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Dr Katrina King

Research Academic

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Katrina King is a research academic with the School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle. She trained as a research scientist with particular expertise in amino acid biochemistry and chronic illness at the University of Newcastle and received her PhD in Biological Sciences in 1999. Since commencing with the Department of Medicine and Public Health, Katrina has become involved in a number of projects associated with colorectal cancer screening including an assessment of the effectiveness of community based faecal occult screening programs for colorectal cancer and an evaluation of the follow-up referral patterns, health care utilisation and clinical outcomes for patients with a positive faecal occult blood tests. She has also been involved in the design and conduct of the Retirement Health and Lifestyle Study, a large multidisciplinary research project conducted by the University of Newcastle in association with researchers from the Central Coast Local Health District Public Health Unit, Urbis Pty Ltd and Hunter Valley Research Foundation. The Retirement Health and Lifestyle study is an on-going cross-sectional study of how older people’s (>65 years of age) homes and neighbourhoods influence their health, well-being and lifestyle. Dr Katrina King’s current research interests include the investigation of factors that influence the health and lifestyle of older Australians, in particular, understanding the role of facility provision, built environment and social factors in improving health outcomes, and the development of preventative health strategies to promote healthy ageing.

Research Expertise
Dr Katrina King has been involved in clinical research for a number of years. Over this time she has developed considerable experience working with large multi-disciplinary and collaborative research projects investigating various aspects of human health and disease. She has also developed expertise in all areas of study management, including study administration, study design, the selection and development of research tools, and the management of staff, and the management and analysis of large multifactorial data sets. Throughout her career she has gained research expertise in the areas of chronic fatigue syndrome, colorectal cancer, cardiovascular disease, preventative and population health and the role of amino acids in disease pathophysiology.


Collaborations
Katrina has worked with several large, multi-disciplinary research teams and has formed collaborations with researchers from the: • School of Environmental and Life Sciences and School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle; • School of Population Health, University of Queensland; • School of Design, Queensland University of Technology; • Public Health Unit, Central Coast Local Health District; • Hunter Valley Research Foundation; • UnitingCare Ageing NSW.ACT; • Urbis Pty Ltd; and • Department of Health Promotion & Education and Department of Endocrinology, Royal North Shore Hospital.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Built Environment
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Colorectal Cancer
  • Gerontology
  • Health
  • Physical Activity
  • Preventative Medicine

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110101 Medical Biochemistry: Amino Acids and Metabolites 20
111712 Health Promotion 40
111716 Preventive Medicine 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Academic University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/10/2005 -  Research Academic University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (16 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Docherty T, Montalto M, Leslie J, King K, Niblett S, Garrett T, 'Temperature profiles of antibiotic-containing elastomeric infusion devices used by ambulatory care patients.', Am J Health Syst Pharm, 74 992-1001 (2017)
DOI 10.2146/ajhp151071
Citations Web of Science - 1
2017 Beckett EL, Martin C, Boyd L, Porter T, King K, Niblett S, et al., 'Reduced plasma homocysteine levels in elderly Australians following mandatory folic acid fortification ¿ A comparison of two cross-sectional cohorts', Journal of Nutrition and Intermediary Metabolism, 8 14-20 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jnim.2017.04.001
Co-authors Martin Veysey, Zoe Yates, Emma Beckett, Mark Lucock
2016 Abbott KA, Veysey M, Lucock M, Niblett S, King K, Burrows T, Garg ML, 'Sex-dependent association between erythrocyte n-3 PUFA and type 2 diabetes in older overweight people.', Br J Nutr, 115 1379-1386 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S0007114516000258
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Manohar Garg, Martin Veysey, Mark Lucock, Tracy Burrows
2016 Beckett EL, Duesing K, Martin C, Jones P, Furst J, King K, et al., 'Relationship between methylation status of Vitamin D-related genes, Vitamin D levels, and methyl-donor biochemistry', Journal of Nutrition and Intermediary Metabolism, 6 8-15 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. Vitamin D is known for its role in the regulation of gene expression via the Vitamin D receptor, a nuclear transcription factor. Mo... [more]

