Dr Kirrilly Thompson

Research Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

I hold a PhD in Social Sciences (2007), based on ethnographic research into bullfighting from horseback in Southern Spain. Since that theoretical beginning in human-animal relations, I have conducted applied ethnographic and mixed methods research projects across a diversity of topics. These have included: organisational risk management, children's sleep and health, train driver fatigue, passenger railway crowding, domestic food waste, academic leadership, large animal rescue and natural disaster preparedness. 

I have an international reputation for my research into human-animal relations, behaviour change for animal welfare and horse rider safety.

In 2013, I secured an ARC DECRA fellowship to reconfigure pet ownership from a natural disaster survival risk factor to a protective factor.

In 2015, I was one of ABC Radio National’s Top 5 Scientists Under 40 for Science Communication. 

My publications portfolio includes over 100 peer-review articles, chapters, edited volumes, manuscripts, reports and magazine articles (h index = 14). I have published several articles in The Conversation, am a regular social science contributor to Horses and People Magazine and co-authored the book ‘(Un)Stable Relations: Horses, Humans and Social Agency’ (Routledge, 2018). 

In addition to my research role at the University of Newcastle, I am an Adjunct Senior Research Fellow at the University of South Australia and have been the longstanding Vice Chair of the Horse Federation of South Australia.

I am driven by kindness, compassion, social justice and sustainability.


Qualifications

  • PHD, University of Adelaide
  • Bachelor of Social Sciences Honours, University of Adelaide

Keywords

  • anthrozoology
  • behaviour change
  • disaster preparedness
  • equestrian social science
  • equines
  • equitation
  • equitation science
  • ethnography
  • human behaviour change for animal welfare
  • human-animal relations
  • natural disasters
  • qualitative research
  • risk perception
  • social science

Languages

  • Spanish (Working)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
520505 Social psychology 50
440107 Social and cultural anthropology 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
11/1/2012 - 31/3/2018 Researcher Central Queensland University
Appleton Institute, Adelaide Campus
Australia
1/1/2008 - 31/12/2011 Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of South Australia
Centre for Sleep Research and Human Factors
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Birke L, Thompson K, (Un)stable relations: Horses, humans and social agency (2017)

This original and insightful book explores how horses can be considered as social actors within shared interspecies networks. It examines what we know about how horses understand ... [more]

This original and insightful book explores how horses can be considered as social actors within shared interspecies networks. It examines what we know about how horses understand us and how we perceive them, as well as the implications of actively recognising other animals as actors within shared social lives. This book explores how interspecies relationships work, using a variety of examples to demonstrate how horses and people build social lives. Considering horses as social actors presents new possibilities for improving the quality of animal lives, the human condition and human-horse relations.

DOI 10.4324/9781315675053
Citations Scopus - 8
2017 Adelman M, Thompson K, Equestrian cultures in global and local contexts (2017)

This edited volume demonstrates the broader socio-cultural context for individual human-horse relations and equestrian practices by documenting the international value of equines;... [more]

This edited volume demonstrates the broader socio-cultural context for individual human-horse relations and equestrian practices by documenting the international value of equines; socially, culturally, as subjects of academic study and as drivers of public policy. It broadens our understanding of the importance of horses to humans by providing case studies from an unprecedented diversity of cultures. The volume is grounded in the contention that the changing status of equines reveals - and moves us to reflect on - important material and symbolic societal transformations ushered in by (post)modernity which affect local and global contexts alike. Through a detailed consideration of the social relations and cultural dimensions of equestrian practices across several continents, this volume provides readers with an understanding of the ways in which interactions with horses provide global connectivity with localized identities, and vice versa. It further discusses new frontiers in the research on and practice of equestrianism, framed against global megatrends and local micro-trends.

DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-55886-8
Citations Scopus - 7
Designing for Zero Waste, Routledge
DOI 10.4324/9780203146057

Chapter (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Adelman M, Thompson K, 'Introduction to equestrian cultures in global and local contexts', 1-14 (2017)

The changing status of equines is revealing of the many important material and symbolic societal transformations ushered in by (post)modernity- affecting global and local contexts... [more]

The changing status of equines is revealing of the many important material and symbolic societal transformations ushered in by (post)modernity- affecting global and local contexts alike. However, few have asked if the changing status of equines is consistent across cultures near and far in time and place. In looking deeper into this question, we redress a concerning imbalance in existing social science literature on equestrian cultures and the equine industry, which has focused almost exclusively on European and North American contexts. The volume we have put together here mounts a convincing argument for the value of equines as subjects of academic study and drivers of public policy. In this introduction, we outline how the different chapters in this volume push current literature and discussion forward. Together they go beyond the work/sport horse divide, reformulate human-horse relations as they unfold socially and historically, and inquire into current equestrian configurations in a wide range of cultural contexts (contributions on Brazil, China, Iran, Morocco, and South Africa are included here). We identify key threads in the burgeoning field of equestrian social science to which our book contributes-gender in equestrian practices; concerns regarding the new equine market and new equine workforce; equestrianism throughout the human life course; class, race, and ethnicity; representations of tradition and modernity in equestrian culture; and performing identity for the self and others. Together, our contributors discuss how these threads intersect in, through and across global and local equestrian contexts.

DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-55886-8_1
Citations Scopus - 3
2017 Thompson K, Adelman M, 'Afterword: Formalising equestrian social science', Equestrian Cultures in Global and Local Contexts 267-278 (2017)

In this concluding chapter, we consider the aggregate significance of our volume. In relation to expanding an understanding of equestrian cultures around the globe, contributions ... [more]

In this concluding chapter, we consider the aggregate significance of our volume. In relation to expanding an understanding of equestrian cultures around the globe, contributions fortified existing research on equestrian cultures in Europe (Chaps. 4, 5, 6 and 7) and North America (Chaps. 9 and 10) whilst providing rare insight into the scarcely studied equestrian cultures of Iran (Chap. 2), Poland (Chap. 8), Morocco (Chap. 12), South Africa (Chap. 13), Brazil (Chap. 11) and China (Chap. 3). Missing from our volume was research on equestrian cultures in Oceania and Australasia as well as other parts of Latin America. At a thematic level, our contributors addressed our earlier call to consider equestrian cultures according to class, risk, equality, aesthetics, sector, identity, age, rural/urban and media. However, whilst these themes are dealt with in depth in the present volume, they are largely anthropocentric. We propose two ways in which an equino-centric perspective could rebalance the literature: (1) by asking how horses take part in equestrian culture and (2) how equestrian culture impacts horses. Given that the experimental field of Equitation Science has made rapid advancements in understanding 'the nature of horses', we recommend the formalisation of a sister science to provide a complementary understanding of 'the cultures of horses', to better understand how horses and humans together generate equestrian cultures. This Afterword thus provides a rationale for the formalisation of Equestrian Social Science in research and teaching. We outline four areas of research that would benefit considerably from Equestrian Social Science: (1) working equids, (2) equine-assisted therapies, (3) welfare, ethics and social license and (4) sustainable equestrian cultures.

DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-55886-8_14
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Thompson K, 'Global equestrian trends in local context: Where are all the women in doma vaquera competitions in Southern Spain?', Equestrian Cultures in Global and Local Contexts 65-79 (2017)

There is a recognized global trend towards increasing female participation in equestrian sports. However, it is important to understand the different ways in which global trends c... [more]

There is a recognized global trend towards increasing female participation in equestrian sports. However, it is important to understand the different ways in which global trends can impact or be challenged by equestrian cultures at their location of origin. For example, whilst women in Southern Spain are frequent competitors in the global 'Olympic' equestrian disciplines of showjumping, eventing and dressage, they are few and far between in doma vaquera competitions, based on local Andalusian riding activitites and aesthetics. This chapter reports the experiences of four capable women doma vaquera riders, supplemented by my own autoethnographic experience as an Australian woman in a Spanish stable yard. Each woman gives a different explanation for the absence of women from doma vaquera competitions. The narratives suggest that even when traditional equestrian pursuits associated with rural spaces and masculinity are translated into competitions and transferred to urban areas, they may still be subject to local norms about which bodies can compete with and against which other bodies, in what ways and in which kinds of spaces. Whist the idea of women and men being able to compete against one another in equestrian sport is admirable it may not always occur 'on equal terms'. In fact, depending on the local culture, it could be inherently unequal.

DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-55886-8_4
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Davison S, Thompson K, Sharp A, Dawson D, 'Reducing wasteful household behaviours: Contributions from psychology and implications for intervention design', Designing for Zero Waste: Consumption, Technologies and the Built Environment 67-88 (2013)

In the quest for environmental sustainability, there is a pressing need for improved proenvironmental behaviour at the individual and community level. Achieving any type of behavi... [more]

In the quest for environmental sustainability, there is a pressing need for improved proenvironmental behaviour at the individual and community level. Achieving any type of behaviour change is rarely easy, however, with habitual behaviours and attitudinal resistance creating significant barriers (Zimbardo and Leippe, 1991). Several psychological models, theories and concepts have been put forward to better understand the behaviour change process and to support policymakers. One notable model is the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of Change (Prochaska and DiClemente, 1983).

