Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott

Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott

Conjoint Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Current Position

Dr Lechner-Scott, a senior staff specialist in the Department of Neurology and Conjoint Professor at the University of Newcastle, opened a multidisciplinary Multiple Sclerosis Clinic at the John Hunter Hospital (JHH) in 2006 and established a MS Research Team at the Hunter Medical Research Institute (which includes 1 MS Fellow, 2 postdoc researchers, 4 PhD students, 1 Honours student, 1 Masters student, 2 Clinical Nurses 2 Clinical Trial Nurses, 1 Data manager and a Bioinformatician).

 

Training

She completed her medical degree at the University of Heidelberg in Germany and PhD thesis on pain pathways. After a Neurological Residency at the University Hospital in Freiburg, Germany, leading a specialised pain clinic, she completed a study on myotonic dystrophy comparing the size of genetic defect with changes on MRI and neuropsychological deficits. During her residency years working with a leading MS research group in Basel, Switzerland, she developed a training program for the disability scoring system in MS, the EDSS, which is now universally accepted, available as an online training program and necessary to be completed by any investigator participating in clinical trials for MS. For easier use for longterm follow up she also developed a phone assessment of disability, which just recently has been reviewed and compared against a battery of other tests and shown to be most valid tool for this purpose.

 

Research Experience

After completing her Neurology training in Europe she moved to Australia, retraining in General Medicine to complete her FRACP and be recognized as a Neurologist in Australia. In 2003, she started as a Staff Specialist for General Medicine and Neurology in the JHH. Since initiation of a specialised MS clinic in 2006 she has now accumulated a patient base of over 800 MS patients, with the number still increasing. All patients’ clinical data are entered into MSBase, an international data base with over 45 000 patients from 69 countries prospectively followed. This enormous amount of epidemiological data has allowed the team to analyse different aspects of the disease course and therapy and published in the last 5 years 27 articles in high-ranking journals like Neurology and Brain. One of the first analyses was conducted in Newcastle and linked positive oligoclonal bands to a poorer prognosis and a latitudinal gradient (Lechner-Scott et al., 2012). Since the start of her MS clinic she acted as principle investigator in 18 international clinical trials, was part of the steering committee of two trials and chair of the safety committee of another phase II trial.

She also is a founding member of the ANZGene collaboration and acted as chair of this collaboration from 2011 to 2013. This team of researchers published the first large genome wide association study in multiple sclerosis in 2009 and has since produced 25 further high-ranking articles. Apart from epigenetic changes in MS her research group also focuses on epidemiological aspects of MS and has recently presented data on the doubling of prevalence of MS in the Newcastle area in the last 15 years.

She acts as regular reviewer for journals such as Scientific Report, Clinical Epigenetics, MSJ, MS and related disorders and others as well as grants from National and International funding agencies.

Total research grant income of her group over the last 5y ~ $7 million

 


Community Engagement

Her standing in the community of MS experts has been accredited with being elected chair of Australian MS Clinical Trials Network, Executive Board member of NSW MS Research & Clinical Trials Network and member of the Medical and Scientific Board of MS Australia, MS Neurology Group ANZAN and Board Member of Hunter Medical Post Graduate Institution. She also has been invited to national and international advisory boards of several pharmaceutical companies. She frequently is invited as guest speaker by local MS societies and other charities.

 

Publication Record

Her publication record has steadily increased and includes 117 peer reviewed articles with 20 articles alone in the last year, accepted in Brain and Lancet Neurology, highly rated journals in the field. She had close to 4000 citations in the last 5 years with an i10 index of 42.

 


Qualifications

  • PhD (Medicine), University of Heidelberg
  • Bachelor of Medicine, University of Heidelberg

Keywords

  • Epigenetics
  • MRI
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Neuroimmunology
  • Neuromyelitis optica

Languages

  • German (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)
  • Italian (Fluent)
  • French (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified 40
060499 Genetics not elsewhere classified 35
110799 Immunology not elsewhere classified 25

Professional Experience

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/02/2004 -  Senior Staff Specialist

Senior Staff Specialist in the Department of Neurology and General Medicine

Head of MS clinic

Hunter New England Health
Internal Medicine
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
PDTY2204 Professional Practice
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Neurological examination
Lectures in CSF 1/02/2003 - 2/06/2017
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Schofield PW, Moore T, Loughland C, Lechner-Scott J, 'The Audio Recorded Cognitive Screen (ARCS): A flexible and versatile instrument for clinic or research', Screening Tests, Nova Science, Hauppaugue, NY 111-126 (2013) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Peter Schofield, Carmel Loughland

Journal article (118 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Stewart T, Spelman T, Havrdova E, Horakova D, Trojano M, Izquierdo G, et al., 'Contribution of different relapse phenotypes to disability in multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, 23 266-276 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1352458516643392
Citations Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Burnard S, Lechner-Scott J, Scott RJ, 'EBV and MS: Major cause, minor contribution or red-herring?', Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, 16 24-30 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurological disease with genetic and environmental risk factors. Epstein Barr-Virus (EBV) has been closely associated with MS but wit... [more]

© 2017 Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurological disease with genetic and environmental risk factors. Epstein Barr-Virus (EBV) has been closely associated with MS but with a significant amount of conflicting evidence. Some of the evidence for EBV involvement in MS includes: almost 100% of MS patients showing past EBV infection, an a ssociation with Infectious Mononucleosis (acute EBV infection), higher titres of EBV antibodies associated with an increased risk of MS development, and an overall altered immune response to EBV found in peripheral blood and the CNS of MS patients. However, evidence for EBV presence in the CSF and T cell responses to EBV in MS have been particularly conflicting. Several hypotheses have been proposed for direct and indirect EBV involvement in MS such as 1) Molecular Mimicry 2) Mistaken Self 3) Bystander Damage and 4) Autoreactive B cells infected with EBV. More recently, an association between EBV and human endogenous retrovirus in MS has been shown, which may provide an alternative pathogenetic target for MS treatment. However, if EBV is not the major contributor to MS and is instead one of several viral or infectious agents able to elicit a similar altered immune response, MS development may be the result of a failure of viral clearance in general. This review aims to evaluate the evidence for the currently discussed theories of EBV involvement in MS pathogenesis.

DOI 10.1016/j.msard.2017.06.002
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
2017 Bukhari W, Prain KM, Waters P, Woodhall M, O'Gorman CM, Clarke L, et al., 'Incidence and prevalence of NMOSD in Australia and New Zealand', Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 88 632-638 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Article author(s). Objectives: We have undertaken a clinic-based survey of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) in Australia and New Zealand to establish incid... [more]

© 2017 Article author(s). Objectives: We have undertaken a clinic-based survey of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) in Australia and New Zealand to establish incidence and prevalence across the region and in populations of differing ancestry. Background: NMOSD is a recently defined demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The incidence and prevalence of NMOSD in Australia and New Zealand has not been established. Methods: Centres managing patients with demyelinating disease of the CNS across Australia and New Zealand reported patients with clinical and laboratory features that were suspicious for NMOSD. Testing for aquaporin 4 antibodies was undertaken in all suspected cases. From this group, cases were identified who fulfilled the 2015 Wingerchuk diagnostic criteria for NMOSD. A capture-recapture methodology was used to estimate incidence and prevalence, based on additional laboratory identified cases. Results: NMOSD was confirmed in 81/170 (48%) cases referred. Capture-recapture analysis gave an adjusted incidence estimate of 0.37 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.39) per million per year and a prevalence estimate for NMOSD of 0.70 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.78) per 100 000. NMOSD was three times more common in the Asian population (1.57 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.98) per 100 000) compared with the remainder of the population (0.57 (95% CI 0.50 to 0.65) per 100 000). The latitudinal gradient evident in multiple sclerosis was not seen in NMOSD. Conclusions: NMOSD incidence and prevalence in Australia and New Zealand are comparable with figures from other populations of largely European ancestry. We found NMOSD to be more common in the population with Asian ancestry.

DOI 10.1136/jnnp-2016-314839
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Ribbons K, Lea R, Schofield PW, Lechner-Scott J, 'Anxiety levels are independently associated with cognitive performance in an Australian multiple sclerosis patient cohort', Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 29 128-134 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved. Neurological and psychological symptoms in multiple sclerosis can affect cognitive function. The objective of this ... [more]

© 2017, American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved. Neurological and psychological symptoms in multiple sclerosis can affect cognitive function. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between psychological measures and cognitive performance in a patient cohort. In 322 multiple sclerosis patients, psychological symptoms were measured using the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale, and cognitive function was evaluated using Audio Recorded Cognitive Screen. Multifactor linear regression analysis, accounting for all clinical covariates, found that anxiety was the only psychological measure to remain a significant predictor of cognitive performance (p < 0.001), particularly memory function (p < 0.001). Further prospective studies are required to determine whether treatment of anxiety improves cognitive impairment.

DOI 10.1176/appi.neuropsych.16050085
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Peter Schofield
2017 Oun A-I, Lechner-Scott J, Ribbons K, Ramadan S, 'Fast magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging techniques in human brain-applications in multiple sclerosis', JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE, 24 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12929-017-0323-2
Co-authors Saadallah Ramadan, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Lizak N, Lugaresi A, Alroughani R, Lechner-Scott J, Slee M, Havrdova E, et al., 'Highly active immunomodulatory therapy ameliorates accumulation of disability in moderately advanced and advanced multiple sclerosis', Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 88 196-203 (2017) [C1]

© BMJ Publishing Group Limited 2016. Objective: To evaluate variability and predictability of disability trajectories in moderately advanced and advanced multiple sclerosis (MS),... [more]

© BMJ Publishing Group Limited 2016. Objective: To evaluate variability and predictability of disability trajectories in moderately advanced and advanced multiple sclerosis (MS), and their modifiability with immunomodulatory therapy. Methods The epochs between Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) steps 3.6, 4.6 and 6.6.5 were analysed. Patients with relapse-onset MS and having reached 6-month confirmed baseline EDSS step (3/4/6) were identified in MSBase, a global observational MS cohort study. We used multivariable survival models to examine the impact of disease-modifying therapy, clinical and demographic factors on progression to the outcome EDSS step (6/6.5). Sensitivity analyses with varying outcome definitions and inclusion criteria were conducted. Results: For the EDSS 3.6, 4.6 and 6.6.5 epochs, 1560, 1504 and 1231 patients were identified, respectively. Disability trajectories showed large coefficients of variance prebaseline (0.92.1.11) and postbaseline (2.15.2.50), with no significant correlations. The probability of reaching the outcome step was not associated with prebaseline variables, but was increased by higher relapse rates during each epoch (HRs 1.58.3.07; p < 0.001). A greater proportion of each epoch treated with higher efficacy therapies was associated with lower risk of reaching the outcome disability step (HRs 0.72.0.91 per 25%; p=0.02). 3 sensitivity analyses confirmed these results. Conclusions: Disease progression during moderately advanced and advanced MS is highly variable and amnesic to prior disease activity. Lower relapse rates and greater time on higher efficacy immunomodulatory therapy after reaching EDSS steps 3, 4 and 6 are associated with a decreased risk of accumulating further disability. Highly effective immunomodulatory therapy ameliorates accumulation of disability in moderately advanced and advanced relapse-onset MS.

DOI 10.1136/jnnp-2016-313976
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Signori A, Izquierdo G, Lugaresi A, Hupperts R, Grand'Maison F, Sola P, et al., 'Long-term disability trajectories in primary progressive MS patients: A latent class growth analysis.', Mult Scler, 1352458517703800 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1352458517703800
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Spelman T, Meyniel C, Ignacio Rojas J, Lugaresi A, Izquierdo G, Grand'Maison F, et al., 'Quantifying risk of early relapse in patients with first demyelinating events: Prediction in clinical practice', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, 23 1346-1357 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1352458516679893
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Ribbons K, Lea R, Tiedeman C, Mackenzie L, Lechner-Scott J, 'Ongoing increase in incidence and prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Newcastle, Australia: A 50-year study', Multiple Sclerosis, 23 1063-1071 (2017) [C1]

© The Author(s), 2016. Background: Since 1959, multiple sclerosis (MS) prevalence has been estimated for the east coast Australian city of Newcastle. Previous surveys, conducted ... [more]

© The Author(s), 2016. Background: Since 1959, multiple sclerosis (MS) prevalence has been estimated for the east coast Australian city of Newcastle. Previous surveys, conducted in 1988 and 2003, have described an increase in the prevalence and incidence of MS. Objectives: In this study, we evaluated whether these trends continue and provide 50 years of MS epidemiological follow-up for this southern hemisphere city. Methods: Expressed per 100,000 people, prevalence of MS in Newcastle was calculated for those with a confirmed diagnosis of MS on 9 August 2011 and incidence based on the number of cases with MS diagnosis made during the preceding decade. Data were age-standardised to the total Australian population. Statistical comparisons were undertaken using Poisson regression analysis. Results: In 2011, the estimate of MS prevalence was 124.2, with female-to-male ratio reaching 3.1, a 53% increase in female predominance since 1996. MS incidence increased to 6.7, with a significantly higher proportion of new female cases since the previous survey. Conclusion: Prevalence of MS in Newcastle has risen linearly and is contributed to by a substantial increase in new cases over the preceding decade. Female predominance of MS cases continues to increase with a new diagnosis three times more likely in women.

DOI 10.1177/1352458516671819
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Caruana P, Lemmert K, Ribbons K, Lea R, Lechner-Scott J, 'Natural killer cell subpopulations are associated with MRI activity in a relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patient cohort from Australia', Multiple Sclerosis, 23 1479-1487 (2017) [C1]

© 2016, © The Author(s), 2016. Background: The importance of the innate immune system in multiple sclerosis (MS) is increasingly recognized and the role of natural killer (NK) c... [more]

© 2016, © The Author(s), 2016. Background: The importance of the innate immune system in multiple sclerosis (MS) is increasingly recognized and the role of natural killer (NK) cells in controlling autoimmunity may be an important modulator of disease activity. Objective: To examine NK subsets in MS patients on different treatments and to evaluate the role of NK subsets as indicators for disease activity. Methods: We measured NK subset levels in blood obtained from 110 relapsing-remitting MS patients. Patients were either off treatment or on treatment with natalizumab, fingolimod, glatiramer acetate or beta-interferon. Disease activity was defined according to ¿No Evidence of Disease Activity¿ (NEDA) criteria within an observation period of up to 2.4 years. The mean NK subset levels were compared among treatment groups using multivariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) and association analysis with disease activity performed using multi-factor logistic regression. Results: Our analysis revealed differences in NK cells and subsets on treatment compared to off treatment (p < 0.0005). A high proportion of bright NK cells were significantly associated with stable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging after adjusting for treatment effects (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The independent association of NK subsets with MRI stability needs to be confirmed in prospective studies to test their usefulness in predicting disease activity in MS patients.

DOI 10.1177/1352458516679267
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Iaffaldano P, Simone M, Lucisano G, Ghezzi A, Coniglio G, Brescia Morra V, et al., 'Prognostic indicators in pediatric clinically isolated syndrome', Annals of Neurology, 81 729-739 (2017)

© 2017 American Neurological Association Objective: To assess prognostic factors for a second clinical attack and a first disability-worsening event in pediatric clinically isola... [more]

© 2017 American Neurological Association Objective: To assess prognostic factors for a second clinical attack and a first disability-worsening event in pediatric clinically isolated syndrome (pCIS) suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods: A cohort of 770 pCIS patients was followed up for at least 10 years. Cox proportional hazard models and Recursive Partitioning and Amalgamation (RECPAM) tree-regression were used to analyze data. Results: In pCIS, female sex and a multifocal onset were risk factors for a second clinical attack (hazard ratio [HR], 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.28, 1.06¿1.55; 1.42, 1.10¿1.84, respectively), whereas disease-modifying drug (DMD) exposure reduced this risk (HR, 95% CI = 0.75, 0.60¿0.95). After pediatric onset MS (POMS) diagnosis, age at onset younger than 15 years and DMD exposure decreased the risk of a first Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS)-worsening event (HR, 95% CI = 0.59, 0.42¿0.83; 0.75, 0.71¿0.80, respectively), whereas the occurrence of relapse increased this risk (HR, 95% CI = 5.08, 3.46¿7.46). An exploratory RECPAM analysis highlighted a significantly higher incidence of a first EDSS-worsening event in patients with multifocal or isolated spinal cord or optic neuritis involvement at onset in comparison to those with an isolated supratentorial or brainstem syndrome. A Cox regression model including RECPAM classes confirmed DMD exposure as the most protective factor against EDSS-worsening events and relapses as the most important risk factor for attaining EDSS worsening. Interpretation: This work represents a step forward in identifying predictors of unfavorable course in pCIS and POMS and supports a protective effect of early DMD treatment in preventing MS development and disability accumulation in this population. Ann Neurol 2017;81:729¿739.

