Associate Professor Anthony Smith

Associate Professor Anthony Smith

Academic Lead, Research

University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health (Medical Imaging)

In a big country

Rural health professionals have very different challenges and incentives than do their city counterparts. Associate Professor Anthony (Tony) Smith works to develop ways of increasing the capacity of rural health professionals to provide better care for patients.

From dealing with a farmer who just spent three days harvesting before having his crushed foot examined, to being asked to diagnose broken bones at the supermarket, Tony speaks from experience when he says health professionals work differently in regional, rural and remote Australia.

After positions in both public hospitals and private practices as a diagnostic radiographer, Tony left full-time clinical practice to pursue a teaching and research career. He aims to help improve outcomes for rural health practitioners and their patients.

In 2003, he relocated to Tamworth with the advent of the University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health (UONDRH), where he is currently Associate Professor and Academic Lead (Research).

From the beginning of 2012, Tony’s position has been based at the UONRDH Manning Education Centre in Taree. There he continues to support students on placement, as well as providing support and continuing education to local health professionals and collaborating to build research opportunities.

“We want to increase the UONDRH’s research profile, encouraging medicine, nursing or the allied health professionals to take on some research as part of their role and support them to do it well,” Tony says.

Tony’s own research interests have evolved from medical imaging and radiation dosimetry to include rural health workforce issues and the development of new models of care that incorporate interprofessional education and practice. Collaborative, team-based care is essential to achieve optimal health care.

Recruitment and retention

Under the multi-million dollar Rural Health Multidisciplinary Training Program, the Federal Government funds universities to support and grow a strong rural health workforce in regional, rural, and remote Australia.

The University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health has major education centres in Tamworth and Taree, where students can spend up to a year of their undergraduate studies. The UONDRH also has hubs at Armidale, Moree, Port Macquarie, and Coffs Harbour, where students are engaged in shorter-term placements of two to eight weeks duration.

Through facilitating educational opportunities, plus conducting research into rural health issues, the UONDRH’s goal is attracting and retaining graduates who have undergone ‘conversion by immersion’ and ideally choose a career pathway.

Education for essential services

Tony is the first to admit that health outcomes for those who live in rural and remote areas are not as good as for those who live in metropolitan locations.

Whilst some factors in the equation, such as geography, attitudes to seeking health care and the availability of the latest technology may not change quickly, Tony is focused on long-term, sustainable improvements.

Since 1993, Tony has coordinated the NSW Limited Licence Radiography Course. Using mixed-mode delivery, the course permits general practitioners and registered nurses to be eligible to apply for a limited x-ray licence under the New South Wales Radiation Control Act 1990.

“Not every rural community has a qualified radiographer available all the time, but they do have a need for x-ray services,” Tony says.

“What we do is provide education, so remote and rural, non-radiographer health practitioners can provide a service that saves patients having to travel long distances for relatively minor diagnostic tests.”

“Working in remote and rural locations requires much dedication, so it is important to provide those health care professionals with opportunities to extend their role and develop new skills.”

Across professional boundaries

In 2006, Tony completed a PhD thesis titled 'Remote X-ray Operator Radiography: A Case Study in Interprofessional Rural Clinical Practice.’

“The most interesting thing I learned during my doctoral study was about the way that health professionals work together, and about the boundaries that exist between them,” Tony said.

“I am aware that professional boundaries do exist and that they are important. Professions have a role in actually preserving and developing knowledge and expertise,” Tony says.

“But being overly concerned about professional boundary issues may be counterproductive in a rural or remote context and create barriers to best quality care.”

“Interprofessional education is an important focus in the Department of Rural Health,” he continues. Led by Tony, the UONDRH successfully applied for a national award in 2014 for interprofessional education, developing opportunities for undergraduates to “Learn Together to Work Together”.

“We get students at undergraduate level together to learn about things at the same time, with a view to actually lowering the barriers that exist between health professions when they get out into the wards and clinics.”

Why rural health

Tony has led a number of projects using both quantitative and qualitative research methods to better understand the decision-making processes and factors that influence students and graduates to enter rural practice.

Results illustrate concerns and deficiencies, as well as the positive aspects. If you are after positives, speak to Tony.

From cheap house prices to easy trips to work through amazing landscapes, Tony will tell you all about the benefits of living and working in the country.

And, as far as professional practice is concerned?…

“One of the aspects of rural health that is really positive is that you get integrated into the community; people come to know and respect you,” Tony says.

“It is nice to be valued. You’re not just another number or cog in the machine.”

“You’re unique. You’re actually someone in the community, making a real difference to peoples’ lives.”

In a big country

Rural health professionals have very different challenges and incentives than do their city counterparts. Associate Professor Anthony (Tony) Smith works to develop ways of increasing the capacity of rural health professionals to provide better care for patients. From dealing with…

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Career Summary

Biography

I have worked a diagnostic radiographer in both public hospitals and private practices. My clinical expertise has spanned computed tomography and accident and emergency imaging. I left full-time clinical practice to pursue an academic career at the University of Newcastle in 1989 and was Head of Medical Radiation Science (MRS) from 1997 to 2001. In 2003 I relocated to Tamworth with the advent of the University Department of Rural Health. I relocated to Taree in 2012 and am currently Academic Lead - Research in the University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health.

In 1996 I completed a research Master of Science degree in 'Radiation Dose in Computed Tomography of the Head with Reference to Scanning Protocol' and in 2006 completed a PhD in 'Remote X-ray Operator Radiography: A Case Study in Interprofessional Rural Clinical Practice'. Current research focuses on rural health workforce issues, with particular interest in models of care that incorporate interprofessional education and practice. I have a strong interest in rural and remote health, especially as it relates to the delivery of medical imaging services. Since 1993, I have coordinated the NSW Limited Licence Radiography Course. I maintain an interest in this field on a national level.

Over the years I have contributed to the medical radiation profession and health service industry by serving on various boards and committees, as well as being on the editorial board of professional journals. In addition to academic awards, I have received the following professional awards and honours, of which I am proud. They include:

  • 2018 - Flinders University and Australian and New Zealand Association of Health Professional Educators (ANZAHPE) Prize for Excellence in Health Professional Education
  • 2014 - Office for Teaching and Learning Award for Programs that Enhance Learning, Innovation in Curricula, Learning and Teaching - 'Interprofessional Learning Modules: Learning Together to Work Together'
  • 2013 - Vice Chancellor's Award for Programs that Enhance Student Learning
  • 2009 - Nicholas Outtersider Memorial Medallion for services to the profession, Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy
  • 1993- Fellowship of the Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy

Research Expertise
I have expertise in both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies, with a focus of rural health workforce issues, the delivery of medical radiation services, and education and training. My research experience also includes inquiry into interprofessional collaboration and team-based care in a variety of practice setting, and into the development of health care roles that extend practitioners beyond their traditional occupational boundaries.

Teaching Expertise
My principal area of teaching is in medical radiation science, particularly diagnostic medical imaging. I also have a strong interest in the delivery of teaching and learning opportunities in rural and remote locations, as well as in the extensions of student and graduate knowledge, skills and abilities beyond the traditional limitations of health care roles. I also have extensive experience in teaching research skills to health professionals from a range of disciplines.

Administrative Expertise
I have extensive administrative experience both within and outside the tertiary education system. I have served, or continue to serve on a range of professional boards and committees, as above, and in 2017 completed the National Excellence in Educational Leadership Initiative (NEELI) Higher Education Academic Staff Leadership Colloquium Online.

Collaborations and Consultancies

  • Nursing and Allied Health Graduate Outcome Tracking (NAHGOT) - Monash Rural Health, Monash University (ongoing)
  • Student Survey Working Group of Australian Rural Health Education Network (ARHEN) - Eleven University Departments of Rural Health Australia-wide (2014 - 2018)
  • Kingdom of Tonga, Ministry of Health - Feasibility and Capacity for In-Country Education of Radiographers (2014)
  • Fiji National University (Fiji Medical School), Suva, Fiji - External examiner & visiting academic (1998 - 2006, 2009, 2018)
  • World Health Organization; Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists; International Society of Radiographers and Radiologic Technologists - Radiographic image interpretation for radiographers from the Pacific Islands (2004-2006)
  • NSW Department of Environment and Climate Change - NSW Limited Licence Radiography Course (1993 - ongoing)



Qualifications

  • PhD (Medical Radiation Science), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Science, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Advanced Practice
  • Diagnostic Radiography
  • Health Professions
  • Interprofessional Collaboration
  • Medical Imaging
  • Medical Radiation Science
  • Rural Health
  • Rural Health Workforce

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110320 Radiology and Organ Imaging 50
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 20
130101 Continuing and Community Education 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2010 -  Editorial Board - Radiography Radiography Journal - UK
United Kingdom
1/01/2009 -  Deputy Director University of Newcastle
Department of Rural Health
Australia
1/01/2003 - 1/01/2009 Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
Department of Rural Health
Australia
1/01/1997 - 1/01/2003 Senior Lecturer, Medical Radiation Science University of Newcastle
Faculty Of Health
Australia
1/01/1993 -  Membership - Australian Institute of Radiography Australian Institute of Radiography
1/01/1989 - 1/01/1997 Lecturer, Medical Radiation Science University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2017 National Excellence in Educational Leadership Initiative, Higher Education Academic Staff Leadership Colloquium
National Excellence in Educational Leadership Initiative (NEELI)

Distinction

Year Award
2018 Flinders University and Australian and New Zealand Association of Health Professional Educators (ANZAHPE) Prize for Excellence in Health Professional Education
Flinders University and Australian and New Zealand Association of Health Professional Educators (ANZAHPE)
2009 Nicholas Outtersider Memorial Medallion
Australian Institute of Radiography
1993 Fellowship of the Australian Institute of Radiography
Australian Institute of Radiography

Recognition

Year Award
2014 Office of Learning and Teaching Award for Programs that Enhance Learning
Unknown
2013 Vice Chancellor’s Award for Programs that Enhance Learning, The University of Newcastle Dep
Unknown
1978 Conjoint Board Diploma of the Australian Institute of Radiography (AIR) & Royal Australian College o
Australian Institute of Radiography

Invitations

Keynote Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2009 A Model of Advanced Practice in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy in Australia
Organisation: RANZCR/AIR/FRO/ACPSEM, Brisbane Description: Invited speaker
2002 The current and future roles of medical radiation professionals
Organisation: New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology Description: Invited speaker
2001 Radiographers and evidenced-based medical imaging
Organisation: UK Radiology Congress, Wembly Conference Centre, London Description: Invited speaker

Thesis Examinations

Year Level Discipline Thesis
2015 PHD Health Can Radiographer Musculoskeletal Trauma Radiograph Interpretation Re-Position the Profession in Australian Healthcare?
2014 PHD Health The influence of slice thickness and reconstruction kernel on dose optimisation of hepatic lesion computed tomography (CT) protocols
2013 PHD Health Introduction of a sonographer practitioner role in the Australian health care system: opportunities and barriers
2013 PHD Health Decision making in diagnostic imaging investigations: a case study of processes and interactions between patients and health care professionals
2010 PHD Health Patient perceptions of health care professionals: implications for innovative and sustainable rural primary health care delivery
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Higgs J, Croker A, Tasker D, Hummell J, Patton N, Health Practice Relationships, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 262 (2014) [A3]
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Kym Rae, Anne Croker, Karin Fisher, Nicky Hudson, Tracy Levett-Jones

Chapter (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Sutton K, Smith A, Waller S, 'Australia's health workforce', Understanding the Australian Health Care System, Elsevier Australia, Chatswood, NSW 278-294 (2019)
2014 Smith AN, 'Health Education and Practice Relationships in a Rural Context', Health Practice Relationships, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, The Netherlands 161-170 (2014) [B1]
2008 Smith AN, Stone N, Bull R, 'Strengthening interprofessional practice', A Textbook of Australian Rural Health, Australian Rural Health Education Network, Canberra, ACT 165-175 (2008) [B2]
2001 Warren-Forward H, Smith AN, Shah GA, 'Safety with Ultrasonic Facilities', Health and Safety Manual, International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists, Ontario, Canada (2001) [B2]
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward
Show 1 more chapter