DOI 10.4324/9780203146057
Citations Scopus - 2
2013 Thompson K, ' The horse has got to want to help : Human-animal habituses and networks of relationity in amateur show jumping', Sport, Animals, and Society 69-84 (2013)
DOI 10.4324/9780203763407
Citations Scopus - 13
2013 Thompson K, 'Qualitative research rules: Using qualitative and ethnographic methods to access the human dimensions of technology', Evaluation of Rail Technology: A Practical Human Factors Guide 75-110 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 10
2013 Thompson K, Adelman M, 'Epilogue: A research agenda for putting gender through its paces', Gender and Equestrian Sport: Riding Around the World 195-211 (2013)

The contributions to this volume have shown that within the context of equestrian sport, women and men find and deliberately locate themselves in positions from which gender is re... [more]

The contributions to this volume have shown that within the context of equestrian sport, women and men find and deliberately locate themselves in positions from which gender is renegotiable. Be they male or female, polo player, fiction reader or bullfighter, riders contribute to and experience gender through their resources and personal desires and skills - regardless of how differentially these may be allocated. Sometimes, equestrian sports facilitate expressions of normative masculinity and femininity which reinforce tradition or the status quo. At other times, equestrianism facilitates open defiance of cultural norms and social legacies of inequality. Gender always matters. However, in what ways do interactions with horses and within the institutional, social and cultural context of the equestrian world affect how it matters? In this epilogue, we draw from the preceding chapters to suggest ten salient areas for further research that are required to deepen and broaden our understanding of gender and equestrian sport.

DOI 10.1007/978-94-007-6824-6_12
Citations Scopus - 13
2013 Thompson K, 'Cojones and rejones: Multiple ways of experiencing, expressing and interpreting gender in the spanish mounted bullfight (Rejoneo)', Gender and Equestrian Sport: Riding Around the World 127-147 (2013)

The footed bullfight (corrida de toros or toreo) has been the subject of much research into gender in Spanish culture. In this chapter, I consider the impact of the horse on gende... [more]

The footed bullfight (corrida de toros or toreo) has been the subject of much research into gender in Spanish culture. In this chapter, I consider the impact of the horse on gendered cultural constructions by considering the form of bullfighting undertaken from horseback (corrida de rejones). I present a 'bio-aesthetic' analysis focused on the presentation and posturing (look and movement) of the bodies of male and female mounted bullfighters. Specifically, I consider the ways in which being astride a horse de-emphasises the biological sexual identity of the rider. I propose that the horse can be considered a liberator (by degrees) of biologically determined and culturally normalised expressions of gender. This chapter is based on 15 months of ethnographic fieldwork undertaken in Andalusia.

DOI 10.1007/978-94-007-6824-6_8
Citations Scopus - 6
2011 Thompson K, 'Theorising rider-horse relations: An ethnographic illustration of the centaur metaphor in the Spanish bullfight', Human-Animal Studies 221-253 (2011)
Citations Scopus - 46
Show 6 more chapters

Journal article (69 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Wilson BJ, Thompson KR, McGreevy PD, 'The race that segments a nation: Findings from a convenience poll of attitudes toward the Melbourne Cup Thoroughbred horse race, gambling and animal cruelty', PLoS ONE, 16 (2021)

The annual Melbourne Cup Thoroughbred horse race has iconic status among many Australians but sits in the context of increasing criticism of the welfare of Thoroughbred racing hor... [more]

The annual Melbourne Cup Thoroughbred horse race has iconic status among many Australians but sits in the context of increasing criticism of the welfare of Thoroughbred racing horses and the ethics of gambling. Despite heated debates and protests playing out in the public domain, there is scant empirical research to document Australian attitudes to the Melbourne Cup, or horse racing more generally. Specifically, little is known about how support for or against the Melbourne Cup correlate with age, gender, income and level of education. To provide a more nuanced understanding of attitudes towards the cup beyond the rudimentary binaries of those who are 'for' or 'against' gambling and horse racing, the purpose of the study was to identify clusters of people with particular views. An opportunistic survey collected data on respondents' gender, age, place of residence, weekly income, employment status and highest level of education, and sought their level of agreement with six statements about the Melbourne Cup, gambling and animal cruelty. Ordinal logistic regression and Chi-square analysis were used to evaluate the age and gender of respondents in clusters respectively. Agreement with the statements revealed some significant associations. Male respondents were at greater odds for agreement with the statement: I regularly bet on horse races (OR = 2.39; 95% CI = 1.78-3.22) as were respondents aged 18-19 years (OR = 2.88; 95% CI = 1.13-7.35) and 20-24 years (OR = 1.90; 95% CI 1.00-3.62) compared with the median 35-40 years age bracket. Agreement with the statement: I will watch the Melbourne Cup but will not place a bet was more likely among the full-time employed (OR = 1.60; 95% CI = 1.10-2.32), for those aged 20-24 years (OR = 1.85; 95% CI = 1.16-2.95). The odds of increasing agreement with the statement: I have never been interested in the Melbourne Cup were multiplied by 0.87 (95% CI = 0.82-0.92) with each successive fiveyear age bracket. The most useful of the predictor variables for agreement was level of education. The odds of increasing with the statement: I have become less interested in the Melbourne Cup over recent years because of my concerns with gambling were multiplied by 1.09 (95% CI = 1.02-1.15) for each increased level of education. Agreement with the statement: I have become less interested in the Melbourne Cup because of my concerns about animal cruelty was weaker amongst male respondents (OR = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.48-0.80), and those in increasing age brackets (OR = 0.88; 95% CI = 0.83-0.93). A series of six clusters were identified that show how certain attributes of respondents characterise their responses. The authors labelled these clusters "Devotees"(n = 313; 30.4% of respondents), "Flaneurs"(n = 244; 21.8% of respondents), "Disapprovers"(n = 163; 15.9% of respondents), "Casuals"(n = 148; 14.4% of respondents), "Gamblers"(n = 126; 12.3% of respondents) and "Paradoxical-voters"(n = 54; 5.3% of respondents). The implications for support of the Melbourne Cup are explored. Copyright:

