. Compared with controls the alemtuzumab cohort had significantly reduced CD4 + and CD8 + central memory T-cells, CD5 + B cells, naïve B cells and CD19 + CD24 hi CD38 hi transitional (putative regulatory) B cells. Nonetheless vaccine responses were comparable between groups. There were significantly higher serum IL-15 and IFN-¿ levels in the alemtuzumab cohort. IL-15 levels were inversely associated with CD4 + total memory and central memory T cells. Conclusion: After 20years the immune system of alemtuzumab recipients continues to show differences from disease controls. Nonetheless mortality and morbidity data, alongside vaccination responses, do not suggest clinical immune compromise. As lymphodepleting therapies, including alemtuzumab, continue to be administered this work is important with regard to long-term immune monitoring and stages of immune recovery.

DOI 10.1186/s13075-016-1188-6
2016 Pratt AG, Anderson AE, Carmody RJ, Isaacs JD, 'Bcl-3 in CD4+ T Cell-Mediated Rheumatoid Arthritis Pathogenesis: Comment on the Article by Meguro et al', Arthritis and Rheumatology, 68 770-771 (2016)
DOI 10.1002/art.39509
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Lord P, Spiering R, Aguillon JC, Anderson AE, Appel S, Benitez-Ribas D, et al., 'Minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (MITAP): A first step towards reproducibility and standardisation of cellular therapies', PeerJ, 2016 (2016)

© 2016 Lord et al. Cellular therapies with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (tolAPC) show great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of des... [more]

© 2016 Lord et al. Cellular therapies with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (tolAPC) show great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of destructive immune responses after transplantation. The methodologies for generating tolAPC vary greatly between different laboratories, making it difficult to compare data from different studies; thus constituting a major hurdle for the development of standardised tolAPC therapeutic products. Here we describe an initiative by members of the tolAPC field to generate a minimum information model for tolAPC (MITAP), providing a reporting framework that will make differences and similarities between tolAPC products transparent. In this way, MITAP constitutes a first but important step towards the production of standardised and reproducible tolAPC for clinical application.

DOI 10.7717/peerj.2300
Citations Scopus - 14
2015 Loxton D, Powers J, Anderson AE, Townsend N, Harris ML, Tuckerman R, et al., 'Online and Offline Recruitment of Young Women for a Longitudinal Health Survey: Findings From the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health 1989-95 Cohort.', J Med Internet Res, 17 e109 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.4261
Citations Scopus - 17
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles, Melissa Harris, Jenny Powers
2015 Powers JR, Anderson AE, Byles JE, Mishra G, Loxton DJ, 'Do women grow out of risky drinking? A prospective study of three cohorts of Australian women', Drug and Alcohol Review, (2015) [C1]

Introduction and Aims: To examine women's drinking behaviour relative to Australian guidelines and identify associated factors over the lifespan. Design and Methods: Data cam... [more]

Introduction and Aims: To examine women's drinking behaviour relative to Australian guidelines and identify associated factors over the lifespan. Design and Methods: Data came from three prospective cohorts of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health aged 18-23 (n=14247), 45-50 (n=13715) and 70-75 years (n=12432) when first surveyed in 1996. The same women were re-surveyed at roughly 3-year intervals until 2012. At each survey, four drinking behaviours were based on two guidelines: long-term drinking (no more than two standard drinks per day) and episodic drinking (no more than four standard drinks on an occasion): (i) no risk (within both guidelines); (ii) low episodic risk (less than once a month); high episodic risk (at least once a month); long-term risk (more than two drinks per day regardless of episodic drinking). Results: No risk drinking increased with age, low episodic risk drinking remained almost constant between ages 18 and 39, and high episodic risk drinking declined rapidly. Few women drank at long-term risk. Factors associated with risky drinking varied with age; however, being a past or current smoker consistently increased the risk, and risks for smokers increased with age. Risky drinking was less likely to be practised by women providing care and needing help with daily tasks, or by pregnant women and those living with children. Discussion and Conclusions: Risky drinking behaviour should be addressed in younger women and in those who smoke. Interventions to reduce risky drinking, possibly in combination with reducing smoking, could be offered through general practice centres.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12246
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles, Jenny Powers
2015 Masca NGD, Hensor EMA, Cornelius VR, Buffa FM, Marriott HM, Eales JM, et al., 'RIPOSTE: a framework for improving the design and analysis of laboratory-based research', ELIFE, 4 (2015)
DOI 10.7554/eLife.05519
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
2015 Loxton D, Powers J, Anderson AE, Townsend N, Harris ML, Tuckerman R, et al., 'Online and Offline Recruitment of Young Women for a Longitudinal Health Survey: Findings From the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health 1989-95 Cohort', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 17 (2015)
DOI 10.2196/jmir.4261
Citations Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Julie Byles, Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton
2014 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Forder PM, Powers J, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Risky drinking patterns are being continued into pregnancy: a prospective cohort study.', PLoS One, 9 e86171 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0086171
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers, Peta Forder, Alexis Hure, Frances Kaylambkin
2014 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Women's perceptions of information about alcohol use during pregnancy: a qualitative study.', BMC Public Health, 14 1048 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-1048
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Frances Kaylambkin, Deborah Loxton
2014 Purvis HA, Anderson AE, Young DA, Isaacs JD, Hilkens CMU, 'A negative feedback loop mediated by STAT3 limits human Th17 responses', Journal of Immunology, 193 1142-1150 (2014)