DOI 10.1002/ana.24938
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Kalincik T, Manouchehrinia A, Sobisek L, Jokubaitis V, Spelman T, Horakova D, et al., 'Towards personalized therapy for multiple sclerosis: prediction of individual treatment response', BRAIN, 140 2426-2443 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/brain/awx185
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Maltby VE, Lea RA, Sanders KA, White N, Benton MC, Scott RJ, Lechner-Scott J, 'Differential methylation at MHC in CD4

© The Author(s). Background: Although many genetic variants have been associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) risk, they do not explain all the disease risk and there remains unc... [more]

© The Author(s). Background: Although many genetic variants have been associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) risk, they do not explain all the disease risk and there remains uncertainty as to how these variants contribute to disease. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that can influence gene expression and has the potential to mediate the effects of environmental factors on MS. In a previous study, we found a differentially methylation region (DMR) at MHC HLA-DRB1 that was associated within relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients in CD4 + T cells. This study aimed to confirm this earlier finding in an independent RRMS cohort of treatment-naive female patients. Methods: Total genomic DNA was extracted from CD4 + T cells of 28 female RRMS and 22 age-matched healthy controls subjects. DNA was bisulfite-converted and hybridised to Illumina 450K arrays. Beta values for all CpGs were analysed using the DMPFinder function in the MINFI program, and a follow-up prioritisation process was applied to identify the most robust MS-associated DMRs. Results: This study confirmed our previous findings of a hypomethylated DMR at HLA-DRB1 and a hypermethylated DMR at HLA-DRB5 in this RRMS patient cohort. In addition, we identified a large independent DMR at MHC, whereby 11 CpGs in RNF39 were hypermethylated in MS cases compared to controls (max. ¿beta = 0.19, P = 2.1 × 10 -4 ). We did not find evidence that SNP genotype was influencing the DMR in this cohort. A smaller MHC DMR was also identified at HCG4B, and two non-MHC DMRs at PM20D1 on chr1 and ERICH1 on chr8 were also identified. Conclusions: The findings from this study confirm our previous results of a DMR at HLA-DRB1 and also suggest hypermethylation in an independent MHC locus, RNF39, is associated with MS. Taken together, our results highlight the importance of epigenetic factors at the MHC locus in MS independent of treatment, age and sex. Prospective studies are now required to discern whether methylation at MHC is involved in influencing risk of disease onset or whether the disease itself has altered the methylation profile.

DOI 10.1186/s13148-017-0371-1
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Vicki E Maltby, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Bateman GA, Lechner-Scott J, Copping R, Moeskops C, Yap SL, 'Comparison of the sagittal sinus cross-sectional area between patients with multiple sclerosis, hydrocephalus, intracranial hypertension and spontaneous intracranial hypotension: a surrogate marker of venous transmural pressure?', FLUIDS AND BARRIERS OF THE CNS, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12987-017-0066-1
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Zhou Y, Simpson S, Charlesworth JC, van der Mei I, Lucas RM, Ponsonby AL, et al., 'Variation within MBP gene predicts disease course in multiple sclerosis', Brain and Behavior, 7 1-6 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/brb3.670
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Kalincik T, Brown JWL, Robertson N, Willis M, Scolding N, Rice CM, et al., 'Treatment effectiveness of alemtuzumab compared with natalizumab, fingolimod, and interferon beta in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a cohort study', The Lancet Neurology, 16 271-281 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Background Alemtuzumab, an anti-CD52 antibody, is proven to be more efficacious than interferon beta-1a in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple scler... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Background Alemtuzumab, an anti-CD52 antibody, is proven to be more efficacious than interferon beta-1a in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, but its efficacy relative to more potent immunotherapies is unknown. We compared the effectiveness of alemtuzumab with natalizumab, fingolimod, and interferon beta in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis treated for up to 5 years. Methods In this international cohort study, we used data from propensity-matched patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis from the MSBase and six other cohorts. Longitudinal clinical data were obtained from 71 MSBase centres in 21 countries and from six non-MSBase centres in the UK and Germany between Nov 1, 2015, and June 30, 2016. Key inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of definite relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, exposure to one of the study therapies (alemtuzumab, interferon beta, fingolimod, or natalizumab), age 65 years or younger, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score 6·5 or lower, and no more than 10 years since the first multiple sclerosis symptom. The primary endpoint was annualised relapse rate. The secondary endpoints were cumulative hazards of relapses, disability accumulation, and disability improvement events. We compared relapse rates with negative binomial models, and estimated cumulative hazards with conditional proportional hazards models. Findings Patients were treated between Aug 1, 1994, and June 30, 2016. The cohorts consisted of 189 patients given alemtuzumab, 2155 patients given interferon beta, 828 patients given fingolimod, and 1160 patients given natalizumab. Alemtuzumab was associated with a lower annualised relapse rate than interferon beta (0·19 [95% CI 0·14¿0·23] vs 0·53 [0·46¿0·61] , p < 0·0001) and fingolimod (0·15 [0·10¿0·20] vs 0·34 [0·26¿0·41] , p < 0·0001), and was associated with a similar annualised relapse rate as natalizumab (0·20 [0·14¿0·26] vs 0·19 [0·15¿0·23] , p=0·78). For the disability outcomes, alemtuzumab was associated with similar probabilities of disability accumulation as interferon beta (hazard ratio [HR] 0·66 [95% CI 0·36¿1·22] , p=0·37), fingolimod (1·27 [0·60¿2·70], p=0·67), and natalizumab (0·81 [0·47¿1·39] , p=0·60). Alemtuzumab was associated with similar probabilities of disability improvement as interferon beta (0·98 [0·65¿1·49], p=0·93) and fingolimod (0·50 [0·25¿1·01] , p=0·18), and a lower probability of disability improvement than natalizumab (0·35 [0·20¿0·59], p=0·0006). Interpretation Alemtuzumab and natalizumab seem to have similar effects on annualised relapse rates in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Alemtuzumab seems superior to fingolimod and interferon beta in mitigating relapse activity. Natalizumab seems superior to alemtuzumab in enabling recovery from disability. Both natalizumab and alemtuzumab seem highly effective and viable immunotherapies for multiple sclerosis. Treatment decisions between alemtuzumab and natalizumab should be primarily governed by their safety profiles. Funding National Health and Medical Research Council, and the University of Melbourne.

DOI 10.1016/S1474-4422(17)30007-8
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Solis WG, Waller SE, Harris AK, Sugo E, Hansen MA, Lechner-Scott J, 'Favourable Outcome in a 33-Year-Old Female with Acute Haemorrhagic Leukoencephalitis', CASE REPORTS IN NEUROLOGY, 9 106-113 (2017)
DOI 10.1159/000472706
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Tettey P, Simpson S, Taylor B, Ponsonby AL, Lucas RM, Dwyer T, et al., 'An adverse lipid profile and increased levels of adiposity significantly predict clinical course after a first demyelinating event', Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 88 395-401 (2017)

© 2017 Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article). All rights reserved. Objective: To investigate the prospective associations be... [more]

© 2017 Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article). All rights reserved. Objective: To investigate the prospective associations between adiposity and lipid-related variables and conversion to multiple sclerosis (MS), time to subsequent relapse and progression in disability. Methods: A cohort of 279 participants with a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination was prospectively followed to 5-year review. Height, weight, waist and hip circumference were measured, and serum samples taken for measurement of lipids and apolipoproteins. Survival analysis was used for conversion to MS and time to relapse, and linear regression for annualised change in disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale). Results: Higher body mass index (BMI; adjusted HR (aHR): 1.22 (1.04 to 1.44) per 5 kg/m 2 increase), hip circumference (aHR: 1.32 (1.12 to 1.56) per 10 cm increase) and triglyceride levels (aHR: 1.20 (1.03 to 1.40) per unit increase) were associated with increased risk of subsequent relapse, while adiposity and lipid-related measures were not associated with conversion to MS. In addition, higher BMI (ß: 0.04 (0.01 to 0.07) per 5 kg/m 2 increase), hip circumference (ß: 0.04 (0.02 to 0.08) per 10 cm increase), waist circumference (ß: 0.04 (0.02 to 0.07) per 10 cm increase), total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein ratio (TC/HDL ratio; ß: 0.05 (0.001 to 0.10) and non-HDL; ß: 0.04 (0.001 to 0.08) at study entry) were associated with a higher subsequent annual change in disability. Conclusions: Higher levels of adiposity, non-HDL and TC/HDL ratio were prospectively associated with a higher rate of disability progression, and higher adiposity and triglycerides were associated with relapse but not with conversion to MS. Improving the lipid profile and losing weight into the healthy range could reduce the accumulation of disability.

DOI 10.1136/jnnp-2016-315037
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Lorscheider J, Jokubaitis VG, Spelman T, Izquierdo G, Lugaresi A, Havrdova E, et al., 'Anti-inflammatory disease-modifying treatment and short-term disability progression in SPMS', Neurology, 89 1050-1059 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 American Academy of Neurology. To investigate the effect of disease-modifying treatment on short-term disability outcomes in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS... [more]

© 2017 American Academy of Neurology. To investigate the effect of disease-modifying treatment on short-term disability outcomes in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). Methods: Using MSBase, an international cohort study, we previously validated a highly accurate definition of SPMS. Here, we identified patients in MSBase who were either untreated or treated with a disease-modifying drug when meeting this definition. Propensity score matching was used to select subpopulations with comparable baseline characteristics. Disability outcomes were compared in paired, pairwise-censored analyses adjusted for treatment persistence, visit density, and relapse rates. Results: Of the 2,381 included patients, 1,378 patients were matchable (treated n = 689, untreated n = 689). Median pairwise-censored follow-up was 2.1 years (quartiles 1.2-3.8 years). No difference in the risk of 6-month sustained disability progression was observed between the groups (hazard ratio [HR] 0.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.7-1.1, p = 0.27). We also did not find differences in any of the secondary endpoints: Risk of reaching Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score =7 (HR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-1.1, p = 0.10), sustained disability reduction (HR 1.0, 95% CI 0.8-1.3, p = 0.79), or change in disability burden (area under the EDSS-time curve, ß =-0.05, p = 0.09). Secondary and sensitivity analyses confirmed the results. Conclusions: Our pooled analysis of the currently available disease-modifying agents used after conversion to SPMS suggests that, on average, these therapies have no substantial effect on relapse-unrelated disability outcomes measured by the EDSS up to 4 years. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with SPMS, disease-modifying treatment has no beneficial effect on short-term disability progression.

DOI 10.1212/WNL.0000000000004330
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Ramanathan S, Mohammad S, Tantsis E, Nguyen T, Merheb V, Fung V, et al., 'The clinical course, therapeutic responses, and outcomes in relapsing MOG antibody-associated demyelination', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, 23 NP1-NP1 (2017)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Zhou Y, Chen M, Simpson S, Lucas RM, Charlesworth JC, Blackburn N, et al., 'Common genetic variation within miR-146a predicts disease onset and relapse in multiple sclerosis', Neurological Sciences, 1-8 (2017)

© 2017 Springer-Verlag Italia S.r.l. Despite extensive studies focusing on the changes in expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in multiple sclerosis (MS) compared to healthy controls... [more]

© 2017 Springer-Verlag Italia S.r.l. Despite extensive studies focusing on the changes in expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in multiple sclerosis (MS) compared to healthy controls, few studies have evaluated the association of genetic variants of miRNAs with MS clinical course. We investigated whether a functional polymorphism in the MS associated miR-146a gene predicted clinical course (hazard of conversion to MS and of relapse, and annualized change in disability), using a longitudinal cohort study of persons with a first demyelinating event followed up to their 5-year review. We found the genotype (GC+CC) of rs2910164 predicted relapse compared with the GG genotype (HR=2.09 (95% CI 1.42, 3.06), p=0.0001), as well as a near-significant (p=0.07) association with MS conversion risk. Moreover, we found a significant additive interaction between rs2910164 and baseline anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers predicting risk of conversion to MS (relative excess risk due to interaction [RERI] 2.39, p=0.00002) and of relapse (RERI 1.20, p=0.006). Supporting these results, similar results were seen for the other EBV-correlated variables: anti-EBNA-2 IgG titers and past history of infectious mononucleosis. There was no association of rs2910164 genotype for disability progression. Our findings provide evidence for miR-146a and EBV infection in modulating MS clinical course.

DOI 10.1007/s10072-017-3177-1
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Kalincik T, Jokubaitis V, Spelman T, Horakova D, Havrdova E, Trojano M, et al., 'Cladribine versus fingolimod, natalizumab and interferon ß for multiple sclerosis.', Mult Scler, 1352458517728812 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1352458517728812
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Malhotra S, Sorosina M, Río J, Peroni S, Midaglia L, Villar LM, et al., 'NLRP3 polymorphisms and response to interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis patients.', Mult Scler, 1352458517739137 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1352458517739137
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Mahurkar S, Moldovan M, Suppiah V, Sorosina M, Clarelli F, Liberatore G, et al., 'Response to interferon-beta treatment in multiple sclerosis patients: A genome-wide association study', Pharmacogenomics Journal, 17 312-318 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved. Up to 50% of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients do not respond to interferon-beta (IFN-ß) treatm... [more]

© 2017 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved. Up to 50% of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients do not respond to interferon-beta (IFN-ß) treatment and determination of response requires lengthy clinical follow-up of up to 2 years. Response predictive genetic markers would significantly improve disease management. We aimed to identify IFN-ß treatment response genetic marker(s) by performing a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS). The GWAS was carried out using data from 151 Australian MS patients from the ANZgene/WTCCC2 MS susceptibility GWAS (responder (R)=51, intermediate responders=24 and non-responders (NR)=76). Of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that were validated in an independent group of 479 IFN-ß-treated MS patients from Australia, Spain and Italy (R=273 and NR=206), eight showed evidence of association with treatment response. Among the replicated associations, the strongest was observed for FHIT (Fragile Histidine Triad; combined P-value 6.74 × 106) and followed by variants in GAPVD1 (GTPase activating protein and VPS9 domains 1; combined P-value 5.83 × 10 5) and near ZNF697 (combined P-value 8.15 × 10 5).

DOI 10.1038/tpj.2016.20
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Pablo Moscato, Rodney Scott
2017 Odenthal C, Simpson S, Oughton J, van der Mei I, Rose S, Fripp J, et al., 'Midsagittal corpus callosum area and conversion to multiple sclerosis after clinically isolated syndrome: A multicentre Australian cohort study', Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology, 61 453-460 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists Introduction: Patients presenting with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) may proceed to clinically definite m... [more]

© 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists Introduction: Patients presenting with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) may proceed to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). Midsagittal corpus callosum area (CCA) is a surrogate marker for callosal atrophy, and can be obtained from a standard MRI study. This study explores the relationship between CCA measured at CIS presentation (baseline) and at 5¿years post presentation, with conversion from CIS to CDMS. The association between CCA and markers of disability progression is explored. Methods: Corpus callosum area was measured on MRI scans at presentation and 5-year review following diagnosis of a first demyelinating event, or evidence of progressive MS, in 143 participants in the Ausimmune/AusLong Study. Relationships between CCA (at baseline and follow-up) and clinical outcomes were assessed. Results: Mean CCA at baseline study was 6.63¿cm 2 (SD 1.01). Patients who converted to MS by 5-year review (n¿=¿100) had a significantly smaller mean CCA at follow-up (6.22 vs. 6.74, P¿=¿0.007). Greater CCA reduction was associated with higher annualized relapse rate over follow-up. Conclusion: Baseline CCA obtained from standard MRI protocols may be compared with subsequent MRI examinations as a surrogate for neurodegeneration and cerebral atrophy in patients with MS. This study demonstrates an association between CCA and disability in individuals presenting with CIS who convert to MS.