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0248945
2020 Thompson K, McManus P, Stansall D, Wilson BJ, McGreevy PD, 'Is whip use important to thoroughbred racing integrity? What stewards reports reveal about fairness to punters, jockeys and horses', Animals, 10 1-13 (2020)

The idea that whip use is critical to thoroughbred racing integrity is culturally entrenched but lacks empirical support. To test the longstanding beliefs that whip use aids steer... [more]

The idea that whip use is critical to thoroughbred racing integrity is culturally entrenched but lacks empirical support. To test the longstanding beliefs that whip use aids steering, reduces interference, increases safety and improves finishing times, we conducted a mixed-method analysis of 126 race reports produced by official stewards of the British Horseracing Authority, representing 1178 jockeys and their horses. We compared reports from 67 ¿Hands and Heels¿ races, where whips are held but not used (whipping-free, WF), with 59 reports from case-matched races where whipping was permitted (whipping permitted, WP). Qualitative coding was used to identify and categorise units of analysis for statistical testing via logistic regression and linear mixed model regression. For both types of race, we explored stewards having anything to report at all, movement on course, interference on course, incidents related to jockey behaviour and finishing times. There were no statistically significant differences between WF and WP races for anything to report (OR: 3.06; CI: 0.74¿14.73), movement on course (OR: 0.90; CI: 0.37¿2.17), interference (OR: 0.90; CI: 0.37¿2.17), jockey-related incidents (OR: 1.24; CI: 0.32¿5.07), and race times (0.512 s, t = 1.459, p = 0.150). That is, we found no evidence that whip use improves steering, reduces interference, increases safety or improves finishing times. These findings suggest that the WF races do not compromise racing integrity. They also highlight the need for more effective ways to improve the steering of horses.

DOI 10.3390/ani10111985
Citations Scopus - 2
2020 Chapman M, Thomas M, Thompson K, 'What people really think about safety around horses: The relationship between risk perception, values and safety behaviours', Animals, 10 1-22 (2020)

The equestrian industry reports high rates of serious injuries, illness and fatalities when compared to other high-risk sports and work environments. To address these ongoing safe... [more]

The equestrian industry reports high rates of serious injuries, illness and fatalities when compared to other high-risk sports and work environments. To address these ongoing safety concerns, a greater understanding of the relationship between human risk perception, values and safety behaviours is required. This paper presents results from an international survey that explored relationships between a respondents¿ willingness to take risk during daily activities along with, their perceptions of risk and behaviours during horse-related interactions. Respondents¿ comments around risk management principles and safety-first inspirations were also analysed. We examined what humans think about hazardous situations or activities and how they managed risk with suitable controls. Analysis identified three important findings. First, safe behaviours around horses were associated with safety training (formal and/or informal). Second, unsafe behaviours around horses were associated with higher levels of equestrian experience as well as income from horse-related work. Finally, findings revealed a general acceptance of danger and imminent injury during horse interactions. This may explain why some respondents de-emphasised or ¿talked-down¿ the importance of safety-first principles. In this paper we predominantly reported quantitative findings of respondents self-reported safety behaviours, general and horse-related risk perceptions despite injury or illness. We discussed the benefits of improved safety-first principles like training, risk assessments, rider-horse match with enriched safety communications to enhance risk-mitigation during human¿horse interactions.

DOI 10.3390/ani10122222
Citations Scopus - 3
2019 Trigg J, Thompson K, Smith B, Bennett P, 'Archetyping relationships with companion animals to understand disaster risk-taking propensity', Journal of Risk Research, 22 475-496 (2019)

Pets factor into the daily decision-making of many people. Importantly, various characteristics of these human¿animal relationships are known to strongly influence pet owners¿ ris... [more]

Pets factor into the daily decision-making of many people. Importantly, various characteristics of these human¿animal relationships are known to strongly influence pet owners¿ risk behaviour and, consequently, their animals¿ welfare during disasters. Yet, few studies have examined a range of such characteristics concurrently in order to describe risk propensity differences in these relationships. In this study, 437 Australian companion-animal (pet) owners reported human¿animal relational, personality and attitudinal characteristics, to examine differences in stated tendency to act to secure their pet¿s welfare whilst risking potential harm in a hypothetical disaster dilemma. Cluster analysis identified five archetypal profiles differing in relational, personality, attitude and risk-propensity characteristics, as well as in stated willingness to risk personal safety for the well-being of a pet. Results suggest that relational archetypes are an effective means of examining pet¿owner risk propensity, to better understand owners¿ risk-taking to protect their animals from harm during a disaster.

