Dr Charles Douglas

Senior Lecturer

School of Medicine and Public Health (Clinical Ethics and Health Law)

Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Douglas is a relatively early career academic, having not taken an academic appointment, or commenced a PhD until establishing himself in his clinical career in 2004. He originally studied mathematics and physics at the University of Adelaide, and worked as a school teacher, which gave him a strong background in science generally and in teaching. He commenced medical training at the University of Newcastle in 1985, and completed his B Med with honours in 1990, having also completed a Bachelor of Medical Science in transplantation with first class honours, further strengthening his research background.

Dr. Douglas then undertook post-graduate training in surgery, taking a break from this in 1999 to do a year of research in ethics (relating to surgery). Soon after completion of his surgical training, an opportunity arose to take an academic position at the University of Newcastle as a Lecturer in Clinical Ethics and Health Law. He has continued in this role while developing his surgical expertise in the areas of breast cancer and melanoma surgery. He now works as a consultant surgeon at the Breast Centre, Gateshead, and at the Newcastle Melanoma Unit, and as a VMO surgeon at the Calvary Mater and Lake Macquarie Private Hospitals. In 2008 he was promoted to Senior Lecturer.

Dr. Douglas has developed a very wide range of research interests in ethics, clinical decision making, basic science and surgery. He was awarded his PhD (on end-of-life decision making) in 2012. He was holder of a Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Research Scholarship in 1999 and a Fellowship of the Federation of European Cancer Societies in 2003. He is also winner of the inaugural General Surgeons Australia Best Paper Prize for his work on the ultrasound diagnosis of appendicitis and the winner of the Sir Edward Hughes Memorial Research Prize for this project (1999). He was shortlisted again for the Sir Edward Hughes Memorial Research Prize for his work on surgeons attitudes to euthanasia (2000). He is the winner of the Ethel and Olive Hewitt Medical Research Scholarship in 2001. He won two ECR grants relating to his work on interviews with palliative care physicians regarding the use of palliative sedation at the end of life in 2007 and 2009, and is already internationally recognised for his work in this area.

Research Expertise
I have a very wide range of expertise, covering a number of different areas. My doctorate (submitted August 2011) is on 'end-of-life decision making' and incorporates 5 papers, two of which relate to moral psychology / philosophy, and 3 of which are sociological studies of doctors, in both qualitative and quantitative research traditions. While working on my PhD I have also published or am conducting clinical studies (a randomised controlled trial on the diagnosis of appendicitis using ultrasound), studies on clinical decision making (using decision aids, using different forms of communication), basic science studies (on the transplantation of thyroid tissue in mice, and on the tension properties of human skin as it relates to reconstructive surgery), and papers on bioethics, particularly the issue of informed consent.

Teaching Expertise
I am the Discipline Lead for ethics and I teach clinical ethics and health law to all years of the JMP program with the exception of Year 5, having developed this course myself. I have a broad interest in other areas of ethics, and have given talks to a variety of other schools in the past. I also teach into the surgery program and am involved in assessment of most years of the JMP program in a number of different areas, most importantly in clinical assessments.

Administrative Expertise
Program Convenor, Bachelor of Medical Science School Student Academic Conduct Officer HES course coordinator Discipline Lead, Clinical Ethics and Health Law Director, Melanoma Unit, Calvary Mater Newcastle.

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Medicine (Honours), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Adelaide
  • Bachelor of Medical Science (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Ethics
  • Surgery
  • Oncology
  • Health Law
  • Breast cancer
  • Breast surgery
  • Clinical ethics
  • Informed consent
  • Moral philosophy
  • Clinical decision making
  • End-of-life decision-making

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Senior Lecturer Priority Research Centre (PRC) for Healthy Lungs | The University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Fellow - Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS)
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/08/2006 -  Visiting Medical Officer Newcastle Mater Hospital
Surgery
Australia

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
1999 Sir Edwin Hughes Memorial Research Prize
Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (31 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Waller A, Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, Zdenkowski N, Douglas C, Walsh J, 'Do medical oncology patients and their support persons agree about end-of-life issues?', Internal Medicine Journal, 48 60-66 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians. Background: The perceptions of those called on to make decisions on behalf of patients who lack capacity at the end of life must a... [more]