Journal article (90 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Wolfgang R, Wakely L, Smith T, Burrows J, Little A, Brown LJ, 'Immersive placement experiences promote rural intent in allied health students of urban and rural origin', JOURNAL OF MULTIDISCIPLINARY HEALTHCARE, 12 699-710 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.2147/JMDH.S214120
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Rebecca Wolfgang, Julie Burrows, Alexandra Little, Leanne Brown
2019 Hawkins N, Jeong S, Smith T, 'Coming ready or not! An integrative review examining new graduate nurses' transition in acute care', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, 25 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ijn.12714
Co-authors Tash Hawkins, Sarah Jeong
2019 Hawkins N, Jeong S, Smith T, 'New graduate registered nurses exposure to negative workplace behaviour in the acute care setting: An integrative review', International Journal of Nursing Studies, 93 41-54 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Background: Negative workplace behaviour among nurses is a globally recognised problem and new graduate nurses are at high risk for exposure. Negative behaviou... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Background: Negative workplace behaviour among nurses is a globally recognised problem and new graduate nurses are at high risk for exposure. Negative behaviour has detrimental effects on new graduate nurses, the nursing profession and patients. Objectives: To synthesise evidence on negative workplace behaviour experienced by new graduate nurses in acute care setting and discuss implications for the nursing profession. Design: An integrative review guided by Whittemore and Knafl's (2005) framework. Data sources and review methods: A search of evidence-based research from five electronic databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, ProQuest, JBI and Scopus) was conducted for the period of 2007-2017. Eligible articles were critically appraised using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Results: Eight qualitative and eight quantitative studies were identified and reviewed. There was a variety of terms and definitions used to describe the disrespectful, unprofessional and uncivil targeted behaviour towards new graduate nurses. The incidence of negative workplace behaviour varied from 0.3% as a daily occurrence to 57.1% experiencing sporadic exposure. The precipitating factors included the new graduates¿ perceived lack of capability, magnifying power and hierarchy, leadership style and influence of management. The negative behaviour was identified as either a personal or professional attack, which left new graduates feeling emotional distress, anxiety or depression, which in turn impacted upon job satisfaction, cynicism, burnout, and intention to leave. The lack of a definitional consensus and the range of negative workplace behaviour make identification, seeking assistance and intervention difficult. Specific or ongoing organisational support to address negative behaviours towards new gradute nurses was not identified. Instead, the way they used to deal with these behaviours were personal. Conclusion: Negative workplace behaviour towards new graduate nurses continues to be an international problem. Available studies are descriptive and exploratory in nature and there have been few effective strategies implemented in acute care setting to address towards new graduate nurses. Multi-level organisational interventions are warranted to influence the ¿civility norms¿ of the nursing profession. With a new understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of negative workplace behaviours towards new graduate nurses and the identification of limited intervention studies being undertaken, the nursing profession is provided with new directions in their future endeavours.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2018.09.020
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Sarah Jeong, Tash Hawkins
2019 Smith T, McNeil K, Mitchell R, Boyle B, Ries N, 'A study of macro-, meso- and micro-barriers and enablers affecting extended scopes of practice: the case of rural nurse practitioners in Australia', BMC NURSING, 18 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12912-019-0337-z
Co-authors Karen Mcneil, Brendan Boyle, Rebecca Mitchell, Nola Ries
2018 Smith T, Cross M, Waller S, Chambers H, Farthing A, Barraclough F, et al., 'Ruralization of students horizons: Insights into Australian health professional students rural and remote placements', Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, 11 85-97 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Smith et al. Introduction: Health workforce shortages have driven the Australian and other Western governments to invest in engaging more health professional students in ru... [more]

© 2018 Smith et al. Introduction: Health workforce shortages have driven the Australian and other Western governments to invest in engaging more health professional students in rural and remote placements. The aim of this qualitative study was to provide an understanding of the lived experiences of students undertaking placements in various nonmetropolitan locations across Australia. In addition to providing their suggestions to improve rural placements, the study provides insight into factors contributing to positive and negative experiences that influence students¿ future rural practice intentions. Methods: Responses to open-ended survey questions from 3,204 students from multiple health professions and universities were analyzed using two independent methods applied concurrently: manual thematic analysis and computerized content analysis using Leximancer software. Results: The core concept identified from the thematic analysis was ¿ruralization of students¿ horizons,¿ a construct representing the importance of preparing health professional students for practice in nonmetropolitan locations. Ruralization embodies three interrelated themes, ¿prepa-ration and support,¿ ¿rural or remote health experience,¿ and ¿rural lifestyle and socialization,¿ each of which includes multiple subthemes. From the content analysis, factors that promoted students¿ rural practice intentions were having a ¿positive¿ practice experience, interactions with ¿supportive staff,¿ and interactions with the ¿community¿ in general. It was apparent that ¿difficulties,¿ eg, with ¿accommodation,¿ ¿Internet¿ access, ¿transport,¿ and ¿financial¿ support, negatively impacted students¿ placement experience and rural practice intentions. Conclusions: The study findings have policy and practice implications for continuing to support students undertaking regional, rural, and remote placements and preparing them for future practice in nonmetropolitan locations. This study may, therefore, further inform ongoing strategies for improving rural placement experiences and enhancing rural health workforce recruitment, retention, and capacity building.

DOI 10.2147/JMDH.S150623
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
2018 Smith AN, 'Supporting medical radiation students on rural placement with collaborative and immersive educational experiences', Spectrum, 25 18-19 (2018)
2018 Fisher KA, Smith A, Brown L, Little A, Wakely K, Hudson J, et al., 'Value-adding to health professional student placement experiences: Enhancing work readiness and employability through a rural community engagement program', Journal of Teaching and Learning for Graduate Employability, 9 41-61 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.21153/jtlge2018vol9no1art698
Co-authors Nicky Hudson, Alexandra Little, Katrina Wakely, Leanne Brown, Karin Fisher, Luke Wakely, Kelly Squires
2018 Smith T, Sutton K, Pit S, Muyambi K, Terry D, Farthing A, et al., 'Health professional students' rural placement satisfaction and rural practice intentions: A national cross-sectional survey', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 26 26-32 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Objective: The aim of this study was to profile students undertaking placements at University Departments of Rural Health (UDRHs) and in... [more]

© 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Objective: The aim of this study was to profile students undertaking placements at University Departments of Rural Health (UDRHs) and investigate factors affecting students' satisfaction and intention to enter rural practice. Design: Cross-sectional survey comprising 21 core questions used by all UDRHs. Setting: Eleven UDRHs across Australia that support students' placements in regional, rural and remote locations. Participants: Medical, nursing and allied health students who participated in UDRH placements between July 2014 and November 2015 and completed the questionnaire. Main outcome measures: Key dependent variables were placement satisfaction and rural practice intention. Descriptive variables were age, gender, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) background, location of placement, healthcare discipline, year of study and type and length of placement. Results: A total of 3328 students responded. The sample was predominantly female (79%), the mean age was 26.0 years and 1.8% identified as ATSI. Most placements (69%) were >2 but =12 weeks, 80% were in Modified Monash 3, 4 or 5 geographical locations. Public hospitals and community health made up 63% of placements. Students satisfied with their placement had 2.33 higher odds of rural practice intention. Those satisfied with Indigenous cultural training, workplace supervision, access to education resources and accommodation had higher odds of overall satisfaction and post-placement rural practice intention. Conclusions: The majority of students were highly satisfied with their placement and the support provided by rural clinicians and the UDRHs. UDRHs are well placed to provide health professional students with highly satisfactory placements that foster rural practice intention.

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12375
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2017 van den Berg ME, Warren HR, Cabrera CP, Verweij N, Mifsud B, Haessler J, et al., 'Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip', Human molecular genetics, 26 2346-2363 (2017)

© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. Resting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome... [more]

© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. Resting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome-wide association study analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation. This study aims to discover new genetic loci associated with heart rate from Exome Chip meta-analyses.Heart rate was measured from either elecrtrocardiograms or pulse recordings. We meta-analysed heart rate association results from 104¿452 European-ancestry individuals from 30 cohorts, genotyped using the Exome Chip. Twenty-four variants were selected for follow-up in an independent dataset (UK Biobank, N¿=¿134¿251). Conditional and gene-based testing was undertaken, and variants were investigated with bioinformatics methods.We discovered five novel heart rate loci, and one new independent low-frequency non-synonymous variant in an established heart rate locus (KIAA1755). Lead variants in four of the novel loci are non-synonymous variants in the genes C10orf71, DALDR3, TESK2 and SEC31B. The variant at SEC31B is significantly associated with SEC31B expression in heart and tibial nerve tissue. Further candidate genes were detected from long-range regulatory chromatin interactions in heart tissue (SCD, SLF2 and MAPK8). We observed significant enrichment in DNase I hypersensitive sites in fetal heart and lung. Moreover, enrichment was seen for the first time in human neuronal progenitor cells (derived from embryonic stem cells) and fetal muscle samples by including our novel variants.Our findings advance the knowledge of the genetic architecture of heart rate, and indicate new candidate genes for follow-up functional studies.

DOI 10.1093/hmg/ddx113
Citations Scopus - 7
2017 Brown L, Smith T, Wakely L, Wolfgang R, Little A, Burrows J, 'Longitudinal tracking of workplace outcomes for undergraduate allied health students undertaking placements in Rural Australia', Journal of Allied Health, 46 79-87 (2017) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Leanne Brown, Alexandra Little, Rebecca Wolfgang, Julie Burrows
2017 Saleheen D, Zhao W, Young R, Nelson CP, Ho W, Ferguson JF, et al., 'Loss of Cardioprotective Effects at the ADAMTS7 Locus as a Result of Gene-Smoking Interactions', Circulation, 135 2336-2353 (2017)

© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc. Background: Common diseases such as coronary heart disease (CHD) are complex in etiology. The interaction of genetic susceptibility with li... [more]

© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc. Background: Common diseases such as coronary heart disease (CHD) are complex in etiology. The interaction of genetic susceptibility with lifestyle factors may play a prominent role. However, gene-lifestyle interactions for CHD have been difficult to identify. Here, we investigate interaction of smoking behavior, a potent lifestyle factor, with genotypes that have been shown to associate with CHD risk. Methods: We analyzed data on 60 919 CHD cases and 80 243 controls from 29 studies for gene-smoking interactions for genetic variants at 45 loci previously reported to be associated with CHD risk. We also studied 5 loci associated with smoking behavior. Study-specific gene-smoking interaction effects were calculated and pooled using fixed-effects meta-analyses. Interaction analyses were declared to be significant at a P value of <1.0×10-3 (Bonferroni correction for 50 tests). Results: We identified novel gene-smoking interaction for a variant upstream of the ADAMTS7 gene. Every T allele of rs7178051 was associated with lower CHD risk by 12% in never-smokers (P=1.3×10-16) in comparison with 5% in ever-smokers (P=2.5×10-4), translating to a 60% loss of CHD protection conferred by this allelic variation in people who smoked tobacco (interaction P value=8.7×10-5). The protective T allele at rs7178051 was also associated with reduced ADAMTS7 expression in human aortic endothelial cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Exposure of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells to cigarette smoke extract led to induction of ADAMTS7. Conclusions: Allelic variation at rs7178051 that associates with reduced ADAMTS7 expression confers stronger CHD protection in never-smokers than in ever-smokers. Increased vascular ADAMTS7 expression may contribute to the loss of CHD protection in smokers.

DOI 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.116.022069
Citations Scopus - 12
2017 Kraja AT, Cook JP, Warren HR, Surendran P, Liu C, Evangelou E, et al., 'New Blood Pressure-Associated Loci Identified in Meta-Analyses of 475 000 Individuals', Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, 10 (2017)

© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc. Background - Genome-wide association studies have recently identified &gt;400 loci that harbor DNA sequence variants that influence blood p... [more]

© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc. Background - Genome-wide association studies have recently identified >400 loci that harbor DNA sequence variants that influence blood pressure (BP). Our earlier studies identified and validated 56 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) associated with BP from meta-analyses of exome chip genotype data. An additional 100 variants yielded suggestive evidence of association. Methods and Results - Here, we augment the sample with 140 886 European individuals from the UK Biobank, in whom 77 of the 100 suggestive SNVs were available for association analysis with systolic BP or diastolic BP or pulse pressure. We performed 2 meta-analyses, one in individuals of European, South Asian, African, and Hispanic descent (pan-ancestry, ¿475 000), and the other in the subset of individuals of European descent (¿423 000). Twenty-one SNVs were genome-wide significant (P<5×10-8) for BP, of which 4 are new BP loci: rs9678851 (missense, SLC4A1AP), rs7437940 (AFAP1), rs13303 (missense, STAB1), and rs1055144 (7p15.2). In addition, we identified a potentially independent novel BP-associated SNV, rs3416322 (missense, SYNPO2L) at a known locus, uncorrelated with the previously reported SNVs. Two SNVs are associated with expression levels of nearby genes, and SNVs at 3 loci are associated with other traits. One SNV with a minor allele frequency <0.01, (rs3025380 at DBH) was genome-wide significant. Conclusions - We report 4 novel loci associated with BP regulation, and 1 independent variant at an established BP locus. This analysis highlights several candidate genes with variation that alter protein function or gene expression for potential follow-up.

