Professor Kristen Pammer

Professor Kristen Pammer

Head of School

School of Psychology

Career Summary

Biography

Professor Pammer is the Head of the School of Psychology. She holds qualifications in science, psychology and neuroanatomy from the University of Wollongong and the University of New South Wales. Her expertise is in applied cognitive psychology, particularly applied aspects of visual attention, such as attentional allocation in driving, reading and dyslexia. In these research contexts, she also do brain imaging research – specifically magnetoencephalographic (MEG) imaging.

Research Expertise

My research activity spans visual attention, language, hazard detection in driving, situational awareness, dyslexia, reading, and indigenous literacy. I have received research funding from various sources, including LIEF funding to build Australia’s first brain imaging MEG machine, and a Linkage grant in which I developed strategic alliances with other university and Government offices around Australia. Specifically this grant developed collaboration with The University of Western Australia, Monash University Accident Research Centre, Ambulance Victoria, ACT Ambulance Service and the NRMW-ACT Road Safety Trust. This Australian-wide collaboration will direct driver training programs in the Emergency Services sector, and help shape novice driver training to reduce driver injury and fatalities in this high-risk category. More recently, we received government funding to investigate the use of autonomous vehicles in the ACT.

I have worked in two of the most pre-eminent MEG laboratories in the world; the Aston MEG lab at Wellcome Trust laboratory for MEG studies, Neurosciences Research Institute, Aston University, the MEG lab in the Low Temperature Laboratory at Helsinki University of Technology, and the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan.

The long term theme of my research has been in understanding the brain mechanisms and visual-attention processes that are involved in reading, particularly in dyslexia. Specifically I have used behavioural and brain imaging technology to understand how very fast visual signals in the brain can guide attention to construct letters and words and guide the eye across the page when reading. My research has been instrumental in demonstrating that such processes are deficient in dyslexic readers.  I was one of the first to demonstrate changes in cortical frequency dynamics can have correlates in cognition such as reading, that the posterior parietal cortex is involved in spatial coding when reading, and that deficits in such spatial coding may be causal in dyslexia. This research has been fundamental in understanding the perceptual and brain mechanisms involved in reading and dyslexia.

Since 2010 my research has shifted to include understanding the visual-attentional mechanisms that are involved in identifying hazards when driving, particularly how failures of visual attention can cause crashes. In understanding how expert drivers attend to the driving situation, we are aiming to understand how novice drivers can be better instructed to reduce road deaths. In this context I have also been looking at motorcycle safety, particularly how drivers fail to detect motorcycles on the road.

Teaching Expertise

I am passionate about teaching and learning; I was an ANU University Education Scholar, a founding Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, developed the Peer Partnerships in Teaching, and Tutor Training program, I was a member of the University Education Committee, the Deputy Director of Science Education (Psychology), and the Associate Dean Science (teaching and learning). My leadership in education has been recognised by my students, my peers, through scholarly works, teaching awards and committee membership.  I have experience teaching and convening at all levels of the undergraduate and postgraduate Psychology program. The courses are all diverse but in all of them I aim to inspire students and encourage them to think like a research-practitioner of Psychology. My SELS scores are above average in all courses and peer recognition includes local and national teaching awards.

I have had extensive experience leading teaching and curriculum restructure within Psychology. I have been responsible for the development of the major and minor pathways in Psychology and their integration with accredited Psychology education sequences. I developed research-based special topics courses, and I mentor staff through providing advice on teaching and supporting awards, and promotions. I have developed tutor training programs for psychology and science in general, which incorporated an online peer review forum where staff can request formal peer review of their teaching practice and I have encouraged teaching academics to provide an open-door teaching policy to allow other staff to learn through experience.  I have also been instrumental in negotiating changes to promotion policies to recognise promotion indicators for teaching and learning.

Responding to the need for a more sensitive and inclusive international profile, I developed an international articulation program at the ANU, in which students are co-taught by Psychology academics in China before articulating into the Psychology program at the ANU. We have collected data on this model, which suggests that this fosters a stronger sense of identity as an ANU student and less accultural stress. I have also developed a Master of Applied Psychology, in order to increase diversity by targeting domestic equity students and international students, thus also addressing the social need for more qualified psychologists to work with diverse populations.

With an ongoing focus on attracting students from non-traditional backgrounds, there is a need for targeted strategies around transitions into university. It is well known that future university commitment, success and satisfaction can be set by the first year university experience, thus I lead the National Science and Engineering Summer School for Indigenous Students; a summer STEM program for indigenous high-school students from all over Australia in which we introduce them to university science classes in a culturally sensitive way. In 2017, this program won a VC’s award for teaching excellence. In addition to this, I have been awarded ANU Top Supervisor Award for postgraduate supervision, Australian Learning and Teaching Council Award for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning, and the ANU Student’s Association Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Administrative expertise

At the Australian National University, I was the Associate Dean Science (teaching and learning), where I played a key role in quality assurance and administrative oversight of undergraduate and postgraduate education programs within the Joint Colleges of Science (College of Medicine Biology and Environment and College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences). In addition to this I represented science at the College of Arts and Social Science Education Committee, and I was on the Joint Colleges Education Committee, the Joint Colleges First Year Conveners meeting and the Science Teaching and Learning Centre steering Committee.

At the University level, I sat on the University Education committee, the Promotions Committee, the Mental Health Advisory Group, the Academic Integrity Working Party, Academic Appeals Committee and the Student Experience Committee.

In Psychology I was the Deputy Director of the ANU Research School of Psychology, the Associate Director (Teaching and Learning), and the undergraduate advisor.

