Dr Heather Douglas

Dr Heather Douglas

Lecturer

School of Psychology

Understanding our professional selves

By providing a glimpse into the human psyche, Dr Heather Douglas’ work in the field of organisational psychology is contributing to more effective systems, structures, and interventions for workplaces and their teams.

Heather Douglas

As a social, personality and individual differences psychologist, Dr Heather Douglas wants to know what factors from our internal and external worlds influence our professional behaviour and performance. Rather than seeing individuals as static, Heather describes people’s behaviours as changing from moment-to-moment based on the complex interplay between environmental settings and people’s own unique personality traits.

“I want to understand how people integrate their motives, emotions, thoughts, sense of self, personality traits, and other systems to produce behaviour at work,” says Heather.

By examining how people engage in their work and why, Heather’s research is establishing an evidence base from which organisations such as hospitals and universities can design more effective systems and recruitment processes, improve access and equity, and create more user-friendly environments.

“I’m proud that my work has had a wide-ranging impact on applied areas of human behaviour including in health systems, on equity issues in education, in organisational behaviour, and more.”

The confidence balance

The idea that people’s behaviour can appear inconsistent has provided Heather with a new lens through which to examine well-documented behavioural patterns in the workplace, such as the “imposter phenomenon”. Also known as imposter syndrome, this phenomenon describes a pattern of behaviour where an individual doubts their professional capabilities, despite objective evidence to the contrary.

“Previous research has explored imposter phenomenon as a ‘maladaptive personality style’, meaning they measure it once per person, and assume this characterises their emotions and behaviour across many time points.”

However, Heather’s work highlights that people who suffer from imposter syndrome may not experience these negative feelings in every situation.

“What my research looks at is how imposter feelings might vary from moment to moment, and what might cause this variation. For example, an impending assignment or work deadline, comparison to a perceived ‘more successful’ co-worker, salience of a particular skillset that an individual wishes they had more competence in, and so on.”

While a lack of confidence can create psychological stress and negative professional outcomes for individuals, Heather’s research shows that high levels of confidence can also have adverse effects.

“The combination of intelligence and confidence predicts potential career ‘derailers’, including difficulty controlling aggression and a lack of stated concern for safety at work.”

Heather’s research into professional confidence has led to improved recruitment strategies for organisations, including more reliable psychological assessment tools that help to match the right person to the right role. It could also help to improve equity in education. External literature demonstrates that minority ethnic students, and those who perceive classroom competition as more threatening, are more likely to experience adverse psychological outcomes in their university courses.

Heather explains that understanding students’ experiences, including why and how they experience psychological syndromes such as imposter syndrome, could lead to improved support services for students and increase equity in terms of both accessibility and performance.

Predicting problems and biases

Heather’s research shows that there is mutually beneficial relationship between a worker and their workplace. Improve worker wellbeing, and productivity increases. Adjust organisational systems, and worker satisfaction improves.

“People derive more than just financial reward from work. They achieve identity, social rewards, a sense of achievement, and more.

“Rather than being driven by laziness, or a lack of interest in being at work, my research suggests that people are motivated until the situation creates the conditions for them to be unmotivated. The interaction between individual differences and the organisational situation might create the perfect conditions for procrastination, counter-productive work behaviour, burnout, emotional exhaustion, need frustration, and voluntary turnover.”

The psychologist’s work provides organisations with valuable insights into likely problem and opportunity areas among their workforces. For example, one of Heather’s research projects sought to determine how the fast-paced, high-stress workplace environment of a NSW hospital emergency department might impact a doctor’s ability to accurately prescribe medications to patients.

“My team observed doctors doing their work, how many times they were interrupted by others, how many times they multi-tasked, and what impact this had on their error rate on prescribing medications to patients.

“What we found was the doctors were more likely to make a mistake when they were interrupted doing this very important task. I contributed the psychological measurement of working memory to this project, and we later found that doctors with higher working memory were more successful in protecting themselves from errors when prescribing medications to patients.”

