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Dr Sarah Wright

Future Fellow

School of Environmental and Life Sciences (Geography and Environmental Studies)

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Sarah Wright is an Associate Professor and Future Fellow in geography and development studies from the University of Newcastle, Australia. She works in critical development studies, particularly on geographies of food, and Indigenous and post-colonial geographies, working with Yolngu co-researchers to explore Indigenous ontologies of connection in North East Arnhem Land. She has a strong commitment to collaborative work and praxis and works closely with community groups, NGOs and social movements in Australia, the Philippines and Kenya.

Research Expertise
My research is focused on the areas of Indigenous geographies, science studies and critical development studies. My work is underpinned by a commitment to social and environmental justice. In Indigenous geographies, my contributions are primarily through a successful ongoing collaboration with Dr Sandie Suchet-Pearson and Dr Kate Lloyd and five Yolngu women, Laklak Burarrwanga and family, from Bawaka in the Northeast Arnhem Land. Together we have explored what it might mean to take Indigenous ontologies of co-becoming seriously, in ways that might help us better understand theoretical concepts such as space and place, and also to move towards a de-colonised, Indigenous-led practice in development studies and natural resource management. The group’s work building on Indigenous ontologies to include Country as a co-author (Bawaka et al 2013; Wright et al 2012) in publications and ethics review processes was highlighted as exceptionally innovative during the Fay Gale Memorial Lecture at the 2011 IAG conference. I have built range of innovative relationships with Indigenous groups and government agencies involved in tourism in the NT including with the Department of Business, Economic and Regional Development and Tourism NT. These relationships focus on interwoven learning exchanges (Wright et al 2007) between academics and Indigenous collaborators. My research in science studies has a specific emphasis on Indigenous knowledge systems and intellectual property, particularly as they relate to geographies of food and food sovereignty. My work focuses on the politics of knowledge, the way that different knowledges are experienced in place and the ways they have been variously adopted, reworked and contested at different scales. My highly cited article (Wright 2005), for example, that explores knowledge spaces as a platform for understanding the construction and co-construction of knowledge, provides an innovative framework from which to explore issues of intercultural communication on ontological levels. I have a strong commitment to collaborative work and praxis and work closely with community groups, NGOs and social movements in Australia, the Philippines and Kenya. I have developed important collaborations with government and community partners in Australia and internationally. In Australia, I have been approached to evaluate educational tourism options, collaborate on the production of materials including websites (Biliru, Mills), co-write books (Burarrwanga et al 2008; Ong’Wen and Wright 2007; Yap et al 2004), write policy documents (Bachmann, Cruzada and Wright 2008), and run pilot study tours (Wagiman Women Rangers, Juma experiences). I have also worked in the Philippines and Kenya supporting farmer-led and Indigenous-led movements.

Teaching Expertise
My teaching is focused on human geography with a specialisation in critical development studies. I am the convenor of the development studies degree at the University of Newcastle and am a lecturer in geography and development studies. I have a Graduate Certificate in the Practice of Tertiary Teaching from the University of Newcastle and have supplemented my formal qualifications in teaching with participation in programs to strengthen my teaching skills including with a year long teaching support program involving training, ongoing consultation and evaluation with the renowned Center for Instructional Development and Research at the University of Washington, USA. Through my teaching I aim for a constructive learning environment that empowers students and facilitates them developing a love of learning that will stay with them throughout their lives. In my work as a teacher, course coordinator and convenor of the Development Studies degree at the University of Newcastle, I aim to encourage an effective learning community both within and beyond my classes. This involves building trust and respectful relationships that support diversity through course design and in the classroom. It is my aim that students develop critical thinking skills and broadly applicable competencies, and come to view themselves as empowered citizens with important contributions to make in the classroom and in broader society. My teaching experience is informed by 15 years professional work as a practitioner and educator in group facilitation, cross-cultural awareness training and community-based environmental education working with non-government organisations and community groups in the Philippines, Cuba, Australia and the US. I value collaboration in teaching and research and place high importance in making contributions that extend beyond the classroom. Since starting at the University of Newcastle, I have developed collaborations with government, community and indigenous partners that bring students and community together through practical-based fieldwork and research. I have worked with indigenous partners and students to help evaluate educational tourism options, to collaborate on the production of educational materials (Biliru, Darwin), to develop a pilot study tour (Wagiman Women Rangers, Tjuwaliyn) and co-produce a publication on the practice and cultural importance of weaving for an indigenous cross-cultural womens program in Arnhemland (Gaywu womens program).

Administrative Expertise
I am currently the Program Convenor for the Bachelor of Development studies and the Bachelor of Development Studies (Hons), and a member of the Development Studies Program Committee. I was a member of the review committee for the Masters of Social Change and Development at the University of Newcastle, participated in the Phase 3 Grad Attributes project for development studies and was a member of the Faculty Advisory group for DCIT student marketing project. I sit on the School of Environmental and Life Sciences Curriculum, Teaching and Learning Committee and am currently the course coordinator for three courses in the School.

Collaborations
My primary research collaboration is within an Indigenous-non-Indigenous research collaboration with Yolngu researchers and knowledge authorities Laklak Burarrwanga, Ritjilili Ganambarr, Merrkiyawuy Ganambarr-Stubbs, Banbapuy Ganambarr and Djawundil Maymuru, as well as Dr Kate Lloyd and Sandie Suchet-Pearson from Macquarie University. We have jointly conceived and developed our research and the research outputs are designed to be meaningful in both community and academic domains. Through our collaborative Indigenous-non-Indigenous research team we have produced a range of mutual benefits for all parties including sharing Yolngu knowledge through the academic community. Our work is underpinned by a partnership document (research agreement) that we have updated several times since it was first written. Together, we have come to see our collaboration as an exchange within which all of us undergo a process of learning and transformation through co-creation. The outputs of our research collaboration highlight the transformative potential of our projects to strengthen communities and progress self-determination and reconciliation through the documentation and communication of Indigenous knowledge for non-Indigenous audiences. ??We have called ourselves Milngurr which, as the partnership document states, “we have chosen because when we work together all our ideas bubble up and we have so much to share, water bubbling up from the ground, knowledge and sharing. This is Larrwaw’ Larrwaw’ which means ideas bubbling up from deep in the well, flowing out, spilling out, pouring out. That is how it is when we are together. We talked about how we all think alike, even though we live different lives in different places. We are family now.”

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Washington
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Sydney

Keywords

  • Cultural Geography
  • Development Studies
  • Food sovereignty
  • Human Geography
  • Indigenous ontologies of co-becoming
  • Post-colonial studies
  • Social Geography
  • Southeast Asia and the Pacific
  • critical development studies

Languages

  • Spanish (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
160403 Social and Cultural Geography 75
160499 Human Geography not elsewhere classified 5
200209 Multicultural, Intercultural and Cross-cultural Studies 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2002 - 1/03/2004 Fellow Social Sciences Research Council
Program on Global Security and Cooperation
Australia
1/08/1999 - 1/08/2004 Casual Academic University of Washington
Department of Geography
United States
1/08/1997 - 1/07/1999 Research Coordinator Mineral Policy Institute
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Member - NSW Geographical Association NSW Geographical Association
Australia
Member - Association of American Geographers Association of American Geographers
United States
Member - Institute of Australian Geographers Institute of Australian Geographers
Australia

Awards

Honours

Year Award
2014 Shortlisted: Best Educational Publishing
Unknown
2013 Academic Staff Excellence Award
Unknown
2012 Best Community Engagement (Honourable mention)
Unknown
2007 Best Full Paper
Unknown

Research Award

Year Award
2014 Eva Powell Award for Best Information Book (Honour book)
Unknown
2004 Edward Ullman Award for outstanding contribution to written scholarship
University of Washington
2002 Social Science Research Council Fellowship
Unknown
2001 Antipode graduate student scholarship
Unknown
2001 Fellowship
Unknown
2001 Chester Fritz Award for international study and exchange
University of Washington

Invitations

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2005 Lecture series to six prominent Filipino universities and policy institutes
Organisation: Hosted by MASIPAG Description: I was invited to conduct a lecture series in the Philippines presenting at six prominent Filipino universities and policy institutes: the University of the Philippines, Diliman; the University of the Philippines, Los Banos; Miriam College; the University of Makati; the Health Alliance for Democracy, and, the Centre for Environmental Concern.
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr R, Ganambarr-Stubbs M, Ganambarr B, Maymuru D, Wright SL, et al., Welcome to My Country, Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest, NSW, 209 (2013) [A1]
2009 Bachmann L, Cruzada E, Wright SL, Food Security and Farmer Empowerment: A study of the Impacts of Farmer-Led Sustainable Agriculture in the Philippines, MASIPAG, Laguna, Philippines, 149 (2009) [A2]
2008 Burarrwanga LL, Maymuru D, Ganambarr B, Wright SL, Suchet-Pearson S, Lloyd K, Weaving Lives Together at Bawaka: North East Arnhem Land, Centre for Urban and Regional Studies, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, 46 (2008) [A2]
2007 O'Neill P, McGuirk PM, Mee KJ, Wright SL, Markwell KW, Momtaz S, King RA, Urban Development and the Lower Hunter: Understanding Context, Connections and Flows, Centre for Urban and Regional Studies, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, N.S.W., 359 (2007) [A2]
Co-authors Robert King, Salim Momtaz, Kathy Mee
2007 Ong'Wen O, Wright SL, Small Farmers and the Future of Sustainable Agriculture, Heinrich Boll Foundation, Berlin, 64 (2007) [A2]
2006 Wright S, Primer on Intellectual Property Rights, MASIPAG (2006) [A2]
2004 Yap E, Wright S, Mertineit A, Nilles B, Save our rice: Farmer-based initiatives to end hunger in Asia (2004) [A3]
Show 4 more books