Currently, I am the Head of the School of Psychology at the University of Newcastle, where I am responsible for the teaching, research and engagement activities of the School.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Wollongong
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Wollongong

Keywords

  • Attention
  • MEG
  • applied cognition
  • autonomous vehicles
  • driving
  • dyslexia
  • expertise
  • indigenous literacy
  • international education
  • language
  • magno/dorsal deficit
  • reading
  • road safety
  • situation awareness

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified 33.33
170103 Educational Psychology 33.33
170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance 33.33

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2017 - 31/12/2017 Research Fellow RIKEN Japan
Japan
1/01/2012 - 31/12/2013 University Education Scholar Australian National University
Australia
1/01/2012 - 31/12/2013 Associate Dean Teaching and Learning Australian National University
Australia
1/01/2012 - 31/12/2013 Associate Director of Science Education (Psychology) Australian National University
Australia
1/01/2012 - 31/12/2013 Deputy Director of the Research School of Psychology Australian National University
Australia
1/01/2004 - 31/12/2005 Visiting researcher Helsinki University of Technology
Finland
1/01/2000 - 31/12/2003 Postdoctoral research fellow Newcastle University
United Kingdom

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2005 - 31/12/2010 Lecturer Level C Australian National University
Australia
1/01/1999 - 31/12/2005 Lecturer Level B Australian National University
Australia
1/01/1996 - 31/12/1999 Lecturer Level A Australian National University
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2017 Vice-Chancellors award for Excellence in Indigenous Education
Australian National University
2010 Australian National University Top Supervisor Award for postgraduate supervision
Australian National University
2009 Australian Learning and Teaching Council Award for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning
Australian Learning and Teaching Council
2008 The Australain National University Student’s Association Award for Excellence in Teaching
Australian National University

Prize

Year Award
2013 Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy
Higher Education Academy
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Pammer K, 'The Role of the Dorsal Pathway in Word Recognition', Visual Aspects of Dyslexia (2012)

© Oxford University Press, 2012. All rights reserved. The complexity of the cortical interactions required to read are astounding. Not least are the interactions that occur withi... [more]

© Oxford University Press, 2012. All rights reserved. The complexity of the cortical interactions required to read are astounding. Not least are the interactions that occur within the visual cortex and beyond in the first 300ms or so of seeing a word. It has been speculated that the dorsal visual pathway plays a vital role in this early visual network by providing a preattentive spatial code for the features of letters and words and providing a spatial navigation mechanism for guiding saccades across the line of text. While a large literature has accumulated to implicate the dorsal pathway in reading, and deficits in the dorsal pathway have been demonstrated to be associated with reading failure, the next challenge is to explore the efficacy of visual training as a technique in reading remediation.

DOI 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199589814.003.0009
Citations Scopus - 2
2010 Pammer K, 'Features Are Fundamental in Word Recognition', The Neural Basis of Reading (2010)

© Oxford University Press, 2014. This chapter describes a model that suggests that the accurate perception of letters and features is intrinsic to good word recognition skills, a... [more]

© Oxford University Press, 2014. This chapter describes a model that suggests that the accurate perception of letters and features is intrinsic to good word recognition skills, and that visual sensitivity may be mediated by a preattentive visual search mechanism from the dorsal pathway. It explores the possibility that systematic exposure to reading and words leads to a functional specialization of a part of the visual system, and, conversely, that a lack of exposure to reading due to other causes, such as poor phonological decoding for example, may impact on the gradual specialization/development of the dorsal pathway.

DOI 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195300369.003.0002

Journal article (38 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Pammer K, Sabadas S, Lentern S, 'Allocating Attention to Detect Motorcycles: The Role of Inattentional Blindness.', Hum Factors, 60 5-19 (2018)
DOI 10.1177/0018720817733901
2016 Sloan N, Doran B, Markham F, Pammer K, 'Does base map size and imagery matter in sketch mapping?', Applied Geography, 71 24-31 (2016)

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Sketch mapping has been an important data collection technique for geographers since the 1960s. Structured sketch mapping requires participants to draw spati... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Sketch mapping has been an important data collection technique for geographers since the 1960s. Structured sketch mapping requires participants to draw spatial data onto a base map containing cartographic information, in order to assist with spatial referencing. A concern that base map characteristics may influence sketch map content has been raised repeatedly in the research literature. However little scholarly attention has been paid to systematically testing the effect of base maps.This paper aims to test the effects of base map size and imagery on structured sketch maps of avoidance behaviour in university students. Using an experimental design, 272 sketch maps were compared for differences in: sketch map style; the location of collective avoidance hotspots; the extent of the reported area avoided; the number of reported areas avoided; the intensity of avoidance; and the tortuosity of sketch map features.No significant differences were found between base maps in sketch map style or the size, intensity or number of areas avoided. Provision of larger base maps caused respondents to draw more detailed sketch maps. Collective avoidance hotspots shifted location slightly between base maps, probably due to difficulties interpreting aerial photographs.Sketch map content appears to be remarkably robust to changes in base map. Base maps appear to assist respondents with spatial referencing rather than cueing respondents to report specific features.

DOI 10.1016/j.apgeog.2016.04.001
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Pammer K, Bairnsfather J, Burns J, Hellsing A, 'Not All Hazards are Created Equal: The Significance of Hazards in Inattentional Blindness for Static Driving Scenes', Applied Cognitive Psychology, 29 782-788 (2015)

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Explaining how we attend to some objects and not others in real world environments remains a challenge for theories of attention. Driving is ... [more]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Explaining how we attend to some objects and not others in real world environments remains a challenge for theories of attention. Driving is an ideal example of this, as it requires a complex synthesis of attentional processing, while still allowing attention to be captured by hazards. In the current study we employed a static inattentional blindness (IB) driving task in which participants were required to make decisions about the content of driving-related scenarios. In a critical trial, an additional stimulus was added to the driving scenario. All unexpected stimuli were thematically consistent with a normal driving environment but varied in their level of hazard threat. Rates of IB were consistent with the level of hazard threat of the stimuli. The results are discussed in terms of semantic-based attentional capture in driving, and models of IB.