DOI 10.1080/13669877.2017.1405458
2019 Thompson K, Clarkson L, 'How owners determine if the social and behavioral needs of their horses are being met: Findings from an Australian online survey', JOURNAL OF VETERINARY BEHAVIOR-CLINICAL APPLICATIONS AND RESEARCH, 29 128-133 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.jveb.2018.12.001
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2018 Thompson K, 'Facing disasters together: how keeping animals safe benefits humans before, during and after natural disasters', Revue scientifique et technique (International Office of Epizootics), 37 223-230 (2018)

More than half of the world's households are thought to contain at least one companion animal. Animals can affect how humans are impacted by natural disasters, how they respo... [more]

More than half of the world's households are thought to contain at least one companion animal. Animals can affect how humans are impacted by natural disasters, how they respond to such events and how well they can recover from them. For this reason alone, there is a real need to keep animals safe before, during and after natural disasters, and to do so in ways that contribute to, rather than compromise, human safety. This paper outlines the negative implications of failing to account for animals in disaster plans and/or to accommodate them in shelters. It also outlines how including animals in disaster response can provide benefits for the physical and mental health and well-being of humans that extend well beyond the disaster event. These implications are discussed in broad terms for the guardians of small and large companion animals, livestock producers and emergency responders with examples drawn from a variety of natural and human-made hazards. Finally, this paper suggests that research on people who do not attempt to save, rescue or evacuate with animals could provide important insights into natural disaster behaviour and human-animal relations.

DOI 10.20506/rst.37.1.2753
Citations Scopus - 7
2018 Thompson K, O'Dwyer L, Bowen H, Smith B, 'One Dog, but Which Dog? How Researchers Guide Participants to Select Dogs in Surveys of Human-Dog Relationships', ANTHROZOOS, 31 195-210 (2018)
DOI 10.1080/08927936.2018.1434057
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2018 Thompson K, Clarkson L, Rebbeck M, 'Too hot to trot? How horse owners in Australia have responded to major weather events', Rural Society, 27 52-65 (2018)

This article commences by outlining five perspectives on the sustainability of equestrian cultures covering the environment, the economy, human health, horse welfare, and social l... [more]

This article commences by outlining five perspectives on the sustainability of equestrian cultures covering the environment, the economy, human health, horse welfare, and social licence. Next, it presents findings from an online survey developed to understand how horse owners in Australia have been affected by major weather and climate events, how they responded in the short and long term, their considerations for the future, and the support they might require. Sixty-nine horse owners participated. Most (90%) reported being affected by major weather/climate event(s) in the last 10¿20 years, four out of five (78%) took action at the time of the event and a similar proportion (80%) had taken actions for the longer term. Most (86%) had thought about preparations for future events, but had not yet taken any action, due to lack of time, money, materials, or storage. Almost all participants (93%) perceived a need for education, research, government policy. Since findings suggest horse owners may be less likely to engage with climate adaptation and sustainable horse keeping public education initiatives when they are related specifically to ¿climate change¿, and more likely to engage when they are related to ¿land care, pasture management and improvement¿, and ¿horse health and welfare¿, an alternative rhetoric is recommended.

DOI 10.1080/10371656.2018.1441854
Citations Scopus - 1
2018 Thompson KR, Clarkson L, Riley CB, van den Berg M, 'Horse Husbandry and Preventive Health Practices in Australia: An Online Survey of Horse Guardians', JOURNAL OF APPLIED ANIMAL WELFARE SCIENCE, 21 347-361 (2018)
DOI 10.1080/10888705.2018.1428099
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2018 Thompson K, Haigh L, 'Perceptions of Equitation Science revealed in an online forum: Improving equine health and welfare by communicating science to equestrians and equestrian to scientists', JOURNAL OF VETERINARY BEHAVIOR-CLINICAL APPLICATIONS AND RESEARCH, 25 1-8 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.jveb.2018.02.002
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 9
2018 Thompson KR, Haigh L, Smith BP, 'Planned and ultimate actions of horse owners facing a bushfire threat: Implications for natural disaster preparedness and survivability', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DISASTER RISK REDUCTION, 27 490-498 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijdrr.2017.11.013
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
2018 Thompson KR, Haigh L, Smith BP, 'Corrigendum to Planned and ultimate actions of horse owners facing a bushfire threat: Implications for natural disaster preparedness and survivability [Int. J. Disaster Risk Reduct. 27 (2018) 490 498](S2212420917303369)(10.1016/j.ijdrr.2017.11.013)', International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 28 874 (2018)

The authors would like to make the following changes: The conference paper by J.I. White, L. Palen (2015) was incorrectly described as being based on floods in North Carolina. The... [more]