Recently, Heather has expanded her work into new research areas, including exploring the effects of cognitive and social biases within workplaces and society. In particular, she is researching a phenomenon known as the “backfire effect”, a tendency for people to strengthen their firmly held opinion in the face of evidence that contradicts it.

“At a societal level, the backfire effect is implicated in a resistance to the evidence of climate change, the impacts of domestic violence, and difficulty considering different political viewpoints.

“I wish to explore the evidence that personality traits moderate a person’s sensitivity to factual evidence contradicting their beliefs on important social issues. This could help us understand the conditions under which the backfire effect is more likely to operate, and therefore where intervention efforts to mitigate it will have the most impact.”

While Heather’s research is targeted at improving workplace systems, culture and productivity, its foray into areas such as the backfire effect could also help to underpin wider health and environmental awareness strategies to create community and even global change.

Understanding our professional selves

By providing a glimpse into the human psyche, Dr Heather Douglas’ work in the field of organisational psychology is contributing to more effective systems, structures, and interventions for workplaces and their teams.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

I completed my PhD in March of 2014 at the University of Newcastle, on the mechanisms by which personality traits translate into behaviour through values, goals, and vocational interests. I am an interdisciplinary applied psychologist with expertise in individual differences assessment and measurement. This includes both intelligence and personality assessment in particular. I have a special interest in the assessment and validation of decision-making style measures in organisational psychology, particularly how individuals enhance or conversely handicap their career progression. I have also applied my expertise to assessing the impact of diversification of higher education populations on academic outcomes, multi-tasking in healthcare professionals, community aged care service provision, and using technology to hack the learning process.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Assessment and Selection
  • Intelligence
  • Personality
  • Psychometrics

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
170103 Educational Psychology 25
170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology 25
170109 Personality, Abilities and Assessment 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/11/2014 - 18/3/2016 Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

Development of research strengths in aged care, particularly the use of indicators of social participation to demonstrate aged care quality.  The role also included the development of research evidence to examine multi-tasking among healthcare providers and the impact of this multi-tasking on subsequent patient care tasks.

Macquarie University
Australian Institute of Health Innovation
Australia
9/12/2013 - 31/10/2014 Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

The University of New South Wales, Australian Institute of Health Innovation (same 
employer moved the entire research group to Macquarie University in November of 2014)


The University of New South Wales
Australian Institute of Health Innovation
Australia
11/4/2016 - 30/11/2018 Lecturer in Psychology

Lecturer in Psychology, Murdoch Singapore Campus. Primary responsibilities included the development and introduction of the Graduate Diploma in Psychology Program at the Murdoch Singapore Campus, teaching into the undergraduate psychology programs offered by Murdoch Singapore, and research and HDR supervision as required.

Murdoch University
School of Psychology and Exercise Science
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (22 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Douglas HE, Rubin J, Scevak J, Southgate E, MacQueen S, Richardson JTE, 'Older women, deeper learning: Age and gender interact to predict learning approach and academic achievement at university.', Frontiers in Education, 5 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/feduc.2020.00158
Co-authors Mark Rubin, Erica Southgate, Suzanne Macqueen, Jill Scevak
2018 Cunningham ML, Douglas H, Boag S, 'General mental ability moderates the link between confidence and integrity test scores', Personality and Individual Differences, 123 94-99 (2018)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd The present study examined whether general mental ability (GMA) moderated the link between confidence and integrity test scores. Participants were 477 Australi... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd The present study examined whether general mental ability (GMA) moderated the link between confidence and integrity test scores. Participants were 477 Australian adults who completed an online survey that gauged GMA, confidence in the accuracy of responses to GMA items, and the Hilson Safety/Security Risk Inventory as a measure of integrity. Results indicated that confidence was a negative predictor of both Safety Risk and Lack of Hostility/Anger Control. An interaction effect was also found in that overconfident individuals (i.e., low GMA and high confidence) were less likely to report more aggression and hostility on the job. The implications of the findings are discussed.

