Dr Phoebe Everingham

Dr Phoebe Everingham

Casual Academic

Newcastle Business School

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Phoebe Everingham is an early career researcher at the University of Newcastle. She has a multidisciplinary background in sociology, anthropology, human geography, tourism studies and management. Her research expertise is focused on sustainable development, particularly tourism and she is committed to working towards tourism models underpinned by social and ecological justice.

Phoebe has experience working with not for profit and non-government organisations in Peru, Ecuador and Australia. Her PhD focused on volunteer tourism, highlighting the problematic aspects of neo-colonial development practices that stereotype host communities as ‘backward’ and needy’. Her research focuses on the importance of mutual intercultural exchange and understanding and community led development. Phoebe believes that working towards sustainable and equitable futures involves learning from different cultural practices and worldviews.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Human Geography, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Intercultural exchange
  • Organisational management
  • Responsible Tourism
  • emotions and affect

Languages

  • Portuguese (Working)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
500302 Critical theory 50
470209 Environment and culture 30
440107 Social and cultural anthropology 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
Newcastle Business School
Australia
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
Newcastle Business School
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (11 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Everingham P, Chassagne N, 'Post COVID-19 ecological and social reset: moving away from capitalist growth models towards tourism as Buen Vivir', Tourism Geographies, 22 555-566 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14616688.2020.1762119
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
2020 Everingham P, 'Book review: Joseph M. Cheer, Leigh Mathews, Kathryn E. van Doore and Karen Flanagan (eds), Modern Day Slavery and Orphanage Tourism (CABI, Wallingford, UK and Boston, MA, USA 2019) 184 pp.', Journal of Qualitative Research in Tourism, 1 138-140 (2020)
DOI 10.4337/jqrt.2020.01.10
2020 Everingham P, Motta SC, 'Decolonising the 'autonomy of affect' in volunteer tourism encounters', TOURISM GEOGRAPHIES, (2020)
DOI 10.1080/14616688.2020.1713879
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Sara C Motta
2019 Chassagne N, Everingham P, 'Buen Vivir: Degrowing extractivism and growing wellbeing through tourism', Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 27 1909-1925 (2019) [C1]

© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Buen Vivir (BV) is a holistic vision for social and environmental wellbeing, which includes alternative... [more]

© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Buen Vivir (BV) is a holistic vision for social and environmental wellbeing, which includes alternative economic activities to the neoliberal growth economy. This article looks at how tourism initiatives under a BV approach can lead to degrowth by drawing on a case study of how BV is put into practice through tourism in the Cotacachi County in Ecuador. We argue that by degrowing socially and environmentally damaging extractive sectors and growing alternative economic activities like community-based tourism, a BV approach could increase social and environmental wellbeing. We refer to LaTouche¿s notion of degrowth as a matrix of multiple alternatives that will reopen the space for human creativity. This complements the notion of BV as a plural approach, and in turn works to decolonise the parameters of how we might understand degrowth. In the case of Cotacachi, the vision for tourism is based on the needs of the community, rather than to satisfy a Eurocentric ideal of development supported by a policy of extractivism. BV is key to how this community conceptualises the potentialities of tourism because it considers the wellbeing of the people and the environment. In this case, degrowth is a consequence of BV, rather than the objective.

DOI 10.1080/09669582.2019.1660668
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2018 Everingham P, 'Speaking Spanglish: Embodying linguistic (b)orderlands in volunteer tourism', Emotion, Space and Society, 27 68-74 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.emospa.2018.04.001
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2017 Young TN, Wearing S, Everingham P, 'Evaluating volunteer tourism: has it made a difference?', Tourism Recreation Research, 42 512-521 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02508281.2017.1345470
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Tamara Young
2016 Everingham P, 'Hopeful possibilities in spaces of "the-not-yet-become': relational encounters in volunteer tourism', TOURISM GEOGRAPHIES, 18 520-538 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14616688.2016.1220974
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
2015 Everingham P, 'Intercultural exchange and mutuality in volunteer tourism: The case of intercambio in Ecuador', Tourist Studies, 15 175-190 (2015) [C1]

Volunteer tourism has been criticised for promoting neo-colonial discourses of development aid. To date, there is a dearth of research into organisations that do not overtly posit... [more]

Volunteer tourism has been criticised for promoting neo-colonial discourses of development aid. To date, there is a dearth of research into organisations that do not overtly position themselves within a development aid context. This article draws on ethnographic research within a small-scale organisation in Ecuador, Fundacion Arte del Mundo, which promotes the creative arts, intercultural learning and mutuality as core to its volunteerism. This article highlights the benefits and potentialities of emphasising such intercultural learning exchanges and suggests that the predominance of development aid discourses, both in the practice and critiques of volunteer tourism can obscure a more serious engagement with such examples of learning and mutuality as constitutive of a less paternalistic volunteer tourism. The article argues that the experiences evident in the volunteerism of Fundacion Arte del Mundo at times actively subvert and decentre neo-colonial binaries and power differentials that often underpin exchanges between volunteers and the local community. By drawing attention to experiences of intercultural learning and mutuality, the article serves to shift the framing of discussion and practices of volunteer tourism away from those which consistently draw on neo-colonial binaries as the reference point of analysis and in doing so reify their interpretive power. © 2014, SAGE Publications. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1177/1468797614563435
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 27
2012 Everingham P, 'Teaching English as voluntary tourism: Intercultural communication and the 'third space'', The Global Studies Journal, 4 39-47 (2012) [C1]
Everingham P, Obrador P, Tucker H, 'Trajectories of embodiment in Tourist Studies', Tourist Studies, 146879762199030-146879762199030
DOI 10.1177/1468797621990300
Johnson PC, Everingham C, Everingham P, 'The juggernaut effect: community resistance and the politics of urban motor-racing events', Annals of Leisure Research, 1-23
DOI 10.1080/11745398.2020.1818590
Co-authors Patricia Johnson
Show 8 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2006 London KA, Everingham P, 'Ethical Behaviour in the Construction Procurement Process', Cooperative Research Centre for Construction Innovation (2006) [D1]

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2006 London KA, Everingham P, Bavinton NJ, 'A Reflexive Capability Model for Sustainable E-business Environments in Construction Supply Chains', Cooperative Research Centre for Construction Innovation: Second International Conference, Gold Coast, Australia (2006) [E1]
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Dr Phoebe Everingham

Position

Casual Academic
GradSchool
Newcastle Business School
College of Human and Social Futures

Contact Details

Email phoebe.everingham@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 0421982593
Mobile 0421982593

Office

Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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