The authors would like to make the following changes: The conference paper by J.I. White, L. Palen (2015) was incorrectly described as being based on floods in North Carolina. The location should have been listed as northern Colorado. We apologise for any confusion or inconvenience.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijdrr.2018.01.016
2018 Padalino B, Rogers CW, Gunter D, Thompson KR, Riley CB, 'A Survey-Based Investigation of Human Factors Associated With Transport Related Injuries in Horses', FRONTIERS IN VETERINARY SCIENCE, 5 (2018)
DOI 10.3389/fvets.2018.00294
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2017 Dawson D, Cleggett C, Thompson K, Thomas MJW, 'Fatigue proofing: The role of protective behaviours in mediating fatigue-related risk in a defence aviation environment', ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION, 99 465-468 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2015.10.011
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 17
2017 Thompson KR, Clarkson L, Riley CB, van den Berg M, 'Horse-keeping practices in Australia: findings from a national online survey of horse owners', AUSTRALIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL, 95 437-443 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/avj.12639
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2017 Smith BP, Hazelton PC, Thompson KR, Trigg JL, Etherton HC, Blunden SL, 'A Multispecies Approach to Co-Sleeping Integrating Human-Animal Co-Sleeping Practices into Our Understanding of Human Sleep', HUMAN NATURE-AN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSOCIAL PERSPECTIVE, 28 255-273 (2017)
DOI 10.1007/s12110-017-9290-2
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2017 Hirsch L, Thompson K, Every D, 'Frustrations, fights, and friendships: The physical, emotional, and behavioural effects of high-density crowding on Mumbai s suburban rail passengers', Qualitative Report, 22 550-566 (2017)

Crammed together in tight folds of humanity, the suburban rail passengers of Mumbai, India, experience the most densely crowded trains in the world (Basu & Hunt, 2012). Whilst... [more]

Crammed together in tight folds of humanity, the suburban rail passengers of Mumbai, India, experience the most densely crowded trains in the world (Basu & Hunt, 2012). Whilst the immediate physical descriptors of crowdedness in Mumbai are well understood (Hirsch, 2016), there is little knowledge of the effect this has on the multitude of passengers. This is an important omission, as the effects of crowding on passengers impact their attitudes, travel behavior, and travel decisions. This paper therefore seeks to discern the physical, emotional, and behavioural effects of rail passenger crowding in Mumbai, India. To achieve this, a qualitative methodology, including 49 face-to-face interviews and 48 hours of ethnographic and autoethnographic observations in Mumbai were conducted. Mumbai is an ideal place to study these effects as it has high-density crowding, the likes of which are not experienced elsewhere. Additionally, there is a limited understanding of the effect of crowding on passengers in non-Western societies. With increasing rail ridership worldwide, the experiences of Mumbai¿s passengers within high densities may align with the future experiences of passengers in other Western and non-Western countries. For academics and service providers, understanding the specifics of the crowd, such as the density, passenger perceptions, and culture is important. With that knowledge, strategies to improve the experience of crowding would be more effective.

Citations Scopus - 2
2017 Thompson K, Trigg J, Smith B, 'Animal Ownership Among Vulnerable Populations in Regional South Australia: Implications for Natural Disaster Preparedness and Resilience', JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH MANAGEMENT AND PRACTICE, 23 59-63 (2017)
DOI 10.1097/PHH.0000000000000416
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2017 Every D, Smith K, Smith B, Trigg J, Thompson K, 'How can a donkey fly on the plane? The benefits and limits of animal therapy with refugees', CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST, 21 44-53 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/cp.12071
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 6
2017 Browning L, Thompson K, Dawson D, 'From early career researcher to research leader: survival of the fittest?', JOURNAL OF HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY AND MANAGEMENT, 39 361-377 (2017)
DOI 10.1080/1360080X.2017.1330814
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
2017 Trigg J, Smith B, Bennett P, Thompson K, 'Developing a scale to understand willingness to sacrifice personal safety for companion animals: The Pet-Owner Risk Propensity Scale (PORPS)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DISASTER RISK REDUCTION, 21 205-212 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijdrr.2016.12.004
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2017 Thompson K, Haigh L, 'Representations of Food Waste in Reality Food Television: An Exploratory Analysis of Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares', SUSTAINABILITY, 9 (2017)
DOI 10.3390/su9071139
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2016 Thompson K, Clarkson L, 'Views on equine-related research in Australia from the Australian equestrian community: perceived outputs and benefits', AUSTRALIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL, 94 89-95 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/avj.12420
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2016 Hirsch L, Thompson K, Blewett V, Every D, 'Death on the lifeline: The perceptions of Mumbai's commuters to high-density-related risk', SECURITY JOURNAL, 29 72-86 (2016)
DOI 10.1057/sj.2015.45
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2016 Thompson K, Nesci C, 'Over-riding concerns: Developing safe relations in the high-risk interspecies sport of eventing', INTERNATIONAL REVIEW FOR THE SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT, 51 97-113 (2016)
DOI 10.1177/1012690213513266
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
2016 Trigg JL, Thompson K, Smith B, Bennett P, 'A moveable beast: Subjective influence of human-animal relationships on risk perception, and risk behaviour during bushfire threat', Qualitative Report, 21 1881-1903 (2016)

