Mr Md Mijanur Rahman

Mr Md Mijanur Rahman

Research student

Career Summary

Biography

My research background is multi-disciplinary with a mixture of statistics, gerontology, and public health. I am interested in modeling the ageing experience of older people and their health service utilization. I am also interested in applying different statistical techniques in all areas of medical and health research, for example, clinical trial and intervention, and prospective longitudinal research. I have enough experience of teaching in statistics, leading an academic department, and managing project on higher education quality enhancement. I have published 14 articles in the different international peer-reviewed journals.

I am currently a Ph.D. candidate in Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Statistics at the Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle. Beyond my Ph.D., I have two different casual-appointments with the same institute (Statistics Assistant and Research Assistant). I am also an Associate Professor (on study leave) of Statistics in Comilla University, Bangladesh. I received MSc in Gerontology in 2014 from the University of Southampton, United Kingdom. Prior to that, I passed BSc and MSc in Statistics from the University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.

My Ph.D. project title is Modelling Trajectories to Aged Care Service Use among Older Australian Women”. This project contributes a sound understanding of the system for delivering of aged care services according to clients changing needs over time, identifying risk factors of using different levels of services, estimating length of stay at each level of service use, predicting probabilities of transitioning into and through entire aged care system, and forecasting care needs for the people of future cohorts.


Keywords

  • Aged care
  • Epidemiology
  • Health service research
  • Healthcare modelling
  • Multi-state modelling
  • Population ageing
  • Public health
  • Statistical modelling
  • Survival analysis

Languages

  • Bengali (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
010402 Biostatistics 50
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 30
110308 Geriatrics and Gerontology 20

Professional Experience

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
28/05/2018 -  Associate professor

I am currently on study leave to undertake a Ph.D. in Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Statistics

Comilla University
Department of Statistics
Bangladesh
24/11/2010 - 27/05/2018 Assistant professor Comilla University
Department of Statistics
Bangladesh
1/02/2005 - 23/11/2010 Lecturer of Statistics Dhaka City College
Department of Statistics
Bangladesh
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Rahman M, Efird JT, Byles JE, 'Patterns of aged care use among older Australian women: A prospective cohort study using linked data', Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 81 39-47 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Background: Women live longer than men and have an increased need for long-term care. The objective of this study was to identify patterns of aged care use among older Aust... [more]

© 2018 Background: Women live longer than men and have an increased need for long-term care. The objective of this study was to identify patterns of aged care use among older Australian women and to examine how these patterns were associated with their demographic and health-related characteristics. Methods: The sample consisted of 8768 women from the 1921¿1926 birth cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), who had survived to age 75-80 years. ALSWH survey and linked administrative aged care and death datasets from 2001 to 2011 were utilized. Patterns of aged care use were identified using a repeated measure latent class analysis. Results: We identified four patterns of aged care use over time, differentiated by timing of service onset, types of service use and time of death. Approximately 41% of the sample were non-users or using basic home and community care (HACC), while 24% were at high risk of using moderate to high-level HACC/community aged care package (CACP). Only 11% had a greater risk of using residential aged care (RAC) over time. Being widowed, residing in remote/regional areas, having difficulty in managing income, having a chronic condition, reporting poor/fair self-rated health, and lower SF-36 quality of life scores were associated with an increased odds of being a member of the following classes: 1) moderate to high-level HACC/CACP, 2) increasing RAC, and 3) early mortality, compared with the non-user class. Conclusions: Distinct patterns of aged care use were identified. These results will facilitate future capacity planning for aged care systems in Australia.

DOI 10.1016/j.archger.2018.11.010
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Julie Byles
2019 Sayers E, Rich J, Rahman MM, Kelly B, James C, 'Does Help Seeking Behavior Change Over Time Following a Workplace Mental Health Intervention in the Coal Mining Industry?', J Occup Environ Med, 61 e282-e290 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001605
Co-authors Carole James, Jane Rich, Brian Kelly
2019 Rahman M, Efird JT, Kendig H, Byles JE, 'Patterns of home and community care use among older participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women s Health', European Journal of Ageing, 16 293-303 (2019) [C1]

© 2019, Springer Nature B.V. The aims of this study were to investigate patterns of home and community care (HACC) use and to identify factors influencing first HACC use among old... [more]

© 2019, Springer Nature B.V. The aims of this study were to investigate patterns of home and community care (HACC) use and to identify factors influencing first HACC use among older Australian women. Our analysis included 11,133 participants from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women¿s Health (1921¿1926 birth cohort) linked with HACC use and mortality data from 2001 to 2011. Patterns of HACC use were analysed using a k-median cluster approach. A multivariable competing risk analysis was used to estimate the risk of first HACC use. Approximately 54% of clients used a minimum volume and number of HACC services; 25% belonged to three complex care use clusters (referring to higher volume and number of services), while the remainder were intermediate users. The¿initiation of HACC use was significantly associated with (1) living in remote/inner/regional areas, (2) being widowed or divorced, (3) having difficulty in managing income, (4) not receiving Veterans¿ Affairs benefits, (5) having chronic conditions, (6) reporting lower scores on the SF-36 health-related quality of life, and (7) poor/fair self-rated health. Our findings highlight the importance of providing a range of services to meet the diverse care needs of older women, especially in the community setting.