DOI 10.1111/1754-9485.12570
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Bateman GA, Lechner-Scott J, Lea RA, 'A comparison between the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis and normal pressure hydrocephalus: is pulse wave encephalopathy a component of MS?', Fluids Barriers CNS, 13 18 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12987-016-0041-2
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Lorscheider J, Buzzard K, Jokubaitis V, Spelman T, Havrdova E, Horakova D, et al., 'Defining secondary progressive multiple sclerosis', BRAIN, 139 2395-2405 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/brain/aww173
Citations Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Collins CDE, Ivry B, Bowen JD, Cheng EM, Dobson R, Goodin DS, et al., 'A comparative analysis of Patient-Reported Expanded Disability Status Scale tools.', Mult Scler, 22 1349-1358 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1352458515616205
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Binder MD, Fox AD, Merlo D, Johnson LJ, Giuffrida L, Calvert SE, et al., 'Common and Low Frequency Variants in MERTK Are Independently Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility with Discordant Association Dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 Status', PLoS Genetics, 12 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Binder et al. Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The risk of developing MS is strongly influenced by ge... [more]

© 2016 Binder et al. Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The risk of developing MS is strongly influenced by genetic predisposition, and over 100 loci have been established as associated with susceptibility. However, the biologically relevant variants underlying disease risk have not been defined for the vast majority of these loci, limiting the power of these genetic studies to define new avenues of research for the development of MS therapeutics. It is therefore crucial that candidate MS susceptibility loci are carefully investigated to identify the biological mechanism linking genetic polymorphism at a given gene to the increased chance of developing MS. MERTK has been established as an MS susceptibility gene and is part of a family of receptor tyrosine kinases known to be involved in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. In this study we have refined the association of MERTK with MS risk to independent signals from both common and low frequency variants. One of the associated variants was also found to be linked with increased expression of MERTK in monocytes and higher expression of MERTK was associated with either increased or decreased risk of developing MS, dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 status. This discordant association potentially extended beyond MS susceptibility to alterations in disease course in established MS. This study provides clear evidence that distinct polymorphisms within MERTK are associated with MS susceptibility, one of which has the potential to alter MERTK transcription, which in turn can alter both susceptibility and disease course in MS patients.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pgen.1005853
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Pablo Moscato, Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Sanders KA, Benton MC, Lea RA, Maltby VE, Agland S, Griffin N, et al., 'Next-generation sequencing reveals broad down-regulation of microRNAs in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis CD4+T cells', CLINICAL EPIGENETICS, 8 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13148-016-0253-y
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott, Vicki E Maltby
2016 Groen K, Maltby VE, Sanders KA, Scott RJ, Tajouri L, Lechner-Scott J, 'Erythrocytes in multiple sclerosis - forgotten contributors to the pathophysiology?', Multiple Sclerosis Journal¿Experimental, Translational and Clinical, 2 2055217316649981-2055217316649981 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/2055217316649981
Co-authors Vicki E Maltby, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
2016 Warrender-Sparkes M, Spelman T, Izquierdo G, Trojano M, Lugaresi A, Grand'Maison F, et al., 'The effect of oral immunomodulatory therapy on treatment uptake and persistence in multiple sclerosis', Multiple Sclerosis, 22 520-532 (2016) [C1]

© SAGE Publications. Objective: We aimed to analyse the effect of the introduction of fingolimod, the first oral disease-modifying therapy, on treatment utilisation and persisten... [more]

© SAGE Publications. Objective: We aimed to analyse the effect of the introduction of fingolimod, the first oral disease-modifying therapy, on treatment utilisation and persistence in an international cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: MSBASIS, a prospective, observational sub-study of the MSBase registry, collects demographic, clinical and paraclinical data on patients followed from MS onset (n=4718). We conducted a multivariable conditional risk set survival analysis to identify predictors of treatment discontinuation, and to assess if the introduction of fingolimod has altered treatment persistence. Results: A total of 2640 patients commenced immunomodulatory therapy. Following the introduction of fingolimod, patients were more likely to discontinue all other treatments (hazard ratio 1.64, p < 0.001) while more patients switched to fingolimod than any other therapy (42.3% of switches). Patients switched to fingolimod due to convenience. Patients treated with fingolimod were less likely to discontinue treatment compared with other therapies (p < 0.001). Female sex, country of residence, younger age, a high Expanded Disability Status Scale score and relapse activity were all independently associated with higher rates of treatment discontinuation. Conclusion: Following the availability of fingolimod, patients were more likely to discontinue injectable treatments. Those who switched to fingolimod were more likely to do so for convenience. Persistence was improved on fingolimod compared to other medications.

DOI 10.1177/1352458515594041
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Kister I, Spelman T, Alroughani R, Lechner-Scott J, Duquette P, Grand'Maison F, et al., 'Discontinuing disease-modifying therapy in MS after a prolonged relapse-free period: A propensity score-matched study', Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 87 1133-1137 (2016) [C1]

Background Discontinuation of injectable diseasemodifying therapy (DMT) for multiple sclerosis (MS) after a long period of relapse freedom is frequently considered, but data on po... [more]

Background Discontinuation of injectable diseasemodifying therapy (DMT) for multiple sclerosis (MS) after a long period of relapse freedom is frequently considered, but data on post-cessation disease course are lacking. Objectives (1) To compare time to first relapse and disability progression among 'DMT stoppers' and propensity-score matched 'DMT stayers' in the MSBase Registry; (2) To identify predictors of time to first relapse and disability progression in DMT stoppers. Methods Inclusion criteria for DMT stoppers were: age =18 years; no relapses for =5 years at DMT discontinuation; follow-up for =3 years after stopping DMT; not restarting DMT for =3 months after discontinuation. DMT stayers were required to have no relapses for =5 years at baseline, and were propensityscore matched to stoppers for age, sex, disability (Expanded Disability Status Score), disease duration and time on treatment. Relapse and disability progression events in matched stoppers and stayers were compared using a marginal Cox model. Predictors of first relapse and disability progression among DMT stoppers were investigated using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results Time to first relapse among 485 DMT stoppers and 854 stayers was similar (adjusted HR, aHR=1.07, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.37; p=0.584), while time to confirmed disability progression was significantly shorter among DMT stoppers than stayers (aHR=1.47, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.84, p=0.001). The difference in hazards of progression was due mainly to patients who had not experienced disability progression in the prebaseline treatment period. Conclusions Patients with MS who discontinued injectable DMT after a long period of relapse freedom had a similar relapse rate as propensity score-matched patients who continued on DMT, but higher hazard for disability progression.

DOI 10.1136/jnnp-2016-313760
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Pan G, Simpson S, Van Der Mei I, Charlesworth JC, Lucas R, Ponsonby AL, et al., 'Role of genetic susceptibility variants in predicting clinical course in multiple sclerosis: A cohort study', Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 87 1204-1211 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. Background The genetic drivers of multiple sclerosis (MS) clinical course are essentially unknown with limited data arising ... [more]

© 2016 Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. Background The genetic drivers of multiple sclerosis (MS) clinical course are essentially unknown with limited data arising from severity and clinical phenotype analyses in genome-wide association studies. Methods Prospective cohort study of 127 first demyelinating events with genotype data, where 116 MS risk-Associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were assessed as predictors of conversion to MS, relapse and annualised disability progression (Expanded Disability Status Scale, EDSS) up to 5-year review (I "EDSS). Survival analysis was used to test for predictors of MS and relapse, and linear regression for disability progression. The top 7 SNPs predicting MS/relapse and disability progression were evaluated as a cumulative genetic risk score (CGRS). Results We identified 2 non-human leucocyte antigen (HLA; rs12599600 and rs1021156) and 1 HLA (rs9266773) SNP predicting both MS and relapse risk. Additionally, 3 non-HLA SNPs predicted only conversion to MS; 1 HLA and 2 non-HLA SNPs predicted only relapse; and 7 non-HLA SNPs predicted I "EDSS. The CGRS significantly predicted MS and relapse in a significant, dose-dependent manner: Those having =5 risk genotypes had a 6-fold greater risk of converting to MS and relapse compared with those with =2. The CGRS for I "EDSS was also significant: Those carrying =6 risk genotypes progressed at 0.48 EDSS points per year faster compared with those with =2, and the CGRS model explained 32% of the variance in disability in this study cohort. Conclusions These data strongly suggest that MS genetic risk variants significantly influence MS clinical course and that this effect is polygenic.

DOI 10.1136/jnnp-2016-313722
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Spelman T, Kalincik T, Jokubaitis V, Zhang A, Pellegrini F, Wiendl H, et al., 'Comparative efficacy of first-line natalizumab vs IFN-ß or glatiramer acetate in relapsing MS', Neurology: Clinical Practice, 6 102-115 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 American Academy of Neurology. Background: We compared efficacy and treatment persistence in treatment-naive patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) in... [more]

© 2016 American Academy of Neurology. Background: We compared efficacy and treatment persistence in treatment-naive patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) initiating natalizumab compared with interferon-ß (IFN-ß)/glatiramer acetate (GA) therapies, using propensity score-matched cohorts from observational multiple sclerosis registries. Methods: The study population initiated IFN-ß/GA in the MSBase Registry or natalizumab in the Tysabri Observational Program, had =3 months of on-treatment follow-up, and had active RRMS, defined as =1 gadolinium-enhancing lesion on cerebral MRI at baseline or =1 relapse within the 12 months prior to baseline. Baseline demographics and disease characteristics were balanced between propensity-matched groups. Annualized relapse rate (ARR), time to first relapse, treatment persistence, and disability outcomes were compared between matched treatment arms in the total population (n 366/group) and subgroups with higher baseline disease activity. Results: First-line natalizumab was associated with a 68% relative reduction in ARR from a mean (SD) of 0.63 (0.92) on IFN-ß/GA to 0.20 (0.63) (p [signed-rank] < 0.0001), a 64% reduction in the rate of first relapse (hazard ratio [HR] 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-0.47; p < 0.001), and a 27% reduction in the rate of discontinuation (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.58-0.93; p 0.01), compared with first-line IFN-ß/GA therapy. Confirmed disability progression and area under the Expanded Disability Status Scale-time curve analyses were not significant. Similar relapse and treatment persistence results were observed in each of the higher disease activity subgroups. Conclusions: This study provides Class IV evidence that first-line natalizumab for RRMS improves relapse and treatment persistence outcomes compared to first-line IFN-ß/GA. This needs to be balanced against the risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in natalizumab-treated patients. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that first-line natalizumab for RRMS improves relapse rates and treatment persistence outcomes compared to first-line IFN-ß/GA.

DOI 10.1212/CPJ.0000000000000227
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Jokubaitis VG, Spelman T, Kalincik T, Lorscheider J, Havrdova E, Horakova D, et al., 'Predictors of long-term disability accrual in relapse-onset multiple sclerosis.', Annals of neurology, 80 89-100 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/ana.24682
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Simpson S, Tan H, Otahal P, Taylor B, Ponsonby AL, Lucas RM, et al., 'Anxiety, depression and fatigue at 5-year review following CNS demyelination', Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, 134 403-413 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 John Wiley &amp; Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd Background: Anxiety and depression are common in multiple sclerosis (MS). We evaluated the prevalence... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Background: Anxiety and depression are common in multiple sclerosis (MS). We evaluated the prevalence and factors associated with anxiety, depression and fatigue at the 5-year review of a longitudinal cohort study following a first clinical diagnosis of CNS demyelination (FCD). Methods: Cases with a FCD were recruited soon after diagnosis and followed annually thereafter. A variety of environmental, behavioural and clinical covariates were measured at five-year review. Anxiety and depression were measured using the Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale (HADS), and fatigue by the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). Results: Of the 236 cases, 40.2% had clinical anxiety (median HADS-A: 6.0), 16.0% had clinical depression (median HADS-D: 3.0), and 41.3% had clinical fatigue (median FSS: 4.56). The co-occurrence of all three symptoms was 3.76 times greater than expectation. Younger age, higher disability, concussion or other disease diagnosis were independently associated with a higher anxiety score; male sex, higher disability, being unemployed, less physical activity, and antidepressant and/or anxiolytic-sedative medication use were independently associated with a higher depression score. Higher disability, immunomodulatory medication use, other disease diagnosis and anxiolytic-sedative medication use were independently associated with having fatigue, while female sex, higher BMI, having had a concussion, being unemployed and higher disability were associated with a higher fatigue score. Conclusion: These results support previous findings of the commonality of anxiety, depression and fatigue in established MS and extend this to post-FCD and early MS cases. The clustering of the three symptoms indicates that they may share common antecedents.

DOI 10.1111/ane.12554
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Tao C, Simpson S, Van Der Mei I, Blizzard L, Havrdova E, Horakova D, et al., 'Higher latitude is significantly associated with an earlier age of disease onset in multiple sclerosis', Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 87 1343-1349 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. Background: Age at onset (AAO) in multiple sclerosis (MS) is an important marker of disease severity and may have prognostic... [more]

© 2016 Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. Background: Age at onset (AAO) in multiple sclerosis (MS) is an important marker of disease severity and may have prognostic significance. Understanding what factors can influence AAO may shed light on the aetiology of this complex disease, and have applications in the diagnostic process. Methods: The study cohort of 22 162 eligible patients from 21 countries was extracted from the MSBase registry. Only patients with MS aged =16 years were included. To reduce heterogeneity, only centres of largely European descent were included for analysis. AAO was defined as the year of the first symptom suggestive of inflammatory central nervous system demyelination. Predictors of AAO were evaluated by linear regression. Results: Compared with those living in lower latitudes (19.0-39.9°), onset of symptoms was 1.9 years earlier for those at higher latitudes (50.0-56.0°) (p=3.83×10 -23 ). A reciprocal relationship was seen for ambient ultraviolet radiation (UVR), with a significantly increasing AAO for patients with MS per each quartile increment of ambient UVR (p=1.56×10 -17 ). We found that the AAO of female patients was ~5 months earlier than male patients (p=0.002). AAO of progressive-onset patients with MS were ~9 years later than relapsing-onset patients (p=1.40×10 -265 ). Conclusions: An earlier AAO in higher latitude regions was found in this worldwide European-descent cohort and correlated inversely with variation in latitudinal UVR. These results suggest that environmental factors which act at the population level may significantly influence disease severity characteristics in genetically susceptible populations.

DOI 10.1136/jnnp-2016-314013
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Spelman T, Mekhael L, Burke T, Butzkueven H, Hodgkinson S, Havrdova E, et al., 'Risk of early relapse following the switch from injectables to oral agents for multiple sclerosis', European Journal of Neurology, 23 729-736 (2016) [C1]

© 2016. Background and Purpose: Early relapse outcomes in long-term stable patients switching from interferon ß/glatiramer acetate (IFNß/GA) to oral therapy are unknown. Object... [more]

© 2016. Background and Purpose: Early relapse outcomes in long-term stable patients switching from interferon ß/glatiramer acetate (IFNß/GA) to oral therapy are unknown. Objective: The objective of this study was to compare early relapse and progression in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients switching to oral therapy following a period of stable disease on IFNß/GA, relative to a propensity-matched comparator of patients remaining on IFNß/GA. Methods: The MSBase cohort study is a global, longitudinal registry for MS. Time to first 6-month relapse in previously stable MS patients switching from platform injectables ('switchers') to oral agents were compared with propensity-matched patients remaining on IFNß/GA ('stayers') using a Cox marginal model. Results: Three-hundred and ninety-six switchers were successfully matched to 396 stayers on a 1:1 basis. There was no difference in the proportion of patients recording at least one relapse in the first 1-6 months by treatment arm (7.3% switchers, 6.6% stayers; P = 0.675). The mean annualized relapse rate (P = 0.493) and the rate of first 6-month relapse by treatment arm (hazard ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 0.70, 2.11) were also comparable. There was no difference in the rate of disability progression by treatment arm (hazard ratio 1.43, 95% confidence interval 0.63, 3.26). Conclusion: This is the first study to compare early relapse switch probability in the period immediately following switch to oral treatment in a population previously stable on injectable therapy. There was no evidence of disease reactivation within the first 6 months of switching to oral therapy.