Chapter (21 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Country B, Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr R, Ganambarr-Stubbs M, Ganambarr B, Maymuru D, et al., 'Co-becoming time/s: Time/s-as-telling-as-time/s', Methodological Challenges in Nature-Culture and Environmental History Research 81-92 (2016)
DOI 10.4324/9781315665924
2015 Wright SL, 'Coping with loneliness at work', Addressing Loneliness: Coping, Prevention and Clinical Interventions 123-134 (2015)
2014 Wright S, 'Food sovereignty in practice: A study of farmer-led sustainable agriculture in the philippines', Globalization and Food Sovereignty: Global and Local Change in the New Politics of Food 214-240 (2014) [B1]
2014 Wright S, 'Food sovereignty in practice: A study of farmer-led sustainable agriculture in the philippines', Globalization and Food Sovereignty: Global and Local Change in the New Politics of Food 214-240 (2014) [B1]
2014 Hodge P, Wright S, Mozeley F, 'More-than-human theorising - Inclusive communities of practice in student practice-based learning', 83-102 (2014) [C1]

How might deeply embodied student experiences and nonhuman agency change the way we think about learning theory? Pushing the conceptual boundaries of practice-based learning and c... [more]

How might deeply embodied student experiences and nonhuman agency change the way we think about learning theory? Pushing the conceptual boundaries of practice-based learning and communities of practice, this chapter draws on student experiential fieldwork 'on Country' with Indigenous people in the Northern Territory (NT), Australia, to explore the peculiar silence when it comes to more-than-human1 features of situated learning models. As students engage with, and learn from, Indigenous epistemologies and ontologies, they become open to the ways their learning is co-produced in and with place. The chapter builds a case for an inclusive conceptualisation of communities of practice, one that takes seriously the material performativity of nonhuman actors - rock art, animals, plants and emotions in the 'situatedness' of socio-cultural contexts. As a co-participant in the students' community of practice, the more-than-human forms part of the process of identity formation and actively helps students learn. To shed light on the student experiences we employ Leximancer, a software tool that provides visual representations of the qualitative data drawn from focus groups with students and field diaries. Copyright © 2014 by Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

DOI 10.1108/S1479-3628(2014)0000010010
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Paul Hodge
2014 Wright SL, 'Resistance', The SAGE Handbook of Human Geography, SAGE, London 705-726 (2014) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Suchet-Pearson S, Wright SL, Lloyd K, Burarrwanga L, Hodge P, 'Footprints across the Beach: Beyond Researcher-Centered Methodologies', A Deeper Sense of Place: Stories and Journeys of Collaboration in Indigenous Research, Oregon State University Press, Corvallis, OR 21-40 (2013) [B1]
Co-authors Paul Hodge
2013 Suchet-Pearson S, Wright S, Lloyd K, Burarrwanga L, Hodge P, 'Footprints across the beach: Beyond researcher-centered methodologies', A Deeper Sense of Place: Stories and Journeys of Indigenous-Academic Collaboration 20-40 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 2
2013 Wright SL, 'Emotional Geographies of Development', Development Perspectives from the Antipodes, Routledge, London (2013)
2013 Lloyd K, Wright SL, Suchet-Pearson S, Burarrwanga L, Bawaka Country, 'Reframing Development through Collaboration: towards a relational ontology of connection in Bawaka, North East Arnhem Land', Development Perspectives from the Antipodes, Routledge, London (2013)
2012 Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr M, Ganambarr B, Suchet-Pearson S, Lloyd K, Wright SL, 'Learning from indigenous conceptions of a connected world', Enough for all Forever: A Handbook for Learning from Sustainability, Common Ground, Illinois, USA 3-13 (2012) [B1]
2012 Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr R, Ganambarr-Stubbs M, Ganambarr B, Maymuru D, Wright SL, et al., 'They are not voiceless', 2013 Voiceless Anthology, Allen and Unwin, Crows Nest, NSW 22-39 (2012) [B2]
2012 Chatwin M, Wakeman R, Wright S, 'Physical Therapies in Pediatric Respiratory Disease', Kendig and Chernick's Disorders of the Respiratory Tract in Children 299-308 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/B978-1-4377-1984-0.00019-X
2009 Morrison RL, Wright SL, 'Friends and Enemies in Organizations: A Work Psychology Perspective', 1-254 (2009)

© Rachel Morrison and Sarah Wright 2009. All rights reserved. An exploration into the ways in which friendships, isolation and enemy-ships influence and affect our experience of ... [more]

© Rachel Morrison and Sarah Wright 2009. All rights reserved. An exploration into the ways in which friendships, isolation and enemy-ships influence and affect our experience of work. The theme of the research volume is 'Alienation to Suffocation'; canvassing issues from loneliness and isolation through to the positive aspects of a friendly workplace.

DOI 10.1057/9780230248359
Citations Scopus - 7
2008 Wright SL, 'Practising hope: Learning from social movement strategies in the Philippines', Fear: Critical Geopolitics and Everyday Life, Ashgate Publishing, Surrey 223-233 (2008) [B1]
2007 Wright S, 'Practising hope: learning from social movement strategies in the Philippines', Fear: Critical geopolitics and everyday life, Ashgate Publishing, Aldershot, Hampshire, England 223-234 (2007) [B1]
2006 Wright SL, 'Responding to hunger in a globalizing world: the emergence of food sovereignty', Global Food Security - An Introduction, ICFAI University Press, Hyderabad, India 1-10 (2006) [B1]
2003 Wright S, 'Rice is life: The search for alternatives in the heartland of the Green Revolution', Regaining the land; Lessons from Farmers' Experience with Sustainable Agriculture in the Philippines., Catholic Institute for International Relations, London 75-95 (2003) [B2]
2003 Wright S, Yap E, 'Rice; Our living heritage', The Custodians of Biodiversity, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Torino, 119-124 (2003) [B2]
2001 Wright S, 'Strategies for change: what next?', , Zed Books (2001) [B1]
2000 Wright S, 'Ethical investment and the mining industry', Ethical Investment, Choice Books, Sydney, 1-10 (2000) [B2]
Show 18 more chapters

Journal article (60 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Wright S, 'Critique as delight, theory as praxis, mucking in', GEOGRAPHICAL RESEARCH, 55 338-343 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/1745-5871.12207
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2017 Plahe J, Wright S, Marembo M, 'Livelihoods crises in Vidarbha, India: Food sovereignty through traditional farming systems as a possible solution', South Asia: Journal of South Asia Studies, 40 600-618 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 South Asian Studies Association of Australia. The Vidarbha region in Maharashtra, India, home to 3.4 million smallholder farmers, is a major cotton-producing region in one... [more]

© 2017 South Asian Studies Association of Australia. The Vidarbha region in Maharashtra, India, home to 3.4 million smallholder farmers, is a major cotton-producing region in one of the wealthiest Indian states. However, between 1995 and 2013, more than 60,000 farmers took their own lives. Many of these suicides have been linked to extreme debt created by the expensive mono-cropping of Bt cotton. Some farming households have responded to these pressures by abandoning Bt cotton growing and turning to sustainable agriculture using traditional mixedcropping methods. Yet the question remains: have the changes produced better livelihoods in Vidarbha? Using a food sovereignty framework, we assess the impact of these changes through an analysis of a 200-household survey across six districts in Vidarbha. We also explore the meaning of food sovereignty for those who practise it, seeking to better understand some of the complexities and experiences associated with the term.

DOI 10.1080/00856401.2017.1339581
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Country B, Wright S, Lloyd K, Suchet-Pearson S, Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr R, et al., 'Meaningful tourist transformations with Country at Bawaka, North East Arnhem Land, northern Australia', TOURIST STUDIES, 17 443-467 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1468797616682134
2017 Wright S, 'Water Politics and Spiritual Ecology: Custom, Environmental Governance and Development', PROGRESS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, 41 274-276 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/0309132516643618
2016 Country B, Wright S, Suchet-Pearson S, Lloyd K, Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr R, et al., 'Co-becoming Bawaka: Towards a relational understanding of place/space', Progress in Human Geography, 40 455-475 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, © The Author(s) 2015. We invite readers to dig for ganguri (yams) at and with Bawaka, an Indigenous Homeland in northern Australia, and, in doing so, consider an Indigen... [more]

© 2015, © The Author(s) 2015. We invite readers to dig for ganguri (yams) at and with Bawaka, an Indigenous Homeland in northern Australia, and, in doing so, consider an Indigenous-led understanding of relational space/place. We draw on the concept of gurrutu to illustrate the limits of western ontologies, open up possibilities for other ways of thinking and theorizing, and give detail and depth to the notion of space/place as emergent co-becoming. With Bawaka as lead author, we look to Country for what it can teach us about how all views of space are situated, and for the insights it offers about co-becoming in a relational world.

DOI 10.1177/0309132515589437
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 15
2016 Wright S, Suchet-Pearson S, Lloyd K, Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr R, Ganambarr-Stubbs M, et al., 'The politics of ontology and ontological politics', DIALOGUES IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, 6 23-27 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/2043820615624053
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2016 Wright SL, Katz JA, 'Protecting Student Intellectual Property in the Entrepreneurial Classroom', Journal of Management Education, 40 152-169 (2016)

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. While universities are intensely protective of revenue streams related to intellectual property interests for the institution and professors, the f... [more]

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. While universities are intensely protective of revenue streams related to intellectual property interests for the institution and professors, the financial and legal interests of students in the entrepreneurial process have largely been overlooked. This lack of attention, both in universities and in the literature, is intriguing given the mushrooming growth in entrepreneurial education courses in almost every U.S. university. This article builds and reflects on an original article by Katz, Harshman, and Lund Dean where the authors advocate for establishing classroom norms for promoting and protecting student intellectual property. We present research, insights, and reflections from Professor Katz regarding the controversial ethical and legal issues related to student intellectual property in university settings and provide suggested resources for faculty traversing these issues.