The transcription factor STAT3 is critically required for the differentiation of Th17 cells, a T cell subset involved in various chronic inflammatory diseases. In this article, we... [more]

The transcription factor STAT3 is critically required for the differentiation of Th17 cells, a T cell subset involved in various chronic inflammatory diseases. In this article, we report that STAT3 also drives a negative-feedback loop that limits the formation of IL-17- producing T cells within a memory population. By activating human memory CD4+CD45RO+ T cells at a high density (HiD) or a low density (LoD) in the presence of the pro-Th17 cytokines IL-1b, IL-23, and TGF-b, we observed that the numbers of Th17 cells were significantly higher under LoD conditions. Assessment of STAT3 phosphorylation revealed a more rapid and stronger STAT3 activation in HiD cells than in LoD cells. Transient inhibition of active STAT3 in HiD cultures significantly enhanced Th17 cell numbers. Expression of the STAT3-regulated ectonucleotidase CD39, which catalyzes ATP hydrolysis, was higher in HiD, than in LoD, cell cultures. Interestingly, inhibition of CD39 ectonucleotidase activity enhanced Th17 responses under HiD conditions. Conversely, blocking the ATP receptor P2X7 reduced Th17 responses in LoD cultures. These data suggest that STAT3 negatively regulates Th17 cells by limiting the availability of ATP. This negative-feedback loop may provide a safety mechanism to limit tissue damage by Th17 cells during chronic inflammation. Furthermore, our results have relevance for the design of novel immunotherapeutics that target the STAT3-signaling pathway, because inhibition of this pathway may enhance, rather than suppress, memory Th17 responses. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

DOI 10.4049/jimmunol.1302467
Citations Scopus - 7
2014 Hure A, Gresham E, Lai J, Anderson A, Martin J, Fealy S, Blumfield M, 'Nutrition in pregnancy: The balancing act', International Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 1 7-12 (2014) [C2]
Co-authors Shanna Fealy, Alexis Hure
2013 Loxton D, Powers J, Fitzgerald D, Forder P, Anderson A, Taft A, Hegarty K, 'The Community Composite Abuse Scale: Reliability and Validity of a Measure of Intimate Partner Violence in a Community Survey from the ALSWH', Journal of Women's Health, Issues & Care, 2 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/2325-9795.1000115
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder
2013 Bowman J, Fletcher A, Wiggers J, Anderson AE, McElwaine K, Bartlem K, et al., 'Psychologists and Smoking Cessation Intervention: Unrealised Potential', Journal of Smoking Cessation, 8 76-84 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/jsc.2013.24
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers
2013 Anderson AE, Bowman JA, Knight J, Wye PM, Terry M, Grimshaw S, Wiggers JH, 'Smoking cessation care provision and support procedures in Australian community mental health centers', Psychiatric Services, 64 707-710 (2013) [C1]

Objective: The study assessed the association of supportive clinical systems and procedures with smoking cessation care at community mental health centers. Methods: Managers (N584... [more]

Objective: The study assessed the association of supportive clinical systems and procedures with smoking cessation care at community mental health centers. Methods: Managers (N584) of community mental health centers in New South Wales, Australia, were asked to complete a survey during 2009 about smoking cessation care. Results: Of the 79 managers who responded, 56% reported that the centers assessed smoking for over 60% of clients, and 34% reported that more than 60% of clients received minimum acceptable smoking cessation care. They reported the use of guidelines and protocols (34%), the use of forms to record smoking status (65%), and the practice of always enforcing smoking bans (52%). Minimum acceptable smoking cessation care was associated with encouraging nicotine replacement therapy for staff who smoke (odds ratio [OR]59.42), using forms for recording smoking status (OR55.80), and always enforcing smoking bans (OR53.82). Conclusions: Smoking cessation care was suboptimal, and additional supportive systems and procedures are required to increase its delivery.