DOI 10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.117.001778
Citations Scopus - 18
2017 Song C, Burgess S, Eicher JD, O'Donnell CJ, Johnson AD, Huang J, et al., 'Causal effect of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 on coronary heart disease', Journal of the American Heart Association, 6 (2017)

© 2017 The Authors. Background--Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) plays an essential role in the fibrinolysis system and thrombosis. Population studies have reported ... [more]

© 2017 The Authors. Background--Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) plays an essential role in the fibrinolysis system and thrombosis. Population studies have reported that blood PAI-1 levels are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, it is unclear whether the association reflects a causal influence of PAI-1 on CHD risk. Methods and Results--To evaluate the association between PAI-1 and CHD, we applied a 3-step strategy. First, we investigated the observational association between PAI-1 and CHD incidence using a systematic review based on a literature search for PAI-1 and CHD studies. Second, we explored the causal association between PAI-1 and CHD using a Mendelian randomization approach using summary statistics from large genome-wide association studies. Finally, we explored the causal effect of PAI-1 on cardiovascular risk factors including metabolic and subclinical atherosclerosis measures. In the systematic meta-analysis, the highest quantile of blood PAI-1 level was associated with higher CHD risk comparing with the lowest quantile (odds ratio=2.17; 95% CI: 1.53, 3.07) in an age- and sex-adjusted model. The effect size was reduced in studies using a multivariable-adjusted model (odds ratio=1.46; 95% CI: 1.13, 1.88). The Mendelian randomization analyses suggested a causal effect of increased PAI-1 level on CHD risk (odds ratio=1.22 per unit increase of log-transformed PAI-1; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.47). In addition, we also detected a causal effect of PAI-1 on elevating blood glucose and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusions--Our study indicates a causal effect of elevated PAI-1 level on CHD risk, which may be mediated by glucose dysfunction.

DOI 10.1161/JAHA.116.004918
Citations Scopus - 26
2017 Smith T, 'We can and do make a difference by improving medical radiation services in rural and remote locations', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RADIATION SCIENCES, 64 241-243 (2017)
DOI 10.1002/jmrs.244
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2017 Brown LJ, Smith A, Wakely L, Little A, Wolfgang R, Burrows J, 'Preparing graduates to meet the allied health workforce needs in rural Australia: Short-term outcomes from a longitudinal study', Education Sciences, 7 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/educsci7020064
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Julie Burrows, Rebecca Wolfgang, Alexandra Little, Luke Wakely
2017 Fisher K, Smith T, Nairn K, Anderson D, 'Rural people who inject drugs: A cross-sectional survey addressing the dimensions of access to secondary needle and syringe program outlets', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 25 94-101 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Objective: To better understand issues related to access to injecting equipment for people who inject drugs (PWID) in a rural area of Ne... [more]

© 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Objective: To better understand issues related to access to injecting equipment for people who inject drugs (PWID) in a rural area of New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Design: Cross-sectional face-to-face survey using convenience and snowball sampling. Setting: Six regional and rural population centres in Northern NSW, within the Hunter New England Local Health District. Participants: The sample included 190 PWID who had accessed a needle and syringe program outlet within 4¿weeks of the survey. Main outcome measures: Data include demographic information, preferred location for accessing injecting equipment, reasons for that preference, whether they obtained enough equipment, travelling distance to an NSP and self-reported hepatitis C virus status. Results: Sixty percent self-identified as Aboriginal people. The median age of respondents was 32¿years and 60% were men. A significantly larger proportion (P¿<¿0.05) of the Aboriginal respondents were women (27% versus 11.6%) and younger (37.6 versus 12.7%) compared to non-Aboriginal respondents. Most preferred to access injecting equipment at a community health facility (62.6%), as opposed to other secondary outlets, where they gained enough equipment (67.4%). Just over 80% said they were tested for HCV in the past year, with about 37% told they had tested positive. Conclusions: There are complex dimensions affecting how rural PWID access secondary NSP outlets. Although access is similarly limited as other rural health services because of the nature of injecting drug use and sensitivities existing in rural communities, there is potential for application of unique access models, such as, promoting secondary distribution networks.

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12304
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Karin Fisher
2016 Traylor M, Adib-Samii P, Harold D, Dichgans M, Williams J, Lewis CM, et al., 'Shared genetic contribution to ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's disease', Annals of Neurology, 79 739-747 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/ana.24621
Citations Scopus - 21
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Christopher Levi
2016 Squibb K, Smith A, Dalton L, Bull RM, 'The 'radiographer-referrer game': image interpretation dynamics in rural practice.', Journal of medical radiation sciences, 63 17-22 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jmrs.152
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2016 van der Harst P, van Setten J, Verweij N, Vogler G, Franke L, Maurano MT, et al., '52 Genetic Loci Influencing Myocardial Mass', Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 68 1435-1448 (2016)

© 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation Background Myocardial mass is a key determinant of cardiac muscle function and hypertrophy. Myocardial depolarization leading to c... [more]

© 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation Background Myocardial mass is a key determinant of cardiac muscle function and hypertrophy. Myocardial depolarization leading to cardiac muscle contraction is reflected by the amplitude and duration of the QRS complex on the electrocardiogram (ECG). Abnormal QRS amplitude or duration reflect changes in myocardial mass and conduction, and are associated with increased risk of heart failure and death. Objectives This meta-analysis sought to gain insights into the genetic determinants of myocardial mass. Methods We carried out a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 4 QRS traits in up to 73,518 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. Results We identified 52 genomic loci, of which 32 are novel, that are reliably associated with 1 or more QRS phenotypes at p¿< 1¿× 10-8. These loci are enriched in regions of open chromatin, histone modifications, and transcription factor binding, suggesting that they represent regions of the genome that are actively transcribed in the human heart. Pathway analyses provided evidence that these loci play a role in cardiac hypertrophy. We further highlighted 67¿candidate genes at the identified loci that are preferentially expressed in cardiac tissue and associated with cardiac abnormalities in Drosophila melanogaster and Mus musculus. We validated the regulatory function of a novel variant in the SCN5A/SCN10A locus in¿vitro and in¿vivo. Conclusions Taken together, our findings provide new insights into genes and biological pathways controlling myocardial mass and may help identify novel therapeutic targets.

DOI 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.07.729
Citations Scopus - 39
2016 Marioni RE, Ritchie SJ, Joshi PK, Hagenaars SP, Okbay A, Fischer K, et al., 'Genetic variants linked to education predict longevity', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 113 13366-13371 (2016)

Educational attainment is associated with many health outcomes, including longevity. It is also known to be substantially heritable. Here, we used data from three large genetic ep... [more]

Educational attainment is associated with many health outcomes, including longevity. It is also known to be substantially heritable. Here, we used data from three large genetic epidemiology cohort studies (Generation Scotland, n = ~17,000; UK Biobank, n = ~115,000; and the Estonian Biobank, n = ~6,000) to test whether education-linked genetic variants can predict lifespan length. We did so by using cohort members' polygenic profile score for education to predict their parents' longevity. Across the three cohorts, meta-analysis showed that a 1 SD higher polygenic education score was associated with ~2.7% lower mortality risk for both mothers (total n deaths = 79,702) and ~2.4% lower risk for fathers (total n deaths = 97,630). On average, the parents of offspring in the upper third of the polygenic score distribution lived 0.55 y longer compared with those of offspring in the lower third. Overall, these results indicate that the genetic contributions to educational attainment are useful in the prediction of human longevity.

DOI 10.1073/pnas.1605334113
Citations Scopus - 29
Co-authors John Attia, Liz Holliday, Rodney Scott, Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Huan T, Esko T, Peters MJ, Pilling LC, Schramm K, Schurmann C, et al., 'A Meta-analysis of Gene Expression Signatures of Blood Pressure and Hypertension', PLoS Genetics, 11 (2015)

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have uncovered numerous genetic variants (SNPs) that are associated with blood pressure (BP). Genetic variants may lead to BP changes by act... [more]

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have uncovered numerous genetic variants (SNPs) that are associated with blood pressure (BP). Genetic variants may lead to BP changes by acting on intermediate molecular phenotypes such as coded protein sequence or gene expression, which in turn affect BP variability. Therefore, characterizing genes whose expression is associated with BP may reveal cellular processes involved in BP regulation and uncover how transcripts mediate genetic and environmental effects on BP variability. A meta-analysis of results from six studies of global gene expression profiles of BP and hypertension in whole blood was performed in 7017 individuals who were not receiving antihypertensive drug treatment. We identified 34 genes that were differentially expressed in relation to BP (Bonferroni-corrected p<0.05). Among these genes, FOS and PTGS2 have been previously reported to be involved in BP-related processes; the others are novel. The top BP signature genes in aggregate explain 5%¿9% of inter-individual variance in BP. Of note, rs3184504 in SH2B3, which was also reported in GWAS to be associated with BP, was found to be a trans regulator of the expression of 6 of the transcripts we found to be associated with BP (FOS, MYADM, PP1R15A, TAGAP, S100A10, and FGBP2). Gene set enrichment analysis suggested that the BP-related global gene expression changes include genes involved in inflammatory response and apoptosis pathways. Our study provides new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, and suggests novel transcriptomic markers for the treatment and prevention of hypertension.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pgen.1005035
Citations Scopus - 54
2015 Massey S, Fisher K, Croker A, Smith T, 'Collaboration across the health care and education interface: what is it like for teachers of children with traumatic brain injury?', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PRIMARY HEALTH, 21 74-78 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/PY13035
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Karin Fisher, Anne Croker
2015 Nikpay M, Goel A, Won HH, Hall LM, Willenborg C, Kanoni S, et al., 'A comprehensive 1000 Genomes-based genome-wide association meta-analysis of coronary artery disease', Nature Genetics, 47 1121-1130 (2015)

© 2015 Nature America, Inc. Existing knowledge of genetic variants affecting risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) is largely based on genome-wide association study (GWAS) analysi... [more]

© 2015 Nature America, Inc. Existing knowledge of genetic variants affecting risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) is largely based on genome-wide association study (GWAS) analysis of common SNPs. Leveraging phased haplotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project, we report a GWAS meta-analysis of ~185,000 CAD cases and controls, interrogating 6.7 million common (minor allele frequency (MAF) > 0.05) and 2.7 million low-frequency (0.005 < MAF < 0.05) variants. In addition to confirming most known CAD-associated loci, we identified ten new loci (eight additive and two recessive) that contain candidate causal genes newly implicating biological processes in vessel walls. We observed intralocus allelic heterogeneity but little evidence of low-frequency variants with larger effects and no evidence of synthetic association. Our analysis provides a comprehensive survey of the fine genetic architecture of CAD, showing that genetic susceptibility to this common disease is largely determined by common SNPs of small effect size.

DOI 10.1038/ng.3396
Citations Scopus - 535
2015 Joshi PK, Esko T, Mattsson H, Eklund N, Gandin I, Nutile T, et al., 'Directional dominance on stature and cognition in diverse human populations', Nature, 523 459-462 (2015)

© 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Homozygosity has long been associated with rare, often devastating, Mendelian disorders, and Darwin was one of the first ... [more]

© 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Homozygosity has long been associated with rare, often devastating, Mendelian disorders, and Darwin was one of the first to recognize that inbreeding reduces evolutionary fitness. However, the effect of the more distant parental relatedness that is common in modern human populations is less well understood. Genomic data now allow us to investigate the effects of homozygosity on traits of public health importance by observing contiguous homozygous segments (runs of homozygosity), which are inferred to be homozygous along their complete length. Given the low levels of genome-wide homozygosity prevalent in most human populations, information is required on very large numbers of people to provide sufficient power. Here we use runs of homozygosity to study 16 health-related quantitative traits in 354,224 individuals from 102 cohorts, and find statistically significant associations between summed runs of homozygosity and four complex traits: height, forced expiratory lung volume in one second, general cognitive ability and educational attainment (P < 1 × 10-300, 2.1 × 10-6, 2.5 × 10-10 and 1.8 × 10-10, respectively). In each case, increased homozygosity was associated with decreased trait value, equivalent to the offspring of first cousins being 1.2 cm shorter and having 10 months' less education. Similar effect sizes were found across four continental groups and populations with different degrees of genome-wide homozygosity, providing evidence that homozygosity, rather than confounding, directly contributes to phenotypic variance. Contrary to earlier reports in substantially smaller samples, no evidence was seen of an influence of genome-wide homozygosity on blood pressure and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, or ten other cardio-metabolic traits. Since directional dominance is predicted for traits under directional evolutionary selection, this study provides evidence that increased stature and cognitive function have been positively selected in human evolution, whereas many important risk factors for late-onset complex diseases may not have been.

