Mr Tesfaye Feyissa

Mr Tesfaye Feyissa

Research student

Career Summary

Biography

Tesfaye Feyissa submitted his PhD thesis in Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Statistics at the University of Newcastle, Australia. Tesfaye’s PhD research examined fertility, contraceptive use and patient-provider discussions regarding fertility plans among women living with HIV in western Ethiopia.  He was responsible for all aspects related to the management of the project, including recruitment, training of staff, data collection and ensuring the quality of the data. As part of his PhD, Tesfaye has published five high-quality papers at high impact factor (Q1) journals. His research skills were strengthened by applying a multimethod approach (a systematic review, quantitative and qualitative studies) using different software packages (STATA, SPSS, and NVIVO).

In his short career, Tesfaye has published 23 papers (ten as the first author). He also authored a successful grant application both at the University of Newcastle, Australia and Wollega University, Ethiopia. During his PhD, Tesfaye received a competitive grant from the Hunter Medical Research Institute. He was also a recipient of The University of Newcastle International Postgraduate Research Scholarship (UNIPRS) and The University of Newcastle Research Scholarship Central 50:50 (UNRSC 50:50).

Prior to his enrolment at the University of Newcastle, he had an established research background with degrees in Nursing and Public Health which provided him an excellent foundation for research. At Wollega University, Ethiopia, Tesfaye was promoted to the rank of Assistant Professor in 2014, which demonstrated his passion and commitment to research and academic work. He was also in a leadership position as the head of the Department of Nursing and was required to supervising nursing staffs, maintaining standards of nursing care, and arranging practical placement at hospitals for students. This leadership role helped him get an excellent experience in project management, organisational and teamwork skills. Being with colleagues, Tesfaye also established a BSC Nursing and a Master of Public Health at Wollega University where he trained students and contributed to the workforce of the country. He has supervision experience having supervised ten postgraduate  students in Ethiopia across topics such as family planning, skilled birth and HIV.

Keywords

  • Chronic diseases
  • Epidemiological studies
  • Infectious diseases
  • Medical statistics
  • Mixed method research
  • Quantitative and qualitative research
  • Quantitative and qualitative research
  •  Quant and qual research in materna health
  •  Quantitative and qualitative research in materna
  •  Reproductive health

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 30
111706 Epidemiology 40
110309 Infectious Diseases 30
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.

Highlighted Publications

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Feyissa T, Harris M, Loxton D, 'Contraceptive use among sexually active women living with HIV in western Ethiopia', Newcastle, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder, Melissa Harris

Journal article (24 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Feyissa T, 'Contraceptive use among sexually active women living with HIV in western Ethiopia', PLoS ONE, 15 (2020)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0237212
Co-authors Peta Forder, Melissa Harris, Deborah Loxton
2020 Feyissa TR, Harris ML, Loxton D, 'Discussing Reproductive Plans with Healthcare Providers by Sexually Active Women Living with HIV in Western Ethiopia', AIDS AND BEHAVIOR, 24 2842-2855 (2020)
DOI 10.1007/s10461-020-02833-1
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Deborah Loxton
2020 Feyissa TR, Harris ML, Loxton D, '"They haven't asked me. I haven't told them either": fertility plan discussions between women living with HIV and healthcare providers in western Ethiopia', Reproductive health, 17 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12978-020-00971-2
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Deborah Loxton
2020 Feyissa TR, Harris ML, Forder PM, Loxton D, 'Fertility among women living with HIV in western Ethiopia and its implications for prevention of vertical transmission: a cross-sectional study.', BMJ open, 10 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-036391
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Peta Forder, Deborah Loxton
2019 Feyissa TR, Harris ML, Melka AS, Loxton D, 'Unintended Pregnancy in Women Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis', AIDS and Behavior, 23 1431-1451 (2019) [C1]

© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. In 2014, about 1.5 million pregnancies occurred among HIV-positive women in low and middle-income countries.... [more]

© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. In 2014, about 1.5 million pregnancies occurred among HIV-positive women in low and middle-income countries. To pool magnitude and factors associated with unintended pregnancy in women living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, a systematic search of electronic databases was undertaken in November 2016. Pooling the magnitude of unintended pregnancy reported by 14 studies yielded a crude summary prevalence of 55.9%. The magnitude of unwanted pregnancy and mistimed pregnancy in six studies ranged from 14 to 59 and 9 to 47.2%, respectively. Contraceptive failure was an important factor for many unintended pregnancies. The magnitude of unintended pregnancy was significantly higher in HIV-positive women than for HIV-negative women in three out of six studies. The available evidence suggests that there is a high magnitude of unintended pregnancy in this population. Improving effective contraceptive utilization is thus a priority to address unintended pregnancies and to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV. PROSPERO Number: CRD42016051310.

DOI 10.1007/s10461-018-2346-4
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Deborah Loxton
2019 Bobo FT, Kasaye HK, Etana B, Woldie M, Feyissa TR, 'Disrespect and abuse during childbirth in Western Ethiopia: Should women continue to tolerate?', PLOS ONE, 14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0217126
Citations Web of Science - 2
2018 Kyu HH, Maddison ER, Henry NJ, Mumford JE, Barber R, Shields C, et al., 'The global burden of tuberculosis: results from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015', The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 18 261-284 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license Background: An understanding of the trends in tuberculosis incide... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license Background: An understanding of the trends in tuberculosis incidence, prevalence, and mortality is crucial to tracking of the success of tuberculosis control programmes and identification of remaining challenges. We assessed trends in the fatal and non-fatal burden of tuberculosis over the past 25 years for 195 countries and territories. Methods: We analysed 10 691 site-years of vital registration data, 768 site-years of verbal autopsy data, and 361 site-years of mortality surveillance data using the Cause of Death Ensemble model to estimate tuberculosis mortality rates. We analysed all available age-specific and sex-specific data sources, including annual case notifications, prevalence surveys, and estimated cause-specific mortality, to generate internally consistent estimates of incidence, prevalence, and mortality using DisMod-MR 2.1, a Bayesian meta-regression tool. We assessed how observed tuberculosis incidence, prevalence, and mortality differed from expected trends as predicted by the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a composite indicator based on income per capita, average years of schooling, and total fertility rate. We also estimated tuberculosis mortality and disability-adjusted life-years attributable to the independent effects of risk factors including smoking, alcohol use, and diabetes. Findings: Globally, in 2015, the number of tuberculosis incident cases (including new and relapse cases) was 10·2 million (95% uncertainty interval 9·2 million to 11·5 million), the number of prevalent cases was 10·1 million (9·2 million to 11·1 million), and the number of deaths was 1·3 million (1·1 million to 1·6 million). Among individuals who were HIV negative, the number of incident cases was 8·8 million (8·0 million to 9·9 million), the number of prevalent cases was 8·9 million (8·1 million to 9·7 million), and the number of deaths was 1·1 million (0·9 million to 1·4 million). Annualised rates of change from 2005 to 2015 showed a faster decline in mortality (-4·1% [-5·0 to -3·4]) than in incidence (-1·6% [-1·9 to -1·2]) and prevalence (-0·7% [-1·0 to -0·5]) among HIV-negative individuals. The SDI was inversely associated with HIV-negative mortality rates but did not show a clear gradient for incidence and prevalence. Most of Asia, eastern Europe, and sub-Saharan Africa had higher rates of HIV-negative tuberculosis burden than expected given their SDI. Alcohol use accounted for 11·4% (9·3¿13·0) of global tuberculosis deaths among HIV-negative individuals in 2015, diabetes accounted for 10·6% (6·8¿14·8), and smoking accounted for 7·8% (3·8¿12·0). Interpretation: Despite a concerted global effort to reduce the burden of tuberculosis, it still causes a large disease burden globally. Strengthening of health systems for early detection of tuberculosis and improvement of the quality of tuberculosis care, including prompt and accurate diagnosis, early initiation of treatment, and regular follow-up, are priorities. Countries with higher than expected tuberculosis rates for their level of sociodemographic development should investigate the reasons for lagging behind and take remedial action. Efforts to prevent smoking, alcohol use, and diabetes could also substantially reduce the burden of tuberculosis. Funding: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

