Mr Tahir Ahmed Hassen

Mr Tahir Ahmed Hassen

Research student

Career Summary

Biography

Tahir Hassen is a final year Ph.D. student at the University of Newcastle, Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Public Health and Medicine.  Mr. Hassen has a robust educational background in Nursing and Public Health. He was awarded Master of Adult Health Nursing in 2013 (Ethiopia) and Master of Emergency and Critical Care Nursing in 2017 (Finland, Spain, and Portugal). Mr. Hassen is an experienced researcher in maternal and child health and chronic diseases. He has authored and co-authored several peer-reviewed publications and actively collaborated with international researchers.  Mr. Hassen also worked in various administrative positions such as administration and development director at Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical Sciences (Ethiopia). He was granted an Erasmus Mundus scholarship amounting to € 27,999 to pursue his Master's degree and the University of Newcastle International Postgraduate Scholarship that valued AUD 28,597 per annum for years


Keywords

  • Adverse birth outcomes
  • Birth outcomes
  • Child development
  • Linked data
  • Maternal health
  • Multilevel analysis
  • Neonatal health
  • Pediatrics quality of life
  • Public Health

Languages

  • Oromo (Mother)
  • Amharic (Fluent)
  • English (Working)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
321302 Infant and child health 70
420606 Social determinants of health 10
520101 Child and adolescent development 20

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
22/1/2018 -  PhD Student

 Conducting research on neonatal health and child development 

Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing (RCGHA), The University of Newcastle, NSW.
Australia
1/10/2015 - 28/2/2017 Master's Student

 Attended a Master's Degree in Emergency and Critical Care Nursing

University of Oviedo, University of Algarve, and Metropolia Unversity of Applied Sciences
Spain
1/9/2014 - 30/5/2015 Lecturer

 Overseeing the school activities

Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical sciences,
Ethiopia
1/9/2014 - 25/9/2015 Administration and Development Director

 Overseeing Medical College and Specialized University Hospital activities.

Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical sciences,
Ethiopia
1/7/2013 - 1/9/2015 Administration and Development Director

 Conducting research and supervising students' peoject

Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical sciences,
Ethiopia
1/9/2010 - 31/3/2013 Assistant Lecturer

 Teaching and Mentoring 

Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical sciences,
Ethiopia
15/9/2008 - 25/8/2010 Graduate Assistant

 Organizing course materials and delivering courses.

Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical sciences,
Nursing and Midwifery
Ethiopia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
NA Health assessment and physical examination
Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical sciences,
Organizing course material, providing the course, and conducting students assessment 
Course provider 15/9/2010 - 14/6/2011
NA Medical-surgical
Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical sciences,
Organizing course material, providing the course, and conducting students assessment 
Course Provider 15/9/2010 - 14/6/2011
NA Medical ethics
Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical sciences,
Organizing course material, providing the course, and conducting students assessment 
Course Provider 14/9/2009 - 15/6/2010
Not Applicable Pathophysiology
Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical sciences,
Organizing course materials, providing the course, and conducting students assessment 
Course Provider 14/9/2009 - 15/6/2010
NA Research Methodology
Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical sciences,
Organizing course material, providing the course, and conducting students assessment 
Course provider 1/9/2012 - 25/6/2013
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Hassen TA, Chojenta C, Egan N, Loxton D, 'The association between the five-minute apgar score and neurodevelopmental outcomes among children aged 8-66 months in Australia', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18 (2021)

This study aimed to evaluate the association of the five-minute Apgar score and neurodevelopmental outcomes in children by taking the entire range of Apgar scores into account. Da... [more]