DOI 10.1038/nature14618
Citations Scopus - 69Web of Science - 69
2015 Smith T, Harris J, Woznitza N, Maresse S, Sale C, 'Letter in response to The conceptual model of advanced practice does include research ', Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences, 62 295-296 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1002/jmrs.146
2015 Croker A, Fisher K, Smith T, 'When students from different professions are co-located: the importance of interprofessional rapport for learning to work together', JOURNAL OF INTERPROFESSIONAL CARE, 29 41-48 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/13561820.2014.937481
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Anne Croker, Karin Fisher
2015 Squibb K, Bull RM, Smith A, Dalton L, 'Australian rural radiographers' perspectives on disclosure of their radiographic opinion to patients', Radiography, 21 25-29 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2014.05.006
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2015 Smith T, Harris J, 'Letter in response to The role of research for advanced practitioners ', Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences, 62 235-235 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1002/jmrs.124
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Smith T, Harris J, Woznitza N, Maresse S, Sale C, 'Conceptualisation of the characteristics of advanced practitioners in the medical radiation professions', Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences, 62 204-211 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jmrs.115
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
2014 Perry JRB, Day F, Elks CE, Sulem P, Thompson DJ, Ferreira T, et al., 'Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche', NATURE, 514 92-+ (2014)
DOI 10.1038/nature13545
Citations Scopus - 232Web of Science - 228
Co-authors Craig Pennell
2014 Arking DE, Pulit SL, Crotti L, Van Der Harst P, Munroe PB, Koopmann TT, et al., 'Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization', Nature Genetics, 46 826-836 (2014)

The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudde... [more]

The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals, we identified 35 common variant loci associated with QT interval that collectively explain ~ 8-10% of QT-interval variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 new QT interval-associated loci in 298 unrelated probands with LQTS identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies new candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS and SCD. © 2014 Nature America, Inc.

DOI 10.1038/ng.3014
Citations Scopus - 114
2014 Postmus I, Trompet S, Deshmukh HA, Barnes MR, Li X, Warren HR, et al., 'Pharmacogenetic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of LDL cholesterol response to statins', Nature Communications, 5 (2014)
DOI 10.1038/ncomms6068
Citations Scopus - 114
2013 Berndt SI, Gustafsson S, Mägi R, Ganna A, Wheeler E, Feitosa MF, et al., 'Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture', Nature Genetics, 45 501-512 (2013)

Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader... [more]

Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-to-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity, including up to 263,407 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 4 new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1 and PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the distribution tails and 7 new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3 and ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we find a large overlap in genetic structure and the distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiological heterogeneity between obesity subgroups. © 2013 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1038/ng.2606
Citations Scopus - 318
2013 Randall JC, Winkler TW, Kutalik Z, Berndt SI, Jackson AU, Monda KL, et al., 'Sex-stratified Genome-wide Association Studies Including 270,000 Individuals Show Sexual Dimorphism in Genetic Loci for Anthropometric Traits', PLoS Genetics, 9 (2013)

Given the anthropometric differences between men and women and previous evidence of sex-difference in genetic effects, we conducted a genome-wide search for sexually dimorphic ass... [more]

Given the anthropometric differences between men and women and previous evidence of sex-difference in genetic effects, we conducted a genome-wide search for sexually dimorphic associations with height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist-to-hip-ratio (133,723 individuals) and took forward 348 SNPs into follow-up (additional 137,052 individuals) in a total of 94 studies. Seven loci displayed significant sex-difference (FDR<5%), including four previously established (near GRB14/COBLL1, LYPLAL1/SLC30A10, VEGFA, ADAMTS9) and three novel anthropometric trait loci (near MAP3K1, HSD17B4, PPARG), all of which were genome-wide significant in women (P<5×10-8), but not in men. Sex-differences were apparent only for waist phenotypes, not for height, weight, BMI, or hip circumference. Moreover, we found no evidence for genetic effects with opposite directions in men versus women. The PPARG locus is of specific interest due to its role in diabetes genetics and therapy. Our results demonstrate the value of sex-specific GWAS to unravel the sexually dimorphic genetic underpinning of complex traits.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003500
Citations Scopus - 183
2013 Keane S, Lincoln M, Rolfe M, Smith AN, 'Retention of the rural allied health workforce in New South Wales: A comparison of public and private practitioners', BMC Health Services Research, 13 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 19
2013 Smith AN, 'To dot or not: The need to redesign frontline image interpretation.', Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology, 57 205 (2013) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2013 Monk CM, Wrightson SJ, Smith TN, 'An exploration of the feasibility of radiation therapist participation in treatment reviews', Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences, 60 100-107 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jmrs.23
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2013 Monk CM, Smith TN, 'Response to letters to the editor regarding feasibility of radiation therapist-performed treatment reviews ', Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences, 60 160-160 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1002/jmrs.27
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Suckling T, Smith T, Reed W, 'A retrospective comparison of smart prep and test bolus multi-detector CT pulmonary angiography protocols', Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences, 60 53-57 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jmrs.17
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2012 Taal HR, St Pourcain B, Thiering E, Das S, Mook-Kanamori DO, Warrington NM, et al., 'Common variants at 12q15 and 12q24 are associated with infant head circumference', NATURE GENETICS, 44 532-+ (2012)
DOI 10.1038/ng.2238
Citations Scopus - 71Web of Science - 73
Co-authors Craig Pennell
2012 Ikram MA, Fornage M, Smith AV, Seshadri S, Schmidt R, Debette S, et al., 'Common variants at 6q22 and 17q21 are associated with intracranial volume', NATURE GENETICS, 44 539-+ (2012)
DOI 10.1038/ng.2245
Citations Scopus - 74Web of Science - 82
Co-authors Craig Pennell
2012 Bis JC, Decarli C, Smith AV, Van Der Lijn F, Crivello F, Fornage M, et al., 'Common variants at 12q14 and 12q24 are associated with hippocampal volume', Nature Genetics, 44 545-551 (2012)

Aging is associated with reductions in hippocampal volume that are accelerated by Alzheimer&apos;s disease and vascular risk factors. Our genome-wide association study (GWAS) of d... [more]

Aging is associated with reductions in hippocampal volume that are accelerated by Alzheimer's disease and vascular risk factors. Our genome-wide association study (GWAS) of dementia-free persons (n = 9,232) identified 46 SNPs at four loci with P values of <4.0 × 10 -7. In two additional samples (n = 2,318), associations were replicated at 12q14 within MSRB3-WIF1 (discovery and replication; rs17178006; P = 5.3 × 10 -11) and at 12q24 near HRK-FBXW8 (rs7294919; P = 2.9 × 10 -11). Remaining associations included one SNP at 2q24 within DPP4 (rs6741949; P = 2.9 × 10 -7) and nine SNPs at 9p33 within ASTN2 (rs7852872; P = 1.0 × 10 -7); along with the chromosome 12 associations, these loci were also associated with hippocampal volume (P < 0.05) in a third younger, more heterogeneous sample (n = 7,794). The SNP in ASTN2 also showed suggestive association with decline in cognition in a largely independent sample (n = 1,563). These associations implicate genes related to apoptosis (HRK), development (WIF1), oxidative stress (MSR3B), ubiquitination (FBXW8) and neuronal migration (ASTN2), as well as enzymes targeted by new diabetes medications (DPP4), indicating new genetic influences on hippocampal size and possibly the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. © 2012 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1038/ng.2237
Citations Scopus - 147
2012 Estrada K, Styrkarsdottir U, Evangelou E, Hsu YH, Duncan EL, Ntzani EE, et al., 'Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 56 bone mineral density loci and reveals 14 loci associated with risk of fracture', Nature Genetics, 44 491-501 (2012)

Bone mineral density (BMD) is the most widely used predictor of fracture risk. We performed the largest meta-analysis to date on lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD, including 17 ge... [more]

Bone mineral density (BMD) is the most widely used predictor of fracture risk. We performed the largest meta-analysis to date on lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD, including 17 genome-wide association studies and 32,961 individuals of European and east Asian ancestry. We tested the top BMD-associated markers for replication in 50,933 independent subjects and for association with risk of low-trauma fracture in 31,016 individuals with a history of fracture (cases) and 102,444 controls. We identified 56 loci (32 new) associated with BMD at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10 -8). Several of these factors cluster within the RANK-RANKL-OPG, mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, endochondral ossification and Wnt signaling pathways. However, we also discovered loci that were localized to genes not known to have a role in bone biology. Fourteen BMD-associated loci were also associated with fracture risk (P < 5 × 10 -4, Bonferroni corrected), of which six reached P < 5 × 10 -8, including at 18p11.21 (FAM210A), 7q21.3 (SLC25A13), 11q13.2 (LRP5), 4q22.1 (MEPE), 2p16.2 (SPTBN1) and 10q21.1 (DKK1). These findings shed light on the genetic architecture and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying BMD variation and fracture susceptibility. © 2012 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1038/ng.2249
Citations Scopus - 610
2012 Smith AN, 'A long way from home: Access to cancer care for rural Australians', Radiography, 18 38-42 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2011.10.041
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 11
2012 Smith AN, 'Why rural health?', Spectrum, 2012 12-14 (2012) [C3]
2012 Whitford D, Smith AN, Newbury J, 'The South Australian Allied Health Workforce survey: Helping to fill the evidence gap in primary health workforce planning', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 18 234-241 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/PY11027
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2012 Keane S, Lincoln M, Smith AN, 'Retention of allied health professionals in rural New South Wales: A thematic analysis of focus group discussions', BMC Health Services Research, 12 175 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 39
2011 Soler Artigas M, Loth DW, Wain LV, Gharib SA, Obeidat M, Tang W, et al., 'Genome-wide association and large-scale follow up identifies 16 new loci influencing lung function', NATURE GENETICS, 43 1082-1090 (2011)
DOI 10.1038/ng.941
Citations Scopus - 254Web of Science - 222
Co-authors Craig Pennell
2011 Ehret GB, Munroe PB, Rice KM, Bochud M, Johnson AD, Chasman DI, et al., 'Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk', Nature, 478 103-109 (2011)

Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (=140mmg... [more]

Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (=140mmg Hg systolic blood pressure =90mmg Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This genome-wide association study of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified sixteen novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate blood pressure (GUCY1A3 GUCY1B3, NPR3 C5orf23, ADM, FURIN FES, GOSR2, GNAS EDN3); the other ten provide new clues to blood pressure physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with blood pressure in East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of blood pressure, and suggest potential novel therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1038/nature10405
Citations Scopus - 1248
2011 Speliotes EK, Yerges-Armstrong LM, Wu J, Hernaez R, Kim LJ, Palmer CD, et al., 'Genome-wide association analysis identifies variants associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease that have distinct effects on metabolic traits', PLoS Genetics, 7 (2011)

© 2011, Public Library of Science. All Rights Reserved. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) clusters in families, but the only known common genetic variants influencing risk ... [more]

© 2011, Public Library of Science. All Rights Reserved. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) clusters in families, but the only known common genetic variants influencing risk are near PNPLA3. We sought to identify additional genetic variants influencing NAFLD using genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of computed tomography (CT) measured hepatic steatosis, a non-invasive measure of NAFLD, in large population based samples. Using variance components methods, we show that CT hepatic steatosis is heritable (~26%-27%) in family-based Amish, Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies (n = 880 to 3,070). By carrying out a fixed-effects meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results between CT hepatic steatosis and ~2.4 million imputed or genotyped SNPs in 7,176 individuals from the Old Order Amish, Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik study (AGES), Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies, we identify variants associated at genome-wide significant levels (p<5×10-8) in or near PNPLA3, NCAN, and PPP1R3B. We genotype these and 42 other top CT hepatic steatosis-associated SNPs in 592 subjects with biopsy-proven NAFLD from the NASH Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN). In comparisons with 1,405 healthy controls from the Myocardial Genetics Consortium (MIGen), we observe significant associations with histologic NAFLD at variants in or near NCAN, GCKR, LYPLAL1, and PNPLA3, but not PPP1R3B. Variants at these five loci exhibit distinct patterns of association with serum lipids, as well as glycemic and anthropometric traits. We identify common genetic variants influencing CT-assessed steatosis and risk of NAFLD. Hepatic steatosis associated variants are not uniformly associated with NASH/fibrosis or result in abnormalities in serum lipids or glycemic and anthropometric traits, suggesting genetic heterogeneity in the pathways influencing these traits.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pgen.1001324
Citations Scopus - 466
2011 Wild PS, Zeller T, Schillert A, Szymczak S, Sinning CR, Deiseroth A, et al., 'A genome-wide association study identifies LIPA as a susceptibility gene for coronary artery disease', Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, 4 403-412 (2011)

