Dr Cassandra Gauld

Dr Cassandra Gauld

Postdoctoral Research Associate

School of Psychological Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Cassandra Gauld is a social psychologist. Her main area of research is in the applied psychology field of road safety where she investigates predictors of risky road user behaviours (e.g., smartphone use) and develops and evaluates theoretically-based interventions (e.g., public education messages). Prior to her appointment at the University of Newcastle she worked at the Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety – Queensland (CARRS-Q) where she also completed her PhD.  Her PhD was entitled ‘A theory-based approach to the development and evaluation of public education messages aimed at social interactive technology use among young drivers’ and it addressed the prevalence of young driver distraction resulting from the use of social interactive technology accessed on smartphones while driving (e.g., Facebook, text messages). In addition to driver distraction, her current research includes autonomous vehicles and indigenous road safety.

Cassandra has worked on various large government and industry road safety projects and her research has contributed to changes in legislation and policy regarding driver distraction and mobile use when driving. She continues to act as a Subject Matter Expert for QLD's Department of Transport and Main Roads regarding future road safety challenges and her work is cited in the their Driver Distraction Research Report. Four of her publications are cited in the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development’s mobile phone scoping report.

Cassandra is an elected member of the Australasian College of Road Safety NSW Chapter Executive Committee. She has been invited to present at numerous community and stakeholder seminars and regularly engages with the media regarding drivers’ smartphone use.  In 2016, she was invited to act as a judge for the QLD Department of Transport and Main Roads’ Co-Lab initiative where young people designed advertising messages against mobile phone use while driving. 

Awards and Scholarships

2020: UON Faculty of Science Staff Excellence Award for Community Engagement

2017: Nominated for a University Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award (Queensland University of Technology)

2014: John Kirby Award for the Best Paper by a New Researcher (competitive) at the Australian Road Safety, Policing, and

          Education Conference.

2013 - 2016: Australian Postgraduate Award PhD Scholarship (competitive)

2012: RACQ Best 4th Year Psychology Thesis in Road Safety (competitive) 

2012: Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety Honours Bursary (competitive)

2011: Dean's Commendation for Outstanding Academic Achievement (University of Southern Queensland)


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Queensland University of Technology

Keywords

  • applied social psychology
  • atttitude behaviour relationship
  • automated vehicles
  • driver distraction
  • mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative)
  • public education messages
  • road safety
  • smartphone
  • young drivers

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
520505 Social psychology 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia
Postdoctoral Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Psychological Sciences
Australia
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Psychological Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
6/2/2017 - 21/12/2018 Research Associate Queensland University of Technology
Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety; School of Psychology and Counselling
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
PSYC3700 Advanced Developmental Psychology and Developmental Psychopathology
School of Psychology, Faculty of Science & IT, University of Newcastle
Course Coordinator 1/2/2021 - 30/11/2021
PSYC6050 Foundations of Applied Psychology 2
School of Psychology, Faculty of Science & IT, University of Newcastle
Course Coordinator 1/2/2021 - 30/11/2021
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Pammer K, Gauld C, McKerral A, Reeves C, ' They have to be better than human drivers! Motorcyclists and cyclists perceptions of autonomous vehicles', Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 78 246-258 (2021) [C1]

Road users and the general population by and large recognise the value of vehicles with automated driving systems and features (otherwise typically known as Autonomous Vehicles (A... [more]

Road users and the general population by and large recognise the value of vehicles with automated driving systems and features (otherwise typically known as Autonomous Vehicles (AVs)) in terms of road safety, reduced emissions and convenience, but are still wary of their capability, preferring the ¿comfort zone¿ of human operator intervention. Motorcyclists and cyclists conversely, are vulnerable to human fallibility in driving, with the majority of crashes occurring as a consequence of other drivers¿ inattention. The transition period associated with the introduction of AVs will require AVs and motorcyclists/cyclists sharing the road for a number of years yet, so we need to understand motorcyclists¿/cyclists¿ perception of AVs. The question of interest here is whether motorcyclists/cyclists reflect the historical literature in this area by having higher levels of trust for human drivers over AVs, or whether they have higher levels of trust in AVs because it removes the ¿human element¿ that has been proven to be particularly dangerous for them. Here we surveyed motorcyclists and cyclists about their trust in human drivers and AVs, and developed a novel suite of questions designed to interrogate the difference between trust in general versus trust as a concept of their own personal safety. Some of the salient outcomes suggest that motorcyclists have medium to low levels of trust for both human drivers and AVs, but are significantly more likely to believe that AVs are safer in terms of their own personal safety, such as prioritising or detecting the rider, compared to human drivers. This relationship varies with age and crash experience. The results here are consistent with the logic that motorcyclists/cyclists have a heightened sense of vulnerability on the road and welcome the introduction of AVs as a way of mitigating personal risk when riding. This insight will be crucial to the subsequent roll-out of AVs in the future.

