Dr Dean Sculley

Dr Dean Sculley

Senior Lecturer

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy (Human Physiology)

Career Summary

Biography

Profile

Dr Dean Sculley graduated from the University of Northampton in 1998 with an honours degree in Human Biology.  He received his MSc in Exercise Physiology from Manchester Metropolitan University in 2000 and a PhD from the University of Leicester in 2004, under the supervision of Professor Simon Langley-Evans.  This was followed by a British Heart Foundation-funded Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship at the University of Nottingham, investigating the effects of maternal nutritional modulation and its effects on Foetal and Developmental Programming in offspring.  He held a lectureship at the University of Northampton until 2007, and has held a lectureship in Human Physiology at the University of Newcastle since 2008.

Research

Research expertise is centred around Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in relation to disease.  His PhD research investigated the effects of salivary antioxidant capacity and its effect on Periodontal Disease status.  During this research, he was the first to measure oxidative stress in saliva using Protein Carbonyls as a biomarker and quantifying salivary antioxidants by flow rate rather than static measurement.  Key findings also include salivary antioxidant capacity and profile being independent to dietary intake and plasma profile, and disease severity being inversely related to salivary antioxidant capacity.  During his Fellowship, Dr Sculley investigated the effects of maternal undernutrition on the antioxidant capacity in offspring.  More specifically, activity of Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase and Glutathione were studied in relation to oxidative stress in tissues such as brain, heart, lung, kidney, liver and eye.  Major effects found include significant programming effects on liver and kidney tissues, leading to a reduction in antioxidant capacity and an increase in free radical-mediated tissue damage.  Effects were especially apparent in kidney tissue, with significant premature loss of nephrons and accelerated kidney dysfunction.

Recent research includes the effects of Omega-3 fatty acids and the inflammatory cascade in Periodontal Disease and Systemic Hypoxia, the inflammatory response and muscle function.  Current research focuses on Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Diabetes and involves the use of smart devices and wireless technology in the promotion, adherence and monitoring of physical exertion in the management of disease.  In addition, current research is also determining the effect of maternal nutrition and lifestyle factors affecting foetal growth and development in utero and the implications these have on disease in the offspring, specifically Type 2 Diabetes.

Teaching

Dr Dean Sculley has been teaching all aspects of Human Physiology to undergraduates since 2006.  He is Course Co-ordinator for HUBS1401 and HUBS1417 and teaches HUBS1406 and Immunity,Microbiology and Genetics modules in HUBS1416.  In addition, he also delivers lectures and lab sessions for HUBS2207 Human Metabolism and Nutritional Biochemistry and writes and delivers the Human Biology preparatory course – PREP096 – to new students prior to Semester 1.  He is consistently rated amongst the highest performers in both course design and teaching throughout the University.



Administrative Expertise


Collaborations
Research collaborations include:

The investigation of Periodontal Disease during the fitment of orthodontic devices with Associate Professor Jane Taylor, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine.

The effects of sex hormones in physical performance in female athletes with Dr Xanna Janse De Jonge,  School of Environmental and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science.

The use of smart technology in the management and treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Diabetes with Dr Andrea Coda, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Leicester - UK
  • Bachelor of Science, The University of Northampton - UK
  • Master of Science, Manchester Metropolitan University - UK

Keywords

  • Developmental Programming
  • Eicosanoids
  • Evolution
  • Genetics
  • Human Physiology
  • Immunology
  • Inflammation
  • Interuterine Growth Restriction
  • Oxidative Stress
  • Periodontal Disease

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
060699 Physiology not elsewhere classified 40
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 40
111499 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Casual Lecturer University of Newcastle
Centre for English Language and Foundation Studies
Australia
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2008 -  Lecturer University of Newcastle
Faculty of Health and Medicine
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Dascombe BJ, Elsworthy N, Scott B, Sculley DV, Reaburn PRJ, 'Physiological changes affecting performance of masters athletes', Nutrition and performance in masters athletes, CRC PRess, Boca Raton, FL 17-45 (2015) [B1]
Co-authors Ben Dascombe