© 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. Vitamin D is known for its role in the regulation of gene expression via the Vitamin D receptor, a nuclear transcription factor. More recently, a role for Vitamin D in regulating DNA methylation has been identified as an additional mechanism of modulation of gene expression. How methylation status influences Vitamin D metabolism and response pathways is not yet clear. Therefore, we aimed to assess the relationship between plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D) and the methylation status of Vitamin D metabolism enzyme genes (CYP2R1, CYP27B1 and CYP24A1) and the Vitamin D receptor gene (VDR). This analysis was conducted in the context of dietary Vitamin D, and background methyl donor related biochemistry, with adjustment for several dietary and lifestyle variables. Percentage methylation at CpG sites was assessed in peripheral blood cells using methylation sensitive and dependent enzymes and qPCR. Standard analytical techniques were used to determine plasma 25(OH)D and homocysteine, and serum folate and B12, with the relationship to methylation status assessed using multi-variable regression analysis. CYP2R1 and VDR methylation were found to be independent predictors of plasma 25(OH)D, when adjusted for Vitamin D intake and other lifestyle variables. CYP24A1 was related to plasma 25(OH)D directly, but not in the context of Vitamin D intake. Methyl-group donor biochemistry was associated with the methylation status of some genes, but did not alter the relationship between methylation and plasma 25(OH)D. Modulation of methylation status of CYP2R1, CYP24A1 and VDR in response to plasma 25(OH)D may be part of feedback loops involved in maintaining Vitamin D homeostasis, and may explain a portion of the variance in plasma 25(OH)D levels in response to intake and sun exposure. Methyl-group donor biochemistry, while a potential independent modulator, did not alter this effect.

DOI 10.1016/j.jnim.2016.04.010
Co-authors Martin Veysey, Zoe Yates, Emma Beckett, Mark Lucock, John Furst
2016 Mingay E, Veysey M, Lucock M, Niblett S, King K, Patterson A, Garg M, 'Sex-dependent association between omega-3 index and body weight status in older Australians', Journal of Nutrition and Intermediary Metabolism, 5 70-77 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors Background/objectives Restricting energy intake for weight management in older adults has potential to adversely affect nutritional status and result in impair... [more]

© 2016 The Authors Background/objectives Restricting energy intake for weight management in older adults has potential to adversely affect nutritional status and result in impairment of an already compromised immune system. Investigation of alternative strategies to combat adiposity and sustain lean muscle mass in older adults are warranted to minimise the risk of developing chronic diseases. Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA), including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may play an important role through their impact on increased fat oxidation and reduced inflammation. This study aimed to examine the association between erythrocyte membrane LCn-3PUFA and anthropometric measures in an older population. Subjects/methods A cross-sectional sample of older adults (n¿=¿620; age 65¿95 years; 56.3% females) from the Retirement Health and Lifestyle Study (RHLS) was analysed. Anthropometric measurements, including height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip circumference (HC) were taken. The fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes was analysed via gas chromatography (GC) to determine the omega-3 index (%EPA plus %DHA). Results An inverse association was detected between the omega-3 index and anthropometric measures, BMI (r¿=¿-0.076, p=0.06), WC (r¿=¿-0.118, p¿ < ¿0.01) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR; r¿=¿-0.149, p¿ < ¿0.001). Stratification of data by sex (females, n¿=¿349; males, n¿=¿271) indicated that these associations were sex-specific. Females displayed an inverse association between the omega-3 index and BMI (r¿=¿-0.146, p¿ < ¿0.01) and WC (r¿=¿-0.125, p¿ < ¿0.05). In contrast, no significant association between the omega-3 index and anthropometric measures was detected in males. After correcting for the potentially confounding effects of age, household income, fish oil supplement status, daily dietary energy intake and total physical activity times, the omega-3 index was inversely associated with BMI and WC in females but not males. Conclusions Omega-3 status was associated with weight status, particularly in older women but not in men. These results suggest the need for sex-based intervention trials to examine the role of dietary intake and/or supplementation of LCn-3PUFA in weight management of older adults.