DOI 10.1177/1052562915622665
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Baruch Y, Wordsworth R, Mills C, Wright S, 'Career and work attitudes of blue-collar workers, and the impact of a natural disaster chance event on the relationships between intention to quit and actual quit behaviour', European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 25 459-473 (2016)

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. Despite being part of a highly visible and important occupational group, blue-collar workers have, to date, been under-represented in careers resea... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. Despite being part of a highly visible and important occupational group, blue-collar workers have, to date, been under-represented in careers research. We explore the relevance and applicability of new career concepts to blue-collar employees, specifically, bus drivers. Based on a survey of 112 bus drivers, we test a model specifying the relationship between career attitude, perceived organizational support, psychological contract, and job satisfaction, as well as intention to quit. Employing a two-phase data collection process, we also test relationships between intentions and actual quit behaviour. Our results support the validity of career theories for blue-collar workers but with notable exceptions, such as lack of relationships between protean career and intention to quit. Contrary to intention-behaviour theory we find that actual quit behaviour was not related to intention to quit, which we attribute to a significant external chance event, a devastating earthquake, which took place during the study period. In addition, we identify relationships that appear to be unique to blue-collar workers.

DOI 10.1080/1359432X.2015.1113168
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Lips-Wiersma M, Wright S, Dik B, 'Meaningful work: differences among blue-, pink-, and white-collar occupations', Career Development International, 21 534-551 (2016)

© 2016, © Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to compare the importance currently placed on meaningful work (MFW), and determine the frequenc... [more]

© 2016, © Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to compare the importance currently placed on meaningful work (MFW), and determine the frequency by which it is experienced in blue-, pink-, and white-collar occupations. Design/methodology/approachs: Using the comprehensive meaningful work scale (Lips-Wiersma and Wright, 2012) with 1,683 workers across two studies, ANOVAs were conducted to examine differences in dimensions of MFW. Findings: While unity with others and developing the inner self were regarded as equally important for white-, blue-, and pink-collar workers, the authors data suggest that white-collar workers placed more importance on expressing full potential and serving others than blue-collar workers. The frequency of experiencing MFW differed across the three groups with white-collar workers experiencing higher levels of unity with others, expressing full potential, and serving others; however no mean differences were found for developing the inner self. Originality/value: This study is the first to empirically investigate an oft-discussed but previously untested question: does the experience of MFW differ across white-, blue-, and pink-collar jobs?

DOI 10.1108/CDI-04-2016-0052
Citations Scopus - 3
2016 Lloyd B, Suchet-Pearson S, Wright S, Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr R, Ganambarr-Stubbs M, et al., 'Morrku Mangawu¿Knowledge on the Land: Mobilising Yol¿u Mathematics from Bawaka, North East Arnhem Land, to Reveal the Situatedness of All Knowledges', Humanities, 5 61-61 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/h5030061
2015 Fisher K, Williams M, Fitzherbert S, Instone L, Duffy M, Wright S, et al., 'Writing difference differently', New Zealand Geographer, 71 18-33 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 New Zealand Geographical Society. This paper investigates the writing of situated knowledge and explores the possibilities of enacting difference by writing differently. W... [more]

© 2015 New Zealand Geographical Society. This paper investigates the writing of situated knowledge and explores the possibilities of enacting difference by writing differently. We present a selection of research stories in which carrier bags, sounds, baskets, gardens and potatoes are interpreted less as objects of research or metaphors to aid in analysing phenomena, than as mediators of the stories. Our stories emphasise the ontological politics of engaging with and representing the relational, the messy, the spontaneous, the unpredictable, the non-human and bodily experiences. These stories demonstrate how writing is performative and how it is integral to the production of knowledge.

DOI 10.1111/nzg.12077
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Michelle Duffy, Lesley Instone
2015 Wright SL, 'More-than-human, emergent belongings: A weak theory approach', Progress in Human Geography, 39 391-411 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0309132514537132
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 16
2015 Country B, Wright S, Suchet-Pearson S, Lloyd K, Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr R, et al., 'Working with and learning from Country: decentring human author-ity', Cultural Geographies, 22 269-283 (2015) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2014 In this paper, we invite you night fishing for wäkun at Bawaka, an Indigenous homeland in North East Arnhem Land, Australia. As we hunt wäkun, we discuss o... [more]

© The Author(s) 2014 In this paper, we invite you night fishing for wäkun at Bawaka, an Indigenous homeland in North East Arnhem Land, Australia. As we hunt wäkun, we discuss our work as an Indigenous and non-Indigenous, human and more-than-human research collective trying to attend deeply to the messages we send and receive from, with and as a part of Country. The wäkun, and all the animals, plants, winds, processes, things, dreams and people that emerge together in nourishing, co-constitutive ways to create Bawaka Country, are the author-ity of our research. Our reflection is both methodological and ontological as we aim to attend deeply to Country and deliberate on what a Yol¿u ontology of co-becoming, that sees everything as knowledgeable, vital and interconnected, might mean for the way academics do research. We discuss a methodology of attending underpinned by a relational ethics of care. Here, care stems from an awareness of our essential co-constitution as we care for, and are cared for by, the myriad human and more-than-human becomings that emerge together to create Bawaka. We propose that practising relational research requires researchers to open themselves up to the reality of their connections with the world, and consider what it means to live as part of the world, rather than distinct from it. We end with a call to go beyond ¿human¿ geography to embrace a more-than-human geography, a geography of co-becoming.

DOI 10.1177/1474474014539248
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
2015 Lloyd K, Suchet-Pearson S, Wright S, Tofa M, Rowland C, Burarrwanga L, et al., 'Transforming Tourists and "Culturalising Commerce": Indigenous Tourism at Bawaka in Northern Australia', International Indigenous Policy Journal, 6 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.18584/iipj.2015.6.4.6
2015 Rapport F, Hutchings HA, Wright S, Doel MA, Clement C, Lewis K, 'Wider consultation on pulmonary rehabilitation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease', Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung, 16 (2015)

© 2015 FQS. In this article we examine whether an innovative mixed method approach could highlight the positive and challenging effects of a Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programme (P... [more]

© 2015 FQS. In this article we examine whether an innovative mixed method approach could highlight the positive and challenging effects of a Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programme (PRP) on the Quality of Life (QOL) of patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). In 2012, we conducted three consultation workshops in Mid-West Wales, UK, with COPD patients that participated in a PRP, their significant others (e.g. spouses and partners), and healthcare professionals who delivered the PRP. We found that there was a resounding enthusiasm for the content and impact of the programme, particularly in the areas of: increased patient activity, enhanced patient control and confidence, a greater willingness to self-manage treatment, and an increased sense of group belonging. Seven key themes mattered most to our study participants: the patient, physical health, mental health, the programme, professionals and significant others, knowledge and education, and the future. We used these themes to craft a best-practice outcomes document (template) of the benefits and challenges of the PRP to inform and support future service evaluation and delivery.

2014 Wright S, 'Quantitative Research Performing other Worlds: lessons from sustainable agriculture in the Philippines', AUSTRALIAN GEOGRAPHER, 45 1-18 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/00049182.2014.869293
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Wright SL, Cameron J, 'Researching diverse food initiatives: from backyard and community gardens to international markets', Local Environment: the international journal of justice and sustainability, 19 1-9 (2014) [C2]
DOI 10.1080/13549839.2013.835096
Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors Jenny Cameron
2014 Le Heron CJ, Wright SL, Melzer TR, Myall DJ, Macaskill MR, Livingston L, et al., 'Comparing cerebral perfusion in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease dementia: An ASL-MRI study', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 34 964-970 (2014)

Emerging evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) share neurodegenerative mechanisms. We sought to directly compare cerebra... [more]

Emerging evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) share neurodegenerative mechanisms. We sought to directly compare cerebral perfusion in these two conditions using arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI). In total, 17 AD, 20 PDD, and 37 matched healthy controls completed ASL and structural MRI, and comprehensive neuropsychological testing. Alzheimer's disease and PDD perfusion was analyzed by whole-brain voxel-based analysis (to assess absolute blood flow), a priori specified region of interest analysis, and principal component analysis (to generate a network differentiating the two groups). Corrections were made for cerebral atrophy, age, sex, education, and MRI scanner software version. Analysis of absolute blood flow showed no significant differences between AD and PDD. Comparing each group with controls revealed an overlapping, posterior pattern of hypoperfusion, including posterior cingulate gyrus, precuneus, and occipital regions. The perfusion network that differentiated AD and PDD groups identified relative differences in medial temporal lobes (AD < PDD) and right frontal cortex (PDD < AD). In conclusion, the pattern of cerebral hypoperfusion is very similar in AD and PDD. This suggests closely linked mechanisms of neurodegeneration mediating the evolution of dementia in both conditions. © 2014 ISCBFM All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1038/jcbfm.2014.40
Citations Scopus - 19
2014 Rapport F, Doel M, Hutchings H, Jones A, Culley L, Wright S, 'Consultation workshops with patients and professionals: Developing a template of patient-centred professionalism in community nursing', Journal of Research in Nursing, 19 146-160 (2014)