Journal article (26 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Stevens CJ, Kittel A, Sculley DV, Callister R, Taylor L, Dascombe BJ, 'Running performance in the heat is improved by similar magnitude with pre-exercise cold-water immersion and mid-exercise facial water spray', JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES, 35 798-805 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2016.1192294
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ben Dascombe, Robin Callister
2017 Scott BR, Slattery KM, Sculley DV, Lockhart C, Dascombe BJ, 'ACUTE PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO MODERATE-LOAD RESISTANCE EXERCISE IN HYPOXIA', JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH, 31 1973-1981 (2017) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Ben Dascombe
2017 Coda A, Sculley D, Santos D, Girones X, Acharya S, 'Exploring the Effectiveness of Smart Technologies in the Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus', Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, 1 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1932296817711198
Co-authors Andrea Coda
2017 Scott BR, Slattery KM, Sculley DV, Smith SM, Peiffer JJ, Dascombe BJ, 'Acute physiological and perceptual responses to high-load resistance exercise in hypoxia', Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, (2017)

© Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. This study assessed whether hypoxia during high-load resistance exercise could enhance the acute physiological... [more]

© Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. This study assessed whether hypoxia during high-load resistance exercise could enhance the acute physiological responses related to muscular development. Twelve trained men performed exercise in three conditions: normoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen [F I O 2 ] = 21%), moderate-level hypoxia (F I O 2 = 16%) and high-level hypoxia (F I O 2 = 13%). Exercise comprised high-load squats and deadlifts (5 × 5 using 80% of 1-repetition maximum with 180-s rest). Muscle oxygenation and activation were monitored during exercise. Metabolic stress was estimated via capillary blood sampling. Perceived fatigue and soreness were also quantified following exercise. While the hypoxic conditions appeared to affect muscle oxygenation, significant differences between conditions were only noted for maximal deoxyhaemoglobin in the deadlift (P = 0·009). Blood lactate concentration increased from 1·1 to 1·2 mmol l -1 at baseline to 9·5-9·8 mmol l -1 after squats and 10·4-10·5 mmol l -1 after deadlifts (P=0·001), although there were no between-condition differences. Perceived fatigue and muscle soreness were significantly elevated immediately and at 24 h following exercise, respectively, by similar magnitudes in all conditions (P=0·001). Muscle activation did not differ between conditions. While metabolic stress is thought to moderate muscle activation and subsequent muscular development during hypoxic resistance training, it is not augmented during traditional high-load exercise. This may be explained by the low number of repetitions performed and the long interset rest periods employed during this training. These findings suggest that high-load resistance training might not benefit from additional hypoxia as has been shown for low- and moderate-load training.

DOI 10.1111/cpf.12451
Co-authors Ben Dascombe
2017 Stevens CJ, Bennett KJM, Sculley DV, Callister R, Taylor L, Dascombe BJ, 'A Comparison of Mixed-Method Cooling Interventions on Preloaded Running Performance in the Heat', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 31 620-629 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 National Strength and Conditioning Association. Stevens, CJ, Bennett, KJM, Sculley, DV, Callister, R, Taylor, L, and Dascombe, BJ. A comparison of mixed-method cooling int... [more]

© 2016 National Strength and Conditioning Association. Stevens, CJ, Bennett, KJM, Sculley, DV, Callister, R, Taylor, L, and Dascombe, BJ. A comparison of mixed-method cooling interventions on preloaded running performance in the heat. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 620-629, 2017 - The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effect of combining practical methods to cool the body on endurance running performance and physiology in the heat. Eleven trained male runners completed 4 randomized, preloaded running time trials (20 minutes at 70% Vo 2 max and a 3 km time trial) on a nonmotorized treadmill in the heat (33° C). Trials consisted of precooling by combined cold-water immersion and ice slurry ingestion (PRE), midcooling by combined facial water spray and menthol mouth rinse (MID), a combination of all methods (ALL), and control (CON). Performance time was significantly faster in MID (13.7 ± 1.2 minutes; p < 0.01) and ALL (13.7 ± 1.4 minutes; p = 0.04) but not PRE (13.9 ± 1.4 minutes; p = 0.24) when compared with CON (14.2 ± 1.2 minutes). Precooling significantly reduced rectal temperature (initially by 0.5 ± 0.2° C), mean skin temperature, heart rate and sweat rate, and increased iEMG activity, whereas midcooling significantly increased expired air volume and respiratory exchange ratio compared with control. Significant decreases in forehead temperature, thermal sensation, and postexercise blood prolactin concentration were obser ved in all conditions compared with control. Performance was improved with midcooling, whereas precooling had little or no influence. Midcooling may have improved performance through an attenuated inhibitory psychophysiological and endocrine response to the heat.

DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001532
Co-authors Ben Dascombe, Robin Callister
2017 Coda A, Sculley D, Santos D, Girones X, Brosseau L, Smith DR, et al., 'Harnessing interactive technologies to improve health outcomes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis', Pediatric Rheumatology, 15 40-45 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12969-017-0168-y
Co-authors Andrea Coda
2016 Stevens CJ, Thoseby B, Sculley DV, Callister R, Taylor L, Dascombe BJ, 'Running performance and thermal sensation in the heat are improved with menthol mouth rinse but not ice slurry ingestion', Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 26 1209-1216 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 John Wiley &amp; Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a cooling strategy designed to predominately ... [more]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a cooling strategy designed to predominately lower thermal state with a strategy designed to lower thermal sensation on endurance running performance and physiology in the heat. Eleven moderately trained male runners completed familiarization and three randomized, crossover 5-km running time trials on a non-motorized treadmill in hot conditions (33 °C). The trials included ice slurry ingestion before exercise (ICE), menthol mouth rinse during exercise (MEN), and no intervention (CON). Running performance was significantly improved with MEN (25.3 ± 3.5 min; P = 0.01), but not ICE (26.3 ± 3.2 min; P = 0.45) when compared with CON (26.0 ± 3.4 min). Rectal temperature was significantly decreased with ICE (by 0.3 ± 0.2 °C; P < 0.01), which persisted for 2 km of the run and MEN significantly decreased perceived thermal sensation (between 4 and 5 km) and ventilation (between 1 and 2 km) during the time trial. End-exercise blood prolactin concentration was elevated with MEN compared with CON (by 25.1 ± 24.4 ng/mL; P = 0.02). The data demonstrate that a change in the perception of thermal sensation during exercise from menthol mouth rinse was associated with improved endurance running performance in the heat. Ice slurry ingestion reduced core temperature but did not decrease thermal sensation during exercise or improve running performance.

DOI 10.1111/sms.12555
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Ben Dascombe, Robin Callister
2015 Stevens CJ, Hacene J, Wellham B, Sculley DV, Callister R, Taylor L, Dascombe BJ, 'The validity of endurance running performance on the Curve 3<sup>TM</sup> non-motorised treadmill', Journal of Sports Sciences, 33 1141-1148 (2015) [C1]

© 2014, © 2014 Taylor &amp; Francis. Abstract: This study aimed to test the validity of a non-motorised treadmill (NMT) for the measurement of self-paced overground endurance ... [more]

© 2014, © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Abstract: This study aimed to test the validity of a non-motorised treadmill (NMT) for the measurement of self-paced overground endurance running performance. Ten male runners performed randomised 5-km running time trials on a NMT and an outdoor athletics track. A range of physiological and perceptual responses was measured, and foot strike was classified subjectively. Performance time was strongly correlated (r¿=¿0.82, ICC¿=¿0.86) between running modes, despite running time being significantly longer on the NMT (1264¿±¿124¿s vs. 1536¿±¿130¿s for overground and NMT, respectively; P¿ < ¿0.001). End blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion were significantly higher on the NMT compared to overground. Integrated electromyography was significantly lower on the NMT for three muscles (P¿ < ¿0.05), and mean stride rate was also significantly lower on the NMT (P¿=¿0.04). Cardiorespiratory responses of heart rate, oxygen uptake and expired air volume demonstrated strong correlations (r¿=¿0.68¿0.96, ICC¿=¿0.75¿0.97) and no statistical differences (P¿ > ¿0.05). Runners were consistently slower on the NMT, and as such it should not be used to measure performance over a specific distance. However, the strong correlations suggest that superior overground performance was reflected in relative terms on the NMT, and therefore, it is a valid tool for the assessment of endurance running performance in the laboratory.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2014.986502
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ben Dascombe
2015 Scott BR, Slattery KM, Sculley DV, Hodson JA, Dascombe BJ, 'Physical performance during high-intensity resistance exercise in normoxic and hypoxic conditions', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 29 807-815 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association. This study aimed to determine whether different levels of hypoxia affect physical performance during high-intensity resista... [more]