Background - eQTL analyses are important to improve the understanding of genetic association results. We performed a genome-wide association and global gene expression study to id... [more]

Background - eQTL analyses are important to improve the understanding of genetic association results. We performed a genome-wide association and global gene expression study to identify functionally relevant variants affecting the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods and Results - In a genome-wide association analysis of 2078 CAD cases and 2953 control subjects, we identified 950 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were associated with CAD at P<10 -3. Subsequent in silico and wet-laboratory replication stages and a final meta-analysis of 21 428 CAD cases and 38 361 control subjects revealed a novel association signal at chromosome 10q23.31 within the LIPA (lysosomal acid lipase A) gene (P=3.7×10 -8; odds ratio, 1.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.14). The association of this locus with global gene expression was assessed by genome-wide expression analyses in the monocyte transcriptome of 1494 individuals. The results showed a strong association of this locus with expression of the LIPA transcript (P=1.3×10 -96). An assessment of LIPA SNPs and transcript with cardiovascular phenotypes revealed an association of LIPA transcript levels with impaired endothelial function (P=4.4×10 -3). Conclusions - The use of data on genetic variants and the addition of data on global monocytic gene expression led to the identification of the novel functional CAD susceptibility locus LIPA, located on chromosome 10q23.31. The respective eSNPs associated with CAD strongly affect LIPA gene expression level, which was related to endothelial dysfunction, a precursor of CAD. © 2011 American Heart Association, Inc.

DOI 10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.110.958728
Citations Scopus - 89
2011 Kathiresan S, Reilly MP, Samani NJ, Schunkert H, Erdmann J, Assimes TL, et al., 'RANTES/CCL5 and risk for coronary events: Results from the MONICA/KORA Augsburg case-cohort, Athero-express and CARDIoGRAM studies', PLoS ONE, 6 (2011)

Background: The chemokine RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted)/CCL5 is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in mice, whereas le... [more]

Background: The chemokine RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted)/CCL5 is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in mice, whereas less is known in humans. We hypothesised that its relevance for atherosclerosis should be reflected by associations between CCL5 gene variants, RANTES serum concentrations and protein levels in atherosclerotic plaques and risk for coronary events. Methods and Findings: We conducted a case-cohort study within the population-based MONICA/KORA Augsburg studies. Baseline RANTES serum levels were measured in 363 individuals with incident coronary events and 1,908 non-cases (mean follow-up: 10.2±4.8 years). Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, metabolic factors and lifestyle factors revealed no significant association between RANTES and incident coronary events (HR [95% CI] for increasing RANTES tertiles 1.0, 1.03 [0.75-1.42] and 1.11 [0.81-1.54]). None of six CCL5 single nucleotide polymorphisms and no common haplotype showed significant associations with coronary events. Also in the CARDIoGRAM study (>22,000 cases, >60,000 controls), none of these CCL5 SNPs was significantly associated with coronary artery disease. In the prospective Athero-Express biobank study, RANTES plaque levels were measured in 606 atherosclerotic lesions from patients who underwent carotid endarterectomy. RANTES content in atherosclerotic plaques was positively associated with macrophage infiltration and inversely associated with plaque calcification. However, there was no significant association between RANTES content in plaques and risk for coronary events (mean follow-up 2.8±0.8 years). Conclusions: High RANTES plaque levels were associated with an unstable plaque phenotype. However, the absence of associations between (i) RANTES serum levels, (ii) CCL5 genotypes and (iii) RANTES content in carotid plaques and either coronary artery disease or incident coronary events in our cohorts suggests that RANTES may not be a novel coronary risk biomarker. However, the potential relevance of RANTES levels in platelet-poor plasma needs to be investigated in further studies. © 2011 Herder et al.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0025734
Citations Scopus - 7
2011 Smith AN, Fisher KA, Keane S, Lincoln M, 'Comparison of the results of two rural allied health workforce surveys in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales: 2005 versus 2008', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 19 154-159 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2011.01202.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Karin Fisher
2011 Keane S, Smith AN, Lincoln M, Fisher KA, 'Survey of the rural allied health workforce in New South Wales to inform recruitment and retention', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 19 38-44 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2010.01175.x
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 55
Co-authors Karin Fisher
2011 Smith AN, Fisher KA, 'Self-reported competency and continuing education needs of limited licence remote X-ray operators in New South Wales, Australia', Rural and Remote Health, 11 1560 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Karin Fisher
2010 Teslovich TM, Musunuru K, Smith AV, Edmondson AC, Stylianou IM, Koseki M, et al., 'Biological, clinical and population relevance of 95 loci for blood lipids', Nature, 466 707-713 (2010)

Plasma concentrations of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are among the most important risk factors f... [more]

Plasma concentrations of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are among the most important risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) and are targets for therapeutic intervention. We screened the genome for common variants associated with plasma lipids in >100,000 individuals of European ancestry. Here we report 95 significantly associated loci (P<-10<sup>-8</sup>), with 59 showing genome-wide significant association with lipid traits for the first time. The newly reported associations include single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near known lipid regulators (for example, CYP7A1, NPC1L1 and SCARB1) as well as in scores of loci not previously implicated in lipoprotein metabolism. The 95 loci contribute not only to normal variation in lipid traits but also to extreme lipid phenotypes and have an impact on lipid traits in three non-European populations (East Asians, South Asians and African Americans). Our results identify several novel loci associated with plasma lipids that are also associated with CAD. Finally, we validated three of the novel genes-GALNT2, PPP1R3B and TTC39B-with experiments in mouse models. Taken together, our findings provide the foundation to develop a broader biological understanding of lipoprotein metabolism and to identify new therapeutic opportunities for the prevention of CAD. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1038/nature09270
Citations Scopus - 2223
2010 Allen HL, Estrada K, Lettre G, Berndt SI, Weedon MN, Rivadeneira F, et al., 'Hundreds of variants clustered in genomic loci and biological pathways affect human height', Nature, 467 832-838 (2010)

Most common human traits and diseases have a polygenic pattern of inheritance: DNA sequence variants at many genetic loci influence the phenotype. Genome-wide association (GWA) st... [more]

Most common human traits and diseases have a polygenic pattern of inheritance: DNA sequence variants at many genetic loci influence the phenotype. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified more than 600 variants associated with human traits1, but these typically explain small fractions of phenotypic variation, raising questions about the use of further studies. Here, using 183,727 individuals, we show that hundreds of genetic variants, in at least 180 loci, influence adult height, a highly heritable and classic polygenic trait2,3. The large number of loci reveals patterns with important implications for genetic studies of common human diseases and traits. First, the 180 loci are not random, but instead are enriched for genes that are connected in biological pathways ( P=0.016) and that underlie skeletal growth defects ( P<0.001). Second, the likely causal gene is often located near the most strongly associated variant: in 13 of 21 loci containing a known skeletal growth gene, that gene was closest to the associated variant. Third, at least 19 loci have multiple independently associated variants, suggesting that allelic heterogeneity is a frequent feature of polygenic traits, that comprehensive explorations of alreadydiscovered loci should discover additional variants and that an appreciable fraction of associated loci may have been identified. Fourth, associated variants are enriched for likely functional effects on genes, being over-represented among variants that alter amino-acid structure of proteins and expression levels of nearby genes. Our data explain approximately 10% of the phenotypic variation in height, and we estimate that unidentified common variants of similar effect sizes would increase this figure to approximately 16% of phenotypic variation (approximately 20% of heritable variation). Although additional approaches are needed to dissect the genetic architecture of polygenic human traits fully, our findings indicate that GWA studies can identify large numbers of loci that implicate biologically relevant genes and pathways. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1038/nature09410
Citations Scopus - 1243
2010 Speliotes EK, Willer CJ, Berndt SI, Monda KL, Thorleifsson G, Jackson AU, et al., 'Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index', Nature Genetics, 42 937-948 (2010)

Obesity is globaLy prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined aSoc... [more]

Obesity is globaLy prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined aSociations betwEn body maS index and g^1/42.8 miLion SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted foLow up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 aDitional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci aSociated with body maS index (P < 5-10-8), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (at MC4R, POMC, SH2B1 and BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one of these loci is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly aSociated loci may provide new insights into human body weight regulation. © 2010 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1038/ng.686
Citations Scopus - 1843
2010 Sotoodehnia N, Isaacs A, De Bakker PIW, DÖrr M, Newton-Cheh C, Nolte IM, et al., 'Common variants in 22 loci are associated with QRS duration and cardiac ventricular conduction', Nature Genetics, 42 1068-1076 (2010)

The QRS interval, from the beginning of the Q wave to the end of the S wave on an electrocardiogram, reflects ventricular depolarization and conduction time and is a risk factor f... [more]