This article examines how human-animal connections influence risk perception and behaviour in companion animal guardians exposed to bushfire threat in Australia. Although the obje... [more]

This article examines how human-animal connections influence risk perception and behaviour in companion animal guardians exposed to bushfire threat in Australia. Although the objective role of psychological bonds with companion animals is well accepted by researchers, subjective interpretations of these bonds by animal guardians are relatively underexamined in this context. We argue that the ways in which connections with pets and other animals are represented influences different forms of safety-risk perception and behaviour when managing animals¿ safety in the face of disaster threat. Thematic analysis of 21 semi-structured interviews with South Australian residents in bushfire-affected areas supported the role of the human-animal bond in shaping risk perception, and influencing engagement in risk-behaviour. Influential factors included animals¿ ¿life value,¿ ¿relative versus absolute¿ risk framing, the ¿constellation of bonds,¿ and ¿action paralysis¿ when facing threat. Implications for future research in decision-making and risk propensities of animal guardians facing disaster threat alongside their pets are then discussed.

Citations Scopus - 4
2016 Every D, Due C, Thompson K, Ryan J, 'Conflicting Perspectives on Nonhuman Animal Rescues in Natural Disasters', SOCIETY & ANIMALS, 24 358-382 (2016)
DOI 10.1163/15685306-12341417
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2016 Chapman M, Thompson K, 'Preventing and Investigating Horse-Related Human Injury and Fatality in Work and Non-Work Equestrian Environments: A Consideration of the Workplace Health and Safety Framework', ANIMALS, 6 (2016)
DOI 10.3390/ani6050033
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2016 Riley CB, Noble BR, Bridges J, Hazel SJ, Thompson K, 'Horse Injury during Non-Commercial Transport: Findings from Researcher-Assisted Intercept Surveys at Southeastern Australian Equestrian Events', ANIMALS, 6 (2016)
DOI 10.3390/ani6110065
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2016 Blunden S, Benveniste T, Thompson K, 'Putting Children's Sleep Problems to Bed: Using Behavior Change Theory to Increase the Success of Children's Sleep Education Programs and Contribute to Healthy Development.', Children (Basel, Switzerland), 3 (2016)
DOI 10.3390/children3030011
2016 Trigg J, Thompson K, Smith B, Bennett P, 'An Animal Just Like Me: The Importance of Preserving the Identities of Companion-Animal Owners in Disaster Contexts', Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 10 26-40 (2016)

The widespread tendency of modern-day pet owners to self-identify with their companion animals psychologically, symbolically and relationally demonstrates how the constructed iden... [more]

The widespread tendency of modern-day pet owners to self-identify with their companion animals psychologically, symbolically and relationally demonstrates how the constructed identities of animal and owner are strongly linked. This becomes particularly apparent during natural disasters. In this review, the new concept of the pet-owning self is discussed in relation to three self-psychology perspectives: self-extension, symbolic interactionism and selfobject relations. We purposefully depart from the realm of attachment theory to argue that these three epistemological approaches to self-identity, although related, warrant closer examination. Although we discuss them in relation to disaster contexts, the concept of the pet-owning self remains widely applicable. We argue for the importance of acknowledging the powerful intersubjectivity inherent to pet keeping, the inseparability of perceived pet identity from owners' experiences of the self and that preserving the cohesion of the two is an essential consideration for owners' psychological wellbeing when managing the integrated pet/owner in the face of risks posed by disaster and other hazards. Future research opportunities and implications are then discussed in the context of social identity theory.

DOI 10.1111/spc3.12233
Citations Scopus - 12
2015 Dawson D, Mayger K, Thomas MJW, Thompson K, 'Fatigue risk management by volunteer fire-fighters: Use of informal strategies to augment formal policy', ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION, 84 92-98 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2015.06.008
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 13
2015 Thompson K, 'For pets' sake, save yourself! Motivating emergency and disaster preparedness through relations of animal guardianship', Australian Journal of Emergency Management, 30 43-46 (2015)

Animal ownership and animal attachment have been considered risk factors for surviving emergencies and disasters. However, there is reason to believe that pet guardianship and ani... [more]

Animal ownership and animal attachment have been considered risk factors for surviving emergencies and disasters. However, there is reason to believe that pet guardianship and animal attachment could be reconfigured from risk factor to protective factor. This is because animal guardianship provides access to a number of social networks and communication channels that can be used to disseminate information. However, information alone is insufficient to drive action. This paper refines the 'pet as protective factor' proposal by detailing three inter-related influences that might be compelling in the transformation of intention to action. These are motivation (relevant and irrelevant), risk perception (likelihood and consequence of risk), and duty (as a form of responsibility to specific others, or a form of moral obligation). The actions of a guardian will not only affect an animal's emergency and natural disaster survivability, but their ability to continue in the co-dependent relationship of guardianship in which they are invested. A consideration of these influences reveals an additional dimension to the 'pet as protective factor' proposal. While it could be used to motivate people to save their pets 'for pets' sake' (and hopefully save themselves in the process), it could also convince people to save themselves for their pet's sake, and hopefully save their pets in the process.