DOI 10.1016/j.trf.2021.02.009
Co-authors Kristen Pammer
2021 Pammer K, Freire M, Gauld C, Towney N, 'Keeping safe on australian roads: Overview of key determinants of risky driving, passenger injury and fatalities for indigenous populations', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18 1-16 (2021) [C1]

Social and cultural barriers associated with inequitable access to driver licensing and associated road safety education, as well as socioeconomic issues that preclude ongoing veh... [more]

Social and cultural barriers associated with inequitable access to driver licensing and associated road safety education, as well as socioeconomic issues that preclude ongoing vehicle maintenance and registration, result in unsafe in-car behaviours such as passenger overcrowding. This in turn is associated with improper seatbelt usage, noncompliance with child restraint man-dates, and driver distraction. For example, in Australia, where seatbelt use is mandatory, Indigenous road users are three times less likely to wear seatbelts than non-Indigenous road users. This is associated with a disproportionately high fatality rate for Indigenous drivers and passengers; 21% of Indigenous motor-vehicle occupants killed on Australian roads were not wearing a seatbelt at the time of impact. In addition, inequitable access to driver licensing instruction due to financial and cultural barriers results in Indigenous learner drivers having limited access to qualified mentors and instructors. A consequent lack of road safety instruction results in a normalising of risky driving behaviours, perpetuated through successive generations of drivers. Moreover, culturally biased driver instruction manuals, which are contextualised within an English written-language learning framework, fail to accommodate the learning needs of Indigenous peoples who may encounter dif-ficulties with English literacy. This results in difficulty understanding the fundamental road rules, which in turn makes it difficult for young drivers to develop and sustain safe in-car behaviours. This paper considers the literature regarding road safety for Indigenous road users and critically evaluates strategies and policies that have been advanced to protect Indigenous drivers. Novel so-lutions to increasing road safety rule compliance are proposed, particularly in relation to passenger safety, which are uniquely embedded within Indigenous ways of knowing, being, and doing. Safe driving practices have crucial health and social implications for Indigenous communities by allow-ing more Indigenous people to participate in work and education opportunities, access healthcare, maintain cultural commitments, and engage with families and friends, qualities which are essential for ongoing health and wellbeing.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph18052446
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Kristen Pammer, Nathan Towney
2021 Freire MR, Gauld C, McKerral A, Pammer K, 'Identifying interactive factors that may increase crash risk between young drivers and trucks: A narrative review', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18 (2021)

Sharing the road with trucks is associated with increased risk of serious injury and death for passenger vehicle drivers. However, the onus for minimising risk lies not just with ... [more]

Sharing the road with trucks is associated with increased risk of serious injury and death for passenger vehicle drivers. However, the onus for minimising risk lies not just with truck drivers; other drivers must understand the unique performance limitations of trucks associated with stop-ping distances, blind spots, and turning manoeuverability, so they can suitably act and react around trucks. Given the paucity of research aimed at understanding the specific crash risk vulnerability of young drivers around trucks, the authors employ a narrative review methodology that brings to-gether evidence from both truck and young driver road safety research domains, as well as data regarding known crash risks for each driving cohort, to gain a comprehensive understanding of what young drivers are likely to know about heavy vehicle performance limitations, where there may be gaps in their understanding, and how this could potentially increase crash risk. We then review literature regarding the human factors affecting young drivers to understand how percep-tual immaturity and engagement in risky driving behaviours are likely to compound risk regarding both the frequency and severity of collision between trucks and young drivers. Finally, we review current targeted educational initiatives and suggest that simply raising awareness of truck limitations is insufficient. We propose that further research is needed to ensure initiatives aimed at increasing young driver awareness of trucks and truck safety are evidence-based, undergo rigorous evaluation, and are delivered in a way that aims to (i) increase young driver risk perception skills, and (ii) reduce risky driving behaviour around trucks.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph18126506
Co-authors Kristen Pammer
2020 Kaye SA, Lewis I, Buckley L, Gauld C, Rakotonirainy A, 'To share or not to share: A theoretically guided investigation of factors predicting intentions to use fully automated shared passenger shuttles', Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 75 203-213 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.trf.2020.10.010
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2020 Murphy G, Gauld C, Lewis I, 'Predicting the monitoring/reading of communications on a smartphone among young drivers using an extended theory of planned behaviour', ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION, 136 (2020) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2020 Gauld CS, Lewis IM, White KM, Watson BC, Rose CT, Fleiter JJ, 'Gender differences in the effectiveness of public education messages aimed at smartphone use among young drivers', Traffic Injury Prevention, 21 127-132 (2020) [C1]