© 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association. This study aimed to determine whether different levels of hypoxia affect physical performance during high-intensity resistance exercise or subsequent cardiovascular and perceptual responses. Twelve resistance-trained young men (age, 25.3 ± 4.3 years; height, 179.0 ± 4.5 cm; body mass, 83.4 ± 9.1 kg) were tested for 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in the back squat and deadlift. Following this, participants completed 3 separate randomized trials of 5 × 5 repetitions at 80% 1RM, with 3 minutes rest between sets, in normoxia (NORM; fraction of inspired oxygen [F I O 2 ] 0.21), moderate-level hypoxia (F I O 2 0.16), or high-level hypoxia (F I O 2 0.13) by a portable hypoxic unit. Peak and mean force and power variables were monitored during exercise. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO 2), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed immediately following each set. No differences in force or power variables were evident between conditions. Similar trends were evident in these variables across each set and across the exercise session in each condition. SpO 2 was lower in hypoxic conditions than in NORM, whereas HR was higher following sets performed in hypoxia. There were no differences between conditions in RPE. These results indicate that a hypoxic stimulus during high-intensity resistance exercise does not alter physical performance during repetitions and sets or affect how strenuous exercise is perceived to be. This novel training strategy can be used without adversely affecting the physical training dose experienced and may provide benefits over the equivalent training in NORM.

DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000680
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Ben Dascombe
2015 Stevens CJ, Hacene J, Sculley DV, Taylor L, Callister R, Dascombe B, 'The Reliability of Running Performance in a 5 km Time Trial on a Non-motorized Treadmill', International Journal of Sports Medicine, 36 705-709 (2015) [C1]

The purpose of the study was to establish the reliability of performance and physiological responses during a self-paced 5 km running time trial on a non-motorized treadmill. 17 m... [more]

The purpose of the study was to establish the reliability of performance and physiological responses during a self-paced 5 km running time trial on a non-motorized treadmill. 17 male runners (age: 32±13 years, height: 177±7 cm, body mass: 71±9 kg, sum of 7 skinfolds: 55±21 mm) performed familiarization then 2 separate maximal 5 km running time trials on a non-motorized treadmill. Physiological responses measured included heart rate, oxygen uptake, expired air volume, blood lactate concentration, tissue saturation index and integrated electromyography. Running time (1 522±163 s vs. 1 519±162 s for trials 1 and 2, respectively) demonstrated a low CV of 1.2% and high ICC of 0.99. All physiological variables had CVs of less than 4% and ICCs of > 0.92, with the exception of blood lactate concentration (7.0±2 mmol·L -1 vs. 6.5±1.5 mmol·L -1 for trials 1 and 2, respectively; CV: 12%, ICC: 0.83) and the electromyography measures (CV: 8-27%, ICC: 0.71-0.91). The data demonstrate that performance time in a 5 km running time trial on a non-motorized treadmill is a highly reliable test. Most physiological responses measured across the 5 km run also demonstrated good reliability.