DOI 10.1016/j.paid.2017.11.004
Citations Scopus - 1
2018 Westbrook JI, Raban MZ, Walter SR, Douglas H, 'Task errors by emergency physicians are associated with interruptions, multitasking, fatigue and working memory capacity: A prospective, direct observation study', BMJ Quality and Safety, 27 655-663 (2018)

© 2018 Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article). All rights reserved. Background Interruptions and multitasking have been demons... [more]

© 2018 Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article). All rights reserved. Background Interruptions and multitasking have been demonstrated in experimental studies to reduce individuals' task performance. These behaviours are frequently used by clinicians in high-workload, dynamic clinical environments, yet their effects have rarely been studied. Objective To assess the relative contributions of interruptions and multitasking by emergency physicians to prescribing errors. Methods 36 emergency physicians were shadowed over 120 hours. All tasks, interruptions and instances of multitasking were recorded. Physicians' working memory capacity (WMC) and preference for multitasking were assessed using the Operation Span Task (OSPAN) and Inventory of Polychronic Values. Following observation, physicians were asked about their sleep in the previous 24 hours. Prescribing errors were used as a measure of task performance. We performed multivariate analysis of prescribing error rates to determine associations with interruptions and multitasking, also considering physician seniority, age, psychometric measures, workload and sleep. Results Physicians experienced 7.9 interruptions/hour. 28 clinicians were observed prescribing 239 medication orders which contained 208 prescribing errors. While prescribing, clinicians were interrupted 9.4 times/hour. Error rates increased significantly if physicians were interrupted (rate ratio (RR) 2.82; 95% CI 1.23 to 6.49) or multitasked (RR 1.86; 95% CI 1.35 to 2.56) while prescribing. Having below-average sleep showed a >15-fold increase in clinical error rate (RR 16.44; 95% CI 4.84 to 55.81). WMC was protective against errors; for every 10-point increase on the 75-point OSPAN, a 19% decrease in prescribing errors was observed. There was no effect of polychronicity, workload, physician gender or above-average sleep on error rates. Conclusion Interruptions, multitasking and poor sleep were associated with significantly increased rates of prescribing errors among emergency physicians. WMC mitigated the negative influence of these factors to an extent. These results confirm experimental findings in other fields and raise questions about the acceptability of the high rates of multitasking and interruption in clinical environments.

DOI 10.1136/bmjqs-2017-007333
Citations Scopus - 48
2018 Rubin JM, Scevak J, Southgate E, Macqueen S, Williams P, Douglas H, 'Older women, deeper learning, and greater satisfaction at university: Age and gender predict university students learning approach and degree satisfaction.', Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 11 82-96 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1037/dhe0000042
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Suzanne Macqueen, Mark Rubin, Jill Scevak, Erica Southgate
2017 Walter SR, Raban MZ, Dunsmuir WTM, Douglas HE, Westbrook JI, 'Emergency doctors' strategies to manage competing workload demands in an interruptive environment: An observational workflow time study', Applied Ergonomics, 58 454-460 (2017)

© 2016 An observational workflow time study was conducted involving doctors in the emergency department (ED) of a large Australian hospital. During 121.7 h across 58 sessions, we ... [more]

© 2016 An observational workflow time study was conducted involving doctors in the emergency department (ED) of a large Australian hospital. During 121.7 h across 58 sessions, we observed interruptive events, conceptualised as prompts, and doctors' strategies to handle those prompts (task-switching, multitasking, acknowledgement, deferral and deflection) to assess the role of multiple work system factors influencing doctors' work in the ED. Prompt rates varied vastly between work scenarios, being highest during non-verbal solo tasks. The propensity to use certain strategies also differed with task type, prompt type and location within the department, although task-switching was by far the most frequent. Communicative prompts were important in patient treatment and workload management. Clinicians appear to adjust their communication strategies in response to contextual factors in order to deliver patient care. Risk due to the interruptive nature of ED communication is potentially outweighed by the positive effects of timely information transfer and advice provision.