DOI 10.1016/j.jnim.2016.04.001
Co-authors Martin Veysey, Amanda Patterson, Mark Lucock, Manohar Garg
2016 Rose M, Veysey M, Lucock M, Niblett S, King K, Baines S, Garg ML, 'Association between erythrocyte omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels and fatty liver index in older people is sex dependent', Journal of Nutrition and Intermediary Metabolism, 5 78-85 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors Background/Objectives Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is highly prevalent in older people but currently no specific drugs are available for its treat... [more]

© 2016 The Authors Background/Objectives Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is highly prevalent in older people but currently no specific drugs are available for its treatment. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3PUFA), known for their lipid-lowering, anti-inflammatory and anti-hypertensive properties, may have therapeutic potential for the management of NAFLD. The aim of this study was to determine whether n-3PUFA levels are associated with the prevalence of NAFLD in older adults. Methods A cross-sectional sample of older adults aged 65¿95 years (n¿=¿620) from the Retirement Health and Lifestyle Study (RHLS) was analysed. Fatty Liver Index (FLI) scores, used as an indicator of NAFLD risk, were calculated using a validated a lgorithm that incorporates body mass index, waist circumference, plasma triglycerides and ¿-glutamyl transferase. Omega-3 index scores (O3I, %eicosapentaenoic acid plus %docosahexaenoic acid) were determined by analysing the fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes by gas chromatography. Results Following application of exclusion criteria, 475 participants were included in the analysis (age 77.9¿±¿7.0 years; 60.4% females). Of these, 216 participants had FLI scores (=60) suggestive of NAFLD (age 77.0¿±¿6.6 years; 49.1% females). O3I was significantly lower in participants with NAFLD compared to those without NAFLD (p¿ < ¿0.01). A significant inverse relationship was found between O3I and FLI (r¿=¿-0.165; p¿ < ¿0.001). This relationship was gender specific with women, but not men, showing a significant association (r¿=¿-0.206; p¿ < ¿0.001). Conclusions The current study demonstrated a sex-dependent inverse relationship between erythrocyte n-3PUFA concentrations and NAFLD in older adults. The finding supports the proposal for sex-stratified n-3PUFA intervention trials in this high-risk age group.

DOI 10.1016/j.jnim.2016.04.007
Co-authors Manohar Garg, Martin Veysey, Mark Lucock, Surinder Baines
2016 Olliver M, Veysey M, Lucock M, Niblett S, King K, MacDonald-Wicks L, Garg ML, 'Erythrocyte omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels are associated with biomarkers of inflammation in older Australians', Journal of Nutrition and Intermediary Metabolism, 5 61-69 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors Background Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory mediators heighten the risk of developing or aggravating a spectrum of chronic diseases and are a strong predict... [more]

© 2016 The Authors Background Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory mediators heighten the risk of developing or aggravating a spectrum of chronic diseases and are a strong predictor of mortality in elderly cohorts. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3PUFA), including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are known to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the relationship between erythrocyte membrane n-3PUFA and inflammation biomarkers has not been well established. Objective This study aimed to determine if n-3PUFA status, together with the omega-3 index (O3I, erythrocyte membrane % EPA plus DHA), is associated with pro-inflammatory mediators in older Australians. Methods The study was a cross-sectional analysis of randomly selected older men and women aged =65 years (n¿=¿620) recruited from the Central Coast of NSW, Australia. Fasted blood samples were analysed for C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen and full blood count using standardised laboratory methods. The fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes was analysed via gas chromatography to determine n-3PUFA levels. The relationships between n-3PUFA and inflammatory mediators were evaluated in multivariate regression models after adjusting for known inflammatory confounders. Results After excluding participants who had an inflammatory disease, CRP levels > 10¿mg/L, or who were taking anti-inflammatory medications or n-3PUFA supplements, 126 participants (age 77.6¿±¿7.3 years; females, 46%) were included in the analysis. After multivariate adjustments, O3I was inversely associated with CRP (ß¿=¿-0.209, p¿ < ¿0.05) and monocyte cell counts (ß¿=¿-0.205, p¿ < ¿0.05), and total n-3PUFA was inversely related to WBC (ß¿=¿-0.238, p¿ < ¿0.05), neutrophils (ß¿=¿-0.212, p¿ < ¿0.05) and monocytes (ß¿=¿-0.246, p¿ < ¿0.05). However no association between fibrinogen and O3I or total n-3PUFA was detected. Conclusions This study demonstrated a negative association between O3I and biomarkers of inflammation in an older population. The findings support a potential role for n-3PUFA supplementation in the management of inflammatory diseases.