DOI 10.1055/s-0034-1398680
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Ben Dascombe, Robin Callister
2014 Sculley DV, 'Periodontal disease: Modulation of the inflammatory cascade by dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids', Journal of Periodontal Research, 49 277-281 (2014) [C1]

Periodontal disease, including gingivitis and periodontitis, is caused by the interaction between pathogenic bacteria and the host immune system. The ensuing oxidative stress and ... [more]

Periodontal disease, including gingivitis and periodontitis, is caused by the interaction between pathogenic bacteria and the host immune system. The ensuing oxidative stress and inflammatory cascade result in the destruction of gingival tissue, alveolar bone and periodontal ligament. This article reviews the underlying mechanisms and host-bacteria interactions responsible for periodontal disease and evidence that nutritional supplementation with fish oil may provide a protective effect. Historical investigations of diet and disease have highlighted an inverse relationship between ingestion of fish oil, which is high in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the incidence of typical inflammatory diseases such as arthritis and coronary heart disease. Ingestion of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, results in their incorporation into membrane phospholipids, which can alter eicosanoid production after stimulation during the immune response. These eicosanoids promote a reduction in chronic inflammation, which has led to the proposal that fish oil is a possible modulator of inflammation and may reduce the severity of periodontal diseases. Tentative animal and human studies have provided an indication of this effect. Further human investigation is needed to establish the protective effects of fish oil in relation to periodontal disease. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/jre.12116
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2014 Scott BR, Slattery KM, Dascombe BJ, Sculley DV, 'Hypoxia and Resistance Exercise: A Comparison of Localized and Systemic Methods', Sports Medicine, (2014) [C1]

It is generally believed that optimal hypertrophic and strength gains are induced through moderate- or high-intensity resistance training, equivalent to at least 60 % of an indivi... [more]

It is generally believed that optimal hypertrophic and strength gains are induced through moderate- or high-intensity resistance training, equivalent to at least 60 % of an individual's 1-repetition maximum (1RM). However, recent evidence suggests that similar adaptations are facilitated when low-intensity resistance exercise (~20-50 % 1RM) is combined with blood flow restriction (BFR) to the working muscles. Although the mechanisms underpinning these responses are not yet firmly established, it appears that localized hypoxia created by BFR may provide an anabolic stimulus by enhancing the metabolic and endocrine response, and increase cellular swelling and signalling function following resistance exercise. Moreover, BFR has also been demonstrated to increase type II muscle fibre recruitment during exercise. However, inappropriate implementation of BFR can result in detrimental effects, including petechial haemorrhage and dizziness. Furthermore, as BFR is limited to the limbs, the muscles of the trunk are unable to be trained under localized hypoxia. More recently, the use of systemic hypoxia via hypoxic chambers and devices has been investigated as a novel way to stimulate similar physiological responses to resistance training as BFR techniques. While little evidence is available, reports indicate that beneficial adaptations, similar to those induced by BFR, are possible using these methods. The use of systemic hypoxia allows large groups to train concurrently within a hypoxic chamber using multi-joint exercises. However, further scientific research is required to fully understand the mechanisms that cause augmented muscular changes during resistance exercise with a localized or systemic hypoxic stimulus. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0177-7
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Ben Dascombe
2014 Scott BR, Dascombe BJ, Delaney JA, Elsworthy N, Lockie RG, Sculley DV, Slattery KM, 'The Validity and Reliability of a Customized Rigid Supportive Harness During Smith Machine Back Squat Exercise', JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH, 28 636-642 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3182a362df
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ben Dascombe, Robert Lockie
2014 Scott BR, Slattery KM, Sculley DV, Lockie RG, Dascombe BJ, 'Reliability of telemetric electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy during high-intensity resistance exercise', Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 24 722-730 (2014) [C1]

This study quantified the inter- and intra-test reliability of telemetric surface electromyography (EMG) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during resistance exercise. Twelve w... [more]