This study aimed to evaluate the association of the five-minute Apgar score and neurodevelopmental outcomes in children by taking the entire range of Apgar scores into account. Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women¿s Health (ALSWH) and Mothers and their Children¿s Health (MatCH) study were linked with Australian state-based Perinatal Data Collections (PDCs) for 809 children aged 8-66 months old. Generalized estimating equations were used to model the association between the five-minute Apgar scores and neurodevelopmental outcomes, using STATA software V.15. Of the 809 children, 614 (75.3%) had a five-minute Apgar score of 9, and 130 (16.1%) had an Apgar score of 10. Approximately 1.9% and 6.2% had Apgar scores of 0-6 and 7-8, respectively. Sixty-nine (8.5%) of children had a neurodevelopmental delay. Children with an Apgar score of 0-6 (AOR = 5.7; 95% CI: 1.2, 27.8) and 7-8 (AOR = 4.1; 95% CI: 1.2, 14.1) had greater odds of gross-motor neurodevelopment delay compared to children with an Apgar score of 10. Further, when continuously modelled, the five-minute Apgar score was inversely associated with neurodevelopmental delay (AOR = 0.75; 95% CI: 0.60, 0.93). Five-minute Apgar score was independently and inversely associated with a neurodevelopmental delay, and the risks were higher even within an Apgar score of 7-8. Hence, the Apgar score may need to be taken into account when evaluating neurodevelopmental outcomes in children.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph18126450
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Deborah Loxton
2021 Hassen TA, Chojenta C, Egan N, Loxton D, 'Determinants of neonatal near miss in Australia: A multilevel analysis', Early Human Development, 156 (2021) [C1]

Background: Neonatal Near Miss (NNM) is a situation where a newborn narrowly survived the neonatal period. It has been hypothesized that identifying factors that contribute to the... [more]

Background: Neonatal Near Miss (NNM) is a situation where a newborn narrowly survived the neonatal period. It has been hypothesized that identifying factors that contribute to the occurrence of NNM and taking timely interventions could enhance the quality of newborn care. However, there is limited evidence in Australia. This study aimed to identify the determinants of NNM in Australia. Methods: Data from the 1973¿78 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) were linked with state-based Perinatal Data Collections (PDC) for 3655 mothers and 5526 newborns who were born between 01 January 2007 and 31 December 2015. A newborn was considered as a near miss case if presented with any of the pragmatic criteria (gestational age <32 weeks, birth weight <1500 g, five-minute Apgar score <7) and survived the neonatal period. A multilevel multivariable logistic regression model was used to identify the determinants of NNM. Results: Of the total 5526 live births included in this study, 95 live births met the criteria for NNM, corresponding to an incidence of 17.2 per 1000 live births. After controlling for potential confounders, maternal age 31¿34 years (AOR = 2.57; 95% CI: 1.05, 6.30) and 35 years and above (AOR = 4.03; 95% CI: 1.58, 10.31), caesarean section (AOR = 2.24; 95% CI: 1.09, 4.57), and gestational hypertension (AOR = 2.63; 95% CI: 1.21, 5.71) increased the odds of NNM. Conclusion: Inclusion of NNM evaluations into newborn care and early screening and interventions for women who become pregnant at older age and those with pregnancy complications could improve the quality of newborn care and reduce neonatal morbidity.

DOI 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2021.105343
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Catherine Chojenta
2021 Hassen TA, Chojenta C, Egan N, Loxton D, 'The association between birth weight and proxy-reported health-related quality of life among children aged 5-10 years old: A linked data analysis', BMC PEDIATRICS, 21 (2021)
DOI 10.1186/s12887-021-02882-y
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Catherine Chojenta
2016 Forouzanfar MH, Afshin A, Alexander LT, Biryukov S, Brauer M, Cercy K, et al., 'Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks, 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015', Lancet (London, England), 388 1659-1724 (2016) [C1]

Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved. BACKGROUND: The... [more]

Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved. BACKGROUND: The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 provides an up-to-date synthesis of the evidence for risk factor exposure and the attributable burden of disease. By providing national and subnational assessments spanning the past 25 years, this study can inform debates on the importance of addressing risks in context.METHODS: We used the comparative risk assessment framework developed for previous iterations of the Global Burden of Disease Study to estimate attributable deaths, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), and trends in exposure by age group, sex, year, and geography for 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks from 1990 to 2015. This study included 388 risk-outcome pairs that met World Cancer Research Fund-defined criteria for convincing or probable evidence. We extracted relative risk and exposure estimates from randomised controlled trials, cohorts, pooled cohorts, household surveys, census data, satellite data, and other sources. We used statistical models to pool data, adjust for bias, and incorporate covariates. We developed a metric that allows comparisons of exposure across risk factors-the summary exposure value. Using the counterfactual scenario of theoretical minimum risk level, we estimated the portion of deaths and DALYs that could be attributed to a given risk. We decomposed trends in attributable burden into contributions from population growth, population age structure, risk exposure, and risk-deleted cause-specific DALY rates. We characterised risk exposure in relation to a Socio-demographic Index (SDI).FINDINGS: Between 1990 and 2015, global exposure to unsafe sanitation, household air pollution, childhood underweight, childhood stunting, and smoking each decreased by more than 25%. Global exposure for several occupational risks, high body-mass index (BMI), and drug use increased by more than 25% over the same period. All risks jointly evaluated in 2015 accounted for 57·8% (95% CI 56·6-58·8) of global deaths and 41·2% (39·8-42·8) of DALYs. In 2015, the ten largest contributors to global DALYs among Level 3 risks were high systolic blood pressure (211·8 million [192·7 million to 231·1 million] global DALYs), smoking (148·6 million [134·2 million to 163·1 million]), high fasting plasma glucose (143·1 million [125·1 million to 163·5 million]), high BMI (120·1 million [83·8 million to 158·4 million]), childhood undernutrition (113·3 million [103·9 million to 123·4 million]), ambient particulate matter (103·1 million [90·8 million to 115·1 million]), high total cholesterol (88·7 million [74·6 million to 105·7 million]), household air pollution (85·6 million [66·7 million to 106·1 million]), alcohol use (85·0 million [77·2 million to 93·0 million]), and diets high in sodium (83·0 million [49·3 million to 127·5 million]). From 1990 to 2015, attributable DALYs declined for micronutrient deficiencies, childhood undernutrition, unsafe sanitation and water, and household air pollution; reductions in risk-deleted DALY rates rather than reductions in exposure drove these declines. Rising exposure contributed to notable increases in attributable DALYs from high BMI, high fasting plasma glucose, occupational carcinogens, and drug use. Environmental risks and childhood undernutrition declined steadily with SDI; low physical activity, high BMI, and high fasting plasma glucose increased with SDI. In 119 countries, metabolic risks, such as high BMI and fasting plasma glucose, contributed the most attributable DALYs in 2015. Regionally, smoking still ranked among the leading five risk factors for attributable DALYs in 109 countries; childhood underweight and unsafe sex remained primary drivers of early death and disability in much of sub-Saharan Africa.INTERPRETATION: Declin...

DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31679-8
Citations Scopus - 2165Web of Science - 622
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Addisushunu Beyene Uon
2016 Kassebaum NJ, Arora M, Barber RM, Bhutta ZA, Carter A, Casey DC, et al., 'Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 315 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE), 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015', LANCET, 388 1603-1658 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31460-X
Citations Scopus - 1178Web of Science - 1120
Co-authors Addisushunu Beyene Uon
2015 Forouzanfar MH, Alexander L, Bachman VF, Biryukov S, Brauer M, Casey D, et al., 'Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks in 188 countries, 1990-2013: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013', The Lancet, 386 2287-2323 (2015) [C1]

Background: The Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factor study 2013 (GBD 2013) is the first of a series of annual updates of the GBD. Risk factor quantification, partic... [more]