DOI 10.1002/acp.3153
Citations Scopus - 2
2015 Allen R, Pammer K, 'The Impact of Concurrent Noise on Visual Search in Children With ADHD.', J Atten Disord, (2015)
DOI 10.1177/1087054715605913
2015 Pammer K, Korrel H, Bell J, 'Visual distraction increases the detection of an unexpected object in inattentional blindness', Visual Cognition, 22 1173-1183 (2015)

© 2015, © 2015 Taylor & Francis. Distraction is typically thought to be detrimental to performance and concentration, and stimuli are classified as ¿distractions¿ if the... [more]

© 2015, © 2015 Taylor & Francis. Distraction is typically thought to be detrimental to performance and concentration, and stimuli are classified as ¿distractions¿ if they take attention away from a primary task. However it has been shown that, under certain circumstances, distractors can also improve task performance. The current study extends this literature by exploring the role of a single discrete transient visual distracting event in increasing attention to an unexpected visual object in an inattentional blindness (IB) paradigm. Experiment 1 investigated the impact of a 48 ms visual distraction stimulus on rates of IB; a second experiment used a shortened, 16 ms visual distracting event. Both the long 48 ms and brief 16 ms distractors significantly reduced overall IB rates, by approximately 50% compared to a no distractor condition. Moreover, this reduction in IB is obtained independent of whether the visual distracting event was noted by the observer. Our findings demonstrate that a single discrete visual distraction can improve the detectability of an unexpected object in an IB task. Implications for theories of distributed attention in such tasks are discussed.

DOI 10.1080/13506285.2014.987859
2014 Fiveash A, Pammer K, 'Music and language: Do they draw on similar syntactic working memory resources?', Psychology of Music, 42 190-209 (2014)

The cognitive processing similarities between music and language is an emerging field of study, with research finding evidence for shared processing pathways in the brain, especia... [more]

The cognitive processing similarities between music and language is an emerging field of study, with research finding evidence for shared processing pathways in the brain, especially in relation to syntax. This research combines theory from the shared syntactic integration resource hypothesis (SSIRH; Patel, 2008) and syntactic working memory (SWM) theory (Kljajevic, 2010), and suggests there will be shared processing costs when music and language concurrently access SWM. To examine this, word lists and complex sentences were paired with three music conditions: normal; syntactic manipulation (out-of-key chord); and a control condition with an instrument manipulation. As predicted, memory for sentences declined when paired with the syntactic manipulation compared to the other two music manipulations, but the same pattern did not occur in word lists. This suggests that both sentences and music with a syntactic irregularity are accessing SWM. Word lists, however, are thought to be primarily accessing the phonological loop, and therefore did not show effects of shared processing. Musicians performed differently from non-musicians, suggesting that the processing of musical and linguistic syntax differs with musical ability. Such results suggest a separation in processing between the phonological loop and SWM, and give evidence for shared processing mechanisms between music and language syntax. © The Author(s) 2012.

DOI 10.1177/0305735612463949
Citations Scopus - 5
2014 Pammer K, 'Temporal sampling in vision and the implications for dyslexia', Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 7 (2014)

It has recently been suggested that dyslexia may manifest as a deficit in the neural synchrony underlying language-based codes (Goswami, 2011), such that the phonological deficits... [more]

It has recently been suggested that dyslexia may manifest as a deficit in the neural synchrony underlying language-based codes (Goswami, 2011), such that the phonological deficits apparent in dyslexia occur as a consequence of poor synchronisation of oscillatory brain signals to the sounds of language. There is compelling evidence to support this suggestion, and it provides an intriguing new development in understanding the aetiology of dyslexia. It is undeniable that dyslexia is associated with poor phonological coding, however, reading is also a visual task, and dyslexia has also been associated with poor visual coding, particularly visuo-spatial sensitivity. It has been hypothesized for some time that specific frequency oscillations underlie visual perception. Although little research has been done looking specifically at dyslexia and cortical frequency oscillations, it is possible to draw on converging evidence from visual tasks to speculate that similar deficits could occur in temporal frequency oscillations in the visual domain in dyslexia. Thus, here the plausibility of a visual correlate of the Temporal Sampling Framework is considered, leading to specific hypotheses and predictions for future research. A common underlying neural mechanism in dyslexia, may subsume qualitatively different manifestations of reading difficulty, which is consistent with the heterogeneity of the disorder, and may open the door for a new generation of exciting research. © 2014 Pammer.

DOI 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00933
Citations Scopus - 11
2014 Metcalf O, Pammer K, 'Impulsivity and related neuropsychological features in regular and addictive first person shooter gaming', Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 17 147-152 (2014)

Putative cyber addictions are of significant interest. There remains little experimental research into excessive use of first person shooter (FPS) games, despite their global popu... [more]

Putative cyber addictions are of significant interest. There remains little experimental research into excessive use of first person shooter (FPS) games, despite their global popularity. Moreover, the role between excessive gaming and impulsivity remains unclear, with previous research showing conflicting findings. The current study investigated performances on a number of neuropsychological tasks (go/no-go, continuous performance task, Iowa gambling task) and a trait measure of impulsivity for a group of regular FPS gamers (n=25), addicted FPS gamers (n=22), and controls (n=22). Gamers were classified using the Addiction-Engagement Questionnaire. Addicted FPS gamers had significantly higher levels of trait impulsivity on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale compared to controls. Addicted FPS gamers also had significantly higher levels of disinhibition in a go/no-go task and inattention in a continuous performance task compared to controls, whereas the regular FPS gamers had better decision making on the Iowa gambling task compared to controls. The results indicate impulsivity is associated with FPS gaming addiction, comparable to pathological gambling. The relationship between impulsivity and excessive gaming may be unique to the FPS genre. Furthermore, regular FPS gaming may improve decision making ability. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

DOI 10.1089/cyber.2013.0024
Citations Scopus - 16
2014 Pammer K, 'Brain mechanisms and reading remediation: more questions than answers.', Scientifica (Cairo), 2014 802741 (2014)
DOI 10.1155/2014/802741
2013 Pammer K, Blink C, 'Attentional differences in driving judgments for country and city scenes: Semantic congruency in inattentional blindness', Accident Analysis and Prevention, 50 955-963 (2013)