Objective: The main aim of this survey study was to evaluate the relative persuasiveness of three newly developed and piloted public education messages aimed at monitoring/reading... [more]

Objective: The main aim of this survey study was to evaluate the relative persuasiveness of three newly developed and piloted public education messages aimed at monitoring/reading social interactive technology on a smartphone among young male and female drivers. In accordance with the Step Approach to Message Design and Testing, the messages were evaluated on a number of outcome measures and also explored the influence of self-reported involvement in the target behavior. Methods: Participants (N = 152; 105 F) were aged 17 to 25 years (Mage = 20.14 years, SD = 2.35) and were randomly allocated to either an intervention (one of the three messages) or control (no message) condition. The messages in the intervention group were assessed on acceptance (i.e., behavioral intention and message effectiveness), rejection, and the third person effect (TPE) differential score (i.e., the message is perceived to be more effective for others than for themselves). Results: Hierarchical regression analyses found that, compared to males, females reported: a) lower intention to monitor/read social interactive technology on a smartphone while driving, b) lower rejection; and, c) lower TPE likelihood, irrespective of message. Conclusions: These findings suggest that young male drivers and young female drivers require different message content to be effective and support the importance of including multiple outcome measures to explain the messages¿ persuasive effects.

DOI 10.1080/15389588.2020.1732948
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2019 Manton KJ, Gauld CS, White KM, Griffin PM, Elliott SL, 'Qualitative study investigating the underlying motivations of healthy participants in phase I clinical trials', BMJ OPEN, 9 (2019)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024224
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2019 Gauld CS, Lewis LM, White KM, Fleiter JJ, Watson B, 'Public education messages aimed at smartphone use among young drivers: A mixed methods exploration of their effectiveness', TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH PART F-TRAFFIC PSYCHOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR, 60 311-326 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.trf.2018.10.027
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2017 Gauld CS, Lewis I, White KM, Fleiter JJ, Watson B, 'Evaluating public education messages aimed at monitoring and responding to social interactive technology on smartphones among young drivers', ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION, 104 24-35 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2017.04.011
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
2017 Gauld CS, Lewis I, White KM, Fleiter JJ, Watson B, 'Smartphone use while driving: What factors predict young drivers' intentions to initiate, read, and respond to social interactive technology?', COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR, 76 174-183 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.chb.2017.07.023
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 40
2016 Gauld CS, Lewis IM, Whitey KM, Watson B, 'Young drivers' engagement with social interactive technology on their smartphone: Critical beliefs to target in public education messages', ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION, 96 208-218 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2016.07.041
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
2016 Gauld CS, Lewis IM, White KM, Watson B, 'Key beliefs influencing young drivers' engagement with social interactive technology on their smartphones: A qualitative study', TRAFFIC INJURY PREVENTION, 17 128-133 (2016)
DOI 10.1080/15389588.2015.1047014
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 17
2015 Gauld C, Lewis I, Haque MM, Washington S, 'Effect of mobile phone use and aggression on speed selection by young drivers: a driving simulator study', JOURNAL OF THE AUSTRALASIAN COLLEGE OF ROAD SAFETY, 26 40-46 (2015)
Citations Web of Science - 3
2014 Gauld CS, Lewis I, White KM, 'Concealing their communication: Exploring psychosocial predictors of young drivers' intentions and engagement in concealed texting', ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION, 62 285-293 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2013.10.016
Citations Scopus - 74Web of Science - 67
2014 Gauld CS, Lewis I, White KM, 'Concealed texting while driving: What are young people's beliefs about this risky behaviour?', SAFETY SCIENCE, 65 63-69 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ssci.2013.12.017
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 25
Show 12 more journal articles