DOI 10.1111/ene.12929
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 MacDonell R, Nagels G, Laplaud DA, Pozzilli C, De Jong B, Martins Da Silva A, et al., 'Improved patient-reported health impact of multiple sclerosis: The ENABLE study of PR-fampridine', Multiple Sclerosis, 22 944-954 (2016) [C1]

© SAGE Publications. Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease that negatively impacts patients&apos; lives. Objective: ENABLE assessed the effect of long-ter... [more]

© SAGE Publications. Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease that negatively impacts patients' lives. Objective: ENABLE assessed the effect of long-term prolonged-release (PR) fampridine (dalfampridine extended release in the United States) treatment on patient-perceived health impact in patients with MS with walking impairment. Methods: ENABLE was a 48-week, open-label, Phase 4 study of PR-fampridine 10 mg twice daily. Patients who showed any improvement in Timed 25-Foot Walk walking speed at weeks 2 and 4 and any improvement in 12-item MS Walking Scale score at week 4 remained on treatment. The primary endpoint was change from baseline in 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) physical component summary (PCS) score. Results: At week 4, 707/901 (78.5%) patients met the criteria to remain on treatment. Patients on treatment demonstrated significant and clinically meaningful improvements in SF-36 PCS scores from baseline (mean change (95% confidence interval)) to week 12 (4.30 (3.83, 4.78); p < 0.0001), week 24 (3.75 (3.23, 4.27); p < 0.0001), week 36 (3.46 (2.95, 3.97); p < 0.0001), and week 48 (3.24 (2.72, 3.77); p < 0.0001). Significant improvements from baseline were also demonstrated in secondary health measures in patients on treatment. Conclusion: PR-fampridine improved patient-perceived physical and psychological health impact of MS measured in a real-life setting.

DOI 10.1177/1352458515606809
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Kalincik T, Jokubaitis V, Izquierdo G, Duquette P, Girard M, Grammond P, et al., 'Comparative effectiveness of glatiramer acetate and interferon beta formulations in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.', Mult Scler, 21 1159-1171 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1352458514559865
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Broadley SA, Barnett MH, Boggild M, Brew BJ, Butzkueven H, Heard R, et al., 'A new era in the treatment of multiple sclerosis', Medical Journal of Australia, 203 139-141 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 AMPCo Pty Ltd. Produced with Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system with a multifactorial aetiol... [more]

© 2015 AMPCo Pty Ltd. Produced with Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system with a multifactorial aetiology and highly variable natural history. A growing understanding of the immunopathogenesis of the condition has led to an expanding array of therapies for this previously untreatable disease. While a cure for MS remains elusive, the potential to reduce inflammatory disease activity by preventing relapses and minimising disease progression is achievable. The importance of early treatment in minimising long-term disability is increasingly recognised. Most of the newer, more effective therapies are associated with risks and practical problems that necessitate an active management strategy and continuous vigilance. While the initiation of these therapies is likely to remain the responsibility of neurologists, other specialist physicians and general practitioners will be involved in the identification and management of adverse effects.

DOI 10.5694/mja14.01218
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Maltby VE, Graves MC, Lea RA, Benton MC, Sanders KA, Tajouri L, et al., 'Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of CD8+T cells shows a distinct epigenetic signature to CD4+T cells in multiple sclerosis patients', CLINICAL EPIGENETICS, 7 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13148-015-0152-7
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Vicki E Maltby, Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 He A, Spelman T, Jokubaitis V, Havrdova E, Horakova D, Trojano M, et al., 'Comparison of switch to fingolimod or interferon beta/glatiramer acetate in active multiple sclerosis.', JAMA Neurol, 72 405-413 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1001/jamaneurol.2014.4147
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Bergamaschi R, Montomoli C, Mallucci G, Lugaresi A, Izquierdo G, Grand'Maison F, et al., 'BREMSO: A simple score to predict early the natural course of multiple sclerosis', European Journal of Neurology, (2015) [C1]

Background and purpose: Early prediction of long-term disease evolution is a major challenge in the management of multiple sclerosis (MS). Our aim was to predict the natural cours... [more]

Background and purpose: Early prediction of long-term disease evolution is a major challenge in the management of multiple sclerosis (MS). Our aim was to predict the natural course of MS using the Bayesian Risk Estimate for MS at Onset (BREMSO), which gives an individual risk score calculated from demographic and clinical variables collected at disease onset. Methods: An observational study was carried out collecting data from MS patients included in MSBase, an international registry. Disease impact was studied using the Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS) and time to secondary progression (SP). To evaluate the natural history of the disease, patients were analysed only if they did not receive immune therapies or only up to the time of starting these therapies. Results: Data from 14 211 patients were analysed. The median BREMSO score was significantly higher in the subgroups of patients whose disease had a major clinical impact (MSSS= third quartile vs. = first quartile, P < 0.00001) and who reached SP (P < 0.00001). The BREMSO showed good specificity (79%) as a tool for predicting the clinical impact of MS. Conclusions: BREMSO is a simple tool which can be used in the early stages of MS to predict its evolution, supporting therapeutic decisions in an observational setting.

DOI 10.1111/ene.12696
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Rojas JI, Patrucco L, Trojano M, Lugaresi A, Izquierdo G, Butzkueven H, et al., 'Multiple sclerosis in Latin America: A different disease course severity? A collaborative study from the MSBase Registry.', Mult Scler J Exp Transl Clin, 1 2055217315600193 (2015)
DOI 10.1177/2055217315600193
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Spelman T, Kalincik T, Zhang A, Pellegrini F, Wiendl H, Kappos L, et al., 'Comparative efficacy of switching to natalizumab in active multiple sclerosis.', Ann Clin Transl Neurol, 2 373-387 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/acn3.180
Citations Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Broadley SA, Barnett MH, Boggild M, Brew BJ, Butzkueven H, Heard R, et al., 'A new era in the treatment of multiple sclerosis', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 203 139-+ (2015)
DOI 10.5694/mja14.01218
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Ribbons KA, McElduff P, Boz C, Trojano M, Izquierdo G, Duquette P, et al., 'Male sex is independently associated with faster disability accumulation in relapse-onset MS but not in primary progressive MS', PLoS ONE, 10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Ribbons et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and re... [more]

© 2015 Ribbons et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Background: Multiple Sclerosis is more common in women than men and females have more relapses than men. In a large international cohort we have evaluated the effect of gender on disability accumulation and disease progression to determine if male MS patients have a worse clinical outcome than females. Methods: Using the MSBase Registry, data from 15,826 MS patients from 25 countries was analysed. Changes in the severity of MS (EDSS) were compared between sexes using a repeated measures analysis in generalised linear mixed models. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to test for sex difference in the time to reach EDSS milestones 3 and 6 and the secondary progressive MS. Results: In relapse onset MS patients (n = 14,453), males progressed significantly faster in their EDSS than females (0.133 vs 0.112 per year, P < 0.001,). Females had a reduced risk of secondary progressive MS (HR (95% CI) = 0.77 (0.67 to 0.90) P = 0.001). In primary progressive MS (n = 1,373), there was a significant increase in EDSS over time in males and females (P < 0.001) but there was no significant sex effect on the annualized rate of EDSS change. Conclusion: Among registrants of MSBase, male relapse-onset patients accumulate disability faster than female patients. In contrast, the rate of disability accumulation between male and female patients with primary progressive MS is similar.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0122686
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Patrick Mcelduff
2015 Jokubaitis VG, Spelman T, Kalincik T, Izquierdo G, Grand'Maison F, Duquette P, et al., 'Predictors of disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome.', Annals of clinical and translational neurology, 2 479-491 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/acn3.187
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Goris A, Pauwels I, Gustavsen MW, Van Son B, Hilven K, Bos SD, et al., 'Genetic variants are major determinants of CSF antibody levels in multiple sclerosis', Brain, 138 632-643 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Author. Immunological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis include the production of antibodies in the central nervous system, expressed as presence of oligoclonal bands an... [more]

© 2015 The Author. Immunological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis include the production of antibodies in the central nervous system, expressed as presence of oligoclonal bands and/or an increased immunoglobulin G index-the level of immunoglobulin G in the cerebrospinal fluid compared to serum. However, the underlying differences between oligoclonal band-positive and-negative patients with multiple sclerosis and reasons for variability in immunoglobulin G index are not known. To identify genetic factors influencing the variation in the antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, we have performed a genome-wide association screen in patients collected from nine countries for two traits, presence or absence of oligoclonal bands (n = 3026) and immunoglobulin G index levels (n = 938), followed by a replication in 3891 additional patients. We replicate previously suggested association signals for oligoclonal band status in the major histocompatibility complex region for the rs9271640*A-rs6457617*G haplotype, correlated with HLA-DRB1*1501, and rs34083746*G, correlated with HLA-DQA1*0301 (P comparing two haplotypes = 8.88 × 10 < sup > -16 < /sup > ). Furthermore, we identify a novel association signal of rs9807334, near the ELAC1/SMAD4 genes, for oligoclonal band status (P = 8.45 × 10 < sup > -7 < /sup > ). The previously reported association of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus with immunoglobulin G index reaches strong evidence for association in this data set (P = 3.79 × 10 < sup > -37 < /sup > ). We identify two novel associations in the major histocompatibility complex region with immunoglobulin G index: the rs9271640*A-rs6457617*G haplotype (P = 1.59 × 10 < sup > -22 < /sup > ), shared with oligoclonal band status, and an additional independent effect of rs6457617*G (P = 3.68 × 10 < sup > -6 < /sup > ). Variants identified in this study account for up to 2-fold differences in the odds of being oligoclonal band positive and 7.75% of the variation in immunoglobulin G index. Both traits are associated with clinical features of disease such as female gender, age at onset and severity. This is the largest study population so far investigated for the genetic influence on antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, including 6950 patients. We confirm that genetic factors underlie these antibody levels and identify both the major histocompatibility complex and immunoglobulin heavy chain region as major determinants.

DOI 10.1093/brain/awu405
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Kalincik T, Horakova D, Spelman T, Jokubaitis V, Trojano M, Lugaresi A, et al., 'Switch to natalizumab versus fingolimod in active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis', Annals of Neurology, 77 425-435 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Neurological Association. Objective: In patients suffering multiple sclerosis activity despite treatment with interferon ß or glatiramer acetate, clinicians ofte... [more]

© 2015 American Neurological Association. Objective: In patients suffering multiple sclerosis activity despite treatment with interferon ß or glatiramer acetate, clinicians often switch therapy to either natalizumab or fingolimod. However, no studies have directly compared the outcomes of switching to either of these agents. Methods: Using MSBase, a large international, observational, prospectively acquired cohort study, we identified patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis experiencing relapses or disability progression within the 6 months immediately preceding switch to either natalizumab or fingolimod. Quasi-randomization with propensity score-based matching was used to select subpopulations with comparable baseline characteristics. Relapse and disability outcomes were compared in paired, pairwise-censored analyses. Results: Of the 792 included patients, 578 patients were matched (natalizumab, n = 407; fingolimod, n = 171). Mean on-study follow-up was 12 months. The annualized relapse rates decreased from 1.5 to 0.2 on natalizumab and from 1.3 to 0.4 on fingolimod, with 50% relative postswitch difference in relapse hazard (p = 0.002). A 2.8 times higher rate of sustained disability regression was observed after the switch to natalizumab in comparison to fingolimod (p < 0.001). No difference in the rate of sustained disability progression events was observed between the groups. The change in overall disability burden (quantified as area under the disability-time curve) differed between natalizumab and fingolimod (20.12 vs 0.04 per year, respectively, p < 0.001). Interpretation: This study suggests that in active multiple sclerosis during treatment with injectable disease-modifying therapies, switching to natalizumab is more effective than switching to fingolimod in reducing relapse rate and short-term disability burden.

DOI 10.1002/ana.24339
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 56
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Kappos L, D'Souza M, Lechner-Scott J, Lienert C, 'On the origin of Neurostatus', Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/j.msard.2015.04.001
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Malhotra S, Rio J, Urcelay E, Nurtdinov R, Bustamante MF, Fernandez O, et al., 'NLRP3 inflammasome is associated with the response to IFN-b in patients with multiple sclerosis', Brain, 138 644-652 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Author. Evidence exists for a potential modulation of inflammasome activity by interferon beta. Here, we investigated the roles of inflammasomes [absent in melanoma 2 ... [more]

© 2015 The Author. Evidence exists for a potential modulation of inflammasome activity by interferon beta. Here, we investigated the roles of inflammasomes [absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2); NLR family, CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4); NLR family, pyrin domain containing 1 and 3 (NLRP1 and NLRP3)] and related cytokines (IL1B, IL10, IL18) in the response to interferon beta in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Ninety-seven patients treated with interferon beta were classified into responders and non-responders according to clinical criteria after 24 months and clinical-radiological criteria after 12 months of treatment. Messenger RNA expression levels of inflammasomes and cytokines were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction in peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected before treatment with interferon beta. In a subgroup of patients, NLRP3 and IL1B expression was also determined after 3 months (n = 32) and 12 months (n = 20) of interferon beta treatment. A polymorphism located in the NLRP3 gene, rs35829419, was genotyped in 789 multiple sclerosis patients treated with interferon beta. Baseline mRNA expression levels for NLRP3 and IL1B were increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from non-responders compared to responders classified according to clinical criteria after 24 months (P = 0.02 and P = 0.001, respectively). No significant differences were observed for other inflammasomes and related cytokines. Differences in NLRP3 and IL1B expression remained significant following a clinical-radiological classification after 12 months (P = 0.007 and P = 0.02, respectively). After treatment with interferon beta, NLRP3 and IL1B expression was increased in responders but unchanged in non-responders. A trend for association was observed between rs35829419 and interferon beta response (pM-H = 0.08). These results point to a role of the NLRP3 inflammasome and its related cytokine IL1B in the response to interferon beta in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

DOI 10.1093/brain/awu388
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Bustamante MF, Morcillo-Suárez C, Malhotra S, Rio J, Leyva L, Fernández O, et al., 'Pharmacogenomic study in patients with multiple sclerosis: Responders and nonresponders to IFN-ß.', Neurology® Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, 2 e154 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1212/nxi.0000000000000154
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Gu BJ, Field J, Dutertre S, Ou A, Kilpatrick TJ, Lechner-Scott J, et al., 'A rare P2X7 variant Arg307Gln with absent pore formation function protects against neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis.', Human molecular genetics, 24 5644-5654 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/hmg/ddv278
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Pablo Moscato
2015 Field J, Shahijanian F, Schibeci S, Johnson L, Gresle M, Laverick L, et al., 'The MS risk allele of CD40 is associated with reduced cell-membrane bound expression in antigen presenting cells: Implications for gene function', PLoS ONE, 10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Field et al. Human genetic and animal studies have implicated the costimulatory molecule CD40 in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the cell speci... [more]

© 2015 Field et al. Human genetic and animal studies have implicated the costimulatory molecule CD40 in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the cell specific gene and protein expression variation controlled by the CD40 genetic variant(s) associated with MS, i.e. the T-allele at rs1883832. Previously we had shown that the risk allele is expressed at a lower level in whole blood, especially in people with MS. Here, we have defined the immune cell subsets responsible for genotype and disease effects on CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein level. In cell subsets in which CD40 is most highly expressed, B lymphocytes and dendritic cells, the MS-associated risk variant is associated with reduced CD40 cell-surface protein expression. In monocytes and dendritic cells, the risk allele additionally reduces the ratio of expression of full-length versus truncated CD40 mRNA, the latter encoding secreted CD40. We additionally show that MS patients, regardless of genotype, express significantly lower levels of CD40 cell-surface protein compared to unaffected controls in B lymphocytes. Thus, both genotype-dependent and independent down-regulation of cell-surface CD40 is a feature of MS. Lower expression of a co-stimulator of T cell activation, CD40, is therefore associated with increased MS risk despite the same CD40 variant being associated with reduced risk of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Our results highlight the complexity and likely individuality of autoimmune pathogenesis, and could be consistent with antiviral and/or immunoregulatory functions of CD40 playing an important role in protection from MS.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0127080
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Pablo Moscato, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Kalincik T, Cutter G, Spelman T, Jokubaitis V, Havrdova E, Horakova D, et al., 'Defining reliable disability outcomes in multiple sclerosis', Brain, 138 3287-3298 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.... [more]

© 2015 The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. Prevention of irreversible disability is currently the most important goal of disease modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis. The disability outcomes used in most clinical trials rely on progression of Expanded Disability Status Scale score confirmed over 3 or 6 months. However, sensitivity and stability of this metric has not been extensively evaluated. Using the global MSBase cohort study, we evaluated 48 criteria of disability progression, testing three definitions of baseline disability, two definitions of progression magnitude, two definitions of long-term irreversibility and four definitions of event confirmation period. The study outcomes comprised the rates of detected progression events per 10 years and the proportions of the recorded events persistent at later time points. To evaluate the ratio of progression frequency and stability for each criterion, we calculated the proportion of events persistent over the five subsequent years once progression was achieved. Finally, we evaluated the clinical and demographic determinants characterising progression events and, for those that regressed back to baseline, determinants of their subsequent regression. The study population consisted of 16 636 patients with the minimum of three recorded disability scores, totalling 112 584 patient-years. The progression rates varied between 0.41 and 1.14 events per 10 years, with the length of required confirmation interval as the most important determinant of the observed variance. The concordance among all tested progression criteria was only 17.3%. Regression of disability occurred in 11-34% of the progression events over the five subsequent years. The most important determinant of progression stability was the length of the confirmation period. For the most accurate set of the progression criteria, the proportions of 3-, 6-, 12- or 24-month confirmed events persistent over 5 years reached 70%, 74%, 80% and 89%, respectively. Regression post progression was more common in younger patients, relapsing-remitting disease course, and after a smaller change in disability, and was inflated by higher visit frequency. These results suggest that the disability outcomes based on 3-6-month confirmed disability progression overestimate the accumulation of permanent disability by up to 30%. This could lead to spurious results in short-term clinical trials, and the issue may be magnified further in cohorts consisting predominantly of younger patients and patients with relapsing-remitting disease. Extension of the required confirmation period increases the persistence of progression events.