DOI 10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30703-X
Citations Scopus - 99Web of Science - 91
Co-authors Addisushunu Beyene Uon
2018 Mokdad AH, Moradi-Lakeh M, El Bcheraoui C, Khalil I, Charara R, Afshin A, Wang H, 'Diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease in the Eastern Mediterranean Region: findings from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 63 177-186 (2018)
DOI 10.1007/s00038-017-1014-1
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Addisushunu Beyene Uon
2018 Mokdad AH, El Bcheraoui C, Wang H, Charara R, Khalil I, Moradi-Lakeh M, et al., 'Trends in HIV/AIDS morbidity and mortality in Eastern Mediterranean countries, 1990-2015: findings from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 63 123-136 (2018)
DOI 10.1007/s00038-017-1023-0
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Addisushunu Beyene Uon
2018 Teka TT, Feyissa TR, Melka AS, Bobo FT, 'Role of antenatal and postnatal care in contraceptive use during postpartum period in western Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.', BMC research notes, 11 581 (2018)
DOI 10.1186/s13104-018-3698-6
2017 Barber RM, Fullman N, Sorensen RJD, Bollyky T, McKee M, Nolte E, Abajobir AA, 'Healthcare Access and Quality Index based on mortality from causes amenable to personal health care in 195 countries and territories, 1990-2015: a novel analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015', LANCET, 390 231-266 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30818-8
Citations Scopus - 223Web of Science - 194
Co-authors Habtamu Bizuayehu Uon, Dimity Pond, Addisushunu Beyene Uon
2017 Gakidou E, Afshin A, Abajobir AA, Abate KH, Abbafati C, Abbas KM, et al., 'Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 84 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks, 1990-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016', LANCET, 390 1345-1422 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32366-8
Citations Scopus - 951Web of Science - 903
Co-authors Addisushunu Beyene Uon
2017 Hay SI, Abajobir AA, Abate KH, Abbafati C, Abbas KM, Abd-Allah F, et al., 'Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 333 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 195 countries and territories, 1990 2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016', The Lancet, 390 1260-1344 (2017)
Citations Scopus - 756Web of Science - 730
Co-authors Habtamu Bizuayehu Uon, Addisushunu Beyene Uon
2017 Naghavi M, Abajobir AA, Abbafati C, Abbas KM, Abd-Allah F, Abera SF, et al., 'Global, regional, and national age-sex specific mortality for 264 causes of death, 1980-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016', LANCET, 390 1151-1210 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32152-9
Citations Scopus - 1574Web of Science - 1452
2017 Wang H, Abajobir AA, Abate KH, Abbafati C, Abbas KM, Abd-Allah F, et al., 'Global, regional, and national under-5 mortality, adult mortality, age-specific mortality, and life expectancy, 1970-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016', LANCET, 390 1084-1150 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)31833-0
Citations Scopus - 297Web of Science - 290
Co-authors Habtamu Bizuayehu Uon, Addisushunu Beyene Uon
2017 Vos T, Abajobir AA, Abbafati C, Abbas KM, Abate KH, Abd-Allah F, et al., 'Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 328 diseases and injuries for 195 countries, 1990-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016', LANCET, 390 1211-1259 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32154-2
Citations Scopus - 1846Web of Science - 1531
Co-authors Habtamu Bizuayehu Uon, Addisushunu Beyene Uon
2017 Fullman N, Barber RM, Abajobir AA, Abate KH, Abbafati C, Abbas KM, et al., 'Measuring progress and projecting attainment on the basis of past trends of the health-related Sustainable Development Goals in 188 countries: an analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016', LANCET, 390 1423-1459 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32336-X
Citations Scopus - 123Web of Science - 109
Co-authors Addisushunu Beyene Uon, Habtamu Bizuayehu Uon
2016 Regassa T, Chala D, Adeba E, 'Premarital Sex in the Last Twelve Months and Its Predictors among Students of Wollega University, Ethiopia', Ethiopian journal of health sciences, 26 351-358 (2016)