The study aimed to clarify the notion of patient-centred professionalism through consultation with the public, stakeholders and professionals in order to develop a thematic templa... [more]

The study aimed to clarify the notion of patient-centred professionalism through consultation with the public, stakeholders and professionals in order to develop a thematic template within nursing. The paper also examines innovative methodology informing eight template themes developed qualitatively. Patient-centred professionalism has had little coverage in nursing literature, whilst 'patient-centredness' is supporting patients through holistic care according to needs and expectations. The study took place in Wales, UK, between October 2009 and September 2010. Data collection entailed consultation workshops with newly qualifying nurses (13 participants), community nurses (nine participants), nursing stakeholders (six participants) and the public (six participants). Analysis involved summative and thematic approaches. Result were revealed through template themes, identified in rank order of significance: the patient, nursing ethos, community nurse as a person, knowledge and skills, working relationships, service delivery, training and information and environment. The patient comes first for nurses and was the major theme of the analysis. This almost goes without saying for nurses, whilst for patients this is a surprise, as they see themselves as marginalised. The patient in patient-centred professionalism has multiple identities, many of which contradict one another - recipient and object of care, a force of resistance and a focus of negotiation. In conclusion, a clearer understanding of the concept should play a central role in policy development for optimal care, informing education and training, and methodological strengths could be explored further by other researchers, across a wide range of contexts. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

DOI 10.1177/1744987113490416
2014 Hutchings HA, Rapport FL, Wright S, Doel MA, Clement C, Lewis KE, 'Nominal Group Technique consultation of a Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programme', F1000Research, 3 (2014)

© 2014 Hutchings HA et al. Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine what patients, professionals and significant others regarded as the most important positive- and c... [more]

© 2014 Hutchings HA et al. Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine what patients, professionals and significant others regarded as the most important positive- and challenging aspects of Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programmes for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and to gain insight into how such programmes could be developed and improved. Method: A modified Nominal Group Technique method was used in three consultation workshops (one with COPD patients who had recently undertaken a Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programme; one with 'significant others' of the same patients; one with secondary care professionals who deliver the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programme). Results: Each of three workshops resulted in the production of approximately ten positive- and ten challenging aspects related to Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programmes. These were further developed by a process of thematisation into seven broad themes. The most important was ' the patient', followed by ' physical health'; jointly ranked as third were: ' mental health' and ' knowledge and education'. ' The programme' and ' professional characteristics' were jointly ranked as fifth, with ' the future' being ranked as the least important theme. Conclusions: The modified Nominal Group Technique method allowed the development of a ranked thematic list that illustrated the important positive- and challenging aspects of Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programmes for patients with COPD. These themes should be core to planning future Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programmes, particularly if patients and carer views are to be considered.

DOI 10.12688/f1000research.3-42.v1
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Wright SL, 'Mundu ainaga na gatiru gake, We dance with what we have', Langscape, 2 26-33 (2013) [C2]
2013 Suchet-Pearson S, Wright S, Lloyd K, Burarrwanga L, 'Caring as Country: Towards an ontology of co-becoming in natural resource management', ASIA PACIFIC VIEWPOINT, 54 185-197 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/apv.12018
Citations Scopus - 48Web of Science - 36
2013 Cooper-Thomas HD, Wright S, 'Person-environment misfit: The neglected role of social context', Journal of Managerial Psychology, 28 21-37 (2013)

Purpose: In recent years, the literature on person-environment fit as a sought-after outcome has burgeoned whereas misfit has been relatively neglected. Specifically, little resea... [more]

Purpose: In recent years, the literature on person-environment fit as a sought-after outcome has burgeoned whereas misfit has been relatively neglected. Specifically, little research has investigated how people develop and maintain perceptions of not fitting in. The aim of this paper is to review past research on misfit, and present new data examining the role of coworker social relations in surfacing or diminishing perceptions of misfit. Design/methodology/approach: Written data were collected from 167 participants and analyzed using thematic coding. Themes emerging from the data were compared against the model of person-environment misfit. Findings: From the authors' analysis of previous misfit research they identify four dimensions of misfit: sociodemographic, individual differences, structural, and social. The authors' data support and extend these dimensions. Further, the findings suggest that the social context is related to perceptions of misfit. Practical implications: Managers can play a key role in misfit perceptions, both through action and inaction. Managers should note the importance of social relations in perceptions of misfit, and aim to provide supportive and well-structured work contexts. Originality/value: This paper makes four key contributions to the person-environment fit literature. One is the categorization of dimensions of misfit, developed from past research. The second is the provision of three conceptual models summarizing different approaches to misfit in relation to fit. Third, the paper provides a novel perspective on misfit by focusing on social norms as the background against which misfit is experienced. Fourth, this research supports and extends on the four component model of misfit developed in the authors' initial review. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

DOI 10.1108/02683941311298841
Citations Scopus - 9
2013 Malinen S, Wright S, Cammock P, 'What drives organisational engagement?: A case study on trust, justice perceptions and withdrawal attitudes', Evidence-based HRM, 1 96-108 (2013)

© 2013, Emerald Group Publishing Limited. PurposePast research has found meaningful differences between job and organisational engagement. However, research to date has mainly fo... [more]

© 2013, Emerald Group Publishing Limited. PurposePast research has found meaningful differences between job and organisational engagement. However, research to date has mainly focused on job engagement, whereas the construct of organisational engagement has been largely neglected. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antecedents of organisational engagement and its influence on withdrawal attitudes. Design/methodology/approachUsing an on-line survey, the authors investigated employees¿ perceptions of fairness and trust in senior management, 12 months prior to the measurement of organisational engagement and withdrawal attitudes. The study was conducted in a professional services public organisation, characterised by frequent change and uncertainty. FindingsThe authors showed that perceptions of procedural justice and trust in senior management predicted organisational engagement 12 months later. In addition, organisational engagement partially mediated the relationship between procedural justice perceptions, trust in senior management, and withdrawal attitudes. Practical implicationsThe authors¿ research suggests that monitoring and influencing employees¿ levels of engagement can benefit organisations, and that leaders in particular can influence employees¿ level of engagement. Indeed, the present research showed that employees who had trust in senior management and felt that they had a voice in the organisation showed higher levels of engagement and lower intentions to exit the organisation. Originality/valueThis research contributes to our understanding of the drivers of engagement, and demonstrates the importance of organisational-level, in addition to job-level engagement.

DOI 10.1108/20493981311318638
Citations Scopus - 6
2012 Lloyd K, Wright SL, Suchet-Pearson S, Burrarwanga L, Hodge PB, 'Weaving lives together : Collaborative fieldwork in North East Arnhem Land, Australia', Annales de Géographie, 687-688 513-524 (2012) [C1]
Co-authors Paul Hodge
2012 Lloyd K, Wright SL, Suchet-Pearson S, Burarrwanga L, Country B, 'Reframing development through collaboration: Towards a relational ontology of connection in Bawaka, North East Arnhem Land', Third World Quarterly, 33 1075-1094 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2012 Wright SL, 'Emotional geographies of development', Third World Quarterly, 33 1113-1127 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
2012 Wright SL, Hodge PB, 'To be transformed: Emotions in cross-cultural, field-based learning in Northern Australia', Journal of Geography in Higher Education, 36 355-368 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/03098265.2011.638708.
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Paul Hodge
2012 Wright SL, Lloyd K, Suchet-Pearson S, Burarrwanga L, Tofa M, 'Telling stories in, through and with Country: Engaging with Indigenous and more-than-human methodologies at Bawaka, NE Australia', Journal of Cultural Geography, 29 39-60 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 26
2012 Rich JL, Wright SL, Loxton DJ, ''Patience, hormone replacement therapy and rain!' Women, ageing and drought in Australia: Narratives from the mid-age cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 20 324-328 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Jane Rich
2012 Wright S, 'Is it lonely at the top? An empirical study of managers and nonmanagers loneliness in organizations', Journal of Psychology: Interdisciplinary and Applied, 146 47-60 (2012)

Loneliness is often assumed to be an occupational hazard for senior-ranked members of an organization. However, most of what researchers hear about being lonely at the top is anec... [more]

Loneliness is often assumed to be an occupational hazard for senior-ranked members of an organization. However, most of what researchers hear about being lonely at the top is anecdote. This article provides empirical evidence from three separate studies assessing loneliness in managers and nonmanagers. Across all three studies, loneliness did not differ by managerial status. Managers were no more or less lonely than their nonmanager counterparts. This suggests that factors beyond seniority may be contributing to loneliness in organizational settings. Ideas for future research are discussed. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/00223980.2011.585187
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Wright S, 'Is it lonely at the top? An empirical study of managers' and nonmanagers' loneliness in organizations.', The Journal of psychology, 146 47-60 (2012)

Loneliness is often assumed to be an occupational hazard for senior-ranked members of an organization. However, most of what researchers hear about being &quot;lonely at the top&q... [more]

Loneliness is often assumed to be an occupational hazard for senior-ranked members of an organization. However, most of what researchers hear about being "lonely at the top" is anecdote. This article provides empirical evidence from three separate studies assessing loneliness in managers and nonmanagers. Across all three studies, loneliness did not differ by managerial status. Managers were no more or less lonely than their nonmanager counterparts. This suggests that factors beyond seniority may be contributing to loneliness in organizational settings. Ideas for future research are discussed.