DOI 10.1016/j.jnim.2016.03.002
Co-authors Lesley Wicks, Martin Veysey, Manohar Garg, Mark Lucock
2016 Ferguson JJA, Veysey M, Lucock M, Niblett S, King K, MacDonald-Wicks L, Garg ML, 'Association between omega-3 index and blood lipids in older Australians', Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, 27 233-240 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Management of hyperlipidaemia remains a cornerstone therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsatura... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Management of hyperlipidaemia remains a cornerstone therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) has been shown to modulate blood lipid profiles and reduce the risk of developing CVD. However, studies relating objective measures of long-term dietary n-3 PUFA intake and circulating lipid levels in older adults are limited. Thus, we aimed to determine whether there is an association between erythrocyte n-3 PUFA status (omega-3 index, O3I) and blood lipid profiles in older adults. A sample of adults aged 65-95 years who participated in the Retirement Health and Lifestyle Study was evaluated. Outcome measures included O3I (% eicosapentaenoic acid+% docosahexaenoic acid) and fasting blood lipid profiles [total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and triglyceride (TG)]. Two hundred and seventy-six subjects were included in the analyses. The mean±SD age was 77.6±7.4 years, and 40.9% were males. O3I was significantly higher in females compared to males. O3I was inversely associated with plasma TG (P < .001) and TC/HDL-cholesterol ratio (P < .05), and positively associated with HDL-cholesterol (P < .05), in all subjects. Associations between O3I and TG were evident in both females (r=-0.250, P < .01) and males (r=-0.225, P < .05). In females only, the odds of being hypertriglyceridaemic were highest in those with lowest O3I (P=006). Trends for hypercholesterolaemia and elevated LDL risk were converse between males and females. Long-term n-3 PUFA status is associated with blood lipid profiles in older Australians. Our findings support the development and implementation of age-specific dietary strategies to reduce the risk of CVD via improving the O3I.

DOI 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2015.09.010
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Manohar Garg, Lesley Wicks, Martin Veysey, Mark Lucock
2015 Beckett EL, Martin C, Choi JH, King K, Niblett S, Boyd L, et al., 'Folate status, folate-related genes and serum miR-21 expression: Implications for miR-21 as a biomarker', BBA Clinical, 4 45-51 (2015) [C1]

© 2015. Background: Free circulating microRNA (miRNA) in serum may be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis. miR-21, the archetypal oncogenic miRNA, has been pr... [more]

© 2015. Background: Free circulating microRNA (miRNA) in serum may be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis. miR-21, the archetypal oncogenic miRNA, has been proposed as a biomarker for colorectal cancer and its benign precursor, adenomatous polyps. However, it is now becoming clear that circulating miRNA profiles may be sensitive to lifestyle and environmental influences. Dietary components involved in one-carbon metabolism are particularly well placed to modulate miRNA expression through an influence on DNA methylation pathways. Methods: We investigated the role of methyl group donors (folate, B12, cysteine, homocysteine), polymorphisms of the enzymes of one-carbon metabolism, and serum miR-21 expression in a primary case-control cohort (colonoscopy confirmed adenomatous colon polyps vs controls; n. =. 253) and a secondary cross-sectional cohort (over 65s; n. =. 649). The relationships between these parameters and serum miR-21 levels were assessed, stratified by gender. Conclusions: Serum miR-21 expression was related to occurrence of adenomatous polyps in females, but not males. Folate levels and MTHFR-C677T genotype was associated with miR-21 expression in both genders. Additionally, DHFR-19 del and MSR-A66G were associated with miR-21 expression in females and males, respectively. Stimulation with excess folate increased expression of miR-21 in colon cancer cell lines. General significance: This study demonstrates that serum miR-21 expression correlates with folate status and related genetic status. This may have consequences for the proposed use of miR-21 as a colorectal cancer biomarker.