This study quantified the inter- and intra-test reliability of telemetric surface electromyography (EMG) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during resistance exercise. Twelve well-trained young men performed high-intensity back squat exercise (12 sets at 70-90% 1-repetition maximum) on two occasions, during which EMG and NIRS continuously monitored muscle activation and oxygenation of the thigh muscles. Intra-test reliability for EMG and NIRS variables was generally higher than inter-test reliability. EMG median frequency variables were generally more reliable than amplitude-based variables. The reliability of EMG measures was not related to the intensity or number of repetitions performed during the set. No notable differences were evident in the reliability of EMG between different agonist muscles. NIRS-derived measures of oxyhaemoglobin, deoxyhaemoglobin and tissue saturation index were generally more reliable during single-repetition sets than multiple-repetition sets at the same intensity. Tissue saturation index was the most reliable NIRS variable. Although the reliability of the EMG and NIRS measures varied across the exercise protocol, the precise causes of this variability are not yet understood. However, it is likely that biological variation during multi-joint isotonic resistance exercise may account for some of the variation in the observed results. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.jelekin.2014.07.008
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Robert Lockie, Ben Dascombe
2013 Stevens CJ, Dascombe B, Boyko A, Sculley D, Callister R, 'Ice slurry ingestion during cycling improves Olympic distance triathlon performance in the heat', Journal of Sports Sciences, 31 1271-1279 (2013) [C1]

This study investigated the effect of ice slurry ingestion during a triathlon on intragastric temperature and 10 km running performance in the heat. Nine well-trained male triathl... [more]

This study investigated the effect of ice slurry ingestion during a triathlon on intragastric temperature and 10 km running performance in the heat. Nine well-trained male triathletes performed two randomised trials of a simulated Olympic distance triathlon in hot conditions (32-34°C). Exercise intensity during the swim (1500 m) and cycle (1 hr) legs was standardised, and the 10 km run leg was a self-paced time trial. During the cycle leg, either 10 g · kgBM -1 of ice slurry ( < 1°C) or room temperature fluid (32-34°C) was ingested. In the run leg of the ice slurry trial, performance time (43.4 ± 3.7 vs. 44.6 ± 4.0 min; P = 0.03), intragastric temperature (at 1.5 km; 35.5 ± 1.2 vs. 37.5 ± 0.4°C; P = 0.002) and perceived thermal stress (at 5 km; 73 ± 9 vs. 80 ± 7 mm; P = 0.04) were significantly lower. Oxygen consumption was significantly higher in the ice trial between 9.5-10 km (52.4 ± 3.4 vs. 47.8 ± 5.4 mL · kg -1 · min -1 ; P = 0.04). The results suggest ice slurry ingestion was an effective ergogenic aid for triathlon running performance in the heat. The attenuation of intragastric temperature and perceived thermal stress were likely contributors to the self-selection of a higher running intensity and improved performance time. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2013.779740
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ben Dascombe
2010 Joles JA, Sculley DV, Langley-Evans SC, 'Proteinuria in aging rats due to low-protein diet during mid-gestation', Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 1 75-83 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S2040174409990183
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2007 Mallinson JE, Sculley DV, Craigon J, Plant R, Langley-Evans SC, Brameld JM, 'Fetal exposure to a maternal low-protein diet during mid-gestation results in muscle-specific effects on fibre type composition in young rats', BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 98 292-299 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S0007114507701678
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 37
2007 Erhuma A, Salter AM, Sculley DV, Langley-Evans SC, Bennett AJ, 'Prenatal exposure to a low-protein diet programs disordered regulation of lipid metabolism in the aging rat', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM, 292 E1702-E1714 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1152/ajpendo.00605.2006
Citations Scopus - 101Web of Science - 92
2006 Langley-Evans SC, Bellinger L, Sculley D, Langley-Evans A, McMullen S, 'Manipulation of the maternal diet in rat pregnancy. Different approaches to the demonstration of the programming principle', EARLY LIFE ORIGINS OF HEALTH AND DISEASE, 573 87-102 (2006)
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2006 Bellinger L, Sculley DV, Langley-Evans SC, 'Exposure to undernutrition in fetal life determines fat distribution, locomotor activity and food intake in ageing rats', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBESITY, 30 729-738 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/sj.ijo.0803205
Citations Scopus - 110Web of Science - 104
2006 Langley-Evans SC, Sculley DV, 'The association between birthweight and longevity in the rat is complex and modulated by maternal protein intake during fetal life', FEBS LETTERS, 580 4150-4153 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.febslet.2006.06.062
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 35
2005 Erhuma AM, Sculley D, Plant R, Salter AM, Langley-Evans SC, Bennett AJ, 'Exposure to a maternal low-protein diet in pregnancy programmes altered expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein in the offspring', PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY, 64 81A-81A (2005)
Citations Web of Science - 2
2005 Sculley DV, Langley-Evans SC, 'Age-related loss of renal function is driven by programmed oxidative processes in the rat', PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY, 64 83A-83A (2005)
2005 Langley-Evans SC, Sculley DV, 'Programming of hepatic antioxidant capacity and oxidative injury in the ageing rat', MECHANISMS OF AGEING AND DEVELOPMENT, 126 804-812 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.mad.2005.03.003
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 37
2003 Sculley DV, Langley-Evans SC, 'Periodontal disease is associated with lower antioxidant capacity in whole saliva and evidence of increased protein oxidation', CLINICAL SCIENCE, 105 167-172 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1042/CS20030031
Citations Scopus - 124Web of Science - 106
2002 Sculley DV, Langley-Evans SC, 'Salivary antioxidants and periodontal disease status', PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY, 61 137-143 (2002)
DOI 10.1079/PNS2001141
Citations Scopus - 110Web of Science - 98
Show 23 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Coda A, Fellas A, Sculley D, Santos D, Girones X, Brosseau L, et al., 'Smart Technologies To Improve Health Outcomes In Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis' (2017)
Co-authors Andrea Coda
2005 Langley-Evans SC, Sculley DV, 'Survival of male rats is unaltered by exposure to a maternal low protein diet during specific periods of intrauterine development', PEDIATRIC RESEARCH (2005)
2005 Sculley DV, Langley-Evans SC, 'Programmed deterioration of renal function is exacerbated by a disruption in the glutathione redox system', PEDIATRIC RESEARCH (2005)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2003 Langley-Evans S, Sculley D, McMullen S, 'Increased oxidative injury in the liver of newborn rats exposed to intrauterine undernutrition is associated with reduced activity of superoxide dismutase.', PEDIATRIC RESEARCH (2003)
2003 Sculley DV, Langley-Evans SC, 'Salivary antioxidant status is independent of dietary intake.', FREE RADICAL RESEARCH (2003)
2003 Sculley DV, Langley-Evans SC, 'Periodontal disease is associated with lower antioxidant capacity in whole saliva and evidence of increased protein oxidation.', FREE RADICAL RESEARCH (2003)
Show 3 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $14,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20172 grants / $14,000