'Looked-but-failed-to-see' vehicle collisions occur when a driver gives all indications of having responsibly evaluated the driving situation yet still fails to see a ha... [more]

'Looked-but-failed-to-see' vehicle collisions occur when a driver gives all indications of having responsibly evaluated the driving situation yet still fails to see a hazard that is clearly in view. The experience maps well onto the psychological phenomenon called inattentional blindness (IB). IB occurs when a viewer fails to see an unexpected object that is clearly visible, particularly if they are concentrating on an additional primary task. In this study, a driving-related IB task was used to explore whether an unexpected stimulus (US) such as a pedestrian or animal, is more likely to be seen in country or city-related driving scenarios if it is congruent or incongruent with the semantic context of the scenes, and thus congruent or incongruent with the attentional set of the viewer. Overall, participants were more likely to see the US in the City scenarios, which also demonstrated a borderline effect of congruency, with incongruent stimuli less likely to be seen than congruent stimuli. Analyses suggested that driver experience was related to detection of the US in City scenarios but not Country scenarios. However, analyses also revealed that participants generally tended to drive in city rather than country environments, thus prompting speculation that the results may reflect attentional requirements for familiar and unfamiliar driving scenarios. Thus we suggest that the analysis of the driving situation, and the attentional set that we develop to filter information, change when the driving situation is more familiar.

DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2012.07.026
Citations Scopus - 9
2013 Metcalf O, Pammer K, 'Physiological arousal deficits in addicted gamers differ based on preferred game genre', European Addiction Research, 20 23-32 (2013)

Background/Aims: There has been significant discussion surrounding the psychopathology of excessive gaming and whether it constitutes an addiction. The current study investigated ... [more]

Background/Aims: There has been significant discussion surrounding the psychopathology of excessive gaming and whether it constitutes an addiction. The current study investigated physiological and subjective levels of arousal in gamers of two genres and the relationship between sensation seeking and gaming addiction. Methods: Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP) and skin conductance were recorded at baseline, during gaming for 15 min and after gaming in 30 massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) and 30 first-person shooter (FPS) male gamers. Gamers were identified as addicted using the Addiction-Engagement Questionnaire. Sensation seeking was measured using the Arnett Inventory of Sensation Seeking. Results: Addicted MMORPG gamers (n = 16) displayed significant decreases in cardiovascular activity during gaming compared to baseline and showed significant increases after gaming. Addicted FPS gamers (n = 13) had significant increases in BP during gaming which decreased significantly after gaming. In comparison, non-addicted MMORPG gamers (n = 14) had significant decreases in HR during gaming, whereas BP in non-addicted MMORPG and FPS gamers (n = 17) increased during gaming and after gaming. There were no significant relationships between sensation seeking and addiction. Conclusion: There are physiological arousal deficits in addicted gamers, and these patterns differ according to the genre of game played. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

DOI 10.1159/000349907
Citations Scopus - 5
2013 Vanags T, Pammer K, Brinker J, 'Process-oriented guided-inquiry learning improves long-term retention of information', American Journal of Physiology - Advances in Physiology Education, 37 233-241 (2013)

Many chemistry educators have adopted the process-oriented guidedinquiry learning (POGIL) pedagogy. However, it is not clear which aspects of POGIL are the most important in terms... [more]

Many chemistry educators have adopted the process-oriented guidedinquiry learning (POGIL) pedagogy. However, it is not clear which aspects of POGIL are the most important in terms of actual learning. We compared 354 first-year undergraduate psychology students' learning in physiological psychology using four teaching methods: control, POGIL, POGIL without reporting [no report out (NRO)], and POGIL run by untrained graduate students [new facilitator (NF)] . Student activities were identical across POGIL variations and highly similar for control. Participants' knowledge was evaluated before (pretest), immediately after (posttest), and 2 wk later (followup). Control and POGIL groups showed no improvement at posttest, whereas NRO and NF groups both recalled more material than at pretest (P = 0.002 and P < 0.0005, respectively). In a surprise test 2 wk later, control (P < 0.0005), NRO (P = 0.03), and NF (P < 0.0005) groups recalled less than at posttest. The POGIL group showed the smallest drop in knowledge (P = 0.05). Importantly, the control group's knowledge was below pretest levels (P < 0.0005), whereas the POGIL, NRO, and NF groups' knowledge was not. Self-assessment of knowledge was consistent across groups at pretest, but POGIL participants had the lowest confidence at posttest and 2 wk later. At followup, the control, NRO, and NF groups showed greater confidence in their knowledge than the POGIL group (P = 0.03, P = 0.002, and P = 0.004, respectively). POGIL and its variations appear to consolidate existing knowledge against memory decay even when student confidence does not match performance. © 2013 The American Physiological Society.

DOI 10.1152/advan.00104.2012
Citations Scopus - 9
2012 Metcalf O, Pammer K, 'Investigating markers of behavioural addiction in excessive massively multiplayer online role-playing gamers', Cyberpsychology, 6 4 (2012)

There is current debate as to whether excessive use of massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) constitutes an addiction. The aim of the following two studies was... [more]

There is current debate as to whether excessive use of massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) constitutes an addiction. The aim of the following two studies was to investigate two markers of behavioural addiction, cue-reactivity and impulsivity, in a sample of MMORPG users. Study 1 employed a rapid serial visual presentation paradigm that required identification and recall of MMORPG or neutral words. Eighteen MMORPG users identified as addicted using the Addiction-Engagement Questionnaire had significantly better recall of MMORPG words compared to neutral words whereas 19 highly engaged and 20 non-MMORPG users showed no differences. These findings are consistent with previous behavioural addiction research. Study 2 explored evidence for trait impulsivity and disinhibition using a continuous performance task and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11. Twenty-three regular MMORPG users and 21 non-gamers did not differ in levels of impulsivity but MMORPG users exhibited significantly lower disinhibition. Significant relationships were found between addiction and both overall impulsivity and the non-planning factor of impulsivity, but not between addiction and the attentional or motor factors of impulsivity. Implications for research conceptualising excessive MMORPG use as a behavioural addiction and methods of identification are discussed. © 2008 Cyberpsychology.