DOI 10.1016/j.bbacli.2015.06.006
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Zoe Yates, Emma Beckett, Mark Lucock, Martin Veysey
2014 Drever J, Veysey M, Lucock MD, Niblett S, King K, MacDonald-Wicks L, Garg ML, 'Association between n-3 PUFA and blood lipid profile in older Australians.', Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism, 1 31-31 (2014)
Co-authors Manohar Garg, Mark Lucock, Lesley Wicks, Martin Veysey
2014 Abbott K, Veysey M, Lucock MD, Niblett S, King K, MacDonald-Wicks L, Garg ML, 'N-3 pufa status is inversely associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in older Australians.', Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism, 1 31-31 (2014)
Co-authors Manohar Garg, Lesley Wicks, Martin Veysey, Mark Lucock
2014 Mingay E, Veysey M, Lucock MD, Niblett S, King K, Patterson A, Garg ML, 'Erythrocyte long chain n-3 pufa level is a predictor of body weight status in older Australians.', Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism, 1 8-9 (2014)
Co-authors Martin Veysey, Manohar Garg, Amanda Patterson, Mark Lucock
2014 Olliver M, Veysey M, Lucock MD, Niblett S, King K, MacDonald-Wicks L, Garg ML, 'Erythrocyte n-3pufa levels predict inflammatory status in older Australians.', Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism, 1 10-10 (2014)
Co-authors Mark Lucock, Martin Veysey, Manohar Garg, Lesley Wicks
2014 Rose M, Veysey M, Lucock MD, Niblett S, King K, Baines S, Garg ML, 'N-3 pufa status predicts non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in older Australians.', Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism, 1 9-9 (2014)
Co-authors Manohar Garg, Martin Veysey, Mark Lucock, Surinder Baines
2007 Niblett SH, King KE, Dunstan RH, Clifton-Bligh P, Hoskin LA, Roberts TK, et al., 'Hematologic and urinary excretion anomalies in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome', Experimental Biology and Medicine, 232 1041-1049 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.3181/0702-RM-44
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Tony Rothkirch, Tim Roberts, Hugh Dunstan
2000 McGregor NR, Niblett SH, Bligh PC, Dunstan RH, Fulcher G, Hoskin L, et al., 'The biochemistry of chronic pain and fatigue', JOURNAL OF CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME, 7, NO.1 3-21 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Tim Roberts, Hugh Dunstan
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Conference (16 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Beckett EL, Duesing K, Martin C, Jones P, Furst J, King K, et al., 'Plasma calcidiol and serum folate levels independently predict the methylation status of the vitamin D receptor gene CpG island' (2016)
Co-authors Emma Beckett, Zoe Yates, John Furst, Mark Lucock, Martin Veysey
2016 Beckett EL, Duesing K, Martin C, Jones P, Furst J, King K, et al., 'Plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol and serum folate levels are independent predictors of the methylation status of the vitamin D receptor gene' (2016)
Co-authors John Furst, Mark Lucock, Martin Veysey, Zoe Yates, Emma Beckett
2015 Garg M, Abbott K, Veysey M, Lucock M, Niblett S, King K, Burrows T, 'Association Between Omega-3 Index and Type 2 Diabetes in Older Overweight/Obese People is Sex Dependent', FASEB JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Mark Lucock, Manohar Garg, Tracy Burrows, Martin Veysey
2015 Kheir AO, King K, Niblett S, Martin C, Beckett E, Yates Z, et al., 'The relationship between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and homocysteine', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Zoe Yates, Martin Veysey, Emma Beckett, Mark Lucock
2015 Siow W, Niblett S, King K, Yates Z, Lucock M, Veysey M, 'NAFLD fibrosis score predicts an increased risk of colorectal polyps', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Zoe Yates, Mark Lucock, Martin Veysey