DOI 10.1016/j.apergo.2016.07.020
Citations Scopus - 24
2017 Douglas HE, Raban MZ, Walter SR, Westbrook JI, 'Improving our understanding of multi-tasking in healthcare: Drawing together the cognitive psychology and healthcare literature', Applied Ergonomics, 59 45-55 (2017)

© 2016 The Authors Multi-tasking is an important skill for clinical work which has received limited research attention. Its impacts on clinical work are poorly understood. In cont... [more]

© 2016 The Authors Multi-tasking is an important skill for clinical work which has received limited research attention. Its impacts on clinical work are poorly understood. In contrast, there is substantial multi-tasking research in cognitive psychology, driver distraction, and human-computer interaction. This review synthesises evidence of the extent and impacts of multi-tasking on efficiency and task performance from health and non-healthcare literature, to compare and contrast approaches, identify implications for clinical work, and to develop an evidence-informed framework for guiding the measurement of multi-tasking in future healthcare studies. The results showed healthcare studies using direct observation have focused on descriptive studies to quantify concurrent multi-tasking and its frequency in different contexts, with limited study of impact. In comparison, non-healthcare studies have applied predominantly experimental and simulation designs, focusing on interleaved and concurrent multi-tasking, and testing theories of the mechanisms by which multi-tasking impacts task efficiency and performance. We propose a framework to guide the measurement of multi-tasking in clinical settings that draws together lessons from these siloed research efforts.

DOI 10.1016/j.apergo.2016.08.021
Citations Scopus - 27
2017 Prgomet M, Douglas HE, Tariq A, Georgiou A, Armour P, Westbrook JI, 'The work of front line community aged care staff and the impact of a changing policy landscape and consumer-directed care', British Journal of Social Work, 47 106-124 (2017)

© The Author 2016. Community aged care in Australia is facing both challenges and opportunities with the introduction of consumer-directed care and its goal to provide clients wit... [more]

© The Author 2016. Community aged care in Australia is facing both challenges and opportunities with the introduction of consumer-directed care and its goal to provide clients with greater choice and control over their care services. Such policy changes impact not only aged care organisations, but front line staff who manage and deliver care. This study investigated the work of front line staff and their perceptions of the impact of a changing policy landscape. Focus groups were conducted with thirteen care workers and six case managers from one Australian aged care organisation. The data revealed valuable information about the: daily activities of front line staff; information exchange mechanisms facilitating front line work; management of clients and client relationships; and implications of policy and organisational changes on front line work and clients. Front line staff highlighted the importance of care coordination, communication and continuity of care delivery, all of which impact on client relationships and quality of care. For aged care organisations and policy makers, the findings identify important areas for consideration when making decisions about changes to community care, including the key role of front line staff in fostering client relationships, providing consistency and continuity, balancing the needs and expectations of clients, and providing support and advocacy of care options.

DOI 10.1093/bjsw/bcw112
Citations Scopus - 4
2017 Douglas H, Georgiou A, Westbrook J, 'Social participation as an indicator of successful aging: An overview of concepts and their associations with health', Australian Health Review, 41 455-462 (2017)

© AHHA 2017 Open Access CC BY-NC-ND. Objectives Social participation has generated a wealth of research in gerontology, but the concept suffers from a lack of conceptual clarity t... [more]

