Dr Cassandra Gauld

Dr Cassandra Gauld

Postdoctoral Research Associate

School of Psychology

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Cassandra Gauld is currently employed as a Postdoctoral Researcher in the applied psychology field of road safety. Prior to her appointment at the University of Newcastle she worked at the Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety – Queensland (CARRS-Q) on various young driver projects focusing on smartphone use and drink driving.

 In 2017 she completed her PhD at the Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety – Queensland (CARRS-Q).  Her thesis was entitled ‘A theory-based approach to the development and evaluation of public education messages aimed at social interactive technology use among young drivers’ for which she was nominated for an Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award. Cassandra’s PhD addressed the prevalence of driver distraction resulting from the use of social interactive technology accessed on smartphones while driving (e.g., Facebook, text messages). Her research focused on young drivers aged 17 – 25 years given their high crash risk, relative to other road user groups, and their increased likelihood to use smartphones and the additional social interactive technologies. 

In 2014, she won the ‘John Kirby Award for the Best Paper by a New Researcher’ at the Road Safety, Research, and Policing, and Education conference for her paper entitled ‘Effect of mobile phone use and aggression on speed selection by young drivers: A  driving simulator study’. Her Honours thesis entitled ‘Concealed texting while driving: Applying an extended theory of planned behaviour’ won the 2012 RACQ Best 4th Year Psychology Thesis in Road Safety. 

Cassandra is the first author on several journal articles and conference presentations. She has been invited to present at numerous community and stakeholder seminars and regularly engages with the media regarding drivers’ smartphone use.  In 2016, she was invited to act as a judge for the QLD Department of Transport and Main Roads’ Co-Lab initiative where young people designed advertising messages against mobile phone use while driving. 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Queensland University of Technology

Keywords

  • applied social psychology
  • atttitude behaviour relationship
  • automated vehicles
  • driver distraction
  • mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative)
  • public education messages
  • road safety
  • smartphone
  • young drivers

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
170113 Social and Community Psychology 50
179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
6/02/2017 - 21/12/2018 Research Associate Queensland University of Technology
Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety; School of Psychology and Counselling
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Gauld CS, Lewis IM, White KM, Fleiter JJ, Watson B, 'Public education messages aimed at smartphone use among young drivers: A mixed methods exploration of their effectiveness', Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 60 311-326 (2019)

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd The main aim of this study was to concept test nine public education messages; with three different messages targeting each of three salient underlying beliefs... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd The main aim of this study was to concept test nine public education messages; with three different messages targeting each of three salient underlying beliefs in accordance with the Step Approach to Message Design and Testing (SatMDT) framework. The underlying beliefs were: (1) believing you are a good driver would encourage a young driver to monitor/read and respond to social interactive technology while driving; (2) slow-moving traffic would encourage a young driver to monitor/read and respond to social interactive technology while driving; and, (3) friends and peers would approve of a young driver monitoring/reading and responding to communications on their smartphone. Consistent with the SatMDT, the testing aimed to establish which three messages (each targeting a different underlying belief) young drivers reported as being the most effective. A mixed methods approach was utilised to provide an in-depth examination of individuals¿ thoughts and feelings about the messages, with such responses assessed via an individual self-report survey and focus group discussions/interviews. Participants (N = 33; 19F, 14 M) were aged 17¿25 years, had a current driver's licence, owned a smartphone, and resided in the Australian state of Queensland. Means for each of the survey items were compared across message concepts to determine which ones were rated highest. Focus group discussion/interview responses underwent a data-led thematic analysis. The results of the quantitative and qualitative analyses were integrated to identify three messages that were deemed the most effective, one for each of the three underlying beliefs. Each of these three messages elicited positive emotion and modelled positive behaviour. This research highlights the importance of concept testing message content with the target audience. The results support current research that suggests road safety messages modelling positive behaviour and eliciting positive emotions may be especially persuasive for young drivers.

DOI 10.1016/j.trf.2018.10.027
2019 Manton KJ, Gauld CS, White KM, Griffin PM, Elliott SL, 'Qualitative study investigating the underlying motivations of healthy participants in phase I clinical trials', BMJ Open, 9 (2019)

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Objectives: If patients are to reap the benefits of continued drug development, an understanding of why healthy participants take part in ... [more]