© 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians. Background: The perceptions of those called on to make decisions on behalf of patients who lack capacity at the end of life must accurately reflect patient preferences. Aims: To establish the extent to which the views of medical oncology outpatients are understood by their support persons, specifically with regards to (i) preferred type and location of end-of-life care, (ii) preferred level of involvement in end-of-life decision-making and (iii) whether the patient has completed an advance care plan or appointed an enduring guardian. Methods: Adults with a confirmed cancer diagnosis and their nominated support persons were approached between September 2015 and January 2016 in the waiting room of an Australian tertiary referral clinic. Consenting participants completed a pen-and-paper survey. Nominated support persons answered the same questions from the patient¿s perspective. Results: In total, 208 participants (39% of eligible dyads) participated. Observed agreement across the five outcomes ranged from 54% to 84%. Kappa values for concordance between patient¿support person responses were fair to moderate (0.24¿0.47) for enduring guardian, decision-making, advance care plan and care location outcomes. A slight level of concordance (k = 0.15; 95% confidence interval: -0.02, 0.32) was found for the type of care outcome. Conclusion: Relying on support persons¿ views does not guarantee that patients¿ actual preferences will be followed. Strategies that make patient preferences known to healthcare providers and support persons while they still have the capacity to do so is a critical next step in improving quality cancer care.

DOI 10.1111/imj.13626
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Nick Zdenkowski, Amy Waller
2018 Younger CWE, Douglas C, Warren-Forward H, 'Ionising radiation risk disclosure: When should radiographers assume a duty to inform?', Radiography, 24 146-150 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 The College of Radiographers Introduction: Autonomy is a fundamental patient right for ethical practice, and informed consent is the mechanism by which health care professi... [more]

© 2017 The College of Radiographers Introduction: Autonomy is a fundamental patient right for ethical practice, and informed consent is the mechanism by which health care professionals ensure this right has been respected. The ethical notion of informed consent has evolved alongside legal developments. Under Australian law, a provider who fails to disclose risk may be found to be in breach of a duty of disclosure, potentially facing legal consequences if the patient experiences harm that is attributable to an undisclosed risk. These consequences may include the common law tort of negligence. Ionising radiation, in the form of a medical imaging examination, has the potential to cause harm. However, stochastic effects cannot be attributable to a specific ionising radiation event. What then is the role of the Australian medical imaging service provider in disclosing ionising radiation risk? Methods: The ethical and legal principles of informed consent, and the duty of information provision to the patient are investigated. These general principles are then applied to the specific and unusual case of ionising radiation, and what responsibilities apply to the medical imaging provider. Finally, the legal, professional and ethical duties of the radiographer to disclose information to their patients are investigated. Results: Australian law is unclear as to whether a radiographer has a common law responsibility to disclose radiation risk. There is ambiguity as to whether stochastic ionising radiation risk could be considered a legal disclosure responsibility. Conclusion: While it is unlikely that not disclosing risk will have medicolegal consequences, doing so represents sound ethical practice.

DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2017.12.002
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Cameron Younger, Helen Warren-Forward
2018 Donovan LC, Douglas CD, Van Helden D, 'Wound tension and 'closability' with keystone flaps, V-Y flaps and primary closure: a study in fresh-frozen cadavers.', Widespread white matter microstructural differences in schizophrenia across 4322 individuals: results from the ENIGMA Schizophrenia DTI Working Group., 88 486-490 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ans.14163
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Dirk Vanhelden
2018 Waller A, Douglas C, Sanson-Fisher R, Zdenkowski N, Pearce A, Evans T, Walsh J, 'Dances with denial: Have medical oncology outpatients conveyed their end-of-life wishes and do they want to?', JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, 16 498-505 (2018) [C1]

© JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Objectives: This study surveyed a sample of medical oncology outpatients to determine (1) the proportion who have alr... [more]

© JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Objectives: This study surveyed a sample of medical oncology outpatients to determine (1) the proportion who have already discussed and documented their end-of-life (EOL) wishes; (2) when and with whom they would prefer to convey their EOL wishes; (3) the EOL issues they would want to discuss; and (4) the association between perceived cancer status and advance care planning (ACP) participation. Methods: Adult medical oncology outpatients were approached in the waiting room of an Australian tertiary treatment center. Consenting participants completed a pen-and-paper survey assessing participation in ACP, preferences for conveying EOL wishes, timing of EOL discussions, and EOL issues they want to be asked about. Results: A total of 203 patients returned the survey (47% of eligible). EOL discussions occurred more frequently with support persons (47%) than with doctors (7%). Only 14% had recorded their wishes, and 45% had appointed an enduring guardian. Those who perceived their cancer as incurable were more likely to have participated in ACP. If facing EOL, patients indicated that they would want family involved in discussions (85%), to be able to write down EOL wishes (82%), and to appoint enduring guardians (91%). Many (45%) preferred the first discussion to happen when their disease became incurable. Slightly less than one-third thought discussions regarding EOL should be patient-initiated. Most agreed doctors should ask about preferred decision-making involvement (92%), how important it is that pain is managed well (95%), and how important it is to remain conscious (82%). Fewer (55%) wanted to be asked about the importance of care extending life. Conclusions: Many patients would like to have discussions regarding EOL care with their doctor and involve their support persons in this process. Only a small percentage of respondents had discussed EOL care with their doctors, recorded their wishes, or appointed an enduring guardian. The first step requires clinicians to ask whether an individual patient wishes to discuss EOL issues, in what format, and at what level of detail.

DOI 10.6004/jnccn.2017.7054
Co-authors Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Nick Zdenkowski
2018 Younger CWE, Douglas C, Warren-Forward H, 'Medical imaging and informed consent ¿ Can radiographers and patients agree upon a realistic best practice?', Radiography, 24 204-210 (2018)

© 2018 The College of Radiographers Introduction: For radiographers, gaining informed consent with our patients represents a challenging undertaking. Reconciling the need to gain ... [more]

© 2018 The College of Radiographers Introduction: For radiographers, gaining informed consent with our patients represents a challenging undertaking. Reconciling the need to gain meaningful consent with time pressures represents one challenge, as does differing expectations of how risk communication should be undertaken. Different methods and thresholds of risk disclosure are considered, with the aim of finding a realistic best practice. Methods: A cross-sectional study of radiographers and members of the public was undertaken. Participants were asked their preferences for how they would like to receive ionising radiation risk information. This included the health care professional(s) most suited to provide the information, the media through which the information was delivered, and the technique for delivering the information. In addition, participants were asked to consider hypothetical scenarios in which they were a patient receiving an ionising radiation examination, and to give the threshold of ionising radiation cancer risk which they would consider material. These scenarios considered variations in the cancer-onset time, and the accuracy of the test. Results: One hundred and twenty-one (121) radiographer participants and one hundred and seventy two (172) members of the public met the inclusion criteria and completed the survey. There was strong agreement in the most appropriate media, and person, to disclose risk, as well as what represents a significant risk. There was considerable agreement in risk delivery technique. However, some of the agreed-upon strategies may be challenging to achieve in clinical practice. Conclusion: Radiographers and patients fundamentally agree upon risk communication strategies, but implementing some strategies may prove clinically challenging.

DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2018.01.005
Co-authors Cameron Younger, Helen Warren-Forward
2018 Zdenkowski N, Butow P, Spillane A, Douglas C, Snook K, Jones M, et al., 'Single-arm longitudinal study to evaluate a decision aid for women offered Neoadjuvant systemic therapy for operable breast cancer', JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, 16 378-385 (2018) [C1]

© JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Background: Neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NAST) is an increasingly used treatment option for women with large operable... [more]

© JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Background: Neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NAST) is an increasingly used treatment option for women with large operable or highly proliferative breast cancer. With equivalent survival outcomes between NAST and up-front surgery, the situation-specific preference-sensitive nature of the decision makes it suitable for a decision aid (DA). This study aimed to develop and evaluate a DA for this population. Methods: A DA booklet was developed according to international standards, including information about adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment, outcome probabilities, and a values clarification exercise. Eligible women, considered by investigators as candidates for NAST, were enrolled in a multi-institutional, single-arm, longitudinal study. Patient-reported outcome measure questionnaires were completed pre- and post-DA, between chemotherapy and surgery, and at 12 months. Outcomes were feasibility (percentage of eligible patients accessing the DA); acceptability to patients (percentage who would recommend it to others) and clinicians (percentage who would use the DA in routine practice); and decision-related outcomes. Results: From 77 eligible women, 59 were enrolled, of whom 47 (79.7%; 95% CI, 69.4-89.9) reported having read the DA; 51 completed the first post-DA questionnaire. Of these 51, 41 participants (80.4%; 95% CI, 69.5-91.3) found the DA useful for their decision about NAST. Of 18 responding investigators, 16 (88.9%; 95% CI, 74.4-103.4) indicated they would continue to use the DA in routine practice. Post-DA, decisional conflict decreased significantly (P<.01); anxiety and distress decreased significantly; and 86.3% (95% CI, 73.7-94.3) achieved at least as much decisional control as they desired. Conclusions: This DA was feasible and acceptable to patients and clinicians, and improvement in decision-related outcomes was demonstrated when used in combination with clinical consultations. This DA could safely be implemented into routine practice for women considering NAST for operable breast cancer.