© AHHA 2017 Open Access CC BY-NC-ND. Objectives Social participation has generated a wealth of research in gerontology, but the concept suffers from a lack of conceptual clarity that renders it difficult to define and measure. This means that research on social participation is difficult to compare directly. The aim of the present study was to draw the literature on social participation in older adults together to inform health services researchers seeking to investigate social participation as an indicator of successful aging. Methods A narrative review of studies investigating the association between social participation and health in adults aged 65 years and older was conducted. Results Three concepts of social participation (i.e. social connections, informal social participation and volunteering) were defined, their measurement instruments described and evidence of their associations with health explored. All three concepts have demonstrated associations with an array of health indicators. Prospective studies reveal that social participation at baseline is positively associated with mental and physical health. Conclusion A model of social participation on health is presented, showing the evidence that all three concepts contribute to the association between social participation and health through their shared mechanisms of social support and social cohesion with the wider community. Using an instrument that can be separated into these three distinct concepts will assist health services researchers to determine the relative effect of each form of participation on the health of older adults. What is known about the topic? Social participation has generated a wealth of research in gerontology. The scope of the literature on social participation is broad and the concepts diverse. For this reason, most previous systematic reviews have been unable to comprehensively assess the effect of all concepts of social participation on health. This means the research on social participation is difficult to compare directly, and indicators of social participation in older adults are difficult for policy makers to select. What does this paper add? This paper overviews the three concepts of social participation, their methods of measurement and their associations with health in older adults. We present a model of social participation that incorporates all three concepts of social participation and their effects on health. We argue that the use of a measure that can be segmented into each of the three forms of social participation will predict more of the variance in health outcomes than any measure on its own. What are the implications for practitioners' Enhancing the social participation of older adults is a key factor in successful aging that many older adults value. However, many service provision organisations tend to focus on meeting the specific physical needs of clients, rather than targeting services that connect older adults with their community. Targeting social participation may present one of the greatest opportunities to improve older adults' general health, and will also generate societal benefits by increasing community contributions from this group. Selecting an indicator of social participation that measures each of the three concepts overviewed in this paper will enable policy makers to identify the areas in which social interventions for older adults will have the most effect.

DOI 10.1071/AH16038
Citations Scopus - 37
2017 Borotkanics R, Rowe C, Georgiou A, Douglas H, Makeham M, Westbrook J, 'Changes in the profile of Australians in 77 residential aged care facilities across New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory', Australian Health Review, 41 613-620 (2017)

© 2017 AHHA. Objective: Government expenditure on and the number of aged care facilities in Australia have increased consistently since 1995. As a result, a range of aged care pol... [more]

© 2017 AHHA. Objective: Government expenditure on and the number of aged care facilities in Australia have increased consistently since 1995. As a result, a range of aged care policy changes have been implemented. Data on demographics and utilisation are important in determining the effects of policy on residential aged care services. Yet, there are surprisingly few statistical summaries in the peer-reviewed literature on the profile of Australian aged care residents or trends in service utilisation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the demographic profile and utilisation of a large cohort of residential aged care residents, including trends over a 3-year period. Methods: We collected 3 years of data (2011-14) from 77 residential aged care facilities and assessed trends and differences across five demographic and three service utilisation variables. Results: The median age at admission over the 3-year period remained constant at 86 years. There were statistically significant decreases in separations to home (z=2.62, P=0.009) and a 1.35% increase in low care admissions. Widowed females made up the majority (44.75%) of permanent residents, were the oldest and had the longest lengths of stay. One-third of permanent residents had resided in aged care for 3 years or longer. Approximately 30% of residents were not born in Australia. Aboriginal residents made up less than 1% of the studied population, were younger and had shorter stays than non-Aboriginal residents. Conclusion: The analyses revealed a clear demographic profile and consistent pattern of utilisation of aged care facilities. There have been several changes in aged care policy over the decades. The analyses outlined herein illustrate how community, health services and public health data can be used to inform policy, monitor progress and assess whether intended policy has had the desired effects on aged care services.

DOI 10.1071/AH16125
Citations Scopus - 6
2017 Douglas HE, Georgiou A, Tariq A, Prgomet M, Warland A, Armour P, Westbrook JI, 'Implementing information and communication technology to support community aged care service integration: Lessons from an Australian aged care provider', International Journal of Integrated Care, 17 (2017)

© 2017 The Author(s). Introduction: There is limited evidence of the benefits of information and communication technology (ICT) to support integrated aged care services. Objective... [more]