DOI 10.1176/appi.ps.201200213
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2013 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Forder P, Powers JR, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Predictors of antenatal alcohol use among Australian women: A prospective cohort study', BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 120 1366-1374 (2013) [C1]

Objective To identify predictors of antenatal alcohol consumption among women who usually consume alcohol. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Australian Longitudinal Study o... [more]

Objective To identify predictors of antenatal alcohol consumption among women who usually consume alcohol. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). Population or Sample A total of 1969 women sampled from the ALSWH 1973-78 cohort. Methods Women were included if they were pregnant in 2000, 2003, 2006 or 2009. The relationship between antenatal alcohol consumption and sociodemographics, reproductive health, mental health, physical health, health behaviours, alcohol guidelines and healthcare factors was investigated using a multivariate logistic regression model. Main outcome measures Alcohol use during pregnancy. Results Most (82.0%) women continued to drink alcohol during pregnancy. Women were more likely to drink alcohol during pregnancy if they had consumed alcohol on a weekly basis before pregnancy (odds ratio [OR] 1.47; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.13-1.90), binge drank before pregnancy (OR 2.28; 95% CI 1.76-2.94), or if they were pregnant while alcohol guidelines recommended low alcohol versus abstinence (OR 1.60; 95% CI 1.26-2.03). Drinking during pregnancy was less likely if women had a Health Care Card (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.45-0.88) or if they had ever had fertility problems (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.48-0.86). Conclusions Most Australian women who drank alcohol continued to do so during pregnancy. Prepregnancy alcohol consumption was one of the main predictors of antenatal alcohol use. Alcohol guidelines, fertility problems and Health Care Card status also impacted antenatal alcohol consumption. © 2013 RCOG.

DOI 10.1111/1471-0528.12356
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Deborah Loxton, Alexis Hure, Jenny Powers, Peta Forder
2013 Loxton D, Chojenta C, Anderson AE, Powers JR, Shakeshaft A, Burns L, 'Acquisition and Utilization of Information About Alcohol Use in Pregnancy Among Australian Pregnant Women and Service Providers', Journal of Midwifery & Women¿s Health, 58 523-530 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jmwh.12014
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton
2012 Carey ML, Anderson AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Lynagh MC, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, 'How well are we meeting haematological cancer survivors' preferences for involvement in treatment decision making?', Patient Education and Counseling, 88 87-92 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2011.12.014
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Mariko Carey
2012 Paul CL, Carey ML, Anderson AE, Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Courtney RJ, Clinton-Mcharg TL, 'Cancer patients' concerns regarding access to cancer care: Perceived impact of waiting times along the diagnosis and treatment journey', European Journal of Cancer Care, 21 321-329 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2011.01311.x
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2012 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Powers JR, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Determinants of pregnant women's compliance with alcohol guidelines: A prospective cohort study', BMC Public Health, 12 1-10 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Alexis Hure, Deborah Loxton, Frances Kaylambkin
2011 Gilligan C, Sanson-Fisher RW, Anderson AE, D'Este CA, 'Strategies to increase community-based intervention research aimed at reducing excessive alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm', Drug and Alcohol Review, 30 659-663 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Conor Gilligan
2010 Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Stewart JM, Anderson AE, 'Being sorry is not enough: The sorry state of the evidence base for improving the health of indigenous populations', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 38 566-568 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2010.02.001
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2009 Anderson AE, MacKerness KJ, Aizen M, Carr VA, Nguyen D, Pre FD, et al., 'Seasonal changes in suppressive capacity of CD4

Background Suppression of allergen-stimulated peripheral blood CD4 + CD25 - effector T cells by CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells obtained from subjects with allergic rhinoconjuncti... [more]