Conference (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Watson B, Lewis I, White K, Ho B, Nandavar S, Oviedo-Trespalacios O, et al., 'Should we be talking about addiction when it comes to young drivers and smartphones?', Sydney (2020)
2019 McKerral A, Boyce N, Gauld C, Pammer K, 'The cost of supervision: Attention and fatigue during automated driving.', Sydney (2019)
Co-authors Kristen Pammer
2019 Gauld C, McKerral A, Pammer K, 'Exploring drivers beliefs about automated driving pre and post a simulated drive', Sydney (2019)
Co-authors Kristen Pammer
2016 Gauld C, Lewis I, White K, Watson B, Fleiter J, 'Public education messages for social interactive technology use on smartphones among young drivers: Are there gender differences?', Brisbane (2016)
2013 Gauld C, Lewis I, White K, 'Identifying the determinants of concealed and obvious texting while driving : are they distinct behaviours?', Identifying the determinants of concealed and obvious texting while driving : are they distinct behaviours?, Adelaide (2013)
2013 Gauld C, Lewis I, Haque M, Washington S, 'Effect of mobile phone use and aggression on speed selection by young drivers: a driving simulator study.', Melbourne (2013)
2013 Gauld C, Lewis I, White K, Watson B, 'Key beliefs influencing young adults smartphone use while driving', Paris (2013)
Show 4 more conferences

Other (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Gauld C, 'Smartphone use while driving: An overview', (2018) [O1]
2016 Gauld C, 'Road safety messages aimed at social interactive technology on smartphones: An application of the SatMDT', (2016) [O1]
2016 Gauld C, 'Developing and evaluating public education messages aimed at smartphone use among young drivers', (2016) [O1]
2016 Gauld C, 'Public education messages aimed at smartphone use among young drivers.', (2016) [O1]
2016 Gauld C, 'Reducing smartphone use among young drivers: Are the messages having the desired effect?', (2016) [O1]
2013 Gauld C, 'Concealed texting while driving: Applying an extended theory of planned behaviour.', (2013) [O1]
Show 3 more others

Report (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Armstrong K, Davey J, Freeman J, Gauld C, Watson A, Young S, 'From Restricted to Open Licence: Does Increasing the Legal BAC for Young Drivers do More Harm Than Good?', Motor Accident Insurance Commission, 40 (2019)
2018 Kaye S-A, Lewis I, Gauld C, Nandavar S, 'A road safety intervention to modify attitudes and behaviour towards mobile phone use while driving: brief report', Budget Direct (2018)

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Gauld C, A theory-based approach to the development and evaluation of public education messages aimed at social interactive technology use on smartphones among young drivers., Queensland University of Technology (2017)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 13
Total funding $742,522

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20212 grants / $210,516

Linking virtual reality with road safety for Indigenous Australians$209,856

Funding body: Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications

Funding body Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications
Project Team Doctor Olivia Whalen, Mrs Melissa Freire, Doctor Cassandra Gauld, Professor Kristen Pammer
Scheme Road Safety Innovation Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2023
GNo G2100408
Type Of Funding C1500 - Aust Competitive - Commonwealth Other
Category 1500
UON Y

Public Education Messages Targetting Drink Driving Among Young, Regional Drivers$660

Funding body: PRC Health Behaviour

Funding body PRC Health Behaviour
Project Team

Gauld & Armstrong

Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20205 grants / $243,540

Connecting humans and self-drive cars: A Safe Vision for Smart Cities$192,528

Funding body: Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications

Funding body Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications
Project Team Professor Kristen Pammer, Doctor Cassandra Gauld, Student Un-named
Scheme Road Safety Innovation Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G2000698
Type Of Funding C1500 - Aust Competitive - Commonwealth Other
Category 1500
UON Y

Scoping study for the evaluation of the SafeT360 educational intervention.$36,533

Funding body: Australian Trucking Association

Funding body Australian Trucking Association
Project Team

Pammer, K., Gauld, C., Brown, S., Eidels, A., Blackmore, K., Smith, S. & McKerral, A.