DOI 10.5817/CP2012-3-4
2012 Beanland V, Pammer K, 'Minds on the blink: The relationship between inattentional blindness and attentional blink', Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics, 74 322-330 (2012)

Failures of conscious visual awareness occur when specific task demands prevent an observer from detecting a stimulus that would otherwise be clearly visible. Two examples are ina... [more]

Failures of conscious visual awareness occur when specific task demands prevent an observer from detecting a stimulus that would otherwise be clearly visible. Two examples are inattentional blindness (IB) and attentional blink (AB). IB is the failure to detect an unexpected stimulus when attention is otherwise engaged. AB describes the inability to detect a second target that is presented within 180-500 ms of the first target. Previous research has suggested that similar cognitive processes underlie both IB and AB; however, they are distinct phenomena, and no evidence has directly linked the two. We tested the same group of observers on an IB task and an AB task. Consistent with our hypotheses, we found that "non-noticers" who failed to detect an unexpected stimulus in the IB task also demonstrated a larger AB effect. This suggests that some observers may be more generally susceptible to failures of conscious visual awareness, regardless of specific context. © 2011 Psychonomic Society, Inc.

DOI 10.3758/s13414-011-0241-4
Citations Scopus - 7
2011 Beanland V, Allen RA, Pammer K, 'Attending to music decreases inattentional blindness', Consciousness and Cognition, 20 1282-1292 (2011)

This article investigates how auditory attention affects inattentional blindness (IB), a failure of conscious awareness in which an observer does not notice an unexpected event be... [more]

This article investigates how auditory attention affects inattentional blindness (IB), a failure of conscious awareness in which an observer does not notice an unexpected event because their attention is engaged elsewhere. Previous research using the attentional blink paradigm has indicated that listening to music can reduce failures of conscious awareness. It was proposed that listening to music would decrease IB by reducing observers' frequency of task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs). Observers completed an IB task that varied both visual and auditory demands. Listening to music was associated with significantly lower IB, but only when observers actively attended to the music. Follow-up experiments suggest this was due to the distracting qualities of the audio task. The results also suggest a complex relationship between IB and TUTs: during demanding tasks, as predicted, noticers of the unexpected stimulus reported fewer TUTs than non-noticers. During less demanding tasks, however, noticers reported more TUTs than non-noticers. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.concog.2011.04.009
Citations Scopus - 11
2010 Beanland V, Pammer K, 'Looking without seeing or seeing without looking? Eye movements in sustained inattentional blindness', Vision Research, 50 977-988 (2010)

Inattentional blindness (IB) describes the failure to notice salient but unexpected stimuli when attention is partially engaged by another task. Few studies have explicitly invest... [more]

Inattentional blindness (IB) describes the failure to notice salient but unexpected stimuli when attention is partially engaged by another task. Few studies have explicitly investigated the role of eye movements in IB and the relative contributions of overt and covert attention. We recorded eye movements in a series of IB experiments using dynamic stimuli. Results indicate that eye movements do not predict IB; noticers and nonnoticers were equally likely to fixate on or near the unexpected item, often for similar durations. Perceptual load also determines whether observers will fixate the unexpected object. In a high perceptual load task, IB was high (81%) and most participants did not allocate overt attention to the unexpected object. Under lower perceptual load IB decreased to 54% and both noticers and nonnoticers fixated on the unexpected object. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.visres.2010.02.024
Citations Scopus - 18
2010 Pammer K, Connell E, Kevan A, 'Spelling and reading: Using visual sensitivity to explore shared or separate orthographic representations', Perception, 39 387-406 (2010)

Do we use the same neurocognitive mechanisms to spell that we do to read? There is a considerable number of conflicting findings, such that evidence has been provided to support c... [more]

Do we use the same neurocognitive mechanisms to spell that we do to read? There is a considerable number of conflicting findings, such that evidence has been provided to support common mechanisms for reading and spelling, while other research supports the proposal that reading and spelling utilise unique neurocognitive resources. Sensitivity to visual spatial-frequency doubling (FD) has been demonstrated to correlate with and specifically predict orthographic processing when reading; therefore, if spelling and reading share some elements of orthographic representation, sensitivity to FD should similarly correlate with, and predict, spelling ability by virtue of this shared association. A double dissociation between reading and spelling was found such that sensitivity to the FD task, as mediated by the visual dorsal stream, predicted reading ability but not spelling, while the visual control task predicted spelling but not reading ability, in poor readers/spellers. The results support a dual-orthographic model with separat e orthographic representations for reading and spelling. © 2010 a Pion publication.

DOI 10.1068/p6077
Citations Scopus - 5
2010 Vidyasagar TR, Pammer K, 'Dyslexia: a deficit in visuo-spatial attention, not in phonological processing', Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 14 57-63 (2010)

Developmental dyslexia affects up to 10 per cent of the population and it is important to understand its causes. It is widely assumed that phonological deficits, that is, deficits... [more]

Developmental dyslexia affects up to 10 per cent of the population and it is important to understand its causes. It is widely assumed that phonological deficits, that is, deficits in how words are sounded out, cause the reading difficulties in dyslexia. However, there is emerging evidence that phonological problems and the reading impairment both arise from poor visual (i.e., orthographic) coding. We argue that attentional mechanisms controlled by the dorsal visual stream help in serial scanning of letters and any deficits in this process will cause a cascade of effects, including impairments in visual processing of graphemes, their translation into phonemes and the development of phonemic awareness. This view of dyslexia localizes the core deficit within the visual system and paves the way for new strategies for early diagnosis and treatment. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.tics.2009.12.003
Citations Scopus - 246
2010 Vidyasagar TR, Pammer K, 'Letter-order encoding is both bottom-up and top-down: Response to Whitney', Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 14 238-239 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.tics.2010.03.008
Citations Scopus - 3
2009 Kevan A, Pammer K, 'Predicting early reading skills from pre-reading measures of dorsal stream functioning', Neuropsychologia, 47 3174-3181 (2009)