BACKGROUND: Premarital sex increases the risk of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections including HIV if unprotected and contraception is not used. Thus, the obj... [more]

BACKGROUND: Premarital sex increases the risk of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections including HIV if unprotected and contraception is not used. Thus, the objective of this study was to assess premarital sex in the last twelve months and its predictors among regular undergraduate students of Wollega University.METHODS: A cross-sectional survey using pretested, structured questionnaire was conducted on a total of 704 regular undergraduate students of Wollega University from February to March, 2014. We used multistage sampling technique to recruit study participants. Binary and multivariable logistic regressions were performed using SPSS version 20 to assess predictors of premarital sex. Statistical significance was determined through a 95% confidence level.RESULTS: Wollega University youths who had premarital sex in the last twelve months were 28.4%; 55.5% of them did not use condom during last sex while 31.3% engaged in multiple sex. Being male [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)(95% Confidence Interval(CI))=2.7(1.58-4.75)], age 20-24 years [AOR(95%CI)=2.8(1.13-7.20)], training on how to use condom [AOR(95%CI)=1.7(1.17-2.46)], being tested for HIV [AOR(95%CI)=2.3(1.48-3.53)], using social media frequently [AOR(95%CI)=1.8(1.14-2.88)], having comprehensive knowledge of HIV [AOR(95% CI)=1.5(1.01-2.10)], alcohol use [AOR (95%CI)=2.2(1.31-3.56)] were associated with increased odds of premarital sex in the last twelve months.CONCLUSION: Nearly one-third of regular undergraduate students of the university were engaged in premarital sex in the last twelve months. Being male, using social media frequently and alcohol use were associated with increased odds of premarital sex in the stated period. Thus, higher institutions have to deliver abstinence messages alongside information about self-protection.

DOI 10.4314/ejhs.v26i4.7
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2016 Vos T, Allen C, Arora M, Barber RM, Brown A, Carter A, et al., 'Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990 2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015', The Lancet, 388 1545-1602 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY license Background Non-fatal outcomes of disease and injury increasingly detract fr... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY license Background Non-fatal outcomes of disease and injury increasingly detract from the ability of the world's population to live in full health, a trend largely attributable to an epidemiological transition in many countries from causes affecting children, to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) more common in adults. For the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015), we estimated the incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for diseases and injuries at the global, regional, and national scale over the period of 1990 to 2015. Methods We estimated incidence and prevalence by age, sex, cause, year, and geography with a wide range of updated and standardised analytical procedures. Improvements from GBD 2013 included the addition of new data sources, updates to literature reviews for 85 causes, and the identification and inclusion of additional studies published up to November, 2015, to expand the database used for estimation of non-fatal outcomes to 60¿900 unique data sources. Prevalence and incidence by cause and sequelae were determined with DisMod-MR 2.1, an improved version of the DisMod-MR Bayesian meta-regression tool first developed for GBD 2010 and GBD 2013. For some causes, we used alternative modelling strategies where the complexity of the disease was not suited to DisMod-MR 2.1 or where incidence and prevalence needed to be determined from other data. For GBD 2015 we created a summary indicator that combines measures of income per capita, educational attainment, and fertility (the Socio-demographic Index [SDI]) and used it to compare observed patterns of health loss to the expected pattern for countries or locations with similar SDI scores. Findings We generated 9·3 billion estimates from the various combinations of prevalence, incidence, and YLDs for causes, sequelae, and impairments by age, sex, geography, and year. In 2015, two causes had acute incidences in excess of 1 billion: upper respiratory infections (17·2 billion, 95% uncertainty interval [UI] 15·4¿19·2 billion) and diarrhoeal diseases (2·39 billion, 2·30¿2·50 billion). Eight causes of chronic disease and injury each affected more than 10% of the world's population in 2015: permanent caries, tension-type headache, iron-deficiency anaemia, age-related and other hearing loss, migraine, genital herpes, refraction and accommodation disorders, and ascariasis. The impairment that affected the greatest number of people in 2015 was anaemia, with 2·36 billion (2·35¿2·37 billion) individuals affected. The second and third leading impairments by number of individuals affected were hearing loss and vision loss, respectively. Between 2005 and 2015, there was little change in the leading causes of years lived with disability (YLDs) on a global basis. NCDs accounted for 18 of the leading 20 causes of age-standardised YLDs on a global scale. Where rates were decreasing, the rate of decrease for YLDs was slower than that of years of life lost (YLLs) for nearly every cause included in our analysis. For low SDI geographies, Group 1 causes typically accounted for 20¿30% of total disability, largely attributable to nutritional deficiencies, malaria, neglected tropical diseases, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Lower back and neck pain was the leading global cause of disability in 2015 in most countries. The leading cause was sense organ disorders in 22 countries in Asia and Africa and one in central Latin America; diabetes in four countries in Oceania; HIV/AIDS in three southern sub-Saharan African countries; collective violence and legal intervention in two north African and Middle Eastern countries; iron-deficiency anaemia in Somalia and Venezuela; depression in Uganda; onchoceriasis in Liberia; and other neglected tropical diseases in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Interpretation Ageing of the world's population is...

DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31678-6
Citations Scopus - 2488Web of Science - 2413
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Addisushunu Beyene Uon
2014 Feyissa TR, Genemo GA, 'Determinants of institutional delivery among childbearing age women in Western Ethiopia, 2013: unmatched case control study.', PLoS One, 9 e97194 (2014)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0097194
Citations Web of Science - 31
2014 Feyissa TR, Melka AS, 'Demand for modern family planning among married women living with HIV in western Ethiopia.', PLoS One, 9 e113008 (2014)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0113008
Citations Web of Science - 9
Regassa T, Fantahun M, 'Fertility Desire and Reproductive Health Care Needs of Men and Women Living with HIV/AIDS in Nekemte, East Wollega, Ethiopia', Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal, 1 31-31
DOI 10.4314/star.v1i3.98797
Abebe M, Addissie A, Regassa T, 'Fertility Desire and Contraceptive Utilization among People Living With HIV/AIDS on ART in Hosanna Town, Southern Ethiopia', Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal, 1 38-38
DOI 10.4314/star.v1i4.98821
Regassa T, Agero G, 'Factors Affecting Prenatal Care Utilization in East Wollega Zone, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia', Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal, 3 148-148
DOI 10.4314/star.v3i2.19
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Conference (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Feyissa T, 'Discussing reproductive plans with healthcare providers among sexually active women living with HIV in Western Ethiopia', Virtual (2020)
2019 Feyissa T, Harris M, Loxton D, 'Contraceptive use among sexually active women living with HIV in western Ethiopia', Newcastle, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder, Melissa Harris
2017 Feyissa T, 'Three minutes thesis presentation', Newcastle, Australia (2017)
2015 Feyissa T, 'Demand for Modern Family Planning among Married Women Living with HIV in Western Ethiopia', Bahirdar, Ethiopia (2015)
2014 Feyissa T, 'Determinants Of Institutional Delivery Among Women Of Reproductive Age', Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (2014)
2013 Feyissa T, 'Fertility Desire and Contraceptive Method Utilization In East Wollega Zone, Western Ethiopia', Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (2013)
2011 Feyissa T, 'Fertility Desire And Reproductive Health Care Needs Of People Living With HIV/AIDS', Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (2011)
2010 Feyissa T, 'Fertility Desire And Contraceptive Method Utilization among people living with HIV In East Wollega Zone, Western Ethiopia', Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (2010)
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Mr Tesfaye Feyissa

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