Scheme No scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

The influence of norms on young males' and young females' smarpthone use$6,401

Funding body: Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Cassandra Gauld, Prof Kristen Pammer

Scheme Strategic Investment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

International Students’ Involvement in UON Leadership Programs$5,884

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Brain and Mental Health | The University of Newcastle

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Brain and Mental Health | The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Paolini, Gauld, Douglas, & Fraser

Scheme Research Support Grant Round Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Normative influences on young drivers’ smartphone use $2,194

Funding body: PRC Health Behaviour

Funding body PRC Health Behaviour
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20192 grants / $12,928

Investigating passengers’ beliefs and factors influencing their intention to use and acceptance of the Newcastle driverless shuttle.$7,933

Funding body: Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Project Team

Pammer, K., Gauld, C., Kaye, S-A., McKerral, A.

Scheme Faculty Strategic Investment Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

A pilot study investigating the feasibility and effectiveness of an online survey version of the induced hypocrisy paradigm to reduce smartphone use among young drivers.$4,995

Funding body: PRC Health Behaviour

Funding body PRC Health Behaviour
Project Team

Gauld, C., Pammer, K., Lewis, I., White, K., Watson, B.

Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20182 grants / $55,000

Distracted Driving Program of Research: Project 1$40,000

Funding body: Australian Automobile Association

Funding body Australian Automobile Association
Project Team

Barry Watson, Sonali Nandavar, Oscar Oviedo-Trespalacios, Ioni Lewis, Katherine White, Bonnie Ho, & Cassandra Gauld

Scheme Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Carla Patterson Memorial Grant$15,000

Project entitled 'Monitoring/reading social interactive technology on smartphones among young drivers: Developing, Piloting, and evaluating the effectiveness of theory-based messages'

Funding body: Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, QUT

Funding body Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, QUT
Project Team

Gauld, C., Lewis, I., White, K.M., Watson, B., & Fleiter, J.

Scheme 2018 IHBI ECR Development Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20171 grants / $31,065

A Road Safety Intervention to Modify Attitudes and Behaviour Towards Mobile Phone Use While Driving$31,065

Funding body: Budget Direct

Funding body Budget Direct
Project Team

Kaye, S., Lewis, I., & Gauld, C.

Scheme A Road Safety Intervention to Modify Attitudes and Behaviour Towards Mobile Phone use While Driving
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20161 grants / $189,473

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Advertising Billboards on Road Safety Behaviour$189,473

Funding body: Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads

Funding body Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads
Project Team

Kaye, S., Lewis, I., Haque, M., Watson, A., & Gauld, C.

Scheme Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Advertising Billboards on Road Safety Behaviour
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding C1600 - Aust Competitive - StateTerritory Govt
Category 1600
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed4
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 Honours Personality Predictors of Initiating Communications on a Smartphone While Driving Psychology, School of Psychology, College of Engineering, Science, and Environment Sole Supervisor
2021 PhD Connecting Humans and Self-Driving Vehicles PhD (Psychology - Science), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2021 Honours The Influence of Norms on Young Drivers' Smartphone Use Psychology, School of Psychology, College of Engineering, Science, and Environment Sole Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 Honours Driverless or Useless: Predicting Intention to Use the Newcastle Driverless Shuttle with an Extended Theory of Planned Behaviour Psychology, Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle | Australia Sole Supervisor
2019 Honours Driving Blind? Predictive Factors Influencing Concealed Smartphone Use Among Young Drivers Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle Sole Supervisor
2018 Honours Predicting the Monitoring/reading of a Smartphone Among Young Drivers using an Extended Theory of Planned Behaviour Psychology, Queensland University of Technology Principal Supervisor
2017 Honours Childcare Employee Ill-Being: The role of Psychological Need Thwarting and Mindfulness Psychology, Queensland University of Technology Principal Supervisor
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Dr Cassandra Gauld

Positions

Postdoctoral Research Associate
School of Psychological Sciences
College of Engineering, Science and Environment

Associate Lecturer
School of Psychological Sciences
College of Engineering, Science and Environment

Contact Details

Email cass.gauld@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4055 3046

Office

Room SR-269
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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