It is well documented that good reading skills may be dependent upon adequate dorsal stream processing. However, the degree to which dorsal stream deficits play a causal role in r... [more]

It is well documented that good reading skills may be dependent upon adequate dorsal stream processing. However, the degree to which dorsal stream deficits play a causal role in reading failure has not been established. This study used coherent motion and visual frequency doubling to examine whether dorsal stream sensitivity measured before the commencement of formal reading instruction can predict emerging literacy skills in Grade 1. We demonstrate that over age, IQ and Kindergarten Letter knowledge, pre-reading measures of dorsal stream functioning, as assessed by frequency doubling sensitivity, could predict early literacy skills. These findings suggest that the relationship between dorsal stream functioning and poor reading skills exists before children learn to read, strengthening the claim that dorsal stream deficits may play a contributing role in reading failure. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2009.07.016
Citations Scopus - 44
2009 Pammer K, 'What can MEG neuroimaging tell us about reading?', Journal of Neurolinguistics, 22 266-280 (2009)

Learning to read is one of the most cognitively complex tasks we will ever learn to do. Thus understanding the reading process is not just intrinsically interesting, but can give ... [more]

Learning to read is one of the most cognitively complex tasks we will ever learn to do. Thus understanding the reading process is not just intrinsically interesting, but can give us a number of valuable insights into the relationship between brain processes and cognitive behaviour. MEG neuroimaging allows us to investigate reading processes in terms of the spatial extent of cortical activations when reading, the timing between brain locations, and the frequency dynamics between different cortical areas. The big challenge now for neuroscience is to model all three components of neural behaviour in order to be able to really understand the complexity of human cognition. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.jneuroling.2008.12.004
Citations Scopus - 7
2008 Kevan A, Pammer K, 'Visual deficits in pre-readers at familial risk for dyslexia', Vision Research, 48 2835-2839 (2008)

Visual processing deficits in dyslexic readers are argued to evolve as a consequence of reading failure. This study examines dorsal stream functioning of children before they comm... [more]

Visual processing deficits in dyslexic readers are argued to evolve as a consequence of reading failure. This study examines dorsal stream functioning of children before they commence formal reading instruction to determine whether visual deficits precede reading difficulties. Coherent motion and visual frequency doubling detection were measured in children at familial risk for dyslexia and in children unselected for family reading history. Here we show that children who are at family risk for dyslexia demonstrate dorsal stream deficits before they learn to read, whilst demonstrating no corresponding deficits in coherent form and static grating control tasks. Results indicate that the dorsal visual deficits observed in dyslexic readers are unlikely to be the result of reading failure. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.visres.2008.09.022
Citations Scopus - 38
2008 Kevan A, Pammer K, 'Making the link between dorsal stream sensitivity and reading', NeuroReport, 19 467-470 (2008)

Different levels of dorsal stream functioning were teased apart to determine whether the observed deficits in dyslexic readers may exist as early as the retinal level, and to expl... [more]

Different levels of dorsal stream functioning were teased apart to determine whether the observed deficits in dyslexic readers may exist as early as the retinal level, and to explore the relative contribution that the different aspects of dorsal processing may make to reading. The paradigm combining frequency doubled stimuli with endogenous cueing demonstrated that dyslexic readers possess a retinal level magnocellular deficit. Regression analyses provided evidence to suggest that different levels of dorsal processing relates to various aspects of reading skills, with low-level magnocellular M(y) processing relating to reading accuracy and irregular word reading, and dorsal stream functioning relating to all aspects of reading skills, including nonword reading. © 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

DOI 10.1097/WNR.0b013e3282f5f7ad
Citations Scopus - 21
2007 Kujala J, Pammer K, Cornelissen P, Roebroeck A, Formisano E, Salmelin R, 'Phase coupling in a cerebro-cerebellar network at 8-13 hz during reading', CEREBRAL CORTEX, 17 1476-1485 (2007)
DOI 10.1093/cercor/bhl059
Citations Scopus - 81Web of Science - 65
2007 Pammer K, Kevan A, 'The contribution of visual sensitivity, phonological processing, and nonverbal IQ to children's reading', Scientific Studies of Reading, 11 33-53 (2007)

It has been suggested that the differences observed for dyslexic readers compared to normal readers on tasks measuring visual sensitivity may simply be the result of differences b... [more]

It has been suggested that the differences observed for dyslexic readers compared to normal readers on tasks measuring visual sensitivity may simply be the result of differences between the two groups in general cognitive ability and/or attentional engagement. One common way to accommodate this proposal is to match normal and dyslexic readers on IQ. However, an explicit test of this suggestion is to take normal and dyslexic readers who differ on IQ - where IQ would be expected to explain reading ability - and determine if visual sensitivity can still account for reading skill, even when IQ is taken into account. In this study we explored the relative contributions of nonverbal IQ, visual sensitivity as measured by sensitivity to the frequency doubling illusion, and phonological and irregular word reading to reading ability. Visual sensitivity explained a significant amount of variance in reading ability, over and above nonverbal IQ, accounting for 6% of the unique variance in reading ability. Moreover, visual sensitivity was related primarily to irregular word reading rather than to nonsense word decoding. This study demonstrates that low-level visual sensitivity plays an intrinsic role in reading aptitude, even when IQ differences between normal and dyslexic readers are contrived to maximize the contribution of IQ to reading skill. These results challenge the suggestion that impaired visual sensitivity may be epiphenomenal to poor reading skills. Copyright © 2007, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

DOI 10.1207/s1532799xssr1101_3
Citations Scopus - 19
2006 Pammer K, Hansen P, Holliday I, Cornelissen P, 'Attentional shifting and the role of the dorsal pathway in visual word recognition', Neuropsychologia, 44 2926-2936 (2006)

A substantial amount of evidence has been collected to propose an exclusive role for the dorsal visual pathway in the control of guided visual search mechanisms, specifically in t... [more]