Background Suppression of allergen-stimulated peripheral blood CD4 + CD25 - effector T cells by CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells obtained from subjects with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis is reduced during the pollen season when compared with out of season. Objective We examined possible explanations for this effect of seasonal pollen exposure on suppression of allergen responses. Methods CD4 + CD25 - and CD4 + CD25 + T cells were isolated from blood obtained from 44 volunteers with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis during and out of the UK grass pollen season. Co-cultures were performed with grass pollen extract and house dust mite (HDM) to examine allergen specificity. The frequency of IL-5 and IL-10 producing cells was determined by ELISPOT and the expression of T cell activation markers and the CD25 + regulatory T cell-associated transcription factor Foxp3 were examined. Lactic acid stripping of IgE was used to determine IgE dependence of T cell responses. Results The seasonal reduction in suppression by CD4 + CD25 + T cells was confirmed and was shown to be allergen specific because suppression of HDM-stimulated cultures was not affected significantly. The CD4 + CD25 + population contained IL-5 and IL-10 producing cells but increases in their frequencies with seasonal pollen exposure were not significant. Both activation marker and Foxp3 expression increased during the pollen season. IgE stripping reduced CD4 + and CD4 + CD25 - T cell responses to allergen, but had no effect on suppression by CD4 + CD25 + T cells. Conclusion The seasonal reduction in suppression of grass pollen-stimulated effector T cells by CD4 + CD25 + T cells is allergen specific and cannot be explained by increased IgE-facilitated allergen presentation. We suggest that changes in the proportion of effector to regulatory T cells among the CD25 + population isolated may partially explain these findings, and that trafficking to the site of allergic disease may reduce allergen-specific regulatory T cell numbers in peripheral blood. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2222.2009.03320.x
Citations Scopus - 21
Show 28 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Forder P, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Predictors of Antenatal Alcohol Consumption in Australia', Brisbane, QLD, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Peta Forder, Alexis Hure, Deborah Loxton
2013 Harris ML, Anderson A, Rich J, Loxton D, 'Drinking alcohol during pregnancy: how do women experience information delivery?', Edmonton, Canada (2013)
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Jane Rich, Deborah Loxton
2013 Chojenta C, Anderson A, Gresham E, Harris ML, Rich J, 'Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health: insights from research higher degree students', Sydney, Australia (2013)
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Catherine Chojenta, Jane Rich
2012 Anderson AE, Loxton DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Powers JR, 'Compliance with alcohol guidelines for pregnant women: Using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Journal of Women's Health, Washington, DC (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers, Frances Kaylambkin
2008 Bowman JA, 'Psychologists and smoking cessation intervention: Unrealised potential', 2008 UK National Smoking Cessation Conference - Archive, London (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Kate Bartlem
2004 Mansfield PK, Carey M, Anderson A, Barsom SH, Koch PB, 'Staging the menopausal transition: Data from the TREMIN Research Program on Women's Health', Women's Health Issues (2004)

The present study was conducted to test the assumptions of a staging system of reproductive aging that was proposed at the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop (STRAW) in 2001. U... [more]

The present study was conducted to test the assumptions of a staging system of reproductive aging that was proposed at the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop (STRAW) in 2001. Using longitudinal data provided by 100 women over a period of 3-12 years, we asked whether midlife women move in a uniform progression from pre- to peri- to postmenopause, as refuted by earlier studies but proposed by the STRAW model, or whether they differ from this assumed pattern. Participants were recruited from the TREMIN Research Program on Women's Health, the oldest ongoing study of menstruation and women's health in the world. Eligibility criteria included reaching menopause during the course of the study and not using exogenous hormones. Participants provided annual self-reports of menopausal stage based on observations of their menstrual cycles ("regular," "changing," and "menopausal"). Findings revealed a lack of uniformity as women progressed toward menopause. From 8 to over 20 different perimenopausal stage patterns were observed, depending on the analysis. While the most common pattern was to progress from regular to changing to menopause, some women experienced menstrual bleeding after a year or more of amenorrhea, others flip-flopped between stages, and still others skipped directly from regular bleeding to menopause. We conclude that there is considerable variation in women's movement across menopausal status categories and urge researchers to accommodate such findings in their model building.

DOI 10.1016/j.whi.2004.08.002
Citations Scopus - 28
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Report (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Mishra G, Loxton DJ, Anderson A, Hockey R, Powers J, Brown W, et al., 'Health and wellbeing of women aged 18 to 23 in 2013 and 1996: findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health', Department of Health, 183 (2014)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers, Meredith Tavener, Melissa Harris, Julie Byles
2012 Dobson A, Byles JE, Brown W, Mishra G, Loxton DJ, Hockey R, et al., 'Adherence to health guidelines: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 90 (2012) [R1]
Co-authors Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton, Alexis Hure, Catherine Chojenta, Jenny Powers
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $25,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20131 grants / $25,000

A life course perspective on the identification of risk factors for low birth weight$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Alexis Hure, Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Ms Amy Anderson, Doctor Melissa Harris
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300904
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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News

Ms Amy Anderson

Alcohol during pregnancy

November 19, 2013

Study shows 80% of expectant mothers consume alcohol during their pregnancy.

Ms Amy Anderson

Position

Post Doctoral Research Fellow
Hunter New England Population Health
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email amy.anderson@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4924 6289
Mobile N/A

Office

Room Room 2213
Building Booth Building
Location Wallsend Campus

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