Citations Scopus - 3
2012 Hutchings H, Rapport F, Wright S, Doel M, Jones A, 'Obtaining consensus about patient-centred professionalism in community nursing: Nominal group work activity with professionals and the public', Journal of Advanced Nursing, 68 2429-2442 (2012)

Aim. To report on the development of a ranked thematic list encompassing the positive and challenging exemplars of patient-centred professionalism in community nursing. Background... [more]

Aim. To report on the development of a ranked thematic list encompassing the positive and challenging exemplars of patient-centred professionalism in community nursing. Background. There has been little research exploring what 'patient-centred professionalism' means to those working within the healthcare settings. Consensus methods, such as those developed through Nominal Group Work, can help establish the extent of agreement on a particular issue whilst overcoming some of the problems associated with group decision-making. Design. Mixed methods studying through consultation workshops. Method. The study took place in South-west Wales, UK between October 2009-September 2010. Thirty-four participants consisting of community nurses (9), newly qualifying nurses (13), nursing stakeholders (6) and members of the public (6) took part in the study. An adapted Nominal Group Work approach was used in five individual consultation workshops: two with community nurses, one with newly qualifying nurses, one with stakeholders and one with members of the public followed by a mixed-group Forum event. Results. Each of the five workshops resulted in the production of approximately ten positive and ten challenging exemplars of patient-centred professionalism. The thematization of these exemplars allowed the development of eight broad themes. The Forum event then provided a mechanism for ranking the importance of these themes. The patient, community nurse as a person and nursing ethos were ranked as the most important themes by study participants. Conclusions. The adapted Nominal Group Work approach was a useful method to allow the development of a ranked thematic list that illustrated the important positive and challenging exemplars of patient-centred professionalism in community nursing. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2011.05938.x
Citations Scopus - 8
2012 Drag LL, Wright SL, Bieliauskas LA, 'Prescribing practices of anticholinergic medications and their association with cognition in an extended care setting', Journal of Applied Gerontology, 31 239-259 (2012)

The current study examined prescribing patterns of anticholinergic (AC) medications and their association with cognitive function in 450 nondemented and nondelirious older adults ... [more]

The current study examined prescribing patterns of anticholinergic (AC) medications and their association with cognitive function in 450 nondemented and nondelirious older adults hospitalized in a postacute extended care center. Participants completed a brief neuropsychological battery that included measures of general mental status, memory, judgment, and executive functioning as part of standard clinical care. An AC burden score was calculated for each participant based on medications taken the day of the testing using the Anticholinergic Drug Scale. Although use of AC medications was common, the majority of participants were taking medications with only minimal AC properties. AC burden and total number of AC medications were negatively correlated with age. AC burden was not associated with lower performance on any of the cognitive measures. In sum, current prescribing practices of AC medications are not associated with negative cognitive effects in a sample of older adults hospitalized in an extended care center. © The Author(s) 2012.

DOI 10.1177/0733464810384592
Citations Scopus - 3
2012 Lips-Wiersma M, Wright S, 'Measuring the Meaning of Meaningful Work: Development and Validation of the Comprehensive Meaningful Work Scale (CMWS)', Group and Organization Management, 37 655-685 (2012)

In this article we build on two in-depth qualitative studies to systematically develop and validate a comprehensive measure of meaningful work. This scale provides a multidimensio... [more]

In this article we build on two in-depth qualitative studies to systematically develop and validate a comprehensive measure of meaningful work. This scale provides a multidimensional, process-oriented measure of meaningful work that captures the complexity of the construct. It measures the dimensions of "developing the inner self"; "unity with others"; "serving others" and "expressing full potential" and the dynamic tensions between these through items on "being versus doing" and "self versus others." The scale also measures inspiration and it's relationship to the existential need to be real and grounded. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses using multicultural samples from a broad range of occupations provide construct validity for the measure. Future research opportunities on the basis of our measure are outlined. © The Author(s) 2012.

DOI 10.1177/1059601112461578
Citations Scopus - 24
2011 Hodge PB, Wright SL, Barraket J, Scott M, Melville R, Richardson S, 'Revisiting 'how we learn' in academia: Practice-based learning exchanges in three Australian universities', Studies in Higher Education, 36 167-183 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/03075070903501895
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Paul Hodge
2011 Rapport F, Wright S, Hutchings H, Doel M, 'Patient-centred professionalism and its impact on community pharmacists', Pharmaceutical Journal, 286 112-113 (2011)
Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Wright SL, Kay RE, Avery ET, Giordani B, Alexander NB, 'The impact of depression on dual tasking among patients with high fall risk', Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 24 142-150 (2011)

Depression predicts fall risk among older adults, and this relationship may be partially explained by depression-associated executive dysfunction, relevant to navigating demanding... [more]

Depression predicts fall risk among older adults, and this relationship may be partially explained by depression-associated executive dysfunction, relevant to navigating demanding environments. This pilot study examined timed stepping accuracy under simple and complex dual-task conditions, using an instrumented walkway based on the Trail Making Test. Participants were balance-impaired older adults, either with (n = 8; major depressive disorder [MDD]) or without (n = 8; nondepressed [ND] ) MDD. After accounting for comfortable gait speed and age, the MDD group was significantly slower than the ND group on the walkway with the highest cognitive demand and demonstrated greater dual-task cost, both of which were correlated with performance on traditional measures of executive functioning. No group differences were observed on the walkway with the least cognitive demand. Balance-impaired older adults with MDD demonstrate increased stepping accuracy time under cognitively demanding conditions, reflecting executive dysfunction and an additional contribution to increased fall risk. © The Author(s) 2011.

DOI 10.1177/0891988711409408
Citations Scopus - 14
2010 Wright SL, 'Cultivating beyond-capitalist economies', Economic Geography, 86 297-318 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1944-8287.2010.01074.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
2010 Hutchings HA, Rapport FL, Wright S, Doel MA, Wainwright P, 'Obtaining consensus regarding patient-centred professionalism in community pharmacy: Nominal group work activity with professionals, stakeholders and members of the public', International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 18 149-158 (2010)

Objectives The aim of this study was to develop a ranked thematic list encompassing the positive and negative exemplars of patient-centred professionalism in community pharmacy. M... [more]

Objectives The aim of this study was to develop a ranked thematic list encompassing the positive and negative exemplars of patient-centred professionalism in community pharmacy. Methods An adapted Nominal Group Work (NGW) method was used in six individual consultation workshops (two with established pharmacists, one with newly qualified pharmacists, one with pharmacy staff, one with stakeholders and one with members of the public) followed by a mixed-group forum event. Key findings Each of the six workshops resulted in the production of approximately 10 positive and 10 negative exemplars of patient-centred professionalism. The thematization of these exemplars allowed the development of 11 broad themes. The mixed-group forum event then provided a mechanism for ranking the importance of these themes. Safety, professional characteristics and relationships with patients were ranked as the most important themes by our study participants. © 2010 Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain.

DOI 10.1211/ijpp/18.03.0004
Citations Scopus - 13
2010 Rapport F, Doel MA, Hutchings HA, Wright S, Wainwright P, John DN, Jerzembek GS, 'Eleven themes of patient-centred professionalism in community pharmacy: Innovative approaches to consulting', International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 18 260-268 (2010)

Objectives The study aimed to clarify patient-centred professionalism within and across community pharmacy settings; position that knowledge in a modern-day environment, accessing... [more]

Objectives The study aimed to clarify patient-centred professionalism within and across community pharmacy settings; position that knowledge in a modern-day environment, accessing the opinions and experiences of patients and professionals; inform the literature on the value of consultation workshops within this context; and develop a template of positive and challenging exemplars of patient-centred professionalism within these contexts. Methods Thirty-nine study participants contributed to extended consultation workshops. Sessions were supported by bio-photographic data of healthcare practices across a range of different settings, and a final forum event. Key findings Thematic analysis of qualitative data, supported by the Nominal Group Work technique, led to a template containing 11 themes of positive and challenging aspects of patient-centred professionalism: safety, professional characteristics, relationships with patients, confidentiality and privacy, accessibility, training, professional pressures, services, environment, changing professional roles and patient characteristics. Themes, while descriptive and rich, highlight difficulties in defining this notion, which is both nuanced and ambiguous. While study participants were interested in the everyday examples of practice and interaction, they were strongly influenced by their different agendas and experiences. Patients, for example, wanted a quick and efficient dispensing service, where their needs and expectations came first. Pharmacists, on the other hand, found that pressing patient demands and overarching company policies led to professional anxiety that distracted them from what they perceived to be the defining aspect of their professionalism, dispensary work. Conclusions The study outcomes indicate, in line with international literature, that while proud of supporting patients, many pharmacists feel demoralised, torn between pressing public and professional demands and the expectations of advice-giving in unfamiliar, formal situations within nondescript, corporate workspaces. © 2010 Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain.