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Objectives: If patients are to reap the benefits of continued drug development, an understanding of why healthy participants take part in phase I clinical trials is imperative. The current study aimed to explore the nature of these underlying motivations which may, in turn, improve the overall participant experience and assist in the development of more effective recruitment and retention strategies. Design: This study used a qualitative design based on the theory of planned behaviour. Specifically, it explored healthy participants' underlying behavioural, control and normative beliefs which influence their participation in phase I clinical trials. Setting: This study took place at a company that specialises in conducting phase I and phase II clinical trials in the Australian state of Queensland. Participants: Participants (n=31) were either currently undergoing a phase I clinical trial or had previously taken part in a phase I clinical trial. Results: Results showed that the motivations were varied and not solely centred on financial gains. Reported advantages of participation included altruism, while inconvenience was most often reported as a disadvantage. Friends were reported as those most likely to approve, while one's mother was reported as most likely to disapprove. Having a suitable time frame/flexible scheduling and feeling comfortable taking part in the trial were both the most commonly reported facilitators, while inflexible scheduling/time commitment was the most commonly reported barrier. Conclusions: Practical implications included the need for organisations involved in clinical trials to be mindful of inflexible scheduling and exploring the possibility of making educational materials available to family members who may be concerned about the risks associated with participation. Overall, it is anticipated that the results of this study will improve the understanding of factors that influence phase I clinical trial participation which may, ultimately, help develop new therapeutics to improve patient health.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024224
2017 Gauld CS, Lewis I, White KM, Fleiter JJ, Watson B, 'Evaluating public education messages aimed at monitoring and responding to social interactive technology on smartphones among young drivers', ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION, 104 24-35 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2017.04.011
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2017 Gauld CS, Lewis I, White KM, Fleiter JJ, Watson B, 'Smartphone use while driving: What factors predict young drivers' intentions to initiate, read, and respond to social interactive technology?', COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR, 76 174-183 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.chb.2017.07.023
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2016 Gauld CS, Lewis IM, Whitey KM, Watson B, 'Young drivers' engagement with social interactive technology on their smartphone: Critical beliefs to target in public education messages', ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION, 96 208-218 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2016.07.041
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2016 Gauld CS, Lewis IM, White KM, Watson B, 'Key beliefs influencing young drivers' engagement with social interactive technology on their smartphones: A qualitative study', TRAFFIC INJURY PREVENTION, 17 128-133 (2016)
DOI 10.1080/15389588.2015.1047014
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2015 Gauld C, Lewis I, Haque MM, Washington S, 'Effect of mobile phone use and aggression on speed selection by young drivers: a driving simulator study', JOURNAL OF THE AUSTRALASIAN COLLEGE OF ROAD SAFETY, 26 40-46 (2015)
Citations Web of Science - 2
2014 Gauld CS, Lewis I, White KM, 'Concealing their communication: Exploring psychosocial predictors of young drivers' intentions and engagement in concealed texting', ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION, 62 285-293 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2013.10.016
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 36
2014 Gauld CS, Lewis I, White KM, 'Concealed texting while driving: What are young people's beliefs about this risky behaviour?', SAFETY SCIENCE, 65 63-69 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ssci.2013.12.017
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
Show 6 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Gauld C, Lewis I, White K, 'Identifying the determinants of concealed and obvious texting while driving : are they distinct behaviours?', Identifying the determinants of concealed and obvious texting while driving : are they distinct behaviours?, Adelaide (2013)

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Gauld C, A theory-based approach to the development and evaluation of public education messages aimed at social interactive technology use on smartphones among young drivers., Queensland University of Technology (2017)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $235,538

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $15,000

Carla Patterson Memorial Grant$15,000

Project entitled 'Monitoring/reading social interactive technology on smartphones among young drivers: Developing, Piloting, and evaluating the effectiveness of theory-based messages'

Funding body: Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, QUT

Funding body Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, QUT
Project Team

Gauld, C., Lewis, I., White, K.M., Watson, B., & Fleiter, J.

Scheme 2018 IHBI ECR Development Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20171 grants / $31,065

A Road Safety Intervention to Modify Attitudes and Behaviour Towards Mobile Phone Use While Driving$31,065

Funding body: Budget Direct

Funding body Budget Direct
Project Team

Kaye, S., Lewis, I., & Gauld, C.

Scheme A Road Safety Intervention to Modify Attitudes and Behaviour Towards Mobile Phone use While Driving
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20161 grants / $189,473

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Advertising Billboards on Road Safety Behaviour$189,473

Funding body: Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads

Funding body Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads
Project Team

Kaye, S., Lewis, I., Haque, M., Watson, A., & Gauld, C.

Scheme Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Advertising Billboards on Road Safety Behaviour
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding C1600 - Aust Competitive - StateTerritory Govt
Category 1600
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 Honours Driving Blind? Predictive Factors Influencing Concealed Smartphone Use Among Young Drivers Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle Sole Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 Honours Predicting the Monitoring/reading of a Smartphone Among Young Drivers using an Extended Theory of Planned Behaviour Psychology, Queensland University of Technology Principal Supervisor
2017 Honours Childcare Employee Ill-Being: The role of Psychological Need Thwarting and Mindfulness Psychology, Queensland University of Technology Principal Supervisor
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Dr Cassandra Gauld

Position

Postdoctoral Research Associate
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email cass.gauld@newcastle.edu.au
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