2015 Veysey M, King K, Niblett SH, Martin C, Beckett EL, Yates ZR, et al., 'Homocysteine Status Is a Predictor of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Is Genotype Dependent', GASTROENTEROLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Martin Veysey, Emma Beckett, Mark Lucock, Zoe Yates
2014 Siow W, Niblett SH, King K, Yates ZR, Lucock M, Veysey M, 'Prevalence and Associations of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in the Elderly', GASTROENTEROLOGY (2014)
Co-authors Zoe Yates, Martin Veysey, Mark Lucock
2014 Siow W, Niblett SH, King K, Yates ZR, Lucock M, Veysey M, 'Fatty Liver Index and NAFLD Fibrosis Score in an Elderly Population', GASTROENTEROLOGY (2014)
Co-authors Martin Veysey, Mark Lucock, Zoe Yates
2014 Veysey M, Siow W, Niblett S, King K, Yates Z, Lucock M, 'Hepatic fibrosis in an elderly population', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Martin Veysey, Mark Lucock, Zoe Yates
2013 Siow W, Niblett S, King K, Yates Z, Hampe T, Lucock M, Veysey M, 'Prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in an elderly Australian population', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Martin Veysey, Mark Lucock, Zoe Yates
2013 Siow W, Niblett S, King K, Yates Z, Martin C, Lucock M, Veysey M, 'A community-based study of dietary macro and micronutrients and the risk of colorectal cancer in an elderly Australian population', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Zoe Yates, Mark Lucock, Martin Veysey
2010 Niblett S, King K, Lucock MD, Roach P, Lewis P, Kennedy D, et al., 'Is Retirement village living good for health? Comparing the health of older adults living in retirement villages and the community' (2010)
Co-authors Paul Roach, Zoe Yates, Mark Lucock, Martin Veysey
2006 King K, Leijten E, Walsh P, Vigenser B, 'A Comparison of the Rotary Bowelscan and National Bowel Cancer Screening Pilot: Is the National Program Cost-Effective' (2006) [E3]
2002 McGregor N, De Becker P, Clifton-Bligh P, Stein E, Butt HL, De Meirleir K, et al., 'Evidence-based model of the pathogenic mechanism associated with symptom expression in ME/CFS', Proceedings of International Clinical and Scientific Meeting (2002) [E3]
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan, Tim Roberts
1998 McGregor N, Dunstan RH, Niblett S, King K, Butt HL, Taylor W, et al., 'Dental Amalgams and CFS', The Clinical and Scientific Basis of Chronic fatigue Syndrome: From Myth Towards Management. Program and Abstracts (1998) [E3]
1998 Niblett SH, Hoskin LA, Dunstan RH, Clifton-Bligh P, McGregor N, Roberts TK, et al., 'Alterations in Urinary Amino and Organic Acid Excretion in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.', The Clinical and Scientific Basis of Chronic fatigue Syndrome: From Myth Towards Management. Program and Abstracts (1998) [E3]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $482,920

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $482,920

Is retirement village living good for health: Comparing the health of older adults living in retirement villages and the community$482,920

Funding body: Central Coast Local Health District

Funding body Central Coast Local Health District
Project Team Associate Professor Martin Veysey, Doctor Katrina King, Doctor Suzanne Niblett
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1401449
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
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Dr Katrina King

Positions

Research Academic
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Research Grants Officer
Office PVC - Science
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email katrina.king@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Building Teaching and Research Unit
Location Gosford
Cnr Henry Parry Drive and Margin Street
Gosford, NSW 2250
Australia
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