© 2017 The Author(s). Introduction: There is limited evidence of the benefits of information and communication technology (ICT) to support integrated aged care services. Objectives: We undertook a case study to describe carelink+, a centralised client service management ICT system implemented by a large aged and community care service provider, Uniting. We sought to explicate the care-related information exchange processes associated with carelink+ and identify lessons for organisations attempting to use ICT to support service integration. Methods: Our case study included seventeen interviews and eleven observation sessions with a purposive sample of staff within the organisation. Inductive analysis was used to develop a model of ICT-supported information exchange. Results: Management staff described the integrated care model designed to underpin carelink+. Frontline staff described complex information exchange processes supporting coordination of client services. Mismatches between the data quality and the functions carelink+ was designed to support necessitated the evolution of new work processes associated with the system. Conclusions: There is value in explicitly modelling the work processes that emerge as a consequence of ICT. Continuous evaluation of the match between ICT and work processes will help aged care organisations to achieve higher levels of ICT maturity that support their efforts to provide integrated care to clients.

DOI 10.5334/ijic.2437
Citations Scopus - 6
2016 Douglas H, McCormack LM, Rose D, 'The Psychometric Properties of Cognitive Confidence: Structure across Cultures in Working Adult Samples.', The Journal of Psychology and Cognition., 1 81-90 (2016) [C1]
Co-authors Lynne Mccormack
2016 Douglas HE, Bore M, Munro D, 'Openness and Intellect: An analysis of the motivational constructs underlying two aspects of personality', Personality and Individual Differences, 99 242-253 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Openness to Experience has been shown to subsume two aspects called Openness and Intellect. The aim of this study was to examine the discriminant validity of ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Openness to Experience has been shown to subsume two aspects called Openness and Intellect. The aim of this study was to examine the discriminant validity of Openness and Intellect in their relationship to Values, Interests, and Major Life Goals. Participants were 893 adults recruited into three studies who completed an online survey consisting of the Big Five Aspect Scales, Schwartz's Values, Holland's Interests, and Major Life Goals. Openness positively predicted Universalism Values in Study 1, and both Artistic Interests and Aesthetic Major Life Goals in all three samples. In contrast, Intellect was not significantly predictive of Values, Interests and Major Life Goals in any of the three studies. The implications of these findings for the discriminant validity of the two aspects are discussed.

DOI 10.1016/j.paid.2016.05.030
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Miles Bore
2016 Lehnbom EC, Douglas HE, Makeham MAB, 'Positive beliefs and privacy concerns shape the future for the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record', Internal Medicine Journal, 46 108-111 (2016)

© 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians. The uptake of the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR) has been slowly building momentum in Australia. The purpo... [more]

© 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians. The uptake of the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR) has been slowly building momentum in Australia. The purpose of the PCEHR is to collect clinically important information from multiple healthcare providers to provide a secure electronic record to patients and their authorised healthcare providers that will ultimately enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare delivery. Reasons for the slow uptake of the PCEHR and future directions to improve its usefulness is discussed later.

DOI 10.1111/imj.12956
Citations Scopus - 5
2016 Douglas HE, Bore M, Munro D, 'Coping with University Education: The relationships of Time Management Behaviour and Work Engagement with the Five Factor Model Aspects', Learning and Individual Differences, 45 268-274 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. We examined the construct validity of time management behaviour and work engagement, defined as a positive work-related state of mind. Two-hundred and eighty-... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. We examined the construct validity of time management behaviour and work engagement, defined as a positive work-related state of mind. Two-hundred and eighty-one participants completed the Time Management Behaviour Scale, the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale - Student Version, and the Big Five Aspect Scales. Linear regression analyses revealed that time management behaviour was positively predicted by the Conscientiousness aspects, Industriousness and Orderliness. Work engagement variables were also predicted by Industriousness, and both aspects of Openness/Intellect. Openness significantly predicted vigor and dedication, while Intellect predicted absorption. These findings indicate that those higher in both time management behaviour and work engagement are more likely to use time effectively and minimise distractions. While individuals higher on time management behaviour are more likely to work in an orderly fashion, individuals higher in work engagement might be quicker to understand information. The implications for supporting students at university to learn more effectively are discussed in light of these findings.