A substantial amount of evidence has been collected to propose an exclusive role for the dorsal visual pathway in the control of guided visual search mechanisms, specifically in the preattentive direction of spatial selection [Vidyasagar, T. R. (1999). A neuronal model of attentional spotlight: Parietal guiding the temporal. Brain Research and Reviews, 30, 66-76; Vidyasagar, T. R. (2001). From attentional gating in macaque primary visual cortex to dyslexia in humans. Progress in Brain Research, 134, 297-312]. Moreover, it has been suggested recently that the dorsal visual pathway is specifically involved in the spatial selection and sequencing required for orthographic processing in visual word recognition. In this experiment we manipulate the demands for spatial processing in a word recognition, lexical decision task by presenting target words in a normal spatial configuration, or where the constituent letters of each word are spatially shifted relative to each other. Accurate word recognition in the Shifted-words condition should demand higher spatial encoding requirements, thereby making greater demands on the dorsal visual stream. Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) neuroimaging revealed a high frequency (35-40 Hz) right posterior parietal activation consistent with dorsal stream involvement occurring between 100 and 300 ms post-stimulus onset, and then again at 200-400 ms. Moreover, this signal was stronger in the shifted word condition, compared to the normal word condition. This result provides neurophysiological evidence that the dorsal visual stream may play an important role in visual word recognition and reading. These results further provide a plausible link between early stage theories of reading, and the magnocellular-deficit theory of dyslexia, which characterises many types of reading difficulty. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2006.06.028
Citations Scopus - 46
2005 Pammer K, Lavis R, Cooper C, Hansen PC, Cornelissen PL, 'Symbol-string sensitivity and adult performance in lexical decision', BRAIN AND LANGUAGE, 94 278-296 (2005)
DOI 10.1016/j.bandl.2005.01.004
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 22
2005 Pammer K, Vidyasagar TR, 'Integration of the visual and auditory networks in dyslexia: A theoretical perspective', Journal of Research in Reading, 28 320-331 (2005)

In addition to an intrinsic difficulty in reading and spelling, one of the defining characteristics of dyslexia is an enduring and pervasive difficulty in phonological coding, suc... [more]

In addition to an intrinsic difficulty in reading and spelling, one of the defining characteristics of dyslexia is an enduring and pervasive difficulty in phonological coding, such that dyslexic readers find it particularly challenging to process and manipulate the constituent sounds of a language. Coexistent with this finding is the evidence that some dyslexic readers also demonstrate subtle sensory coding problems in the visual and auditory domains. Few theories have been proposed to unite these different findings within a coherent model of reading. Here the evidence for visual, auditory and phonological coding problems in dyslexia is briefly reviewed, and a hypothesis is proposed for how adequate early sensory coding may be intrinsic to phonological awareness and subsequent reading ability. In this hypothesis, a cortical network is assumed that incorporates the visual, auditory and phonological skills of reading. The visual sub-component of the network is mediated by the dorsal visual pathway, which is responsible for the accurate spatial encoding of letters, words and text. The auditory component of the network in pre-readers is intrinsic to the development of phonological sensitivity, and then grapheme-phoneme assimilation as reading skills develop. In this hypothesis, some of the symptoms of dyslexia may result from subtle problems in the encoding of both visual and auditory information and their role in maintaining the synchronicity of the reading network. © United Kingdom Literacy Association 2005.

DOI 10.1111/j.1467-9817.2005.00272.x
Citations Scopus - 34
2005 Pammer KM, 'What¿s in a name?', Special Education Perspectives, 3-3 (2005)
2004 Pammer K, Hansen P, Holliday I, Cornelissen P, 'Using magnetoencephalography to map early cortical activation in visual word recognition', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 56 131-131 (2004)
2004 Pammer K, Lavis R, Hansen P, Cornelissen PL, 'Symbol-string sensitivity and children's reading', BRAIN AND LANGUAGE, 89 601-610 (2004)
DOI 10.1016/j.bandl.2004.01.009
Citations Scopus - 66Web of Science - 68
2004 Pammer K, Hansen PC, Kringelbach ML, Holliday I, Barnes G, Hillebrand A, et al., 'Visual word recognition: the first half second', NEUROIMAGE, 22 1819-1825 (2004)
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2004.05.004
Citations Scopus - 136Web of Science - 116
2004 Pammer K, Lavis R, Cornelissen P, 'Visual encoding mechanisms and their relationship to text presentation preference', DYSLEXIA, 10 77-94 (2004)
DOI 10.1002/dys.264
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
2003 Pammer K, Hansen P, Holliday I, Barnes G, Hillebrand A, Singh K, Cornelissen P, 'Specific frequency bands in MEG reflect functional components of the reading network', JOURNAL OF PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, 17 234-235 (2003)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2001 Pammer K, Lovegrove W, 'The influence of color on transient system activity: Implications for dyslexia research', PERCEPTION & PSYCHOPHYSICS, 63 490-500 (2001)
DOI 10.3758/BF03194415
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
2001 Pammer K, Wheatley C, 'Isolating the M(y)-cell response in dyslexia using the spatial frequency doubling illusion', VISION RESEARCH, 41 2139-2147 (2001)
DOI 10.1016/S0042-6989(01)00092-X
Citations Scopus - 57Web of Science - 43
1999 Vidyasagar TR, Pammer K, 'Impaired visual search in dyslexia relates to the role of the magnocellular pathway in attention', NeuroReport, 10 1283-1287 (1999)

WE tested the hypothesis that in a cluttered visual scene, the magnocellular (M) pathway is crucial for focusing attention serially on the objects in the field. Since developmenta... [more]

WE tested the hypothesis that in a cluttered visual scene, the magnocellular (M) pathway is crucial for focusing attention serially on the objects in the field. Since developmental dyslexia is commonly associated with an M pathway deficit, we compared reading impaired children and age- matched normal readers in a search task that required the detection of a target defined by the conjunction of two features, namely form and colour, that are processed by the parvocellular dominated ventral neocortical stream. The dyslexic group's performance was significantly poorer than the controls when there were a large number of distractor items. The scheme of selective attention proposed from these results provides a neural mechanism that underlies reading and explains the pathophysiology of dyslexia.