The QRS interval, from the beginning of the Q wave to the end of the S wave on an electrocardiogram, reflects ventricular depolarization and conduction time and is a risk factor for mortality, sudden death and heart failure. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis in 40,407 individuals of European descent from 14 studies, with further genotyping in 7,170 additional Europeans, and we identified 22 loci associated with QRS duration (P < 5 × 10 -8). These loci map in or near genes in pathways with established roles in ventricular conduction such as sodium channels, transcription factors and calcium-handling proteins, but also point to previously unidentified biologic processes, such as kinase inhibitors and genes related to tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that SCN10A, a candidate gene at the most significantly associated locus in this study, is expressed in the mouse ventricular conduction system, and treatment with a selective SCN10A blocker prolongs QRS duration. These findings extend our current knowledge of ventricular depolarization and conduction. © 2010 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1038/ng.716
Citations Scopus - 200
2009 Smith AN, 'Advanced practice: Profession-led and patient-focused', The Radiographer, 56 4-5 (2009) [C3]
2009 Smith AN, 'Critical appraisal of quantitative and qualitative research literature', The Radiographer, 56 6-10 (2009) [C1]
2009 Smith T, 'Evidence based medical imaging (EBMI).', Radiologic technology, 80 270-275 (2009) [E3]
2009 Smith AN, Brown LJ, Cooper RJ, 'A multidisciplinary model of rural allied health clinical-academic practice: A case study', Journal of Allied Health, 38 236-241 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19
Co-authors Leanne Brown
2009 Smith AN, 'A short history of the origins of radiography in Australia', Radiography, 15 E42-E47 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2009.07.005
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2009 Smith AN, Traise PR, Cook A, 'The influence of a continuing education program on the image interpretation accuracy of rural radiographers', Rural and Remote Health, 9 Article No. 1145 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
2008 Smith AN, Cooper RJ, Brown LJ, Hemmings R, Greaves J, 'Profile of the rural allied health workforce in Northern New South Wales and comparison with previous studies', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 16 156-163 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2008.00966.x
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Leanne Brown
2008 Smith AN, 'Evidence based medical imaging (EBMI)', Radiography, 14 233-237 (2008) [C2]
DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2007.02.006
Citations Web of Science - 7
2008 Hardy M, Legg J, Smith AN, Ween B, Williams I, Motto J, 'The concept of advanced radiographic practice: An international perspective', Radiography, 14 E15-E19 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2008.10.001
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 12
2008 Smith AN, Yielder J, Ajibulu O, Caruana E, 'Progress towards advanced practice roles in Australia, New Zealand and the Western Pacific', Radiography, 14 E20-E23 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2008.04.002
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 8
2008 Keane S, Smith AN, Lincoln M, Wagner SR, Lowe SE, 'The Rural Allied Health Workforce Study (RAHWS): Background, rationale and questionnaire development', Rural and Remote Health, 8 Article No. 1132 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 10
2008 Smith AN, 'Radiographers' role in radiological reporting: a model to support future demand - Reply', Medical Journal of Australia, 188 318 (2008) [C3]
2008 Hardy M, Snaith B, Smith AN, 'Radiographer reporting of trauma images: United Kingdom experience and the implications for evolving international practice', The Radiographer, 55 16-19 (2008) [C2]
2007 Smith AN, ''Skill transfer' and interprofessional boundaries in rural and remote radiography', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 15 273-274 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2007.00907.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2007 Smith AN, Jones PD, 'Remote x-ray operator radiography: A case study in interprofessional rural clinical practice', Journal of Interprofessional Care, 21 289-302 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13561820701240298
Citations Scopus - 4
2007 Smith AN, Stone N, Bull R, Chesters J, Waller S, Playford D, Fuller J, 'Australian Rural Health Education Network's position on interprofessional education and practice in health care', Rural And Remote Health, 7 866 (2007) [C3]
2007 Cowan I, Smith TJ, Nakabea P, Ajibulu O, Hennessy O, 'Developing the image interpretation skills of South Pacific radiographers: A joint WHO/RANZCR/ISRRT project', Australasian Radiology, 51 527-531 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1673.2007.01889.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
2007 Smith AN, Baird M, 'Radiographers' role in radiological reporting: A model to support future demand', Medical Journal of Australia, 186 629-631 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 43
2006 Smith AN, 'Critical analysis of the argument in favour of radiographer assistants', The Radiographer, 53 7-10 (2006) [C3]
2005 Smith AN, Williams LT, Lyons MJ, Lewis S, 'Pilot testing a multiprofessional learning module : lessons learned', Focus on Health Professional Education, 6 21-23 (2005) [C1]
Co-authors Lauren Williams
2005 Smith AN, Williams LT, Lyons MJ, 'A Multiional Learning Module on Ethical Healthcare and Professional Practice', Focus on Health Professional Education, 6 21-23 (2005) [C1]
Co-authors Lauren Williams
2005 Donald K, Smith AN, Doherty SR, Sundararajan V, 'Effect of an on-site emergency physician in a rural emergency department at night', Rural and Remote Health, 5 article 380 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14
2004 Smith AN, McKiernan S, 'The Redevelopment of the New South Wales Remote X-ray Operators Licensing Course', The Radiographer, 51 117-122 (2004) [C1]
Co-authors Sharmaine Mckiernan
2003 Duggan L, Warren-Forward H, Smith AN, Kron T, 'Investigation of dose reduction in neonatal radiography using specially designed phantoms and LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs', The British Journal of Radiology, 76 232-237 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1259/bjr/79291075
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward
2003 Smith AN, Lewis S, 'Opportunities for Role Development for Medical Imaging Practitioners in Australia: Part 2 - Mechanisms for Change', The Radiographer, 50 35-39 (2003) [C1]
2003 Adams J, Smith T, 'Qualitative methods in radiography research: a proposed framework', Radiology: an international journal of diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy, 9 193-199 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S1078-8174(03)00061-0
Citations Scopus - 34
1998 Kron T, Duggan L, Smith AN, Rosenfeld A, Butson M, Kaplan G, et al., 'Dose response of various radiation detectors to synchrotron radiation', Physics in Medicine and Biology, 43 3235-3259 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 110Web of Science - 107
1998 Smith AN, Shah GA, Kron T, 'Variation of patient dose in head CT', The British Journal of Radiology, 71 1296-1301 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 24
1997 Smith AN, Shah GA, 'A survey of routine head CT protocols in Australia', BRITISH JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, 70 372-374 (1997)
DOI 10.1259/bjr.70.832.9166073
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
1996 Kron T, Smith A, Hyodo K, 'Synchrotron radiation in the study of the variation of dose response in thermoluminescence dosimeters with radiation energy', Australasian Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine, 19 225-236 (1996)

Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) is a versatile technique with many applications for dosimetry of ionising radiation. However, in the range of kilovoltage x-rays which is widely... [more]

Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) is a versatile technique with many applications for dosimetry of ionising radiation. However, in the range of kilovoltage x-rays which is widely used for diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, problems arise from the differing dose response of most TL dosimeters with the radiation energy. The dose response of various TL detector types was investigated in mono-energetic x-ray beams of 26.8, 33.2, 40, 80.4 and 99.6keV from a synchrotron radiation source at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan. This response was studied as a function of TL material (LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P and Al2O3), the detector geometry and size, and their thermal history. Due to the asymmetric diffraction from a Si crystal employed to produce monoenergetic photons there was more than 50% dose inhomogeneity in some of radiation fields used. Therefore, the different TL dosimeter types were rotated around and the results related to the reading of a set of "standard" LiF:Mg,Ti ribbons which were included in all experiments as reference detectors. No significant influence of the detector shape (physical size, thickness) on the dose response with energy could be found. However, the pre-irradiation thermal history influences the dose response with radiation energy: a fast cool down of LiF:Mg,Ti after a high temperature anneal will increase the sensitivity by more than a factor of two. The relatively new TLD material LiF:Mg,Cu,P (GR-200, obtained from Solid Dosimeter & Detector Laboratories, Beijing) was found to be approximately 100 times more sensitive than the standard LiF:Mg,Ti. In addition it proved to be more tissue equivalent for photon radiation between 27keV and 40keV. The performance of LiF:Mg,Cu,P makes it a very interesting TL material deserving further evaluation for applications in diagnostic and therapeutic x-rays.

Citations Scopus - 7
Croker A, Smith T, Fisher K, Littlejohns S, 'Educators Interprofessional Collaborative Relationships: Helping Pharmacy Students Learn to Work with Other Professions', Pharmacy, 4 17-17 [C1]
DOI 10.3390/pharmacy4020017
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Karin Fisher, Sonja Littlejohns, Anne Croker
Show 87 more journal articles

Conference (94 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Denham G, Smith A, James D, McKiernan S, 'Interprofessional collaboration could reduce low yield plain abdominal radiography by converting evidence into practice', Adelaide (2019)
Co-authors Sharmaine Mckiernan
2019 Smith A, Bauer K, Grant K, 'Benefits of sharing limited licence radiography online course material across State boundaries', Hobart, TAS (2019)
2019 Brown L, Smith A, Wakely L, Wolfgang R, Little A, Burrows J, 'Mapping rural workforce outcomes from a longitudinal study of allied health graduates', Brisbane, QLD (2019)
Co-authors Julie Burrows, Leanne Brown, Rebecca Wolfgang, Luke Wakely
2019 Wolfgang R, Wakely L, Brown L, Smith A, Little A, Burrows J, 'Rural career intentions: The influence of placement experiences for allied health students', Hobart, TAS (2019)
Co-authors Alexandra Little, Leanne Brown, Julie Burrows, Rebecca Wolfgang, Luke Wakely
2019 Grant K, Smith A, Bauer K, 'Working together across borders to improve educational resources for rural and remote X-ray operators', Adelaide, SA (2019)
2019 Denham G, Smith A, James D, McKiernan S, 'Interprofessional collaboration could reduce low yield plain abdominal radiography by converting evidence into practice', Adelaide, SA (2019)
2019 Smith A, Bauer K, Grant K, 'Improving the Educational Resources for Limited Licence X-ray Operators in Two Australian States Tony Smith, University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health Australia', Canberra, ACT (2019)
2019 Smith A, Williams I, Bird M, 'X-ray image interpretation education for rural multidisciplinary health professional generalists: Is there a need? Tony Smith, University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health Australia', Canberra, ACT (2019)
2019 Smith A, Waller S, Beauchamp A, Sutton K, Depczynski J, Brown L, et al., 'The Nursing and Allied Health Graduate Outcomes Tracking Study: Methodology for Large-scale Data Linkage Tony Smith, University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health Australia', Canberra, ACT (2019)
Co-authors Karin Fisher, Luke Wakely, Leanne Brown
2018 Brown LJ, Smith AN, Wakely L, Wolfgang R, Little A, Burrows J, 'Growing the rural allied health workforce through immersion placements', Canberra (2018)
Co-authors Alexandra Little, Leanne Brown, Julie Burrows, Luke Wakely, Rebecca Wolfgang
2018 Ferns JL, Little AL, Smith AN, Croker AL, Brown LJ, 'Educating for collaborative healthcare opportunities (ECHO): Evolution on a rural landscape', Auckland, NZ (2018)
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Alexandra Little, Anne Croker, Jane Ferns
2018 Smith AN, Brown LJ, Wakely LT, Wolfgang RL, Little AL, Burrows JM, 'Tracking change on the rural workforce landscape: a longitudinal study of allied health recent graduates', Darwin, NT (2018)
Co-authors Alexandra Little, Julie Burrows, Luke Wakely, Leanne Brown, Rebecca Wolfgang
2018 Smith AN, May JA, Burrows JM, Wakely LT, Brown LJ, Fisher KA, et al., 'Counting the chickens as they hatch: tracking students and the rural health pipeline', Tamworth, NSW (2018)
Co-authors Jennifer May, Luke Wakely, Karin Fisher, Leanne Brown, Julie Burrows
2018 De Silva LK, Cooper E, Wakely LT, Brown LJ, Little AL, Ferns JL, 'Preparing for the interprofessional landscape: a program facilitating collaboration between physiotherapy and radiography students', Darwin, NT (2018)
Co-authors Lani Desilva, Alexandra Little, Luke Wakely, Jane Ferns, Leanne Brown, Emma Cooper
2018 Smith AN, Denham G, 'Forgo the fluid levels: Diagnostic criteria for intestinal obstruction on plain abdominal radiographs', Canberra, ACT (2018)
2018 McNeil K, Mitchell R, Boyle B, Smith AN, Ries N, 'The nurse-doctor : Nurse practitioners, disruption and identity threat', Samos, Greece (2018)
Co-authors Karen Mcneil, Brendan Boyle, Rebecca Mitchell
2018 Smith AN, 'Relevance of Barriers and Enablers Affecting Rural Nurse Practitioners to Extended Scope Medical Radiation Practice', Canberra (2018)
2018 Smith AN, Cooper E, Vignes M, Marjoribanks J, Tessier J, James D, et al., 'Strengthening Rural Medical Radiation Workforce through Collaboration and Immersive Educational Experiences', Canberra (2018)
DOI 10.1002/jmrs.259
Co-authors David Lyall, Yolanda Surjan, Jamie Marjoribanks, Emma Cooper
2017 Denham G, Smith AN, 'Do requests for acute abdomen radiographic examinations correlate with evidence based guidelines?', Annual Scientific Meeting of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy, Perth, WA (2017)
2017 Smith AN, 'Why Rural Health? Encouraging and Supporting Students to Experience and Consider Rural Practice', MRS Clinical Educators Forum 2017, Cairns (2017)
2017 Brown LJ, Smith A, Wakely L, Wolfgang R, Little A, Burrows J, 'Where are they now? Tracking allied health graduates after rural placements', 14th National Rural Health Conference, Cairns (2017)
Co-authors Julie Burrows, Leanne Brown, Luke Wakely, Rebecca Wolfgang, Alexandra Little
2017 Brown L, Smith A, Wakely LT, Little A, Wolfgang R, Burrows J, 'Developing the future allied health workforce for Australian rural health context', Cairns (2017)
Co-authors Rebecca Wolfgang, Leanne Brown, Julie Burrows, Alexandra Little, Luke Wakely
2017 Farthing A, Pit S, Smith AN, Sutton K, Terry D, Waller S, et al., ''Ruralisation' through University Department of Rural Health supported student placements', Cairns (2017)
2017 Smith AN, McNeil K, Mitchell R, Boyle B, Ries N, 'Exploring factors affecting uptake of extended scope of practice in rural areas', Cairns (2017)
Co-authors Karen Mcneil, Nola Ries, Brendan Boyle
2017 Sutton K, Waller S, Fisher K, Smith AN, 'Informing rural practice decision-making of urban trained allied health and nursing students', Cairns (2017)
Co-authors Karin Fisher
2016 Farthing A, Sutton K, Fisher K, Smith AN, Wall A, 'Exploring incentives for early career professionals to 'Work in the Village': Industry stakeholder perspectives', Port Lincoln, SA (2016)
Co-authors Karin Fisher
2016 Terry D, Barraclough F, Pit S, Smith AN, 'Getting them out there: The impact of rural exposure on satisfaction and practice intention among nursing students', Hobart, Tasmania (2016)
2016 Farthing A, Smith AN, Sutton K, Pitt S, Terry D, 'Going back to 'the village': the effect of UDRH allied health student placements on rural practice intention', Port Lincoln, SA (2016)
2016 Schumann G, Liu C, O'Reilly P, Gao H, Song P, Xu B, et al., 'KLB is associated with alcohol drinking, and its gene product ß-Klotho is necessary for FGF21 regulation of alcohol preference', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2016)

Excessive alcohol consumption is a major public health problem worldwide. Although drinking habits are known to be inherited, few genes have been identified that are robustly link... [more]

Excessive alcohol consumption is a major public health problem worldwide. Although drinking habits are known to be inherited, few genes have been identified that are robustly linked to alcohol drinking. We conducted a genome-wide association metaanalysis and replication study among > 105,000 individuals of European ancestry and identified ß-Klotho (KLB) as a locus associated with alcohol consumption (rs11940694; P = 9.2 × 10-12). ß-Klotho is an obligate coreceptor for the hormone FGF21, which is secreted from the liver and implicated in macronutrient preference in humans. We show that brain-specific ß-Klotho KO mice have an increased alcohol preference and that FGF21 inhibits alcohol drinking by acting on the brain. These data suggest that a liver-brain endocrine axis may play an important role in the regulation of alcohol drinking behavior and provide a unique pharmacologic target for reducing alcohol consumption.