DOI 10.1007/s10433-018-0495-y
Co-authors Julie Byles
2018 Khan MN, Islam MM, Rahman MM, 'Inequality in utilization of cesarean delivery in Bangladesh: a decomposition analysis using nationally representative data', Public Health, 157 111-120 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The Royal Society for Public Health Objective: This study examined the inequality in cesarean section (CS) utilization and its socio-economic contributors. Study design: Re... [more]

© 2018 The Royal Society for Public Health Objective: This study examined the inequality in cesarean section (CS) utilization and its socio-economic contributors. Study design: Retrospective two-stage stratified sample design. Methods: Data were extracted from two rounds of the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey conducted in 2004 and 2014. Concentration Index of CS utilization was calculated using the wealth quintile. Regression-based decomposition method was applied to assess the socio-economic contributors of inequality in CS utilization. Results: The rate of CS utilization increased from 4.98% in 2004 to 24.21% in 2014. The utilization of CS was highly concentrated among the women of higher socio-economic status (SES) in both rounds of the survey. Results of the decomposition models revealed wealth quintile, higher education, higher number of antenatal visits, and being overweight or obese as the critical factors contributing to the inequalities of CS utilization. Conclusion: Bangladesh is now observing a rapid rise in CS utilization and women with higher SES are the main client group of this life saving procedure. There may have inadequate access for those who are relatively less advantaged, even when CS is necessary. Strong initiative from the government is necessary to ensure proper access to this service regardless of women's SES.

DOI 10.1016/j.puhe.2018.01.015
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Mdnuruzzaman Khan Uon
2018 Rahman M, Guntupalli AM, Byles JE, 'Socio-demographic differences of disability prevalence among the population aged 60 years and over in Bangladesh', Asian Population Studies, 14 77-95 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This study aims to delineate the sociodemographic differences in disability prevalence across the population ag... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This study aims to delineate the sociodemographic differences in disability prevalence across the population aged 60 years and over in Bangladesh, and to investigate the association of factors with reporting disability in later life. A microdata sample for those aged 60 years or over from the Census of Bangladesh 2011 was used where disability was assessed with a self-reported single response question. Logistic regression models were performed separately for men and women. Results reveal that the disability prevalence rate increased sharply with age, and it was higher among older women (5.2 per cent) compared to men (4.8 per cent). Physical and vision disabilities were the two categories with the highest prevalence of reported disabilities, with a higher prevalence of physical disability among men and vision disability among women. Being older, female, currently not in marital partnership, and having a lower educational attainment, not being employed, living alone, and residing in the rural areas were significantly associated with reporting disability in later life. The higher prevalence of disability among older women, those who are illiterate, and those residing in rural areas highlights the need for policies prioritising these groups. Special attention should also be given to those who are currently not in marital partnership, particularly women who are living alone.

DOI 10.1080/17441730.2017.1396038
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Julie Byles
2018 James C, James C, Calear AL, Tynan R, Roach D, Leigh L, Oldmeadow C, 'Correlates of psychological distress among workers in the mining industry in remote Australia: Evidence from a multi-site cross-sectional survey', PLOS ONE, 13 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0209377
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Christopher Oldmeadow, Carole James
2017 Milton AH, Rahman M, Hussain S, Jindal C, Choudhury S, Akter S, et al., 'Trapped in Statelessness: Rohingya Refugees in Bangladesh.', Int J Environ Res Public Health, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14080942
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Hall
2017 Milton AH, Hussain S, Akter S, Rahman M, Mouly TA, Mitchell K, 'A Review of the Effects of Chronic Arsenic Exposure on Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14060556
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 6
2017 Rahman M, Khan HTA, Hafford-Letchfield T, Sultana R, 'Socio-economic inequalities in health among older adults in two rural sub-districts in India and Bangladesh: a comparative cross-sectional study', Asian Population Studies, 13 292-305 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Health inequalities have been observed among older people in many developing countries, particularly among thos... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Health inequalities have been observed among older people in many developing countries, particularly among those with least social protection and low socio-economic (SES) status. This study attempted to examine effects of SES on the health of older adults, and related gender differences, in two rural sub-districts - Matlab, Bangladesh and Vadu, India. The study utilised the WHO SAGE-INDEPTH Wave 1, 2007 Matlab, Bangladesh and Vadu, Pune District, India datasets. Both gender and SES indicators were strongly associated with all health indicators of older adults in the Bangladesh site, whereas in India, education and asset quintiles were not consistently associated with self-rated health, quality of life and functional ability score but gender was consistently associated with all health indicators except the quality of life score. The SES-health gradient was noticeably higher amongst older adults in Matlab, Bangladesh than in Vadu, India. Education was also found to be an important predictor of health outcome in both sites.

DOI 10.1080/17441730.2017.1364461
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2016 Rahman MM, Khan HTA, Hafford-Letchfield T, 'Correlates of Socioeconomic Status and the Health of Older People in the United Kingdom', Illness, Crisis & Loss, 24 195-216 (2016)
DOI 10.1177/1054137315608347
Show 7 more journal articles

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 James C, Rahman M, Sayers E, Kelly B, 'Task Rotation: Implementation in industry', Odense, Denmark (2019)
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Carole James
2019 James C, Rahman M, Kelly B, 'Addressing industry Mental Health: Mates in Mining Mental Health Program', Sydney, NSW, Australia (2019)
DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12585
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Carole James
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $140,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20121 grants / $140,000

Improvement of Teaching and Learning environment at the Department of Statistics, Comilla University, Bangladesh$140,000

The grant has been successfully implemented

Funding body: World Bank

Funding body World Bank
Project Team

Dr dulal chandra Nandi, Md Tareq Ferdous Khan, and Md Adeed Salman Chowdury

Scheme Academic innovation in teaching and learning
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding C3232 - International Govt - Other
Category 3232
UON N
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Mr Md Mijanur Rahman

Contact Details

Email mdmijanur.rahman@uon.edu.au
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