DOI 10.1097/00001756-199904260-00024
Citations Scopus - 123
1994 Avons S, Wright K, Pammer KM, 'The word-length effect in probed and serial recall', Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology ¿ Human Experimental Psychology, 47 207-231 (1994)
DOI 10.1080/14640749408401151
Citations Scopus - 64
Show 35 more journal articles

Conference (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Pammer KM, Sabadas S, 'Coming out of no-where: Attention and motorcycle detection', Proceedings of the 2016 Australasian Road Safety Conference, Canberra, ACT (2016)
2015 Pammer KM, 'Exploring the role of healthy distraction on driver performance', Proceedings of the 2015 Australasian Road Safety Conference, Gold Coast, Qld (2015)
2015 Beanland V, Pammer KM, Sledziowskaa M, Stone A, 'Drivers' attitudes and knowledge regarding motorcycle lane filtering practices immediately preceding the Australian Capital Territory lane filtering trial', Proceedings of the 2015 Australasian Road Safety Conference, Gold Coast, Qld (2015)
2013 Flint S, Pammer KM, 'Principles of test development in Papua New Guinea', Proceedings of the 20th International Association for Cross Cultural Psychology, Los Angeles, CA (2013)
2011 Metcalf O, Pammer K, 'Attentional bias in excessive massively multiplayer online role-playing gamers using a modified Stroop task', Computers in Human Behavior (2011)

There is considerable dispute regarding the nature of excessive or problematic Internet-related behaviour and whether it constitutes a clinical addiction. Classification of excess... [more]

There is considerable dispute regarding the nature of excessive or problematic Internet-related behaviour and whether it constitutes a clinical addiction. Classification of excessive gaming is hindered by a lack of experimental research investigating behavioural responses from gamers and comparing these patterns to those found in established addictions. We investigated whether an attentional bias for gaming-related words existed for addicted Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Gamers (MMORPGers) identified using the Addiction-Engagement Questionnaire. Forty frequent MMORPGers (15 female) and 19 non-MMORPGers (eight female) completed a computerised modified Stroop task comprised of game-related, negative and neutral word lists, Addiction-Engagement Questionnaire, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21, gaming-related variables. The results indicated that addicted MMORPGers had significantly longer reaction times to negative and MMORPG words compared to neutral words, whereas highly engaged and non-MMORPG participants showed no such bias. The presence of an attentional bias in addicted MMORPGers is comparable with research investigating this behavioural response in established addictions. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.chb.2011.05.001
Citations Scopus - 19
2009 Beanland V, Pammer KM, 'Gorilla watching: Effects of exposure and expectations on inattentional blindness', Proceedings of ASCS 2009: 9th Conference of the Australasian Society for Cognitive Science, Macquarie University (2009)
2005 Pammer K, Holliday I, Cornelissen P, 'Evidence for dorsal pathway involvement in visual word recognition', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY (2005)
2002 Pammer K, Lavis R, Cornelissen P, 'Dynamic visual processes in normal reading: Implications for developmental dyslexia?', PERCEPTION (2002)
2001 Pammer K, Cornelissen P, 'Natural variability in position coding predicts performance on lexical decision', PERCEPTION (2001)
2001 Pammer K, 'Sensitivity to the spatial-frequency-doubling illusion as an index of M(y)-cell dysfunction in dyslexia', PERCEPTION (2001)
Show 7 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 10
Total funding $2,551,652

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $1,340,000

ACT Government Autonomous Vehicle Trials$1,340,000

Funding body: ACT Government Autonomous Vehicle Trials

Funding body ACT Government Autonomous Vehicle Trials
Project Team

Professor Kristen Pammer

Scheme Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20161 grants / $90,000

Questacon/ANU co-funded PhD scholarship $90,000

Funding body: Questacon

Funding body Questacon
Scheme Co-Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20141 grants / $100,000

Haptic feedback driving simulator for road safety research$100,000

Funding body: Australian National University

Funding body Australian National University
Scheme Major Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20131 grants / $151,884

Attention and hazard perception while driving; how experts see the scene$151,884

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20121 grants / $8,644

Evaluating best practice and the development of a working model of peer-review of teaching$8,644

Funding body: Australian National University

Funding body Australian National University
Scheme Teaching Enhancement Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20101 grants / $90,000

Understanding “looked-but-failed-to-see” crshes the role of inattentional blindness$90,000

Funding body: NRMA Road Safety Trust

Funding body NRMA Road Safety Trust
Scheme Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20081 grants / $6,000

Aston Visiting Scholar$6,000

Funding body: Aston University

Funding body Aston University
Scheme Visiting Scholar
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20071 grants / $20,000

BESA neuroimaging software$20,000

Funding body: Australian National University

Funding body Australian National University
Scheme Vice-Chancellor Discretionary Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20052 grants / $745,124

Magnetoencephalographic neuroimaging system$734,124

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Scheme Linkage-Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Using MEG to assess cortical interactions in colour-sound synaesthesia$11,000

Funding body: Australian Academy of Sciences

Funding body Australian Academy of Sciences
Scheme Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current6

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 Unknown Visual and phonological correlates of reading in Mandarin Education, Australian National University Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Clinical decision making in paramedics Education, Australian National University Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD The neural correlates of visual consciousness Education, Australian National University Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Understanding the reach of national outreach in STEM Education, Australian National University Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Reading achievement in indigenous children Education, Australian National University Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD Psychological factors implicated in the development and maintenance chronic pain Education, Australian National University Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Implications of dorsal pathway atrophy in aging Education, Australian National University Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Rumination, attention and depression Education, Australian National University Principal Supervisor
2017 Unknown Mindfulness in the classroom Education, Australian National University Principal Supervisor
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Professor Kristen Pammer

Position

Head of School
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email kristen.pammer@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 49217980

Office

Room W206
Building Behavioural Sciences Building
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