DOI 10.1016/j.lindif.2015.12.004
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Miles Bore
2015 Tariq A, Douglas HE, Smith C, Georgiou A, Osmond T, Armour P, Westbrook JI, 'A Descriptive Analysis of Incidents Reported by Community Aged Care Workers', Western Journal of Nursing Research, 37 859-876 (2015)

© The Author(s) 2014 Little is known about the types of incidents that occur to aged care clients in the community. This limits the development of effective strategies to improve ... [more]

© The Author(s) 2014 Little is known about the types of incidents that occur to aged care clients in the community. This limits the development of effective strategies to improve client safety. The objective of the study was to present a profile of incidents reported in Australian community aged care settings. All incident reports made by community care workers employed by one of the largest community aged care provider organizations in Australia during the period November 1, 2012, to August 8, 2013, were analyzed. A total of 356 reports were analyzed, corresponding to a 7.5% incidence rate per client year. Falls and medication incidents were the most prevalent incident types. Clients receiving high-level care and those who attended day therapy centers had the highest rate of incidents with 14% to 20% of these clients having a reported incident. The incident profile indicates that clients on higher levels of care had higher incident rates. Incident data represent an opportunity to improve client safety in community aged care.

DOI 10.1177/0193945914562615
Citations Scopus - 4
2015 Raban MZ, Walter SR, Douglas HE, Strumpman D, Mackenzie J, Westbrook JI, 'Measuring the relationship between interruptions, multitasking and prescribing errors in an emergency department: A study protocol', BMJ Open, 5 (2015)

Introduction: Interruptions and multitasking are frequent in clinical settings, and have been shown in the cognitive psychology literature to affect performance, increasing the ri... [more]

Introduction: Interruptions and multitasking are frequent in clinical settings, and have been shown in the cognitive psychology literature to affect performance, increasing the risk of error. However, comparatively less is known about their impact on errors in clinical work. This study will assess the relationship between prescribing errors, interruptions and multitasking in an emergency department (ED) using direct observations and chart review. Methods and analysis: The study will be conducted in an ED of a 440-bed teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia. Doctors will be shadowed at proximity by observers for 2 h time intervals while they are working on day shift (between 0800 and 1800). Time stamped data on tasks, interruptions and multitasking will be recorded on a handheld computer using the validated Work Observation Method by Activity Timing (WOMBAT) tool. The prompts leading to interruptions and multitasking will also be recorded. When doctors prescribe medication, type of chart and chart sections written on, along with the patient's medical record number (MRN) will be recorded. A clinical pharmacist will access patient records and assess the medication orders for prescribing errors. The prescribing error rate will be calculated per prescribing task and is defined as the number of errors divided by the number of medication orders written during the prescribing task. The association between prescribing error rates, and rates of prompts, interruptions and multitasking will be assessed using statistical modelling. Ethics and dissemination: Ethics approval has been obtained from the hospital research ethics committee. Eligible doctors will be provided with written information sheets and written consent will be obtained if they agree to participate. Doctor details and MRNs will be kept separate from the data on prescribing errors, and will not appear in the final data set for analysis. Study results will be disseminated in publications and feedback to the ED.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009076
Citations Scopus - 14
2014 Southgate E, Douglas H, Scevak J, MacQueen S, Rubin JM, Lindell C, 'The academic outcomes of first-in-family in an Australian university: An exploratory study.', International Studies in Widening Participation, 1 31-45 (2014) [C1]
Co-authors Suzanne Macqueen, Erica Southgate, Mark Rubin, Jill Scevak
2012 Douglas HE, Bore MR, Munro D, 'Distinguishing the dark triad: Evidence from the five-factor model and the Hogan Development Survey', Psychology, 3 237-242 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.4236/psych.2012.33033
Co-authors Miles Bore
2012 Douglas HE, Bore MR, Munro D, 'Construct validity of a two-factor model of psychopathy', Psychology, 3 243-248 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.4236/psych.2012.33034
Co-authors Miles Bore
2011 Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Douglas HE, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Williamson A, Barker DJ, 'Cutting the research pie: A value-weighting approach to explore perceptions about psychosocial research priorities for adults with haematological cancers', European Journal of Cancer Care, 20 345-353 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2010.01188.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Chris Paul, Daniel Barker, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2011 Carey ML, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Campbell S, Douglas HE, 'Patient or treatment centre? Where are efforts invested to improve cancer patients' psychosocial outcomes?', European Journal of Cancer Care, 20 152-162 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2010.01211.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Mariko Carey
2009 Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Douglas HE, Webb G, 'Are we there yet? The state of the evidence base for guidelines on breaking bad news to cancer patients', European Journal of Cancer, 45 2960-2966 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ejca.2009.08.013
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Chris Paul, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher
Show 19 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Douglas H, Bore MR, Munro D, 'An exploration of the correlates of Openness and Intellect', Travelodge Hotel, Newcastle (2014)
Co-authors Miles Bore
2013 Douglas H, Bore MR, Munro D, 'The Five-Factor Theory and its Contribution to Organisational Culture, Academic Achievement, and Degree Choice', Griffith University South Bank Campus (2013)
Co-authors Miles Bore
2011 Douglas HE, Bore MR, Munro D, 'The five factor theory of personality: An empirical investigation', Conference Proceedings: 2011 Australian Conference on Personality and Individual Differences, Hobart, Tasmania (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Miles Bore
2010 Bore MR, Munro D, Bridge PC, Douglas HE, Powis DA, 'A comparison of three personality trait models and the implications for selection into the medical and allied health professions', Abstracts of the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychology, Melbourne, Australia (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Miles Bore
2010 Douglas HE, 'The construct validity of the two factor model of psychopathy', Abstracts of the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychology, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
2009 Douglas HE, Bore MR, Munro D, 'Integrating adaptive and pathological traits: The role of the Dark Triad', 8th Australasian Conference on Personality & Individual Differences (ACPID09): Conference Program, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Miles Bore
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Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Scevak J, Southgate E, Rubin, Macqueen S, Douglas H, Williams P, Southgate EL, 'Equity Groups and Predictors of Academic Success in Higher Education.', National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education (NCSEHE) Curtin University, 19 (2015) [R1]
Co-authors Erica Southgate, Suzanne Macqueen, Mark Rubin, Jill Scevak
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $118,953