DOI 10.1093/brain/awv258
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Graves MC, Benton M, Lea RA, Boyle M, Tajouri L, Macartney-Coxson D, et al., 'Methylation differences at the HLA-DRB1 locus in CD4+ T-Cells are associated with multiple sclerosis', Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 20 1033-1041 (2014) [C1]

Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is thought to be caused by T-cell mediated autoimmune dysfunction. Risk ofdeveloping MS is influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Mod... [more]

Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is thought to be caused by T-cell mediated autoimmune dysfunction. Risk ofdeveloping MS is influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Modifiable differences in DNA methylation arerecognized as epigenetic contributors to MS risk and may provide a valuable link between environmental exposure andinherited genetic systems.Objectives and methods: To identify methylation changes associated with MS, we performed a genome-wide DNAmethylation analysis of CD4+ T cells from 30 patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 28 healthy controls using Illumina450K methylation arrays.Results : A striking differential methylation signal was observed at chr. 6p21, with a peak signal at HLA-DRB1. Afterprioritisation, we identified a panel of 74 CpGs associated with MS in this cohort. Most notably we found evidence of amajor effect CpG island in DRB1 in MS cases (pFDR < 3 x 10 < sup > -3 < /sup > ). In addition, we found 55 non-HLA CpGs that exhibiteddifferential methylation, many of which localise to genes previously linked to MS.Conclusions: Our findings provide the first evidence for association of DNA methylation at HLA-DRB1 in relation toMS risk. Further studies are now warranted to validate and understand how these findings are involved in MS pathology. © The Author(s) 2013.

DOI 10.1177/1352458513516529
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
2014 Broadley SA, Barnett MH, Boggild M, Brew BJ, Butzkueven H, Heard R, et al., 'Therapeutic approaches to disease modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis in adults: An Australian and New Zealand perspective Part 2 New and emerging therapies and their efficacy', Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, (2014) [C1]

In Part 2 of this three part review of multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment with a particular focus on the Australian and New Zealand perspective, we review the newer therapies that ... [more]

In Part 2 of this three part review of multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment with a particular focus on the Australian and New Zealand perspective, we review the newer therapies that have recently become available and emerging therapies that have now completed phase III clinical trial programs. We go on to compare the relative efficacies of these newer and emerging therapies alongside the existing therapies. The effectiveness of ß-interferon in the treatment of different stages and the different disease courses of MS is critically reviewed with the conclusion that the absolute level of response in term of annualised relapse rates (where relapses occur) and MRI activity are similar, but are disappointing in terms of sustained disability progression for progressive forms of the disease. Finally we review the controversial area of combination therapy for MS. Whilst it remains the case that we have no cure or means of preventing MS, we do have a range of effective therapies that when used appropriately and early in the disease course can have a significant impact on short term and longer term outcomes. Crown Copyright © 2014.

DOI 10.1016/j.jocn.2014.01.018
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Broadley SA, Barnett MH, Boggild M, Brew BJ, Butzkueven H, Heard R, et al., 'Therapeutic approaches to disease modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis in adults: An Australian and New Zealand perspective Part 3 Treatment practicalities and recommendations', Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, (2014) [C1]

In this third and final part of our review of multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment we look at the practical day-to-day management issues that are likely to influence individual treat... [more]

In this third and final part of our review of multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment we look at the practical day-to-day management issues that are likely to influence individual treatment decisions. Whilst efficacy is clearly of considerable importance, tolerability and the potential for adverse effects often play a significant role in informing individual patient decisions. Here we review the issues surrounding switching between therapies, and the evidence to assist guiding the choice of therapy to change to and when to change. We review the current level of evidence with regards to the management of women in their child-bearing years with regards to recommendations about treatment during pregnancy and whilst breast feeding. We provide a summary of recommended pre- and post-treatment monitoring for the available therapies and review the evidence with regards to the value of testing for antibodies which are known to be neutralising for some therapies. We review the occurrence of adverse events, both the more common and troublesome effects and those that are less common but have potentially much more serious outcomes. Ways of mitigating these risks and managing the more troublesome adverse effects are also reviewed. Finally, we make specific recommendations with regards to the treatment of MS. It is an exciting time in the world of MS neurology and the prospects for further advances in coming years are high. Crown Copyright © 2014.

DOI 10.1016/j.jocn.2014.01.017
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Broadley SA, Barnett MH, Boggild M, Brew BJ, Butzkueven H, Heard R, et al., 'Therapeutic approaches to disease modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis in adults: An Australian and New Zealand perspective Part 1 Historical and established therapies', Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, (2014) [C1]

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a potentially life-changing immune mediated disease of the central nervous system. Until recently, treatment has been largely confined to acute treatmen... [more]

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a potentially life-changing immune mediated disease of the central nervous system. Until recently, treatment has been largely confined to acute treatment of relapses, symptomatic therapies and rehabilitation. Through persistent efforts of dedicated physicians and scientists around the globe for 160 years, a number of therapies that have an impact on the long term outcome of the disease have emerged over the past 20 years. In this three part series we review the practicalities, benefits and potential hazards of each of the currently available and emerging treatment options for MS. We pay particular attention to ways of abrogating the risks of these therapies and provide advice on the most appropriate indications for using individual therapies. In Part 1 we review the history of the development of MS therapies and its connection with the underlying immunobiology of the disease. The established therapies for MS are reviewed in detail and their current availability and indications in Australia and New Zealand are summarised. We examine the evidence to support their use in the treatment of MS. Crown Copyright © 2014.

DOI 10.1016/j.jocn.2014.01.016
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Jokubaitis VG, Li V, Kalincik T, Izquierdo G, Hodgkinson S, Alroughani R, et al., 'Fingolimod after natalizumab and the risk of short-term relapse', NEUROLOGY, 82 1204-1211 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1212/WNL.0000000000000283
Citations Scopus - 79Web of Science - 66
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Spelman T, Gray O, Trojano M, Petersen T, Izquierdo G, Hupperts R, et al., 'Seasonal variation of relapse rate in multiple sclerosis is latitude dependent', Annals of Neurology, 76 880-890 (2014) [C1]

© VC 2014 American Neurological Association. Objective: Previous studies assessing seasonal variation of relapse onset in multiple sclerosis have had conflicting results. Small r... [more]

© VC 2014 American Neurological Association. Objective: Previous studies assessing seasonal variation of relapse onset in multiple sclerosis have had conflicting results. Small relapse numbers, differing diagnostic criteria, and single region studies limit the generalizability of prior results. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a temporal variation in onset of relapses in both hemispheres and to determine whether seasonal peak relapse probability varies with latitude. Methods: The international MSBase Registry was utilized to analyze seasonal relapse onset distribution by hemisphere and latitudinal location. All analyses were weighted for the patient number contributed by each center. A sine regression model was used to model relapse onset and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) seasonality. Linear regression was used to investigate associations of latitude and lag between UVR trough and subsequent relapse peak. Results: A total of 32,762 relapses from 9,811 patients across 30 countries were analyzed. Relapse onset followed an annual cyclical sinusoidal pattern with peaks in early spring and troughs in autumn in both hemispheres. Every 10- of latitude away from the equator was associated with a mean decrease in UVR trough to subsequent relapse peak lag of 28.5 days (95% confidence interval 5 3.29-53.71, p50.028). Interpretation: We demonstrate for the first time that there is a latitude-dependent relationship between seasonal UVR trough and relapse onset probability peak independent of location-specific UVR levels, with more distal latitude associated with shorter gaps. We confirm prior meta-analyses showing a strong seasonal relapse onset probability variation in the northern hemisphere, and extend this observation to the southern hemisphere.

DOI 10.1002/ana.24287
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Kalincik T, Buzzard K, Jokubaitis V, Trojano M, Duquette P, Izquierdo G, et al., 'Risk of relapse phenotype recurrence in multiple sclerosis', Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 20 1511-1522 (2014) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2014. Objectives: The aim was to analyse risk of relapse phenotype recurrence in multiple sclerosis and to characterise the effect of demographic and clinical fea... [more]

© The Author(s) 2014. Objectives: The aim was to analyse risk of relapse phenotype recurrence in multiple sclerosis and to characterise the effect of demographic and clinical features on this phenotype. Methods: Information about relapses was collected using MSBase, an international observational registry. Associations between relapse phenotypes and history of similar relapses or patient characteristics were tested with multivariable logistic regression models. Tendency of relapse phenotypes to recur sequentially was assessed with principal component analysis. Results: Among 14,969 eligible patients (89,949 patient-years), 49,279 phenotypically characterised relapses were recorded. Visual and brainstem relapses occurred more frequently in early disease and in younger patients. Sensory relapses were more frequent in early or non-progressive disease. Pyramidal, sphincter and cerebellar relapses were more common in older patients and in progressive disease. Women presented more often with sensory or visual symptoms. Men were more prone to pyramidal, brainstem and cerebellar relapses. Importantly, relapse phenotype was predicted by the phenotypes of previous relapses. (OR = 1.8-5, p = 10-14). Sensory, visual and brainstem relapses showed better recovery than other relapse phenotypes. Relapse severity increased and the ability to recover decreased with age or more advanced disease. Conclusion: Relapse phenotype was associated with demographic and clinical characteristics, with phenotypic recurrence significantly more common than expected by chance.

DOI 10.1177/1352458514528762
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Cox MB, Bowden NA, Scott RJ, Lechner-Scott J, 'Common genetic variants in the plasminogen activation pathway are not associated with multiple sclerosis', Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 20 489-491 (2014) [C1]

Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) is involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) aetiology. Previously, we identified differential gene expression of plasminogen activation cascade genes ... [more]

Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) is involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) aetiology. Previously, we identified differential gene expression of plasminogen activation cascade genes in MS patients. Based on our gene expression results, we wanted to identify whether polymorphisms in the genes associated with the plasminogen pathway could predict MS risk. We genotyped 1153 trio families, 727 MS cases and 604 healthy controls for 17 polymorphisms in MMP9, plasminogen activator urokinase (PLAU), PLAU receptor (PLAUR) and serpin peptidase inhibitor/clade 2/member B2 (SERPINB2) genes. No associations were found between the 17 polymorphisms and MS. Also, gene expression levels were analysed according to genotype: no associations were observed. In conclusion despite the consistent evidence for the role of MMP9 and the plasminogen activation cascade in MS, we found no associations between genotype nor gene expression. This suggested there are other potentially modifiable factors influencing gene expression in MS. © The Author(s) 2013.

DOI 10.1177/1352458513498127
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Nikola Bowden, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Parnell GP, Gatt PN, McKay FC, Schibeci S, Krupa M, Powell JE, et al., 'Ribosomal protein S6 mRNA is a biomarker upregulated in multiple sclerosis, downregulated by interferon treatment, and affected by season', Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 20 675-685 (2014) [C1]

Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system which responds to therapies targeting circulating immune cells. Objective: Our aim ... [more]

Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system which responds to therapies targeting circulating immune cells. Objective: Our aim was to test if the T-cell activation gene expression pattern (TCAGE) we had previously described from whole blood was replicated in an independent cohort. Methods: We used RNA-seq to interrogate the whole blood transcriptomes of 72 individuals (40 healthy controls, 32 untreated MS). A cohort of 862 control individuals from the Brisbane Systems Genetics Study (BSGS) was used to assess heritability and seasonal expression. The effect of interferon beta (IFNB) therapy on expression was evaluated. Results: The MS/TCAGE association was replicated and rationalized to a single marker, ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6). Expression of RPS6 was higher in MS than controls (p < 0.0004), and lower in winter than summer (p < 4.6E-06). The seasonal pattern correlated with monthly UV light index (R=0.82, p < 0.002), and was also identified in the BSGS cohort (p < 0.0016). Variation in expression of RPS6 was not strongly heritable. RPS6 expression was reduced by IFNB therapy. Conclusions: These data support investigation of RPS6 as a potential therapeutic target and candidate biomarker for measuring clinical response to IFNB and other MS therapies, and of MS disease heterogeneity.© The Author(s) 2013.

DOI 10.1177/1352458513507819
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Hughes SE, Spelman T, Gray OM, Boz C, Trojano M, Lugaresi A, et al., 'Predictors and dynamics of postpartum relapses in women with multiple sclerosis', Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 20 739-746 (2014) [C1]

Background: Several studies have shown that pregnancy reduces multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses, which increase in the early postpartum period. Postpartum relapse risk has been pre... [more]

Background: Several studies have shown that pregnancy reduces multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses, which increase in the early postpartum period. Postpartum relapse risk has been predicted by pre-pregnancy disease activity in some studies. Objective: To re-examine effect of pregnancy on relapses using the large international MSBase Registry, examining predictors of early postpartum relapse. Methods: An observational case-control study was performed including pregnancies post-MS onset. Annualised relapse rate (ARR) and median Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores were compared for the 24 months pre-conception, pregnancy and 24 months postpartum periods. Clustered logistic regression was used to investigate predictors of early postpartum relapses. Results: The study included 893 pregnancies in 674 females with MS. ARR (standard error) pre-pregnancy was 0.32 (0.02), which fell to 0.13 (0.03) in the third trimester and rose to 0.61 (0.06) in the first three months postpartum. Median EDSS remained unchanged. Pre-conception ARR and disease-modifying treatment (DMT) predicted early postpartum relapse in a multivariable model. Conclusion: Results confirm a favourable effect on relapses as pregnancy proceeds, and an early postpartum peak. Preconception DMT exposure and low ARR were independently protective against postpartum relapse. This novel finding could provide clinicians with a strategy to minimise postpartum relapse risk in women with MS planning pregnancy.© The Author(s) 2013.