Randomised control trial of smart-watch technology for improving pain, quality of life, drug-therapy & physical-activity adherence in children with Juvenile Arthritis (Invited Woodend application)$11,000

Funding body: Perpetual Limited

Funding body Perpetual Limited
Project Team Doctor Andrea Coda, Doctor Dean Sculley, Doctor Gabor Major, Dr Xavier Girones, Dr Derek Santos, Dr Jeffrey Chaitow, Professor Lucie Brosseau, Professor Derek Smith, Professor Keith Rome, Professor Joshua Burns, Associate Professor Davinder Singh-Grewal
Scheme Impact Philanthropy Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1601367
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Smart Technologies in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis$3,000

Funding body: Auckland University of Technology

Funding body Auckland University of Technology
Project Team Doctor Andrea Coda, Doctor Dean Sculley, Dr Xavier Girones, Dr Derek Santos, Dr Jeffrey Chaitow, Professor Derek Smith, Professor Keith Rome, Professor Joshua Burns, Associate Professor Davinder Singh-Grewal
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701172
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2014 PhD Training responses in females PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Performance, Physiological and Perceptual Effects of Cooling Endurance Athletes in the Heat PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD The Acute Physiological Physical and Perceptual Responses to Intermittent Hypoxic Resistance Training PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Dean Sculley

Positions

Senior Lecturer
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Lecturer
Centre for English Language and Foundation Studies
Academic Division

Focus area

Human Physiology

Contact Details

Email dean.sculley@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4349 4596
Fax (02) 4349 4538

Office

Room BE144
Building Health Precinct
Location Ourimbah
10 Chittaway Road
Ourimbah, NSW 2258
Australia
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