DOI 10.1111/j.2042-7174.2010.00056.x
Citations Scopus - 17
2010 Lloyd K, Suchet-Pearson S, Wright SL, Burarrwanga LL, 'Stories of crossings and connections from Bawaka, North East Arnhem Land, Australia', Social and Cultural Geography, 11 702-717 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14649365.2010.508598
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
2009 Mee KJ, Wright SL, 'Geographies of belonging: Why belonging? Why geography?', Environment and Planning A, 41 772-779 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1068/a41364
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 43
Co-authors Kathy Mee
2009 Muller S, Power ER, Suchet-Pearson S, Wright SL, Lloyd K, ''Quarantine matters!': Quotidian relationships around quarantine in Australia's northern borderlands', Environment and Planning A, 41 780-795 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1068/a40196
2009 Chen Y, Wright S, Westfall R, 'Reversed gender distribution of diabetes in Northern Canada', Public Health, 123 782-786 (2009)

Objectives: To determine age and gender distributions of prevalent diabetes and related risk factors for Northern Canadians. Study design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: The data... [more]

Objectives: To determine age and gender distributions of prevalent diabetes and related risk factors for Northern Canadians. Study design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: The data used were from 78,549 people aged 40 years or more (including 1148 from Northern Canada) who participated in a national survey in 2005. The study questionnaire covered the information on diabetes and potential risk factors. Multiple classification analysis and a logistic regression model were used for multivariate analysis. Results: In Northern Canada, the prevalence of diabetes tended to increase with age more rapidly in women (P = 0.013), while the opposite was true for Southern Canada (P < 0.001). Compared with women aged 40-54 years, the adjusted odds ratio for diabetes was 3.31 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-10.4] for women aged 55-69 years and 6.39 (95%CI 1.42-22.8) for women aged 70+ years living in Northern Canada. The corresponding odds ratios for men living in Northern Canada were 1.58 (95%CI 0.53-4.71) and 4.30 (95%CI 0.81-22.9), respectively. The prevalence of obesity was higher for women (28.2%) than men (22.5%) in Northern Canada (P = 0.041). Conclusions: The gender and age distribution of diabetes is unusual in Northern Canada, where the prevalence increases with age more rapidly in women than in men. Further study is required in order to gain an understanding of the possible genetic, cultural and other reasons for this pattern. © 2009 The Royal Society for Public Health.

DOI 10.1016/j.puhe.2009.10.016
Citations Scopus - 2
2009 Wright SL, Canetto SS, 'Stereotypes of older lesbians and gay men', Educational Gerontology, 35 424-452 (2009)

This study examined stereotypes of older lesbians and gay men. Key findings are that older lesbians and gay men were perceived as similar to older heterosexual women and men with ... [more]

This study examined stereotypes of older lesbians and gay men. Key findings are that older lesbians and gay men were perceived as similar to older heterosexual women and men with regard to aging stereotypes, such as being judicious. At the same time, sexual minorities were targets of unique stereotypes. Consistent with the implicit inversion theory, lesbians were conceived as similar to heterosexual men, and gay men similar to heterosexual women with regard to gender-stereotypic traits, and regardless of age. These findings suggest the persistence into late adulthood of the belief that lesbians and gay men are inverted females and males. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/03601270802505640
Citations Scopus - 7
2009 Meyer C, Arcelus J, Wright S, 'Accuracy of self-reported weight and height among women with eating disorders: A replication and extension study', European Eating Disorders Review, 17 366-370 (2009)

Objective: Self-reported height and weight data are commonly reported within eating disorders research, and often used clinically. The aims of this study are to demonstrate the ac... [more]

Objective: Self-reported height and weight data are commonly reported within eating disorders research, and often used clinically. The aims of this study are to demonstrate the accuracy of self-reported height and weight among a group of women with eating disorders, and to determine whether that accuracy is associated with clinical diagnosis or levels of eating psychopathology. Method: Sixty-four female patients (39 diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa or atypical Anorexia Nervosa and 25 with Bulimia Nervosa or atypical Bulimia Nervosa) were asked to self-report their height and weight. They then completed the Eating Disorders Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Finally, they were weighed and their height was measured in a standardised manner. Accuracy scores for height and weight were calculated by subtracting their actual weight and height from their self-reports. Results: Both diagnostic groups were relatively accurate in self-reporting their height. However, women with Bulimia Nervosa or atypical Bulimia Nervosa significantly underestimated their weight while women with Anorexia Nervosa or atypical Anorexia Nervosa overestimated it. Weight estimation was associated with higher levels of restraint among the Anorexia Nervosa group only. Discussion: These findings highlight the importance of obtaining objective height and weight data both within clinical and research settings. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

DOI 10.1002/erv.950
Citations Scopus - 12
2009 Wright SL, Langenecker SA, Deldin PJ, Rapport LJ, Nielson KA, Kade AM, et al., 'Gender-specific disruptions in emotion processing in younger adults with depression', Depression and Anxiety, 26 182-189 (2009)

Background: One of the principal theories regarding the biological basis of major depressive disorder(MDD)implicates a dysregulation of emotion- processing circuitry. Gender diffe... [more]

Background: One of the principal theories regarding the biological basis of major depressive disorder(MDD)implicates a dysregulation of emotion- processing circuitry. Gender differences in how emotions are processed and relative experience with emotion processing might help to explain some ofthe disparities in the prevalence of MDD between women and men. This study sought to explore how gender and depression status relate to emotion processing. Methods: This study employed a 2(MDD status)× 2(gender)factorial design to explore differences in classifications ofposed facial emotional expressions(N = 151). Results: For errors, there was an interaction between gender and depression status. Women with MDD made more errors than did nondepressed women and men with MDD, particularly for fearful and sad stimuli(Ps < .02), which they were likely to misinterpret as angry(Ps < 04). There was also an interaction ofdiagnosis and gender for response cost for negative stimuli, with significantly greater interference from negative faces present in women with MDD compared to nondepressed women(P =.01). Men with MDD, conversely, performed similarly to control men(P =.61). Conclusions: These results provide novel and intriguing evidence that depression in younger adults( < 35 years)differentially disrupts emotion processing in women as compared to men. This interaction could be driven by neurobiological and social learning mechanisms, or interactions between them, and may underlie differences in the prevalence of depression in women and men. Depression and Anxiety. © 2008 Wiley-hiss, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/da.20502
Citations Scopus - 32
2009 Wright SL, Suchet-Pearson S, Lloyd K, Burarrwanga LL, Burarrwanga D, ''That means the fish are fat': Sharing experiences of animals through Indigenous-owned tourism', Current Issues in Tourism, 12 505-527 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13683500903042907
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
2008 Wright SL, 'Locating a politics of knowledge: Struggles over intellectual property in the Philippines', Australian Geographer, 39 409-426 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/00049180802419104
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
2008 Wright SL, 'Globalizing governance: The case of intellectual property rights in the Philippines', Political Geography, 27 721-739 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.polgeo.2008.08.004
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 6
2007 Wright S, Goldman B, Beresin N, 'Three essentials for successful fall management: Communication, policies and procedures, and teamwork', Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 33 42-48 (2007)

Falls among older adults, especially within the nursing home setting, can be challenging for health care providers. Attention to the basic processes of communication, policy and p... [more]

Falls among older adults, especially within the nursing home setting, can be challenging for health care providers. Attention to the basic processes of communication, policy and procedure, and teamwork proved to be necessary steps to facilitate successful fall management within this pilot program. This article provides an overview of the specified areas, along with examples of techniques developed to address identified needs in each of the three areas. A focused examination of these three essentials could prove instructive to any facility working to improve its fall management process.

Citations Scopus - 9
2007 Wright SL, Persad C, 'Distinguishing between depression and dementia in older persons: Neuropsychological and neuropathological correlates', Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 20 189-198 (2007)

Dementia and depression are frequently comorbid among older adult patients. Depression is related to cognitive decrement and can even represent the first signs of a neurodegenerat... [more]

Dementia and depression are frequently comorbid among older adult patients. Depression is related to cognitive decrement and can even represent the first signs of a neurodegenerative process. It can be difficult to distinguish depressed patients exhibiting the first signs of dementia from those whose cognition will improve with treatment. In this article, studies from the neuropsychological literature are reviewed that aid in accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Furthermore, the relationship between depression and dementia is explored by examining potential neurobiological mechanisms that may potentiate both syndromes in the context of the ongoing debate on depression as a prodrome and/or a risk factor for dementia. This article is concluded with suggestions for clinicians when deciding who to refer for neuropsychological assessment and with ideas for further research that might promote a better understanding of the complex association between depression and dementia during old age. © 2007 Sage Publication.

DOI 10.1177/0891988707308801
Citations Scopus - 81
2007 Roberts SM, Wright SL, O'Neill P, 'Good governance in the Pacific? Ambivalence and possibility', Geoforum, 38 967-984 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.geoforum.2007.04.003
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
2007 Wright SL, Suchet-Pearson S, Lloyd K, 'An interwoven learning exchange: Transforming research-teaching relationships in the top end, Northern Australia', Geographical Research, 45 150-157 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1745-5871.2007.00444.x
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 13
2006 Wright SL, Burt CDB, Strongman KT, 'Loneliness in the workplace: Construct definition and scale development', New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 35 59-68 (2006)

This paper describes the conceptual development and validation of a scale to measure loneliness in the workplace. Despite extensive literature on loneliness and the measurement of... [more]

This paper describes the conceptual development and validation of a scale to measure loneliness in the workplace. Despite extensive literature on loneliness and the measurement of the phenomenon, the issue of assessing worker loneliness is not well researched. A 16-item self-report loneliness scale was developed for intended use in the workplace. Two separate studies were conducted to examine the reliability and validity of the scale. For each study participants were recruited by email and completed the scale via a website published on the internet. The first study included 514 employees, while the second study included 363 employees, each representing various occupational groups. Exploratory factor analysis using oblique rotation generated two factors representing emotional deprivation at work and social companionship at work. On a subsequent sample, confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the two-factor structure by demonstrating a significantly better fit than a single-factor structure. The results indicate the scale has good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Preliminary evidence for convergent and discriminant validity is also provided.