Background: The Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factor study 2013 (GBD 2013) is the first of a series of annual updates of the GBD. Risk factor quantification, particularly of modifiable risk factors, can help to identify emerging threats to population health and opportunities for prevention. The GBD 2013 provides a timely opportunity to update the comparative risk assessment with new data for exposure, relative risks, and evidence on the appropriate counterfactual risk distribution. Methods: Attributable deaths, years of life lost, years lived with disability, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) have been estimated for 79 risks or clusters of risks using the GBD 2010 methods. Risk-outcome pairs meeting explicit evidence criteria were assessed for 188 countries for the period 1990-2013 by age and sex using three inputs: risk exposure, relative risks, and the theoretical minimum risk exposure level (TMREL). Risks are organised into a hierarchy with blocks of behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks at the first level of the hierarchy. The next level in the hierarchy includes nine clusters of related risks and two individual risks, with more detail provided at levels 3 and 4 of the hierarchy. Compared with GBD 2010, six new risk factors have been added: handwashing practices, occupational exposure to trichloroethylene, childhood wasting, childhood stunting, unsafe sex, and low glomerular filtration rate. For most risks, data for exposure were synthesised with a Bayesian metaregression method, DisMod-MR 2.0, or spatial-temporal Gaussian process regression. Relative risks were based on meta-regressions of published cohort and intervention studies. Attributable burden for clusters of risks and all risks combined took into account evidence on the mediation of some risks such as high body-mass index (BMI) through other risks such as high systolic blood pressure and high cholesterol. Findings: All risks combined account for 57·2% (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 55·8-58·5) of deaths and 41·6% (40·1-43·0) of DALYs. Risks quantified account for 87·9% (86·5-89·3) of cardiovascular disease DALYs, ranging to a low of 0% for neonatal disorders and neglected tropical diseases and malaria. In terms of global DALYs in 2013, six risks or clusters of risks each caused more than 5% of DALYs: dietary risks accounting for 11·3 million deaths and 241·4 million DALYs, high systolic blood pressure for 10·4 million deaths and 208·1 million DALYs, child and maternal malnutrition for 1·7 million deaths and 176·9 million DALYs, tobacco smoke for 6·1 million deaths and 143·5 million DALYs, air pollution for 5·5 million deaths and 141·5 million DALYs, and high BMI for 4·4 million deaths and 134·0 million DALYs. Risk factor patterns vary across regions and countries and with time. In sub-Saharan Africa, the leading risk factors are child and maternal malnutrition, unsafe sex, and unsafe water, sanitation, and handwashing. In women, in nearly all countries in the Americas, north Africa, and the Middle East, and in many other high-income countries, high BMI is the leading risk factor, with high systolic blood pressure as the leading risk in most of Central and Eastern Europe and south and east Asia. For men, high systolic blood pressure or tobacco use are the leading risks in nearly all high-income countries, in north Africa and the Middle East, Europe, and Asia. For men and women, unsafe sex is the leading risk in a corridor from Kenya to South Africa. Interpretation: Behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks can explain half of global mortality and more than one-third of global DALYs providing many opportunities for prevention. Of the larger risks, the attributable burden of high BMI has increased in the past 23 years. In view of the prominence of behavioural risk factors, behavioural and social science research on interventions for these risks should be strengthened. Many prevention and pri...

DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)00128-2
Citations Scopus - 1647Web of Science - 1593
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2015 Murray CJL, Barber RM, Foreman KJ, Ozgoren AA, Abd-Allah F, Abera SF, et al., 'Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for 306 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 188 countries, 1990-2013: quantifying the epidemiological transition', LANCET, 386 2145-2191 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)61340-X
Citations Scopus - 1139Web of Science - 1050
2014 Ahmed T, Assefa N, Demisie A, 'Levels of Adult Patients' Satisfaction with Nursing Care in Selected Public Hospitals in Ethiopia', International Journal of Health Sciences, 8 375-383 (2014)
DOI 10.12816/0023994
Mohammedhussein M, Hajure M, Shifa JE, Hassen TA, 'Perceived stigma among patient with pulmonary tuberculosis at public health facilities in southwest Ethiopia: A cross-sectional study', PLOS ONE, 15 e0243433-e0243433
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0243433
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $151,265

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $100,090

HDR Scholarship$100,090

 Designing and conducting PhD research project

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Tahir Hassen

Scheme The University of Newcastle International Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20151 grants / $41,175

Postgraduate scholarship $41,175

 Attended Master's Degree in Emergency and Critical care Nursing 

Funding body: Erasmus Mundus

Funding body Erasmus Mundus
Project Team

Tahir Hassen

Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20141 grants / $10,000

Effect of Trigonella Foenum Graecum (Fenugreek) ‘Abesh’ on Blood Glucose, Glycosylated Hemoglobin, and Lipid Levels in Patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus: Randomized Controlled Trial$10,000

 Designing and conducting the study

Funding body: Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical sciences,

Funding body Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical sciences,
Project Team

Tahir Hassen, Abera Tura, Aboma Abdi, Bereket Molla, Haji Bedene, Nejib Yousuf Zerihun Ataro

Scheme Research Methodology
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Mr Tahir Ahmed Hassen

Contact Details

Email tahirahmed.hassen@uon.edu.au
Link Research Networks
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