DOI 10.1073/pnas.1611243113
Citations Scopus - 70
2016 Sutton K, Waller S, Fisher K, Farthing A, McAnnalley K, Russell D, et al., 'Understanding the Decision to Relocate Rural Amongst Urban Nursing and Allied Health Students and Recent Graduates' (2016)
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Karin Fisher
2016 Farthing A, Smith AN, Terry D, Pitt S, Sutton K, 'Do rural and remote placements make students 'remotely interested'?', Mt Isa, Queensland (2016)
2016 Smith AN, 'Limited Licence X-ray Operator Continuing Education On-line', ASMMIRT 2016 Rise and Shine Meeting Handbook, Brisbane (2016)
2016 Smith AN, 'Pushing professional boundaries and chaellenging the status quo: Are the benefits worth the risks?', Gippsland (2016)
2015 Croker AL, Smith T, Wakely L, 'More about interprofessional education: Is educators' rapport a missing link?', Melbourne (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Anne Croker
2015 Levett-Jones TL, Smith A, Croker A, 'Do As We Say And As We Do: Building Rapport Between Educators For Role Modelling And Planning Learning Together To Work Together?', Newcastle, NSW (2015)
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Anne Croker
2015 Smith A, Thurlow K, 'Clinical supervision practices in medical imaging in the spotlight via SuperSIM', Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences Vol 61, Issue S1 Abstracts from the 2015 NZIMRT-AIR Scientific Meeting, Wellington, New Zealand (2015) [E3]
DOI 10.1002/jmrs.120
Co-authors Kelly Thurlow
2015 Squibb K, Smith AN, Bull R, Dalton L, 'Australian rural radiographers' experiences in disclosure to patients and referrers of radiographic findings', Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences Volume 62 Issue Supplement S1, Wellington, New Zealand (2015) [E3]
DOI 10.1002/jmrs.119
2015 Brown LJ, Smith T, Wakely L, Burrows J, Wolfgang R, Little A, 'Conversion by immersion: outcomes of short and long-term rural allied health placements', People Places Possibilities - 13th National Rural Health Conference, Darwin (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Julie Burrows, Rebecca Wolfgang, Leanne Brown, Luke Wakely, Alexandra Little
2015 Marley R, Smith AN, 'Using simulation in teaching interprofessional team skills to undergraduate rural health students', People Places Possibilities - 13th National Rural Health Conference, Darwin (2015) [E3]
2015 Smith AN, Mitchell R, Ries N, Boyle B, 'Challenging the status quo in rural health workforce roles: risks versus benefits', People Places Possibilities - 13th National Rural Health Conference, Darwin (2015) [E2]
Co-authors Nola Ries, Rebecca Mitchell, Brendan Boyle
2015 Fisher KA, Croker A, Smith T, May J, 'Grappling with a shared understanding of 'interprofessional learning': "I know what i mean... but what do we mean"', ANZAHPE-AMEA 2015 Conference, Newcastle (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Karin Fisher, Jennifer May, Anne Croker
2015 Brown LJ, Smith T, Wakely L, Wolfgang R, Little A, Harries-Jones H, et al., 'Engaging allied health students in experiential learning: The rural immersion experience', ANZAHPE-AMEA 2015 Conference, Newcastle (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Alexandra Little, Luke Wakely, Rebecca Wolfgang, Julie Burrows, Leanne Brown
2015 Fisher KA, Brown L, Smith T, Hudson N, 'Evaluation of a community engagement program: What do rural healthcare students gain from experiential community-engaged learning?', ANZAHPE-AMEA 2015 Conference, Newcastle (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Karin Fisher, Nicky Hudson, Leanne Brown
2015 Smith T, Thurlow K, Marley R, Conway J, Lea J, 'SuperSIM: Making use of simulation to enhance clinical supervision practices of rural and remote health professionals', ANZAHPE-AMEA 2015 Conference, Newcastle (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Kelly Thurlow
2014 Fisher KA, Croker A, May J, Smith T, 'Are we on the same page yet?": Using photo-elicitation for shared understandings within an interpretive research team', N/A, Sydney (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer May, Anne Croker, Karin Fisher
2014 Wolfgang RL, Brown L, Smith T, Wakely L, Harries-Jones H, Little A, Burrows J, 'Diving deeper - outcomes of a rural immersive experience for allied health students', Surf's Up: Ride the Waves SARRAH National Conference for Rural and Remote Allied Health Professionals, Kingscliff NSW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Alexandra Little, Rebecca Wolfgang, Leanne Brown, Julie Burrows, Luke Wakely
2014 Fisher K, Wakely L, Squires K, Shipley L, Wakely K, Brown L, et al., 'A model for enhancing community engagement of undergraduate health professional students on rural placement', The 2014 Muster Global Community Engaged Medical Education, Uluru (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Katrina Wakely, Luke Wakely, Nicky Hudson, Karin Fisher, Kelly Squires, Leanne Brown
2014 Croker AL, Wolfgang R, Leys J, Wakely K, Fisher K, Smith T, et al., 'Students as Individuals in Interprofessional Learning: Should there be an 'I' in 'Team'?', ANZAHPE 2014 Conference Handbook & Program, Gold Coast (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Wolfgang, Alexandra Little, Jacqui Leys, Anne Croker, Katrina Wakely, Karin Fisher
2014 Harries-Jones H, Smith AN, 'Broadening their horizons: Medical radiation science students' experiences with interprofessional learning', 2014 Combined Scientific Meeting - Imaging and Radiation in Personalised Medicine, Melbourne (2014) [E3]
2014 Smith AN, Harries-Jones H, 'Knowledge and skill gaps of limited license x-ray operators and the educational imperative', 2014 Combined Scientific Meeting Imaging and Radiation in Personalised Medicine, Melbourne (2014) [E3]
2013 Monk C, Wrightson S, Smith AN, 'Exploration of the feasibility of radiation therapist performed treatment reviews', NA, Hobart (2013) [E3]
2013 Croker AL, Fisher K, Smith A, May J, 'Of vacuums and scaffolds: Interprofessional learning on a rural clinical placement', The 2013 Practice-Based Education Summit http://csusap.csu.edu.au/~areport/documents/pbe_summit_2013/Handbook.pdf, Sydney, NSW, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Anne Croker, Jennifer May, Karin Fisher
2013 Harries-Jones HM, Smith AN, 'Getting to the bones of the problem: challenging boundaries of practice', 12th National Rural Health Conference Handbook, Adelaide (2013) [E3]
2013 Keane S, Rolfe M, Lincoln M, Smith AN, 'Developing an evidence base to underpin rural workforce policy in allied health', Proceedings of the 12th National Rural Health Conference, Adelaide (2013) [E2]
2013 Schoo A, Smith AN, Carson D, Lincoln M, Lowe S, Campbell N, et al., 'Geographical classifications and incentives for rural allied health workforce recruitment and retention', Proceedings of the 12th National Rural Health Conference, Adelaide (2013) [E2]
2013 Brown LJ, Wakely L, Smith A, 'Outback Immersion: Allied health students' experiences of long term rural placements', ANZAHPE 2013 Conference Handbook & Program, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Luke Wakely
2013 Harries-Jones H, Burrows J, Smith T, Brown L, wakely L, 'Interprofessional learning: from the Start for the Future', ANZAHPE 2013 Conference Handbook & Program, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Julie Burrows, Luke Wakely
2013 Croker AL, May J, Fisher K, Smith A, 'A Moving Feast of Opportunities: How do Students in Rural Areas Learn to Work with other Professions?', Handbook & Program of ANZAHPE 2013 - Professional Development of Health Professional Educators, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Anne Croker, Jennifer May, Karin Fisher
2012 Smith AN, Harries-Jones H, 'The golden guitar and more: A model of rural undergraduate education and experience', Conference Handbook & Programme. 9th Annual Scientific Meeting of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
2012 Suckling T, Smith AN, Reed W, Jones T, 'It's all in the timing: Comparison of two MDCT pulmonary angiography protocols', Conference Handbook & Programme. 9th Annual Scientific Meeting of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
2012 Harries-Jones H, Smith AN, 'Is there a role for radiographers in minor injury management in rural and remote hospitals?', Conference Handbook and Programme. 9th Annual Scientific Meeting of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
2012 Smith AN, Wakely LT, Brown LJ, Wolfgang RL, 'Creating community capacity and enhancing student learning on rural placement', Conference Handbook. SARRAH National Conference, Launceston, Tasmania (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Luke Wakely, Rebecca Wolfgang
2012 Smith AN, Wakely LT, Brown LJ, Burrows JM, 'Integrating interprofessional learning into rural clinical placements - Assessing student's attitudes', Symposium Program. Interprofessional Education for Quality Use of Medicines, Newcastle Beach, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Julie Burrows, Leanne Brown, Luke Wakely
2012 Croker A, Smith AN, Fisher KA, May JA, 'Exploring interprofessional education - Seeing the whole elephant', Symposium Program. Interprofessional Education for Quality Use of Medicines, Newcastle Beach, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer May, Anne Croker, Karin Fisher
2011 Harrison JA, Fisher KA, Smith AN, 'Migrant access to health care in rural northern NSW: A qualitative study', 2011 PHC Research Conference Abstracts, Brisbane, QLD (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Karin Fisher
2011 Fisher KA, Smith AN, Keane S, Lowe S, Campbell N, Whitford D, 'Continuing professional development for allied health professionals: A rural perspective', 2011 PHC Research Conference Abstracts, Brisbane, QLD (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Karin Fisher
2011 Coates JC, Fisher KA, Smith AN, Shipley LG, 'It is not just physical! Socio-cultural factors and falls experiences in elderly Australian Aboriginals', 2011 PHC Research Conference Abstracts, Brisbane, QLD (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Karin Fisher
2011 Crowley ET, Brown LJ, Smith AN, Williams LT, 'Evidence based interprofessional learning for dietetic students on rural clinical placement', Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference Oral Program Abstracts, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Lauren Williams, Elesa Crowley, Leanne Brown
2010 Smith AN, 'Australian Institute of Radiography - Advanced Practice Advisory Panel Report', 16th ISRRT World Congress. Scientific Program, Gold Coast, QLD (2010) [E3]
2010 Smith AN, 'Developing on-line continuing education for nurse and GP rural and remote X-ray operators (RXOs)', 16th ISRRT World Congress. Scientific Program, Gold Coast, QLD (2010) [E3]
2010 Harrison J, Fisher KA, Smith AN, 'Access to rural health care for new arrivals: A literature review', 2010 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts, Darwin, NT (2010) [E2]
Co-authors Karin Fisher
2010 Smith AN, Misan G, Chesters J, Rodda R, Theaker S, Warren K, et al., 'RISEN: A web-based resource for rural and remote health professionals to support chronic disease self-management', 2010 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts, Darwin, NT (2010) [E3]
2010 Keane S, Smith AN, Lincoln M, 'The New South Wales Rural Allied Health Workforce Study (RAHWS)', 2010 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts, Darwin, NT (2010) [E3]
2010 Lowe S, Keane S, Campbell N, Smith AN, 'Filling the knowledge gap: Developing a profile of the allied health workforce', 2010 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts, Darwin, NT (2010) [E3]
2010 Coates JC, Smith AN, Shipley LG, 'Recruitment of elderly Aboriginal Australians for a qualitative study of falls risks, experiences and outcomes', 2010 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts, Darwin, NT (2010) [E3]
2010 Massey SE, Fisher KA, Croker A, Smith AN, 'Partners in rehabilitation. Health and education collaborating in paediatric brain injury - A literature review', 2010 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts, Darwin, NT (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Karin Fisher
2010 Warren K, Misan G, Rodda R, Smith AN, Chesters J, 'Rural interprofessional self-management education network (RISEN)', All Together Better Health 5 Conference. Program, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
2010 Smith AN, Brown LJ, May JA, Wakely LT, Greaves J, Wolfgang R, et al., 'Interprofessional learning modules: Making undergraduate IPE clinically relevant', All Together Better Health 5 Conference. Program, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Elesa Crowley, Luke Wakely, Leanne Brown, Jennifer May
2010 Smith AN, Way T, Harvey B, 'Descriptive reporting by radiographers in frontline medical imaging to improve diagnostic accuracy', Australasian Conference on Error in Medical Imaging: Making Imaging Safer. Program, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
2009 Beautement S, Croese D, Gray D, Hansen B, Smith AN, 'RADiWEB: A multidisciplinary, rural-metro medical imaging support and continuing education resource', Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
2009 Smith AN, 'A model of advanced practice in diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy in Australia', Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
2009 Smith AN, Traise P, Hansen B, Cook A, 'Improving the radiographic image interpretation skills of rural radiographers through continuing education', Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
2009 Coates JC, Smith AN, 'Falls in elderly Aboriginal people: A qualitative study exploring risks, experiences & outcomes', 2009 General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference: Abstracts and Presentations, Adelaide, SA (2009) [E3]
2009 Smith AN, Traise PR, Croese D, Hansen B, Gray D, 'Improving the radiographic image interpretation skills of rural radiographers through flexible modes of continuing education', Rural Health: The Place To Be: 10th National Rural Health Conference, Cairns, QLD (2009) [E3]
2007 Smith AN, Jones PD, 'Qualitative research of rural and remote radiographic practice by non-radiographers', 2007 Rural Health Research Colloquium. Official Program, Tamworth, NSW (2007) [E3]
2007 Traise P, Smith AN, 'Investigating the effect of continuing education on the accuracy of image interpretation by rural radiographers', 4th Biennial NSW Primary Health Care Research & Evaluation Conference. Programme and Abstract Book, Bondi Beach (2007) [E3]
2007 Stone N, Waller S, Smith AN, Fuller J, Bull R, Playford D, 'The RIPENing: Advancing rural interprofessional education in Australia', 9th National Rural Health Conference. Abstracts, Albury, NSW (2007) [E3]
2007 Smith AN, Brown LJ, Cooper RJ, Blackman KR, Hayes P, 'Outcomes of rural allied health academic appointments in the University Department of Rural Health (UDRH), Northern NSW', NSW Rural Allied Health Conference 2007. Rural Allied Health: Actions and Solutions. Program Book, Dubbo, NSW (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Leanne Brown
2005 Smith AN, Thornberry P, Cooper RJ, Brown LJ, Williams LT, Lyons MJ, Jones PD, 'The Challenge of evaluating rural undergraduate multi-professional education', Central to Health: Sustaining Well-being in Remote and Rural Health, Alice Springs (2005) [E2]
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Lauren Williams
2004 McKiernan ST, Smith A, 'The Redevelopment of the NSW Remote X-ray Operators Licensing Course', Coffs Harbour (2004)
Co-authors Sharmaine Mckiernan
2004 Smith AN, Thornberry P, McParlane J, 'From the Bush to The Bay: Collegial Collaboration in Multiprofessional Education', Honouring Our Tertiary Teaching, The University of New England, Armidale, NSW (2004) [E1]
2003 Williams LT, Jones P, Lyons MJ, Smith AN, Capra SM, 'Learning to work together: interdisciplinary modules in undergraduate education', 6th Annual Conference of the Canadian Dietician's Association, Calgary (2003) [E4]
Co-authors Lauren Williams
1999 Anayat R, Hendriks J, Shah A, Smith A, Allen B, 'The use of Internet as a mode of delivery for nuclear medicine postgraduate education', RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES IN CLINICAL MEDICINE AND RESEARCH XXIII, BADGASTEIN, AUSTRIA (1999)
1999 Duggan LJ, Sathiakumar C, Warren-Forward H, Symonds M, McConnel P, Smith T, Kron T, 'Suitability of LiF:Mg,Cu,P and Al2O3:C for low dose measurements in medical imaging', Solid State Dosimetry, Burgos, Spain (1999) [E1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Lisa Duggan, Helen Warren-Forward
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 22
Total funding $1,127,482