Citations Scopus - 17
2005 Wright SL, 'Knowing scale: intelle@tual property rights, knowledge spaces and the production of the global', Social & Cultural Geography, 6 903-921 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14649360500353350
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
2002 Wright S, 'Antipode Graduate Student Scholarship', Antipode, 34(1): 151-54, 151-154 (2002) [C1]
2002 Wright S, 'Focus on the CGIAR: Public-private partnerships (2002) [C1]
2000 Fannin M, Fort S, Marley J, Miller J, Wright S, 'The battle in Seattle: A response from local geographers in the midst of the WTO Ministerial', Antipode. 32(3): 215-221, 215-221 (2000) [C1]
Show 57 more journal articles

Conference (47 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Mee KJ, Wright S, 'Indigenising the curriculum', Institute of Australian Geographers Program, ANU, Canberra (2015)
Co-authors Kathy Mee
2014 Wright SL, Tofa M, Bawaka C, Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr R, Ganambarr B, et al., 'Meaningful transformations with Country at Bawaka, north east Arnhem Land', Conference Abstracts, The University of Melbourne (2014) [E3]
2014 Wright SL, 'Critical Development Panel', Conference abstracts, The University of Melbourne (2014)
2014 Wright SL, 'Hope and hopelessness in resistance movements: Land reform in the Philippines', Conference abstracts, The University of Melbourne. (2014) [E3]
2014 Wright SL, Lloyd K, Bawaka C, Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr R, Ganambarr M, et al., 'Welcome to My Country', Conference abstracts, Newcastle City Hall (2014)
2013 Wright SL, Bawaka C, Lloyd K, Suchet Pearson S, Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr R, et al., 'Decentering human author-ity: Working with and learning from Country', Conference abstracts, University of Sydney (2013) [E3]
2013 Wright SL, Bawaka C, Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr R, Ganambarr M, Ganambarr B, et al., 'Working with and learning from Country', Seminar Abstract, University of Newcastle (2013) [E3]
2013 Wright SL, Lloyd K, Suchet- Pearson S, Bawaka C, Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr R, et al., 'Caring as Country: towards an ontology of co-becoming in environmental management, development studies and into the educational sphere', Seminar Abstract, Macquarie University (2013) [E3]
2012 Wright SL, 'Discussant: Balancing parenting and academia: individual concerns and micro-level strategies', Conference abstracts, Inspiring Connections, Macquarie University, Sydney (2012) [E3]
2012 Wright SL, Bawaka country, Burarrwanga L, Ganambarr M, Ganambarr B, Maymuru D, et al., 'Voices of country: Working with and learning from Country', IAG Conference 2012, Macquarie University, Sydney (2012) [E3]
2012 Wright SL, Lloyd S, Suchet-Pearson S, 'Reflecting on our academic collaboration as working as a pack.', Proceedings, IAG Conference, Macquarie University, Sydney (2012) [E3]
2012 Wright SL, Hodge P, Mozeley F, 'Transformative student learning in the Northern Territory ¿ lessons for WIL in cross-cultural settings.', 2012 Engagement Australia Conference Proceedings Next Steps: Community Engaged Learning, QUT, Brisbane (2012) [E3]
2011 Lloyd K, Wright SL, Suchet-Pearson S, Burarrwanga L, ''We're a part of it': Knowledge making and cosmos nurturing with Bawaka country, North East Arnhem Land', Institute of Australian Geographers Conference 2011 Abstracts, Wollongong (2011) [E3]
2011 Suchet-Pearson S, Lloyd K, Wright SL, Burarrwanga L, ''Nature, the land, can understand': Yolngu country, more-than-human agency and situated engagement in natural resource management', Institute of Australian Geographers Conference 2011 Abstracts, Wollongong (2011) [E3]
2011 Wright SL, 'Amid hope, despair, joy and anger: Emotional experiences of land reform in the Philippines', Institute of Australian Geographers Conference 2011 Abstracts, Wollongong (2011) [E3]
2011 Fisher K, Baker T, Instone LH, Mee KJ, McGuirk PM, Sherval M, et al., 'Kitchen stories: An introduction to the Situated Knowledge Production Sessions', Institute of Australian Geographers Conference Abstracts, Wollongong (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Kathy Mee, Lesley Instone, Meg Sherval
2011 Lewis N, Baker T, Instone LH, Mee KJ, McGuirk PM, Sherval M, et al., 'Journeying towards propositions about situated knowledge practices', Institute of Australian Geographers Conference Abstracts, Wollongong (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Meg Sherval, Lesley Instone, Kathy Mee
2010 Wright SL, Suchet-Pearson S, Lloyd K, Burarrwanga L, Tofa M, 'Telling stories in, through and with country: Engaging with Indigenous and more-than-human methodologies at Bawaka, NE Australia', Proceedings of the American Association of Geographers Conference, Washington DC (2010) [E3]
2010 Wright SL, lloyd K, Suchet-Pearson S, 'Development Studies and Indigenous-academic research collaboration in Australia', Proceedings of the Development Studies in the Antipodes: Current Research and Praxis: An International Expert Symposium, Flinders University, Adelaide (2010) [E3]
2010 Wright SL, Lloyd S, Suchet-Pearson S, Burarrwanga L, Maymuru D, 'Patterns of belonging at Bawaka, North East Arnhem Land: documenting and communicating Yolngu Hidden Mathematics to care for, and be cared for by, country', Proceedings,, Christchurch, New Zealand. (2010) [E3]
2010 Wright SL, 'Emotional Geographies of Development', Proceedings of Development Studies in the Antipodes: Current Research and Praxis: An International Expert Symposium, Flinders University, Adelaide (2010) [E3]
2009 Suchet-Pearson S, Wright SL, Lloyd K, Burarrwanga LL, Burarrwanga D, 'Reimagining relationships between people, animals and place through Indigenous-owned tourism: A case study of Bawaka cultural experiences, North East Arnhem Land, Australia', Minding Animals 2009: Oral Presentation Abstracts, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
2009 Wright SL, Hall N, Switzer M, Lloyd K, Suchet-Pearson S, Maymuru D, 'Holding it together: The integration of fibre arts and tourism in northern Australia', Proceedings,, Canberra (2009) [E3]
2009 Wright SL, 'Community centred food economies: A case study of Masipag, Philippines', Proceedings, International Community Development Conference, Brisbane, Australia. (2009) [E3]
2009 Muller S, Power ER, Suchet-Pearson S, Wright S, Lloyd K, '"Quarantine matters!": quotidian relationships around quarantine in Australia's northern borderlands', ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING A (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1068/a40196
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2008 Lloyd K, Suchet-Pearson S, Wright SL, Burarrwanga LL, 'Weaving and working together: Collaborative fieldwork narratives in North East Arnhem Land, Australia', -, Arras, France (2008) [E3]
2008 Wright SL, Suchet-Pearson S, Lloyd K, Burarrwanga LL, 'Weaving together: Participation and change in North East Arnhem Land, Australia', Connecting People, Participation & Place: An International Conference of Participatory Geographies: Conference Paper Abstracts, Durham, UK (2008) [E3]
2008 Wright SL, 'Building networks of food sovereignty in South and Southeast Asia', ISA '08 Proceedings, San Francisco, CA (2008) [E2]
2008 Barraket J, Carey G, Melville R, Richardson S, Scott M, Wright SL, 'Universities as civic institutions: The impacts of practice-based learning exchange on students, third sector organizations and academic staff', ISTR 2008: Conference Abstracts, Barcelona, Spain (2008) [E3]
2008 Wright SL, 'Food sovereignty and an ontology of proliferation', Proceedings, Symposium on Private Governance in the Agro-Food System, Munster, Germany (2008)
2007 Wright SL, 'Extra-territoriality and the politics of intellectual property', 2007 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers. Meeting Program, San Francisco, USA (2007) [E3]
2007 Suchert-Pearson S, Wright SL, Lloyd K, 'Stories of crossings and connections in Bawaka, North-East Arnhemland', Abstracts - Contemporary Geography for Australia. Institute of Australian Geographers Conference, Melbourne, VIC (2007) [E3]
2007 Wright SL, Lloyd K, Suchet-Pearson S, 'Weaving baskets, weaving stories together in North Australia: reflections on the process of joint authorship', Proceedings, IGU Commission on Indigenous Peoples¿ Knowledge and Rights, Taipei, Taiwan (2007)
2007 Wright SL, Suchet-Pearson S, Lloyd K, 'Educational tourism and learning exchanges with Indigenous tour operators in the Northern Territory', Proceedings of the 17th Annual CAUTHE Conference, Manly, NSW (2007) [E1]
2007 Lloyd K, Suchet-Pearson S, Wright SL, 'Decentring Fortress Australia: Borderland geographies as relational spaces', Proceedings of the ARCRNSISS Methodology, Tools and Techniques and Spatial Theory Paradigm Forums Workshop, Newcastle, Australia (2007) [E1]
2006 Roberts S, Wright S, O''Neill P, 'Good Governance in the Pacific: An Examination of Process and Meaning', Abstracts, International Geographical Union Regional Conference, Brisbane, Australia (2006) [E1]
2006 O''Neill P, Wright S, Roberts S, 'Competing views of the Pacific island economies', International Geographical Union Conference, Brisbane, Australia (2006) [E1]
2006 Wright S, Suchet-Pearson S, Lloyd K, 'Learning exchanges in Australia's northern borderlands: reciprocity, mutuality and ethical approaches to research and teaching', International Geographical Union Regional Conference, Brisbane, Australia (2006) [E1]
2005 Suchet-Pearson S, Lloye K, Wright SL, 'Borderland geographies: the excision of Melville Island in policy and practice', Abstracts, UNE, Armidale, Australia (2005) [E3]
2005 Wright SL, 'Weaving a Globalization from below', Edited Volume of Proceedings Cuerta Conferencia Internacional de Geografia Critica, Mexico City, Mexico (2005) [E2]
2004 Wright S, 'Harvesting knowledge: the contested terrain of intellectual property rights in the Philippines', Abstracts, Institute of Australian Geographers Conference, Stamford Grand Hotel, Glenelg, Australia (2004) [E1]
2003 Wright SL, 'Strategies for food security: putting biotech industry claims in context', Proceedings, Symposium on Genetic Engineering and GMOs, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Philippines (2003)
2002 Wright S, 'Action research methods in the Social Sciences', Abstracts, First National Peasants-Scientists Conference, UPLB College, Laguna, Philippines (2002) [E1]
2002 Wright S, 'Seeds of dissent: Intellectual property rights, rice and globalization in the Philippines', Abstracts, Social Science Research Council fellows meeting, Moscow, Russia (2002) [E1]
2001 Wright S, 'Gardening for the revolution: urban food production, space and knowledge in post Soviet era Cuba', Abstracts, American Association of Geographers, New York (2001)
2001 Wright SL, 'Seeds of Dissent: Intellectual Property Rights, Rice and Globalization in the Philippines.', Proceedings, Land Institute Symposium, Kansas, USA. (2001)
2000 Wright SL, 'More World, Less Bank: Movement, movement and the movement in Seattle and Washington DC', Abstracts, The International Critical Geographers Website, Taegu, South Korea (2000)
Show 44 more conferences