DOI 10.6004/jnccn.2017.7063
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski, Christopher Oldmeadow
2018 Waller A, Sanson-Fisher R, Zdenkowski N, Douglas C, Hall A, Walsh J, 'The right place at the right time: Medical oncology outpatients' perceptions of location of end-of-life care', JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, 16 35-41 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Background: Helping people achieve their preferred location of care is an important indicator of quality end-of-... [more]

© 2018 JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Background: Helping people achieve their preferred location of care is an important indicator of quality end-of-life (EOL) care. Using a sample of Australian medical oncology outpatients, this study examined (1) their preferred location of EOL care; (2) their perceived benefits and worries of receiving care in that location; (3) the percentage who had discussed preferences with their doctor and/or support person; and (4) whether they wanted their doctor to ask them where they wanted to die. Methods: Adults with a confirmed diagnosis of cancer were approached between September 2015 and January 2016 in the waiting room of an Australian oncology outpatient clinic. Consenting participants completed a home-based pen-and-paper survey indicating preferred location of care, perceived benefits and worries of that location, whether they had discussed preferences with their doctors, and whether they were willing to be asked about their preferences. Results: A total of 203 patients returned the survey (47% of those eligible). Less than half preferred to be cared for at home (47%), 34% preferred a hospice/palliative care unit, and 19% preferred the hospital. Common benefits and worries associated with locations included perceived burden on others, familiarity of environment, availability of expert medical care, symptom management, and likelihood of having wishes respected. More patients had discussed preferences with their support persons (41%) than doctors (7%). Most wanted a doctor to ask them about preferred location of care (87%) and thought it was important to die in the location of their choice (93%). Conclusions: Patients were willing to have clinicians to ask them where they wanted to die, although few had discussed their preferences with doctors. Although home was the most preferred location for many patients, the overall variation suggests that clinicians should adopt a systematic approach to eliciting patient preferences.

DOI 10.6004/jnccn.2017.7025
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Nick Zdenkowski
2017 Douglas C, 'Addiction medicine ethics: relapse, no lapse and the struggle to treat addicts like everyone else', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 47 1121-1123 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/imj.13559
2016 Zdenkowski N, Butow P, Hutchings E, Douglas C, Coll JR, Boyle FM, 'A Decision Aid for Women Considering Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Operable Invasive Breast Cancer: Development and Protocol of a Phase II Evaluation Study (ANZ1301 DOMINO)', JMIR RESEARCH PROTOCOLS, 5 (2016)
DOI 10.2196/resprot.5641
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski
2016 Zdenkowski N, Butow P, Mann GB, Fewster S, Beckmore C, Isaacs R, et al., 'A survey of Australian and New Zealand clinical practice with neoadjuvant systemic therapy for breast cancer', Internal Medicine Journal, 46 677-683 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians. Background: Neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NAST) has become an established treatment option for women with operable breast cancer. ... [more]

© 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians. Background: Neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NAST) has become an established treatment option for women with operable breast cancer. Aim: We aimed to better understand NAST treatment patterns, barriers and facilitators in Australia and New Zealand. Methods: We undertook a cross-sectional survey of the current clinical practice of Australian and New Zealand breast cancer specialists. Questions included referral patterns for NAST, patient selection, logistics, decision making and barriers. Results: Of 207 respondents, 162 (78%) reported routinely offering NAST to selected patients with operable breast cancer (median 9% of patients offered NAST). Specialty, location, practice type, gender or years of experience did not predict for offering NAST. In all, 45 and 58% wanted to increase the number of patients who receive NAST in routine care and in clinical trials respectively. Facilitators included the multidisciplinary team meeting and access to NAST clinical trials. Specialist-reported patient barriers included: patient desire for immediate surgery (63% rated as important/very important); lack of awareness of NAST (50%); concern about progression (43%) and disinterest in downstaging (32%). Forty-three per cent of participants experienced system-related barriers to the use of NAST, including other clinicians' lack of interest (27%); lack of clinical trials (24%) and unacceptable wait for a medical oncology appointment (37%). Conclusion: This group of Australian and New Zealand clinicians are interested in NAST for operable breast cancer in routine care and clinical trials. Patient- and system-related barriers that prevent the optimal uptake of this treatment approach will need to be systematically addressed if NAST is to become a more common approach.