DOI 10.1177/1352458513507816
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Shahijanian F, Parnell GP, McKay FC, Gatt PN, Shojoei M, O'Connor KS, et al., 'The CYP27B1 variant associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease is underexpressed in tolerizing dendritic cells', HUMAN MOLECULAR GENETICS, 23 1425-1434 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/hmg/ddt529
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Pablo Moscato, Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Goris A, van Setten J, Diekstra F, Ripke S, Patsopoulos NA, Sawcer SJ, et al., 'No evidence for shared genetic basis of common variants in multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis', HUMAN MOLECULAR GENETICS, 23 1916-1922 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/hmg/ddt574
Citations Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Pablo Moscato, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
2013 Mechelli R, Umeton R, Policano C, Annibali V, Coarelli G, Ricigliano VAG, et al., 'A "Candidate-Interactome" Aggregate Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Data in Multiple Sclerosis', PLoS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0063300
Citations Scopus - 19
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
2013 Kalincik T, Butzkueven H, Spelman T, Trojano M, Duquette P, Izquierdo G, et al., 'Persistence on therapy and propensity matched outcome comparison of two subcutaneous interferon beta 1a dosages for multiple sclerosis', PLoS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0063480
Citations Scopus - 16
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2013 Verheul F, Smolders J, Trojano M, Lepore V, Zwanikken C, Amato MP, et al., 'Fluctuations of MS births and UV-light exposure', ACTA NEUROLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, 127 301-308 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ane.12007
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2013 Kalincik T, Vivek V, Jokubaitis V, Lechner-Scott J, Trojano M, Izquierdo G, et al., 'Sex as a determinant of relapse incidence and progressive course of multiple sclerosis', Brain, 136 3609-3617 (2013) [C1]

The aim of this work was to evaluate sex differences in the incidence of multiple sclerosis relapses; assess the relationship between sex and primary progressive disease course; a... [more]

The aim of this work was to evaluate sex differences in the incidence of multiple sclerosis relapses; assess the relationship between sex and primary progressive disease course; and compare effects of age and disease duration on relapse incidence. Annualized relapse rates were calculated using the MSBase registry. Patients with incomplete data or < 1 year of follow-up were excluded. Patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis were only included in the sex ratio analysis. Relapse incidences over 40 years of multiple sclerosis or 70 years of age were compared between females and males with Andersen-Gill and Tweedie models. Female-to-male ratios stratified by annual relapse count were evaluated across disease duration and patient age and compared between relapse-onset and primary progressive multiple sclerosis. The study cohort consisted of 11 570 eligible patients with relapse-onset and 881 patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Among the relapse-onset patients (82 552 patient-years), 48 362 relapses were recorded. Relapse frequency was 17.7% higher in females compared with males. Within the initial 5 years, the female-to-male ratio increased from 2.3:1 to 3.3:1 in patients with 0 versus =4 relapses per year, respectively. The magnitude of this sex effect increased at longer disease duration and older age (P < 10 -12 ). However, the female-to-male ratio in patients with relapse-onset multiple sclerosis and zero relapses in any given year was double that of the patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Patient age was a more important determinant of decline in relapse incidence than disease duration (P < 10 -12 ). Females are predisposed to higher relapse activity than males. However, this difference does not explain the markedly lower female-to-male sex ratio in primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Decline in relapse activity over time is more closely related to patient age than disease duration. © The Author (2013).

DOI 10.1093/brain/awt281
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2013 Lee SH, Harold D, Nyholt DR, Goddard ME, Zondervan KT, Williams J, et al., 'Estimation and partitioning of polygenic variation captured by common SNPs for Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and endometriosis', HUMAN MOLECULAR GENETICS, 22 832-841 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/hmg/dds491
Citations Scopus - 80Web of Science - 79
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Pablo Moscato
2013 Cortes A, Field J, Glazov EA, Hadler J, Stankovich J, Brown MA, 'Resequencing and fine-mapping of the chromosome 12q13-14 locus associated with multiple sclerosis refines the number of implicated genes', HUMAN MOLECULAR GENETICS, 22 2283-2292 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/hmg/ddt062
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Pablo Moscato, Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2013 Beecham AH, Patsopoulos NA, Xifara DK, Davis MF, Kemppinen A, Cotsapas C, et al., 'Analysis of immune-related loci identifies 48 new susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis', NATURE GENETICS, 45 1353-+ (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ng.2770
Citations Scopus - 448Web of Science - 420
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2013 Cox MB, Bowden NA, Scott RJ, Lechner-Scott J, 'Altered expression of the plasminogen activation pathway in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in multiple sclerosis: possible pathomechanism of matrix metalloproteinase activation', Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 19 1268-1274 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1352458513475493
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nikola Bowden, Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2013 Patsopoulos NA, Barcellos LF, Hintzen RQ, Schaefer C, Van Duijn CM, Noble JA, et al., 'Fine-Mapping the Genetic Association of the Major Histocompatibility Complex in Multiple Sclerosis: HLA and Non-HLA Effects', PLOS GENETICS, 9 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003926
Citations Web of Science - 66
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott, Pablo Moscato
2013 Jokubaitis VG, Spelman T, Lechner-Scott J, Barnett M, Shaw C, Vucic S, et al., 'The Australian Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Immunotherapy Study: A Prospective, Multicentre Study of Drug Utilisation Using the MSBase Platform', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0059694
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2012 Lill CM, Liu T, Schjeide B-MM, Roehr JT, Akkad DA, Damotte V, et al., 'Closing the case of APOE in multiple sclerosis: no association with disease risk in over 29 000 subjects', Journal of Medical Genetics, 49 558-562 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott, Pablo Moscato
2012 Hughes S, Spelman T, Trojano M, Lugaresi A, Izquierdo G, Grand'Maison F, et al., 'The Kurtzke EDSS rank stability increases 4 years after the onset of multiple sclerosis: Results from the MSBase Registry', Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 83 305-310 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/jnnp-2011-301051
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2012 Kister I, Chamot E, Cutter G, Bacon TE, Jokubaitis VG, Hughes SE, et al., 'Increasing age at disability milestones among MS patients in the MSBase Registry', Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 318 94-99 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jns.2012.03.017
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2012 Lechner-Scott J, Spencer B, De Malmanche T, Attia JR, Fitzgerald M, Trojano M, et al., 'The frequency of CSF oligoclonal banding in multiple sclerosis increases with latitude', Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 18 974-982 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1352458511431729
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 24
Co-authors John Attia, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2012 Yan J, Liu J, Lin CY, Scott R, Lechner-Scott J, Brown MA, et al., 'Interleukin-6 gene promoter-572 C allele may play a role in rate of disease progression in multiple sclerosis', International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 13 13667-13679 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijms131013667
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Pablo Moscato, Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2012 Cox MB, Ban M, Bowden NA, Baker A, Scott R, Lechner-Scott J, 'Potential association of vitamin D receptor polymorphism Taq1 with multiple sclerosis', Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 18 16-22 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1352458511415562
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Nikola Bowden
2012 Trojano M, Lucchese G, Graziano G, Taylor BV, Simpson S, Lepore V, et al., 'Geographical variations in sex ratio trends over time in multiple sclerosis', PLOS One, 7 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0048078
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2012 Meyniel C, Spelman T, Jokubaitis VG, Trojano M, Izquierdo G, Grand'Maison F, et al., 'Country, sex, EDSS change and therapy choice independently predict treatment discontinuation in multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome', PLoS One, 7 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0038661
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2011 Ritchie ME, Ruijie L, Carvalho BS, Irizarry RA, Bahlo M, Booth DR, et al., 'Comparing genotyping algorithms for Illumina's Infinium whole-genome SNP BeadChips', BMC Bioinformatics, 12 68-79 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2105-12-68
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Pablo Moscato, Rodney Scott
2011 Patsopoulos NA, De Bakker PIW, Esposito F, Reischl J, Lehr S, Bauer D, et al., 'Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci', Annals of Neurology, 70 897-912 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/ana.22609
Citations Scopus - 186Web of Science - 175
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott, Pablo Moscato
2011 De Bakker PIW, Kappos L, Polman CH, Chibnik LB, Hafler DA, Matthews PM, et al., 'Modeling the cumulative genetic risk for multiple sclerosis from genome-wide association data', Genome Medicine, 3 1-11 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/gm217
Citations Scopus - 43
Co-authors Pablo Moscato, Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2011 Ma GZM, Stankovich J, Kilpatrick TJ, Binder MD, Field J, Bahlo M, et al., 'Polymorphisms in the receptor tyrosine kinase MERTK gene are associated with multiple sclerosis susceptibility', PLoS ONE, 6 1-6 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0016964
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Pablo Moscato, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
2011 O'Gorman C, Freeman S, Taylor BV, Butzkueven H, Broadley SA, Bahlo M, et al., 'Familial recurrence risks for multiple sclerosis in Australia', Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 82 1351-1354 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/jnnp.2010.233064
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Pablo Moscato, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2011 The International Multiple Sclerosis Consortium, Control TWTC, Cox MB, Lechner-Scott J, Scott R, 'Genetic risk and a primary role for cell-mediated immune mechanisms in multiple sclerosis', Nature, 476 214-219 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1267Web of Science - 1172
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2011 Malhotra S, Morcillo-Suarez C, Brassat D, Goertsches R, Lechner-Scott J, Urcelay E, et al., 'IL28B polymorphisms are not associated with the response to interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis', Journal of Neuroimmunology, 239 101-104 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jneuroim.2011.08.004
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2011 Jokubaitis VG, Butzkueven H, Spelman T, Lechner-Scott J, Barnett M, Shaw C, et al., 'Treatment utilisation and persistence in the Australian relapsing-remitting MS population: results from the MSBase Registry', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, 17 S447-S448 (2011)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2010 Jensen CJ, Stankovich J, Van der Walt A, Bahlo M, Taylor BV, van der Mei IAF, et al., 'Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility-Associated SNPs Do Not Influence Disease Severity Measures in a Cohort of Australian MS Patients', PLOS ONE, 5 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0010003
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Pablo Moscato
2010 Cox MB, Cairns MJ, Gandhi KS, Carroll AP, Moscovis CC, Stewart GJ, et al., 'MicroRNAs miR-17 and miR-20a inhibit T cell activation genes and are under-expressed in MS whole blood', Plos One, 5 e12132 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0012132
Citations Scopus - 135Web of Science - 110
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott, Murray Cairns, Pablo Moscato
2010 Riveros RC, Mellor D, Gandhi KS, McKay FC, Cox MB, Berretta RE, et al., 'A transcription factor map as revealed by a genome-wide gene expression analysis of whole-blood mRNA transcriptome in multiple sclerosis', Plos One, 5 1-28 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0014176
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Pablo Moscato, Rodney Scott, Regina Berretta, Carlos Riveros
2010 Field J, Browning SR, Johnson LJ, Danoy P, Varney MD, Tait BD, et al., 'A polymorphism in the HLA-DPB1 gene is associated with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis', PLoS ONE, 5 (2010) [C1]

We conducted an association study across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex to identify loci associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). Comparing 1927 SNPs in 1618 MS cases a... [more]

We conducted an association study across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex to identify loci associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). Comparing 1927 SNPs in 1618 MS cases and 3413 controls of European ancestry, we identified seven SNPs that were independently associated with MS conditional on the others (each P=4×10 -6 ). All associations were significant in an independent replication cohort of 2212 cases and 2251 controls (P=0:001) and were highly significant in the combined dataset (P=6 × 10 -8 ). The associated SNPs included proxies for HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DRB1*03:01, and SNPs in moderate linkage disequilibrium (LD) with HLA-A*02:01, HLA-DRB1*04:01 and HLA-DRB1*13:03. We also found a strong association with rs9277535 in the class II gene HLA-DPB1 (discovery set P = 9 × 10 -9 , replication set P = 7 × 10 -4 , combined P=2 × 10 -10 ). HLA-DPB1 is located centromeric of the more commonly typed class II genes HLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1. It is separated from these genes by a recombination hotspot, and the association is not affected by conditioning on genotypes at DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1. Hence rs9277535 represents an independent MS-susceptibility locus of genome-wide significance. It is correlated with the HLA-DPB1*03:01 allele, which has been implicated previously in MS in smaller studies. Further genotyping in large datasets is required to confirm and resolve this association. © 2010 Field et al.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0013454
Citations Scopus - 31
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Pablo Moscato, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2010 Gandhi KS, McKay FC, Cox MB, Riveros RC, Armstrong N, Heard RN, et al., 'The multiple sclerosis whole blood mRNA transcriptome and genetic associations indicate dysregulation of specific T cell pathways in pathogenesis', Human Molecular Genetics, 19 2134-2143 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/hmg/ddq090
Citations Scopus - 65Web of Science - 57
Co-authors Carlos Riveros, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Pablo Moscato, Rodney Scott
2010 Booth DR, Heard RN, Stewart GJ, Cox M, Scott R, Lechner-Scott J, et al., 'Lack of support for association between the KIF1B rs10492972[C] variant and multiple sclerosis', Nature Genetics, 42 469-470 (2010) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
2010 Lechner-Scott J, Kerr T, Spencer B, Agland S, Lydon A, Schofield PW, 'The audio recorded cognitive screen (ARCS) in patients with multiple sclerosis: A practical tool for multiple sclerosis clinics', Multiple Sclerosis, 16 1126-1133 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1352458510374743
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Peter Schofield
2010 Esposito F, Patsopoulos NA, Cepok S, Kockum I, Leppa V, Booth DR, et al., 'IL12A, MPHOSPH9/CDK2AP1 and RGS1 are novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci', Genes and Immunity, 11 397-405 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/gene.2010.28
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
2010 Ban M, McCauley JL, Zuvich R, Baker A, Bergamaschi L, Cox MB, et al., 'A non-synonymous SNP within membrane metalloendopeptidase-like 1 (MMEL1) is associated with multiple sclerosis', Genes and Immunity, 11 660-664 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/gene.2010.36
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2009 Stankovich J, Butzkueven H, Marriott M, Chapman C, Tubridy N, Tait BD, et al., 'HLA-DRB1 associations with disease susceptibility and clinical course in Australians with multiple sclerosis', Tissue Antigens, 74 17-21 (2009)

Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*1501 and other class II alleles influence susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS), but their contribution if any to the clinical course of MS ... [more]

Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*1501 and other class II alleles influence susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS), but their contribution if any to the clinical course of MS remains uncertain. Here, we have investigated DRB1 alleles in a large sample of 1230 Australian MS cases, with some enrichment for subjects with primary progressive (PPMS) disease (n = 246) and 1210 healthy controls. Using logistic regression, we found that DRB1*1501 was strongly associated with risk (P = 7 × 10 -45 ), as expected, and after adjusting for DRB1*1501, a predisposing effect was also observed for DRB1*03 (P = 5 × 10 -7 ). Individuals homozygous for either DRB1*15 or DRB1*03 were considerably more at risk of MS than heterozygotes and non-carriers. Both the DRB1*04 and the DRB1*01/DRB1*15 genotype combinat ion, respectively, protected against PPMS in comparison to subjects with relapsing disease. Together, these data provide further evidence of heterogeneity at the DRB1 locus and confirm the importance of HLA variants in the phenotypic expression of MS. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

DOI 10.1111/j.1399-0039.2009.01262.x
Citations Scopus - 31
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2009 Bahlo M, Booth DR, Broadley SA, Brown MA, Foote SJ, Griffiths LR, et al., 'Genome-wide association study identifies new multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci on chromosomes 12 and 20', Nature Genetics, 41 824-828 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ng.396
Citations Scopus - 357Web of Science - 289
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott, Pablo Moscato
2008 Gray OM, Jolley D, Zwanikken, Trojano M, Grand'Maison F, Duquette P, et al., 'The Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS) re-examined: EDSS rank stability in the MSBase dataset increases five years after onset of multiple sclerosis', Neurology Asia, 217-219 (2008) [C2]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2003 Lechner-Scott J, Kappos L, Hofman M, Polman CH, Ronner H, Montalban X, et al., 'Can the expanded disability status scale be assessed by telephone?', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, 9 154-159 (2003)
DOI 10.1191/1352458503ms884oa
Citations Scopus - 84Web of Science - 79
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Robert Gibberd
2000 Ritz M, Lechner-Scott J, Scott R, Fuhr P, Malik N, Erne B, et al., 'Characterisation of autoantibodies to peripheral myelin protein 22 in patients with hereditary and acquired neuropathies', Journal of Neuroimmunology, 104 155-163 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 45
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
1998 Plohmann AM, Kappos L, Ammann W, Thordai A, Wittwer A, Huber S, et al., 'Computer assisted retraining of attentional impairments in patients with multiple sclerosis', Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 64 455-462 (1998)

Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of a computer based retraining of specific impairments of four different attentional domains in patients with multiple sclerosis. Methods. Twen... [more]

Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of a computer based retraining of specific impairments of four different attentional domains in patients with multiple sclerosis. Methods. Twenty two outpatients with multiple sclerosis received consecutively a specific training comprising 12 sessions in each of the two most impaired attention functions. The baseline of attentional deficits, the performance after each training period, and the course of performance in the next nine weeks was assessed by a computerised attention test battery. Additionally, the impact of the training on daily functioning was evaluated with a self rating inventory. Results. Subgroups of patients with multiple sclerosis showing different patterns of attentional impairment could be separated. Significant improvements of performance could almost exclusively be achieved by the specific training programmes. The increase of performance remained stable for at least nine weeks. For quality of life patients reported less attention related problems in everyday situations. Conclusions. In patients with multiple sclerosis it seems worthwhile to assess attentional functions in detail and to train specific attention impairments selectively.