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2009 Barraket J, Melville R, Wright SL, Scott M, Richardson S, Carey G, et al., 'Engaging with learning: Understanding the impact of practice based learning exchange', Australian Learning and Teaching Council, 47 (2009) [R1]
Co-authors Paul Hodge

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Rich JL, The nature of things: An Interdisciplinary Investigation Into The Experiences and Impacts of Drought For Three Generations Of Australian Women, University of Newcastle (2014)
Co-authors Jane Rich
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 27
Total funding $1,991,036

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20172 grants / $133,250

DVC(RI) Research Support for Future Fellowship (FT16)$91,800

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Sarah Wright
Scheme Future Fellowship Support
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2024
GNo G1700428
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Building resilience in agri-food systems in Asia through sustainable and equitable practices (Asia)$41,450

Funding body: Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Funding body Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Project Team Doctor Sarah Wright, Dr Jagit Plahe, Gavin Jack
Scheme Australia Awards Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700920
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

20162 grants / $1,337,924

Weather cultures: Enhancing adaptive capacity to environmental change$950,354

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Sarah Wright
Scheme Future Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1600665
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Caring for Country: Geographies of Co-existence in Urban and Rural Areas$387,570

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Sarah Wright, Doctor Paul Hodge
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1501170
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20151 grants / $9,914

Caring for Country in urban and rural settings – towards effective geographies of co-existence$9,914

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Sarah Wright, Doctor Paul Hodge
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501142
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20141 grants / $72,000

Closing other gaps: Yolngu perspectives on and proposals for two-ways learning to improve intercultural communication and policy$72,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Dr Sandie Suchet-Pearson, Doctor Sarah Wright, Dr Kate Lloyd
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1400516
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20131 grants / $25,000

Two-ways learning as a foundation for inter-cultural communication: Yol?u challenges to dominant frameworks (9201201083)$25,000

Funding body: Macquarie University

Funding body Macquarie University
Project Team

Dr Sandra Suchet-Pearson

Scheme MU Safety Net
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20112 grants / $16,730

A case of apples and oranges? Can learning in one Indigenous community be applied to policy and programs in other communities?$10,000

Funding body Unknown
Project Team

Sarah Wright

Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Cross-cultural learning through WIL in the Northern Territory$6,730

Funding body Unknown
Project Team

Sarah Wright

Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20101 grants / $10,000

Strategic support to enhance collaborations and grants performances$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Prof PAULINE McGuirk, Associate Professor Jenny Cameron, Doctor Lesley Instone, Associate Professor Kathleen Mee, Doctor Meg Sherval, Doctor Sarah Wright
Scheme Special Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000678
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20094 grants / $45,263

Places of Crossing and Connection in Australia’s Northern Border Region$19,853

Funding body: Macquarie University

Funding body Macquarie University
Project Team

Dr Kate Lloyd

Scheme MU Safety Net
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Places of crossing and connection in Australia's northern border region$10,000

Funding body: Macquarie University

Funding body Macquarie University
Project Team

Sarah Wright

Scheme MU Safety Net
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Re-imagining Australia's northern borderlands$9,410

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Sarah Wright
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190551
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Weaving Lives Together$6,000

Funding body: Arts NT

Funding body Arts NT
Project Team

Dr Kate Lloyd

Scheme Small grants scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20081 grants / $19,734

Places of Crossing and Connection in Australia’s Northern Border Region$19,734

This project advances understandings of Australia's northern border region by investigating historical and contemporary links between norther Australia and the Indonesian archipelago. It maps key material, cultural and information flows and reconsiders the roles that borders play in creating and maintaining social identity at different scales.

Funding body: Macquarie University

Funding body Macquarie University
Project Team

Dr Sandra Suchet-Pearson

Scheme MU Safety Net
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20072 grants / $36,981

Engaging with learning: understanding the impacts of practice based learning exchange$35,281

Funding body: Australian Learning and Teaching Council

Funding body Australian Learning and Teaching Council
Project Team Doctor Sarah Wright
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188469
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

2007 Annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers (AAG), Hilton, San Francisco, USA, 17/4/2207 - 21/4/2007$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Sarah Wright
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187630
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20061 grants / $740

International Georgraphical Union 2006 Brisbane Conference and joint meeting of the Institute of Australian Georaphers and the New Zealand Georgraphical Society 3-7 July 2006$740

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Sarah Wright
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186623
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20054 grants / $163,500

Urban Research Development Project$150,000

Funding body: Newcastle Innovation

Funding body Newcastle Innovation
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip O'Neill, Prof PAULINE McGuirk, Associate Professor Kathleen Mee, Associate Professor Kevin Markwell, Doctor Sarah Wright, Associate Professor Salim Momtaz
Scheme Administered Research
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0187935
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Tourism and identity in Australia's northern borderlands$9,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Sarah Wright
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185532
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

International Conference of Critical Geography, 8-12 January 2005, Mexico$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Sarah Wright
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0184950
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Intellectual Property Rights and food security$2,000

Funding body: Social Science Research Council (SSRC), USA

Funding body Social Science Research Council (SSRC), USA
Project Team

Sarah Wright

Scheme Dissemination of research results
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

20041 grants / $15,000

Reducing conflict over land in the Philippines$15,000

Funding body: Social Science Research Council (SSRC), USA

Funding body Social Science Research Council (SSRC), USA
Project Team

Sarah Wright

Scheme Award - Global Secuirty and Cooperation (competitive grant scheme)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

20021 grants / $85,000

Fellowship, Program on Global Security and Cooperation$85,000

Funding body: Social Sciences Research Council

Funding body Social Sciences Research Council
Project Team

Sarah Wright

Scheme Fellowship, Program on Global Security and Cooperation
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

20013 grants / $20,000

Intellectual Property Rights, Rice and Globalization in the Philippines$10,000

Funding body: Institute for the Study of World Politics

Funding body Institute for the Study of World Politics
Project Team

Sarah Wright

Scheme Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2002
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Small research award for conducting substantial dissertation research$5,000

Funding body: Northwest Consortium for Southeast Asian Studies

Funding body Northwest Consortium for Southeast Asian Studies
Project Team

Sarah Wright

Scheme Small research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Social and ethical implications of biotechnology in the Philippines$5,000

Funding body: University of Washington

Funding body University of Washington
Project Team

Sarah Wright

Scheme Chester Fritz Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed5
Current3

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.4

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2011 PhD Critical and Social Movement Relevant Research with Autonomy-Oriented Social Movements PhD (Human Geography), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2010 PhD Food Sovreignty: Lineaments of Non-Capitalist Economies PhD (Human Geography), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
1998 PhD Governance of Labour Practices in the Production Networks of Transnational Corporations: the Case of Nike Inc. Human Geography, University of Newcastle Sole Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2014 PhD Emotional Orientalisms: A Postcolonial Study of Emotions in HIV and AIDS Development Work in PNG PhD (Human Geography), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD The Nature of Things: An Interdisciplinary Investigation Into the Experiences and Impacts of Drought For Three Generations of Australian Women PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD Post-human Geographies of the Southern Ocean PhD (Human Geography), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2009 PhD Development Discourse and the Postcolonial Challenge - The Case of Fiji's Aid Industry PhD (Human Geography), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2008 PhD Rewriting the Rules - The Anti-Sweatshop Movement; Nike, Reebok and Adidas' Participation in Voluntary Labour Regulation; and Workers' Rights to Form Trade Unions and Bargain Collectively PhD (Human Geography), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Sole Supervisor
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News

Food Security Research Partnerships Strengthened by International Fellows Visit

July 28, 2017

Dr Sarah Wright facilitated an international fellows visit for the Centre for Urban and Regional Studies (CURS) at UON’s Callaghan campus on July 4th.

Australian Research Council Funding Success

November 1, 2016

15 UON projects have been awarded over $5.7 million in ARC funding for Discovery Projects, Future Fellowships and Discovery Early Career Researcher Awards.
Sarah Wright

UON attracts over $5.7 million in ARC funding to support future research

November 1, 2016

Including a prestigious ARC Future Fellowship for $930,000 awarded to Associate Professor Sarah Wright.

Dr Sarah Wright

Position

Future Fellow
Development Studies
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Focus area

Geography and Environmental Studies

Contact Details

Email sarah.wright@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7157
Fax (02) 4921 5877

Office

Room SRR 216
Building Social Sciences.
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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