DOI 10.1111/imj.13049
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski
2015 Zdenkowski N, Butow P, Mann B, Fewster S, Douglas C, Boyle FM, 'Decisions about neoadjuvant systemic therapy for breast cancer: A survey of Australian and New Zealand specialists', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 85 797-798 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/ans.13266
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski
2014 Douglas C, 'Moral concerns with sedation at the end of life', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ETHICS, 40 241-241 (2014)
DOI 10.1136/medethics-2012-101024
Citations Web of Science - 2
2014 Douglas C, 'Moral concerns with sedation at the end of life', Journal of Medical Ethics, 40 241 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/medethics-2012-101024
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Douglas CD, Kerridge IH, Ankeny RA, 'Double meanings will not save the principle of double effect', Journal of Medicine and Philosophy (United Kingdom), 39 304-316 (2014) [C1]

In an article somewhat ironically entitled &quot;Disambiguating Clinical Intentions,&quot; Lynn Jansen promotes an idea that should be bewildering to anyone familiar with the lite... [more]

In an article somewhat ironically entitled "Disambiguating Clinical Intentions," Lynn Jansen promotes an idea that should be bewildering to anyone familiar with the literature on the intention/foresight distinction. According to Jansen, "intention" has two commonsense meanings, one of which is equivalent to "foresight." Consequently, questions about intention are "infected" with ambiguity-people cannot tell what they mean and do not know how to answer them. This hypothesis is unsupported by evidence, but Jansen states it as if it were accepted fact. In this reply, we make explicit the multiple misrepresentations she has employed to make her hypothesis seem plausible. We also point out the ways in which it defies common sense. In particular, Jansen applies her thesis only to recent empirical research on the intentions of doctors, totally ignoring the widespread confusion that her assertion would imply in everyday life, in law, and indeed in religious and philosophical writings concerning the intention/foresight distinction and the Principle of Double Effect. © 2014 The Author.

DOI 10.1093/jmp/jhu011
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Douglas C, Morris O, Donovan L, 'The keystone flap: Is your 'unclosable' wound really unclosable?', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 84 496-497 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/ans.12575
2013 Douglas CD, Kerridge IH, Ankeny RA, 'NARRATIVES OF 'TERMINAL SEDATION', AND THE IMPORTANCE OF THE INTENTION-FORESIGHT DISTINCTION IN PALLIATIVE CARE PRACTICE', BIOETHICS, 27 1-11 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8519.2011.01895.x
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
2013 Douglas CD, Low NCK, Seitz MJ, 'The Keystone Flap: Not an Advance, Just a Stretch', ANNALS OF SURGICAL ONCOLOGY, 20 973-980 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1245/s10434-012-2684-9
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2013 Douglas C, Morris O, 'The 'keystone concept': time for some science', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 83 498-499 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/ans.12291
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2013 Douglas C, Proudfoot E, 'Nudging and the Complicated Real Life of ¿Informed Consent¿', The American Journal of Bioethics, 13 16-17 (2013) [C2]
DOI 10.1080/15265161.2013.781716
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2012 Papeix G, Zardawi IM-A, Douglas CD, Clark DA, Braye SG, 'The accuracy of the 'triple test' in the diagnosis of papillary lesions of the breast', Acta Cytologica, 56 41-46 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2012 Douglas CD, Jansen M, Kerridge I, 'The devil is in the detail: Best practice, or catholic practice?', American Journal of Bioethics, 12 38-39 (2012) [C3]
2011 Harwood RC, Douglas CD, Clark D, 'Decision aids for breast and nodal surgery in patients with early breast cancer: Development and a pilot study', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, 7 114-122 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2010.01375.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 6
2009 Douglas CD, 'End-of-life decisions and moral psychology: Killing, letting die, intention and foresight', Journal of Bioethical Inquiry, 6 337-347 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11673-009-9173-2
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2008 Douglas CD, Kerridge I, Ankeny R, 'Managing intentions: The end-of-life administration of analgesics and sedatives, and the possibility of slow euthanasia', Bioethics, 22 388-396 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8519.2008.00661.x
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 38
2007 Douglas CD, McPhee JR, 'Informed consent: A review of the ethical and legal basis for medical decision-making for the competent patient', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 77 521-522 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.2007.04144.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2004 Winn RD, Laura S, Douglas C, Davidson PM, Gani JS, 'Protocol-Based approach to suspected appendicitis, incorporating the alvarado score and outpatient antibiotics', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 74 324-329 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-1433.2004.02993.x
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
2001 Douglas C, Kerridge I, McPhee J, Parkinson L, Spigelman AD, Rainbird K, 'The intention to hasten death: a survey of attitudes and prctices of surgeons in Australia', Medical Journal of Australia, 175 511-515 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 46
Co-authors L Parkinson
2001 Douglas C, 'Diagnosis of acute appendicitis - Appendicitis is a separate clinical entity in men and women - Reply', BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 323 50-50 (2001)
2000 Douglas CD, MacPherson NE, Davidson P, Gani JS, 'Randomised controlled trial of ultrasonography in diagnosis of acute appendicitis, incorporating the Alvarado score', British Medical Journal, 321 919 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 142Web of Science - 101
1999 Davidson PM, Douglas CD, Hosking CS, 'Graded compression ultrasonography in the assessment of the "tough decision" acute abdomen in childhood', PEDIATRIC SURGERY INTERNATIONAL, 15 32-35 (1999)
DOI 10.1007/s003830050506
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
1989 Douglas C, 'Combined effects of donor tissue culture and single-dose recipient immunosuppression on the survival of murine thyroid allografts.', Transplant Procedures, 21 3761-3762 (1989) [C1]
Show 28 more journal articles