Citations Scopus - 113
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
1997 Roelcke U, Kappos L, Lechner-Scott J, Brunnschweiler H, Huber S, Ammann W, et al., 'Reduced glucose metabolism in the frontal cortex and basal ganglia of multiple sclerosis patients with fatigue: A 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study', Neurology, 48 1566-1571 (1997)

To investigate the pathophysiology of fatigue in MS, we assessed cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRGlu) in 47 MS patients using PET and 18 F- fluorodeoxyglucose. Applying the Fatig... [more]

To investigate the pathophysiology of fatigue in MS, we assessed cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRGlu) in 47 MS patients using PET and 18 F- fluorodeoxyglucose. Applying the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), we first compared MS patients with severe (MS-FAT, n = 19, FSS > 4.9) and MS patients without fatigue (MS-NOF, n = 16, FSS < 3.7) on a pixel-by-pixel basis using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM95). Second, we compared FSS values of all 47 patients covering the whole range of this scale with CMRGlu using an analysis of covariance (SPM95). In addition, we determined global CMRGlu by region-of-interest analysis. Sixteen healthy subjects served as control subjects (CON). Global CMRGlu was significantly lower in both MS groups compared with CON (CON 43.3 ± 6.9 µmol/100 mL/min, MS-FAT 34.7 ± 4.4 MS- NOF 35.4 ± 4.5) but was not related to fatigue severity. Comparing the two MS groups, SPM95 analysis revealed predominant CMRGlu reductions bilaterally in a prefrontal area involving the lateral and medial prefrontal cortex and adjacent white matter, in the premotor cortex, putamen, and in the right supplementary motor area of MS-FAT. In addition, there were CMRGlu reductions in the white matter extending from the rostral putamen toward the lateral head of the caudate nucleus. FSS values were inversely related to CMRGlu in the right prefrontal cortex. CMRGlu in the cerebellar vermis and anterior cingulate was relatively higher in MS-FAT than in MS-NOF patients. CMRGlu of both regions showed positive correlations with FSS values. Our data suggest that fatigue in MS is associated with frontal cortex and basal ganglia dysfunction that could result from demyelination of the frontal white matter.

Citations Scopus - 339
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
1997 Lechner-Scott J, Steck AJ, Scott RJ, 'Genetic analyses in neurology', Schweizerische Medizinische Wochenschrift, 127 1141-1153 (1997)

The use of either direct or indirect genetic analyses in neurology is becoming ever greater as more genes are identified thanks to the human genome project. Often the methodologie... [more]

The use of either direct or indirect genetic analyses in neurology is becoming ever greater as more genes are identified thanks to the human genome project. Often the methodologies are complex and difficult to understand. The aim of this review is to present various approaches to molecular diagnosis using several different inherited neurological diseases as examples. These include inherited mitochondriopathies, monogenetic disorders like trinucleotid repeat instability syndromes, duplication anomalies and specific point mutations as well as heterogenetic diseases such as limb girdle dystrophy and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Possible pathogenetic implications can now be proposed as the basis of new therapeutic modalities.

Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
1997 Scollo-Lavizzari G, Lechner-Scott J, 'Syncopes from a neurological point of view', Therapeutische Umschau, 54 135-143 (1997)

A syncope is defined as a sudden, temporary loss of consciousness, associated with loss of postural tone with spontaneous recovery. The incidence is high and the differential diag... [more]

A syncope is defined as a sudden, temporary loss of consciousness, associated with loss of postural tone with spontaneous recovery. The incidence is high and the differential diagnosis broad; therefore, the first observations are essential for the management of the patient. In this review diseases will be described which manifest themselves with syncopes that fall under the auspices of either internal medicine or neurology. First, the etiologies of syncopes are discussed in the strict sense of the word, i.e. due to a global cerebral ischemia such as in orthostatic hypotension and vasopressor syncopes. Thereafter, a discussion concerning the differential diagnosis of syncopes will be introduced, including mainly psychogenic and epileptic seizures as well as vertebrobasilar hypoperfusion. Depending on the reason of the loss of consciousness, it can be a common benign disorder or a severe life-threatening disease. The personal history or witness account of the incidence provides the most useful information concerning diagnosis. The cardiological diagnostic procedures are discussed elsewhere. In some instances an EEG can further help with the diagnosis. In many cases an etiology can't be found, even if extensive investigations have been performed.

Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
1997 Willimann P, Lechner-Scott J, Ferracin F, Miescher G, Steck AJ, 'Clinical significance of the anti-GQ(1b)-antibodies in patients with Miller-Fisher-syndrome', Aktuelle Neurologie, 24 67-70 (1997)

Antibodies against gangliosides are often positive in the Guillain-Barre and Miller Fisher syndromes. Antibodies against ganglioside GQ(1b) are highly associated with Miller Fishe... [more]

Antibodies against gangliosides are often positive in the Guillain-Barre and Miller Fisher syndromes. Antibodies against ganglioside GQ(1b) are highly associated with Miller Fisher syndrome. We report on 7 patients with the typical triad for Miller Fisher syndrome ataxia, areflexia and ophthalmoplegia. Anamnestic data revealed a precedent respiratory or gastrointestinal infection in 5 patients. Sera were analysed by ELISA for anti-GQ(1b). Positive titres were found in all 7 patients. Repeated measurements showed a slow decrease of antibody titre. No correlation between anti-GQ(1b) antibodies and clinical severity or increased protein levels of cerebral spinal fluid could be found. The slow decrease of the anti-GQ(1b) antibodies and the mainly IgG isotope of the antibodies suggest a T-cell mediated immune response. The pathological relevance and the role of the anti-GQ(1b) antibodies in the course of the disease remain to be investigated.

Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
1996 Lechner-Scott J, Engelter S, Steck AJ, Dellas S, Tolnay M, Probst A, 'A patient with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) confirmed by sural nerve biopsy [7]', Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 60 235-236 (1996)
Citations Scopus - 25
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
1996 Huber S, Spycher M, Lechner-Scott J, Bellaiche Y, Steck AJ, Kappos L, 'Multiple sclerosis: Treatment with recombinant interferon beta-1b', Schweizerische Medizinische Wochenschrift, 126 1475-1481 (1996)

Recombinant interferon beta-1b has been registered with the Swiss health authorities since August 1995. Due to a special arrangement with health insurances it has been possible to... [more]

Recombinant interferon beta-1b has been registered with the Swiss health authorities since August 1995. Due to a special arrangement with health insurances it has been possible to prescribe this medication since spring 1995. We report on our experience with the first 30 consecutively treated multiple sclerosis patients. Indication, adverse event profile and clinical response to treatment are described. The most common side effects were local injection site reactions (63%), influenza-like symptoms (50%) and fatigue (33%). As compared to the prestudy period we observed a 49% reduction in the exacerbation rate. Compliance was excellent, possibly due to strict selection and extensive information about possible effects and side effects.

Citations Scopus - 10
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
1995 Lechner-Scott JS, Scott RJ, Steck AJ, Kappos L, 'Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. Clinical and molecular genetic aspects', Schweizer Archiv für Neurologie und Psychiatrie (Zurich, Switzerland : 1985), 146 157-167 (1995)

Hereditary motor sensory neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of inherited diseases of the peripheral nerves. In this review the clinical and genetic differences between the sub... [more]

Hereditary motor sensory neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of inherited diseases of the peripheral nerves. In this review the clinical and genetic differences between the sub-groups of this disease will be discussed. Since the discovery of a 1.5 mb duplication on chromosome 17 p11.2-12 in most patients with a hereditary motor sensory neuropathy and a variety of different mutations on chromosomes 1 and X in other patients with a similar disease profile, Dycks' clinical classification needs to be re-evaluated. In this review Dycks' taxonomy of heridihary neuropathies will be compared to a new genetic classification and a relevant diagnostic procedure proposed when a hereditary neuropathy is suspected.

Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
Show 115 more journal articles