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20191 grants / $29,953

2020 Women in Research [WIR] Fellowship $29,953

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Heather Douglas
Scheme Women in Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1901347
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20161 grants / $34,300

Innovation Catalyst for the Community Mental Health Intervention Team (COMIT) and the UBK Health Oriented Ageing (HOA) Community Ecosystem$34,300

This funding was received to conduct a case study on the Innovation and Collaboration Practices of O'Joy Care Services in Singapore. This case study was conducted through the lens of integrated care on O'Joy's delivery of mental health and social participation for older adults in the Upper Boon Keng region of Singapore. The final workshop on this case study was designed to enhance learning for non-profit organisations and leaders in this provision of community aged care services. A culture of knowledge sharing and collaboration was discussed, including best-practices for better service provision to older adults in the community. A case study report was also produced from the program of work.

Douglas, H.E., Tay, G., Bali, A.S., & Vas, C. (2016). Innovation Catalyst for the Community Mental Health Intervention Team (COMIT) and the UBK Health Oriented Ageing (HOA) Community Ecosystem. Toteboard: Case Study Collaborator.


Funding body: Tote Board

Funding body Tote Board
Project Team

Douglas H, Bali A, Vas C

Scheme Tote Board Case Study Collaborator
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding C3212 - International Not for profit
Category 3212
UON N

20141 grants / $54,700

Equity groups and predictors of academic success in higher education$54,700

Funding body: National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education (NCSEHE)

Funding body National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education (NCSEHE)
Project Team

Doctor Jill Scevak, Associate Professor Erica Southgate, Doctor Suzanne MacQueen, Associate Professor Mark Rubin, Dr Heather Douglas

Scheme Research Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON N
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Dr Heather Douglas

Position

Lecturer
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email heather.douglas@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4913 8773
Links UoN Blogs
Research Networks

Office

Room W253
Building Behavioural Science - W
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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