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Zdenkowski N, Butow P, Spillane AJ, Douglas C, Beckmore C, Jones M, Boyle FM, 'Primary results of a study to evaluate a decision aid for women offered neoadjuvant systemic therapy for breast cancer', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Madrid, SPAIN (2017)
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski
2017 Waller A, Sanson-Fisher R, Zdenkowski N, Douglas C, Walsh J, Hall A, 'Are older and seriously ill Australians planning for their future medical care?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski, Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 5
Total funding $352,081

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $182,578

Who decides and at what cost? Comparing patient, surrogate and oncologist perspectives on end of life care$182,578

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Emeritus Professor Neil Rees, Ms Gill Batt, Doctor Charles Douglas, Professor Ian Olver, Doctor Nick Zdenkowski, Conjoint Associate Professor Frans Henskens
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1300011
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20132 grants / $150,303

Who decides and at what cost? Comparing patient, surrogate and oncologist perspectives on end of life care$130,303

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Emeritus Professor Neil Rees, Ms Gill Batt, Doctor Charles Douglas, Professor Ian Olver, Doctor Nick Zdenkowski, Doctor Scott Twaddell, Conjoint Associate Professor Frans Henskens
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1300851
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Reducing psychosocial burden among women diagnosed with breast cancer and their support persons: A randomised controlled trial of a web-based intervention.$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Charles Douglas, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Conjoint Associate Professor Frans Henskens
Scheme Near Miss
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300705
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20091 grants / $9,600

A qualitative study of terminal sedation in end-of-life care, involving in-depth interviews with health care providers in palliative care$9,600

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Charles Douglas
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190227
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20071 grants / $9,600

A qualitative study of terminal sedation in end-of-life care, involving in-depth interviews with health care providers in palliative care$9,600

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Charles Douglas
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187405
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current4

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.33

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Attitudes and Practices Using Opioids at End-of-Life: Comparing Australia and Vietnam PhD (Gerontology & Geriatrics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD Informed Consent for Clinical Examinations Involving Ionising Radiation PhD (Medical Radiation Sc), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2007 Honours Informed consent and the management of probably benign breast lesions Medical Science, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2007 Honours Informed consent and management of probably benign breast lesions Medical Science, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
1999 Honours Ultrasound diagnosis of appendicitis Accounting, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
1998 Honours Ultrasound diagnosis of appendicitis - randomised controlled trial Medical Science, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Charles Douglas

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Clinical Ethics and Health Law

Contact Details

Email charles.douglas@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 0400 390 748

Office

Room BB107
Building Bowman Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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