Conference (85 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Jokubaitis VG, Kalincik T, Horakova D, Havrdova E, Kleinova P, Izquierdo G, et al., 'Genotype-phenotype correlations in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: making use of a robust severity phenotype', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Orlando, FL (2017)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Merkel B, Jokubaitis V, Spelman T, Lechner-Scott J, McCombe P, Slee M, et al., 'TIMING OF HIGH-EFFICACY DISEASE MODIFYING THERAPIES FOR RELAPSING-REMITTING MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS', JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY NEUROSURGERY AND PSYCHIATRY, Gold Coast, AUSTRALIA (2017)
DOI 10.1136/jnnp-2017-316074.16
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Jokubaitis V, Kleinova P, Izquierdo G, Matesanz F, Kalincik T, Kilpatrick T, et al., 'Genotype-phenotype correlations in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: preliminary results from a multinational study', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, MS Res Australia, Sydney, AUSTRALIA (2017)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Jokubaitis V, Ai-Lan N, Kalincik T, van der Walt A, Lechner-Scott J, Barnett M, et al., 'Pregnancy incidence, therapy exposure and post-partum relapse risk: a 12-year retrospective multicentre analysis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, MS Res Australia, Sydney, AUSTRALIA (2017)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Lea R, Maltby V, Graves M, Benton M, Scott R, Lechner-Scott J, 'Epigenome-wide association study of CD19+B Cells in MS patients reveals distinct methylation profiles compared to T cells', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, MS Res Australia, Sydney, AUSTRALIA (2017)
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Lea R, Maltby V, Ribbons K, Min M, Scott R, Lechner-Scott J, 'Dimethyl fumarate changes the methylation profile in CD4+cells of MS patients', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, MS Res Australia, Sydney, AUSTRALIA (2017)
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Ribbons K, Lea G, Lea R, Lechner-Scott J, 'Cognitive function screening tools in MS: Performance comparison of patients using the Audio Recorded Cognitive screen (ARCS) and the Brief International Cognitive Assessment for Multiple Sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, MS Res Australia, Sydney, AUSTRALIA (2017)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Tea F, Brilot F, Ramanathan S, Merheb V, Lopez JA, Zou A, et al., 'Exploring the importance of antigen conformation in MOG autoantibody detection', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, MS Res Australia, Sydney, AUSTRALIA (2017)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Arm J, Ribbons K, Lea R, Ramadan S, Lechner-Scott J, 'Are inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitter levels in the posterior cingulate cortex associated with MS fatigue?', Paris, France (2017)
Co-authors Saadallah Ramadan, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2017 Arm J, Ribbons K, Lechner-Scott J, Skehan K, Luchow S, Thomas MA, Ramadan S, 'Enhanced detection of weak metabolites with short initial echo time 2D L-COSY', Honolulu, HI, USA (2017)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Saadallah Ramadan
2017 Al-iedani O, Ribbons K, Arm J, Lechner-Scott J, Ramadan S, 'Diurnal effects on brain MRI volume and 1D MR neurospectroscopy', Honolulu, HI, USA (2017)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Saadallah Ramadan
2016 Signori A, Izquierdo G, Lugaresi A, Hupperts R, Grand'Maison F, Sola P, et al., 'Long-term disability trajectories in primary progressivs MS patients - a latent class growth analysis.', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, London, ENGLAND (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Jokubaitis VG, Kalincik T, Lorscheider J, Spelman T, Horakova D, Duquette P, et al., 'Pregnancy protects against long-term disability accrual in relapsing-remitting MS', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, London, ENGLAND (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Jokubaitis VG, Kalincik T, Horakova D, Havrdova E, Kleinova P, Kucerova K, et al., 'Defining a robust disease severity phenotype for use in genetic association studies', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, London, ENGLAND (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Haartsen J, Spelman T, Baker J, Agland S, Lechner-Scott J, Burke T, et al., 'MSFIRST - utilising a longitudinal, prospective, comparative drug safety module for use in everyday MS clinical practice to evaluate and track incidence and characteristics of safety outcomes in MS patients on therapy over the long term', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, London, ENGLAND (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Kalincik T, Sobisek L, Jokubaitis V, Spelman T, Horakova D, Havrdova E, et al., 'Individual response to disease modifying therapies: a global observational cohort study', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, London, ENGLAND (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Spelman T, Pellegrini F, Zhang A, Trojano M, Wiendl H, Kappos L, et al., 'Comparative analysis of MS outcomes in natalizumab-treated patients using a novel three-way multinomial propensity score match', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, London, ENGLAND (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Spelman T, Kalincik T, Trojano M, Grand'Maison F, Izquierdo G, Havrdova E, et al., 'Comparative analysis of MS outcomes in dimethyl fumarate-treated patients relative to propensity matched fingolimod, interferon, glatiramer acetate, or teriflunomide', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, London, ENGLAND (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Kalincik T, Brown JW, Robertson N, Willis M, Scolding N, Pearson O, et al., 'Comparison of 5-year treatment outcomes between alemtuzumab versus natalizumab, fingolimod and interferon beta-1a', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, London, ENGLAND (2016)
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Lorscheider J, Jokubaitis V, Spelman T, Izquierdo G, Lugaresi A, Havrdova E, et al., 'Anti-inflammatory disease modifying treatment does not attenuate disability progression in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, London, ENGLAND (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Butzkueven H, Spelman T, Kalincik T, Jokubaitis V, Zhang A, Pellegrini F, et al., 'Efficacy and Treatment Persistence of First-line Natalizumab vs. Interferon beta or Glatiramer Acetate in relapsing MS.', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Seoul, SOUTH KOREA (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Butzkueven H, Barnett M, Broadley S, Hodgkinson S, King J, Kneebone C, et al., 'Efficacy and Safety of Natalizumab in Multiple Sclerosis: Interim Observational Program Results from an Australian Cohort.', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Seoul, SOUTH KOREA (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Lizak NS, Lugaresi A, Alroughani R, Lechner-Scott J, Slee M, Jokubaitis V, et al., 'Immunomodulatory therapy slows accumulation of disability in moderately advanced multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, New Orleans, LA (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Lizak NS, Lugaresi A, Alroughani R, Lechner-Scott J, Slee M, Jokubaitis V, et al., 'Immunomodulatory therapy slows accumulation of disability in moderately advanced multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, New Orleans, LA (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2016 Maltby VE, Graves M, Lea R, Benton MC, Sanders KA, Tajouri L, et al., 'Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of CD8+T cells reveals distinct epigenetic signatures', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, New Orleans, LA (2016)
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Vicki E Maltby
2016 Sanders KA, Benton MC, Maltby VE, Lea R, Agland S, Griffin N, et al., 'A negative regulator of T-cell activation, SOCS6, is up-regulated in response to decreased microRNA expression in SPMS CD4+T-cells', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, New Orleans, LA (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott, Vicki E Maltby
2016 Kalincik T, Lizak N, Jokubaitis V, Butler E, Lechner-Scott J, Slee M, et al., 'Australian cladribine experience', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, London, ENGLAND (2016)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Sanders K, Benton MC, Lea RA, Maltby VE, Agland S, Scott RJ, et al., 'MicroRNA sequencing identifies four down-regulated microRNAs in CD4+T-cells of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Vicki E Maltby
2015 Maltby V, Graves M, Lea R, Benton M, Sanders K, Lechner-Scott J, et al., 'Minor methylation differences at various loci in CD8+T-Cells are associated with multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Vicki E Maltby, Rodney Scott
2015 Kalincik T, Stewart T, Jokubaitis V, Spelman T, Lechner-Scott J, Slee M, et al., 'Contribution of various relapse phenotypes to disability in multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Lizak N, Lugaresi A, Alroughani R, Lechner-Scott J, Slee M, Hodgkinson S, et al., 'Immunomodulatory therapy slows accumulation of disability in moderately advanced multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Jokubaitis V, Spelman T, Kalincik T, Lorscheider J, McCombe P, Lechner-Scott J, et al., 'First-line injectable therapy and pregnancy protect against long-term disability accrual in patients with relapse-onset multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Lorscheider J, Buzzard K, Jokubaitis V, Spelman T, Lechner-Scott J, McCombe P, et al., 'Defining secondary progressive multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Ribbons K, Quadrelli S, Lechner-Scott J, Al-Iedani O, Arm J, Ramadan S, '2D MR spectroscopy can identify molecules differentiating MS from healthy controls', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Saadallah Ramadan, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Ribbons K, Tiedeman C, Mackenzie L, Lechner-Scott J, 'On-going increase in incidence and prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Newcastle, Australia', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Ribbons K, Tiedeman C, McPherson Z, Mackenzie L, Lechner-Scott J, 'Are pregnancies prior to MS onset protective against subsequent disease severity?', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Wiley J, Field J, Dutertre S, Kilpatrick TJ, Lechner-Scott J, Scott R, et al., 'A rare P2X7 variant Arg307Gln with absent pore formation function protects against neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
2015 Lea R, Benton M, Scott R, Lechner-Scott J, 'Next Phase ANZGene Proposal - Epigenome-Wide Association Studies of Multiple Sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Kister I, Spelman T, Alroughani R, Lechner-Scott J, Duquette P, Grand'maison F, et al., 'Are stable MS patients who stop their disease-modifying therapy (DMT) at increased risk for relapses and disability progression compared to patients who continue on DMTs? A propensity-score matched analysis of the MSBase registrants', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Haartsen J, Agland S, Baker J, Burke T, Rath L, Lechner-Scott J, et al., 'MS FIRST - utilising a drug safety module for use in MS clinical practice to evaluate lymphocyte reduction in fingolimod treatment over time, demographic predictors of lymphopenia and association with reported safety events', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Jokubaitis VG, Spelman T, Kalincik T, Travaglini D, Paolicelli D, Duquette P, et al., '10-year progression predictors after first treatment initiation in a relapsing-remitting MS cohort', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Ribbons K, Lea R, Tiedeman C, MacKenzie L, Lechner-Scott J, 'On-going increase in incidence and prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Newcastle, Australia: a 50-year study', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Ribbons K, Lea R, Schofield P, Agland S, Lechner-Scott JS, 'Anxiety levels are a predictor of cognitive performance in an Australian MS patient cohort', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Peter Schofield
2015 Ribbons K, Quadrelli S, Lechner-Scott J, Al-Iedani O, Arm J, Mountford C, Ramadan S, '2D MR spectroscopy can identify molecules differentiating MS from healthy controls', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Saadallah Ramadan, Carolyn Mountford
2015 Spelman T, Izquierdo G, Alroughani R, Fernandez Bolaos R, Havrdova E, Horaova D, et al., 'Comparison of efficacy and persistence of first line fingolimod vs interferon-beta/glatiramer in the presence of prior disease activity', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Lechner-Scott J, Bar-Or A, Fox RJ, Gold R, Xiao J, Edwards MR, 'Long-term effect of delayed-release dimethyl fumarate on total disability burden in DEFINE, CONFIRM, and ENDORSE: area under the curve analysis of changes from baseline in expanded disability status scale scores', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Spelman T, Kalincik T, Jokubaitis V, Zhang A, Pellegrini F, Wiendl H, et al., 'Comparative efficacy of first-line natalizumab versus IFNb or glatiramer acetate in relapsing MS', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Spelman T, Mekhael L, Burke T, Butzkueven H, Hodgkinson S, Havrdova E, et al., 'Risk of early relapse following switch to oral agents for multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Lizak N, Lugaresi A, Alroughani R, Lechner-Scott J, Slee M, Havrdova E, et al., 'Immunomodulatory therapy slows accumulation of disability in moderately advanced multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Ribbons K, Lea R, McPherson Z, Lechner-Scott J, 'Are pregnancies prior to MS onset protective against subsequent disease severity?', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Stewart T, Jokubaitis V, Spelman T, Havrdova E, Horakova D, Trojano M, et al., 'Effect of relapse phenotype on the accumulation of disability in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Lorscheider J, Buzzard K, Jokubaitis V, Spelman T, Havrdova E, Horakova D, et al., 'Defining secondary progressive multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 12
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Macdonell R, Barnett M, Lechner-Scott J, King J, Truffinet P, Dukovic D, Wolinsky JS, 'Rapid Onset of Efficacy of Teriflunomide in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Ribbons K, Lea R, Schofield P, Agland S, Lechner-Scott J, 'Anxiety Levels are a Predictor of Cognitive Performance in an Australian MS patient cohort', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Peter Schofield
2015 Sanders KA, Benton MC, Lea RA, Maltby VE, Agland S, Scott RJ, et al., 'MicroRNA sequencing identifies down-regulated microRNA in CD4+T-cells of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Vicki E Maltby, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2015 Gu B, Field J, Kilpatrick T, Lechner-Scott J, Scott R, Lea R, et al., 'A rare P2X7 variant ARG307GLN with absent pore formation function protects against neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, Cairns, AUSTRALIA (2015) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
2014 Spelman T, Meyniel C, Trojano M, Lugaresi A, Izquierdo G, Grand'Maison F, et al., 'Independent predictors of time to relapse after CIS in high-risk patients', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Boston, MA (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Kalincik T, Jokubaitis V, Spelman T, Horakova D, Havrdova E, Trojano M, et al., 'Evaluation of common criteria of progression of disability in a large observational cohort', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Boston, MA (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Ribbons K, Schofield P, Lea RA, Caruana P, Agland S, Lechner-Scott J, 'Cognitive impairment as measured by Audio Recorded Cognitive Screen in an MS clinic population with up to 6 years follow up', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Boston, MA (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Schofield, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Graves MC, Ribbons K, Lea R, Vucic S, Shaw CP, Broadley S, et al., 'Do disease modifying treatments affect cognitive performance in early multiple sclerosis?', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Boston, MA (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Schofield, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Goris A, Pauwels I, Gustavsen MW, Van Son B, Hilven K, Bos SD, et al., 'Genetic risk factors are associated with cerebrospinal fluid measures in multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Boston, MA (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Sanders KA, Lea RA, Agland SE, Scott RJ, Lechner-Scott J, Tajouri L, 'Next generation sequencing of microRNA in the CD4+T-cells of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis individuals', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Boston, MA (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
2014 He A, Spelman T, Jokubaitis V, Lugaresi A, Izquierdo G, Trojano M, et al., 'Comparison of fingolimod versus interferon beta/glatiramer acetate as second-line therapy in active multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Boston, MA (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Kalincik T, Horakova D, Spelman T, Jokubaitis V, Trojano M, Lugaresi A, et al., 'Comparative efficacy of switch to natalizumab or fingolimod in active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Boston, MA (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Graves MC, Benton M, Lea R, Macartney D, Tajouri L, Scott RJ, Lechner-Scott J, 'Epigenetic changes in CD8(+) T cells and CD19(+) B cells isolated from relapsing/remitting multiple sclerosis patients', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Boston, MA (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Spelman T, Jokubaitis V, Izquierdo G, Duquette P, Grand'Maison F, Grammond P, et al., 'Predictors of disability accrual in multiple sclerosis patients on first-line therapy', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Boston, MA (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2014 Butzkueven H, Kalincik T, Jokubaitis V, Izguierdo G, Duquette P, Girard M, et al., 'Head-to-head Comparisons of Interferon Beta and Glatiramer Acetate in Clinical Practice', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Kyoto, JAPAN (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2013 Lechner-Scott J, 'Genetic backgrounds for cognitive impairment in MS', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Beijing, PEOPLES R CHINA (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2013 Graves M, Benton M, Lea R, Boyle M, Tajouri L, Macartney-Coxson D, et al., 'Epigenetic changes in CD4+T cells isolated from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Copenhagen, DENMARK (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Rodney Scott
2013 Caruana P, Lemmert K, Lea R, Reeves G, Lechner-Scott J, 'Natural killer cell subset patterns on established treatments for multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Copenhagen, DENMARK (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2012 Hughes S, Spelman T, Gray O, Boz C, Trojano M, Zwanikken C, et al., 'EXPOSURE TO INTERFERON-beta THERAPY IN EARLY PREGNANCY: A LITERATURE REVIEW OF PREGNANCY OUTCOMES IN WOMEN WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS', JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY NEUROSURGERY AND PSYCHIATRY, Brighton, ENGLAND (2012) [E3]
DOI 10.1136/jnnp-2012-304200a.64
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2012 Ribbons KA, McElduff P, Vetere S, Boz C, Trojano M, Zwanikken C, et al., 'Male MS patients fare worse!', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Lyon, FRANCE (2012)
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2012 Ribbons KA, Agland S, Schofield P, Brown K, McElduff P, Lechner-Scott J, 'Disease modifying multiple sclerosis treatments improve cognitive function in a routine clinical setting', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Melbourne, AUSTRALIA (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Peter Schofield, Patrick Mcelduff
2012 Mahurkar S, Moldovan M, Slee M, Butzkueven H, Taylor B, Broadley S, et al., 'Pharmacogenomics of interferon beta and glatiramer acetate response in Australian MS Patients', Multiple Sclerosis Journal, Melbourne, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2012 Cox MB, Scott R, Stankovich J, Kermode A, Cortes A, Brown M, et al., 'The P2X7 receptor: Interaction with a HLA Class II allele which modulates the autoantibody response in multiple sclerosis', Multiple Sclerosis Journal, Hamburg, Germany (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2012 Caruana P, Cox MB, Agland SE, Lechner-Scott J, 'Role of lymphocyte subsets in monitoring for Fingolimod', Internal Medicine Journal, Wellington, NZ (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2010 Lechner-Scott J, Tintore M, Hagstromer M, Wicklein EM, Penner IK, Sjostrom M, 'Assessment of physical activity and fitness in patients with early multiple sclerosis: Baseline data from the Australian Subgroup in the Betaferon (R) Treatment and Exercise Data Gathering IN Early MS (BEGIN) Study', Multiple Sclerosis, Hong Kong (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2009 Cox MB, Bowden NA, Scott R, Lechner-Scott J, 'Gene expression profiling in multiple sclerosis', AMATA 2009, Katoomba, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Nikola Bowden, Rodney Scott
2009 Gray OM, Zwanikken C, Trojano M, Grand'Maison F, Duquette P, Grammond P, et al., 'The Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS) re-examined: EDSS rank stability in the MSBase dataset increases 5 years after onset of multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, Kuala Lumpur, MALAYSIA (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2009 Lechner-Scott J, Kerr T, Agland S, Lydon A, Schofield P, 'Audio recorded cognitive screening: new tool to assess cognitive impairment in the clinical setting', Multiple Sclerosis, Dusseldorf, Germany (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Peter Schofield
2009 Gray OM, Jolley D, Zwanikken C, Trojano M, Grand'Maison F, Duquette P, et al., 'Temporal variation of onset of relapses in multiple sclerosis is not seasonal: results from the MSBase registry', Multiple Sclerosis, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2009 Gray O, Jolley D, Gibson K, Trojano M, Zwanikken C, Grand'Maison F, et al., 'Onset of relapses in multiple sclerosis: The effect of seasonal change in both the northern and southern hemisphere', Multiple Sclerosis, Dusseldorf, Germany (2009) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2008 Butzkueven H, Jolley D, Trojano M, Zwanikken C, Maison FG, Duquette P, et al., 'The Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score re-examined: Expanded Disability Status Scale rank stability in the MSBase dataset increases five years after onset of multiple sclerosis', MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, Montreal, CANADA (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
2007 Cox M, Bowden NA, Moscato PA, Berretta RE, Scott R, 'Memetic algorithms as a new method to interpret gene expression profiles in multiple sclerosis', Multiple Sclerosis (Abstracts of the 23rd Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis and the 12th Annual Conference of Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis), Prague, Czech Republic (2007) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Regina Berretta, Pablo Moscato, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Nikola Bowden
1999 Lienert C, Lechner-Scott J, Schött D, Constantinescu C, Kappos L, 'Use of composite scores in the quantification of deterioration in multiple sclerosis', Multiple Sclerosis (1999)
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Jeannette Lechner-Scott
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 19
Total funding $7,808,362

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20201 grants / $324,692

What predicts the progressive phase of multiple sclerosis$324,692

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Rodney Scott, Professor Bruce Taylor, Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Associate Professor Rodney Lea
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1700152
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20174 grants / $5,973,189

Track Australian MS patients$2,967,594

Funding body: Biogen inc

Funding body Biogen inc
Project Team

Helmut Butzkueven, Bruce Taylor, Tomas Kalincik, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Michael Barnett, Trevor Kilpatrick

Scheme Biogen
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Track Australian MS patients$2,967,594

Funding body: Biogen inc

Funding body Biogen inc
Project Team

Helmut Butzkueven, Bruce Taylor, Tomas Kalincik, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Michael Barnett, Trevor Kilpatrick

Scheme Biogen
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

The effect of common multiple sclerosis treatment on epigenetic markers in patients$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Vicki Maltby, Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Associate Professor Rodney Lea
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701562
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Investigation of erythrocyte microRNA content in Multiple Sclerosis$18,000

Funding body: Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia Limited

Funding body Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia Limited
Project Team Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Laureate Professor Rodney Scott, Doctor Vicki Maltby
Scheme Incubator Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600995
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20164 grants / $377,044

A Phase II Randomised Controlled Trial of An early Tailored Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Based Intervention for Depression in Those Newly Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (ACTION-MS)$270,044

Funding body: Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia Limited

Funding body Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia Limited
Project Team

L. Kiropulos, T. Kilpatrick, Butzkueven H, Lechner-Scott J, Kalincik T, MacDonald E, Shaw S

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Comparison of cognitive screening tools in multiple sclerosis and the association with employment status.$67,000

Funding body: TEVA Global

Funding body TEVA Global
Project Team

Ribbons K, Lechner-Scott J

Scheme TEVA
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Magnetic resonance spectroscopic GABA scanning of brain of MS patients for biochemical changes$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Saadallah Ramadan, Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600306
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Can we unveil the Natural Killer cell masquerade behind multiple sclerosis disease activity?$20,000

Funding body: John Hunter Charitable Trust Grant

Funding body John Hunter Charitable Trust Grant
Project Team

Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Myintzu Min

Scheme John Hunter Charitable Trust Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON N

20152 grants / $27,000

The effect of treatment on patients with Multiple Sclerosis$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Vicki Maltby, Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Associate Professor Rodney Lea
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501393
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Analyses of epigenetic signatures of post-mortem lesions in MS brains and correlation to circulating body fluids$7,000

Funding body: Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia Limited

Funding body Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia Limited
Project Team Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Ms Katherine Sanders, Miss Rebecca Seeto
Scheme Vacation Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501580
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20141 grants / $220,000

Unifying genomics and methylation studies of multiple sclerosis$220,000

Funding body: Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia Limited

Funding body Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia Limited
Project Team Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Laureate Professor Rodney Scott, Associate Professor Helmut Butzkueven, Professor Bruce Taylor
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1400570
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20131 grants / $38,448

A genome-wide study of lymphocyte-specific DNA methylation status in relation to Multiple Sclerosis$38,448

Funding body: Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia Limited

Funding body Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia Limited
Project Team Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Laureate Professor Rodney Scott, Associate Professor Rodney Lea
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300511
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20121 grants / $26,846

The cytokine gene expression profile in multiple sclerosis patients with chronic fatigue$26,846

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Dr KAREN Ribbons, Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200772
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20111 grants / $60,000

MicroRNA in Multiple Sclerosis$60,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Laureate Professor Rodney Scott
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100271
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20101 grants / $50,000

Correlation of cytokine levels with fatigue and cognition in RRMS under therapy$50,000

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1101023
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20082 grants / $90,000

The complex genetics of multiple sclerosis$75,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Laureate Professor Rodney Scott, Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott
Scheme Macquarie Group Foundation PhD Scholarship in Information Based Medicine
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0189689
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

PULSE Research Exchange$15,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Laureate Professor Rodney Scott
Scheme PULSE Research Exchange
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188563
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20061 grants / $621,143

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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current5

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.27

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Investigation of the Erythrocyte and Erythrocyte-Derived Extracellular Vesicle MicroRNA Content and Function in Multiple Sclerosis PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Genetic and molecular differences of Multiple Sclerosis subgroups. Is there a failure in viral and aberrant immune cell clearance driving disease course? PhD (Medical Genetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) in the Diagnosis and Management of Multiple Sclerosis. PhD (Medical Radiation Sc), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 Honours Mindfully Managing Stress in Multiple Sclerosis (MindS)
MS nurse research project
Nursing, Murdoch University Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Fast magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging for whole brain metabolic profiling of multiple sclerosis PhD (Medical Radiation Sc), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 Honours Functional effects of miRNAs in Multiple Sclerosis: Effects on SOCS6 and DNMT expression in T cells Biological Sciences, The University of Newcastle- School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Epigenetic Variations and Psychosocial Parameters in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD The Complex Genetics of Multiple Sclerosis PhD (Medical Genetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Conjoint Professor Jeannette Lechner-Scott

Position

Conjoint Professor
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email jeannette.lechnerscott@newcastle.edu.au
Phone ####

Office

Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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