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $10,000

Exploration of rural palliative care models in the Tamworth region to inform future research$10,000

This project aims to use qualitative research focus groups to explore the knowledge and understanding of clinicians, managers, service users and community representatives about palliative care service provision in the Tamworth region and to identify strengths and weaknesses of the current service model. Informed by focus group participants’ perceptions, as well as by previous research and background information, opportunities to redesign the service model will be examined, with the aim of developing an alternative, person-centred, humanistic and cost-effective model of rural palliative care. The findings will be incorporated into the design of future service implementation research, with a view to translation to other parts of the Hunter New England Local Health District (HNELHD) and other rural areas.

Funding body: NSW Department of Health

Funding body NSW Department of Health
Project Team

Hungerford P, Fisher K, Smith T, Gourlay J, Croker A, May J

Scheme NSW Regional Health Partners RICH Outcomes Research Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

20161 grants / $18,180

Understanding the Decisions to Relocate Rural amongst Urban Nursing and Allied Health Students and Recent Graduates$18,180

Funding body: Rural Health Workforce Australia

Funding body Rural Health Workforce Australia
Project Team Associate Professor Anthony Smith, Mr Keith Sutton, Prof Darryl Maybery, Associate Professor Tim Carey, Dr Susan Waller
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600685
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20151 grants / $32,500

Expanding On-Line Educational Opportunities for Limited Licence X-ray Operators$32,500

This project will build on a successful project conducted in 2014 under RHCE2 Round 5 funding. The previous project took advantage of existing course material and expertise available at the University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health (UONDRH) to create an online course delivery and continuing education platform.

Funding body: Rural Health Continuing Education (RHCE) Program

Funding body Rural Health Continuing Education (RHCE) Program
Project Team

Tony Smith

Scheme Rural Health Continuing Education (RHCE) Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20141 grants / $32,443

SuperSIM: Developing Clinical Supervisor Training e-Resources Using Simulation Learning Environments$32,443

The development of flexible resources to provide education in clinical supervison of health professional students for rural and remote practitioners.

Funding body: Health Workforce Australia

Funding body Health Workforce Australia
Project Team

A/Prof Tony Smith

Scheme Clinical Supervision Rural & Remote Program (CSRRP), Health Education and Training Institute (HETI)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

20131 grants / $65,725

Development of online educational resources for limited license remote x-ray operators$65,725

Development of a website, sitting under the Australian Institute of Radiography's Medical Radiation Learning webpage, for the delivery of the NSW Limited Licence Radiography program.

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team

A/Prof Tony Smith

Scheme Rural Health Continuing Education (RHCE) Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20121 grants / $38,349

Provision of face-to-face workshops for NSW remote x-ray operators$38,349

Development and delivery of a series face-to-face continuing education workshops for limited licence remote x-ray operators at 4 sites in NSW.

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team

A/Prof Tony Smith

Scheme Rural Health Continuing Education (RHCE) Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20111 grants / $136,191

Investigation of access to the needle syringe program in rural and remote areas of the Hunter New England region$136,191

Funding body: Hunter New England Area Health Service

Funding body Hunter New England Area Health Service
Project Team Doctor Karin Fisher, Associate Professor Anthony Smith
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100867
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20091 grants / $49,473

The development of web-based resources for rural and remote health professionals to support chronic disease self-management$49,473

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Associate Professor Anthony Smith
Scheme Chronic Disease Self-management/Lifestyle and Risk Modification Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190574
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20083 grants / $211,010

Web-Based Continuing Education Resource for Remote X-ray Operators$122,510

Development of an online continuing education resource for limited licence x-ray operators in NSW

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team

Dr Tony Smith

Scheme Rural Health Support Education and Training (RHSET) program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Multidisciplinary Medical Imaging Support and Continuing Education: A Rural-Metro Partnership$62,000

Development of a web-based resource called RadiWeb for radiographers and other medical iamging staff to access relevant continuing education and service delivery resources online.

Funding body: NSW Department of Health

Funding body NSW Department of Health
Project Team

Darren Croese

Scheme NSW Institute for Rural Clinical Services and Teaching (IRCST)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

NSW Rural Allied Health Workforce Study (RAHWS)$26,500

Development of a profile of the rural allied health workforce in NSW by means of a cross-sectional survey.

Funding body: NSW Department of Health

Funding body NSW Department of Health
Project Team

Sheila Keane

Scheme NSW Institute for Rural Clinical Services and Teaching (IRCST)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20041 grants / $162,308

Pacific Region World Health Organisation (WHO) Centre for Continuing Education in Diagnostic Imaging$162,308

Development and delivery of continuing education workshops for radiographers from Pacific Island nations to learn how to correctly interpret radiographs and identify abnormalities. Workshops were conducted in Fiji.

Funding body: World Health Organisation

Funding body World Health Organisation
Project Team

Dr Ian Cowan

Scheme Centres of Excellence in Radiology and Medical Imaging
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20031 grants / $947

2003 National Conference of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology New Zealand 15-17 August 2003$947

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Anthony Smith
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0183234
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20013 grants / $68,452

Development of a Flexible Teaching and Learning Package for General Practitioner (GP) and Nurse(RN) Remote X-ray Operators.$33,563

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care
Project Team Associate Professor Anthony Smith
Scheme Rural Health Support Education & Training (RHSET)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0180432
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Redevelopment of the Remote X-Ray Operators Licensing Course.$31,189

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Associate Professor Anthony Smith
Scheme State Services Development Branch Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0181596
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Visit of Dr Pauline Reeves from 18 February 2002 to 29 March 2002$3,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Anthony Smith
Scheme Visitor Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0181635
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19991 grants / $65,884

Predictive validity of lumbar MRI for conservative therapy of low back pain$65,884

Investigation of the use of MRI scans in predicting the outcomes of low back pain rehabilitation.

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Health and Family Services

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Health and Family Services
Project Team

Prof Nik Bogduk

Scheme Diagnostic and Imaging and Technology
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1999
Funding Finish 2000
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

19982 grants / $61,608

Preparing patients for a potentially threatening investigation: a comparison of strategies$51,208

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Billie Bonevski, Associate Professor Anthony Smith
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1998
Funding Finish 1999
GNo G0177151
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Measurement of radiation dose to neonates in chest & abdominal x-rays$10,400

Using thermoluminescence dosimeters to measure radiation dose to neonates undergoing planin chest and abdominal radiographs at the John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW.

Funding body: John Hunter Children's Hospital

Funding body John Hunter Children's Hospital
Project Team

Michael Symonds

Scheme Child and Youth Health Network
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1998
Funding Finish 1999
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

19961 grants / $160,627

The centre for remote and rural radiography, NSW$160,627

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care
Project Team Associate Professor Anthony Smith
Scheme Rural Health Support Education & Training (RHSET)
Role Lead
Funding Start 1996
Funding Finish 1998
GNo G0175544
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

19952 grants / $13,785

Use of synchrotron radiation in studying variations in TLD dose response with x-ray energy$12,566

Testing of new thermoluminesence dosimetry materials using mono-energetic synchrotron radiation at the Japanese Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Tsukuba, Japan.

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Industry Science and Technology

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Industry Science and Technology
Project Team

Dr Tomas Kron

Scheme Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1996
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

10th Euro-African Conference of the International Society of Rediographers and Radiologic Technologists - The Hague - from 16 - 20 October$1,219

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Anthony Smith
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1995
GNo G0175505
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed4
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Creating Respectful Workplaces to Support Nurses in Regional Acute Care Settings PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2013 PhD Australian rural radiographers: radiographic interpretation, communication and disclosure of their radiographic opinion Health, University of Tasmania Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD Factors Contributing to Recruitment and Retention of Rural Allied Health Professionals in NSW Health, University of Sydney Co-Supervisor
2006 Masters The Side of a Radial Annular Tear on CT Discography and the Side of the Patient's Symptoms: Is There a Correlation? M MedSc (Med Radiation Sc) [R], Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2004 Masters Evaluation of the Health Status of Chronic Low Back Pain Patients Undergoing a Functional Restoration Program M MedSc (Med Radiation Sc) [R], Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
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Associate Professor Anthony Smith

Position

Academic Lead, Research
University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health
University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Medical Imaging

Contact Details

Email tony.smith@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4055 1912
Mobile 0466 440 037
Fax (02) 4055 1901
Links Research Networks
Personal webpage

Office

Room Manning Education Centre, Taree
Building UDRH&RCS - Northern NSW 69A High St Taree NSW 2430
Location Manning Rural Referral Hospital, Taree

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