Citations Scopus - 11
2015 Smith B, Taylor M, Thompson K, 'Risk perception, preparedness and response of livestock producers to bushfires: A South Australian case study', Australian Journal of Emergency Management, 30 38-42 (2015)

Animal ownership has been shown to be a risk factor for the survival of humans during emergencies and natural disasters largely due to evacuation failures. For livestock producers... [more]

Animal ownership has been shown to be a risk factor for the survival of humans during emergencies and natural disasters largely due to evacuation failures. For livestock producers, it is often impossible to evacuate their animals given the need to ensure the safety of all persons, property (e.g. dwellings, equipment, paddocks), pets, and the welfare of their stock. To determine their use of information and warnings, and their planning and preparedness behaviour, 41 livestock producers from three field sites around rural South Australia that were threatened or impacted by significant bushfires in January 2014 were interviewed. The majority had a low level of concern for bushfire threat, with almost all opting to 'stay and defend' their property. Few had formally written 'bushfire risk management plans', adequate insurance for livestock, a contingency plan, or used information resources. However, they reported multiple other routine and ordinary practices contributing to their bushfire preparedness. Such activities used a more 'common sense' approach, conducted as part of everyday property management practices and farming culture. It is clear that livestock producers have different needs before and during bushfires, and have a different perception of risk than other animal owners or rural dwellers in general.

Citations Scopus - 12
2015 Trigg J, Smith B, Thompson K, 'Does emotional closeness to pets motivate their inclusion in bushfire survival plans? Implications for emergency communicators', Australian Journal of Emergency Management, 30 24-30 (2015)

As pet ownership influences responses to the threat of bushfire, current preparedness communication acknowledges the pet-owner relationship as a key reason for including pets in e... [more]

As pet ownership influences responses to the threat of bushfire, current preparedness communication acknowledges the pet-owner relationship as a key reason for including pets in emergency plans. However, not all pet-owner relationships are the same. Some people are physically and emotionally 'closer' to their pets than are others, a difference that could impact survival plan intentions. This South Australian study examines how differences in pet-owner closeness affects owners' views of pets as a motivator for plan creation and of pet inclusion in planning across four survivalplan intention types: 'stay and defend', 'split the household', 'wait and decide', and 'leave early'. Of several pet-owner closeness indicators, family membership of pets and anticipated separation distress influenced whether pets were considered a motivator and were included in plans. Intention-specific recommendations for creating motivating communications based on these effects are presented for emergency services communicators.

Citations Scopus - 13
2015 Thompson K, Leighton MA, Riley C, 'Helping hands, hurting hooves: Towards a multidisciplinary paradigm of large animal rescue', Australian Journal of Emergency Management, 30 53-58 (2015)

Large Animal Rescue (LAR) entails the removal of a large animal from a place of danger to one of safety by the most humane method, with an overriding regard for the safety and wel... [more]

Large Animal Rescue (LAR) entails the removal of a large animal from a place of danger to one of safety by the most humane method, with an overriding regard for the safety and welfare of responders as well as members of the public. However, there has been little consideration for the ways in which human and animal safety are mutually incorporated and the unique challenges posed by the human-animal bond with respect to LAR. Moving beyond the focus of previous authors on its technical aspects, this article reconciles the two perspectives with a multispecies, anthrozoological account of LAR. It provides examples from three previously undocumented rescues of horses trapped in mud, flood waters, and a gully to illustrate the ways in which the safety of humans and animals are mutually dependent. Above all, the case studies signal the need for a shift towards multidisciplinary approaches to LAR that engage emergency services, engineering, veterinary sciences and social sciences in collaborative knowledge sharing and creation.

Citations Scopus - 3
2015 Taylor M, McCarthy M, Burns P, Thompson K, Smith B, Eustace G, 'The challenges of managing animals and their owners in disasters: Perspectives of Australian response organisations and stakeholders', Australian Journal of Emergency Management, 30 31-37 (2015)

This paper documents the findings of a comprehensive national survey of Australian response organisations and other relevant stakeholders involved in the management of animals and... [more]

This paper documents the findings of a comprehensive national survey of Australian response organisations and other relevant stakeholders involved in the management of animals and their owners in emergencies and disasters. The aim of the study was to identify and prioritise the challenges encountered by these organisations in the management of animals and animal owners. In addition, attitudes towards organisational responsibility for the management of animals in emergencies and awareness of relevant emergency response and recovery arrangements were sought. A sample of 98 respondents representing 68 organisations from all Australian states and territories were surveyed. The main challenges identified in the management of animals and their owners were in the logistics of animal management (personnel and equipment), the physical management and rescue of animals, interactions with owners during emergency response, and post-emergency impacts on the management of animals and their owners (distress and emotional issues). As would be expected, different categories of organisations and stakeholders experienced different challenges. Issues were reported across all categories irrespective of their formallyassigned roles and responsibilities in this area.

Citations Scopus - 8
2015 Trigg J, Thompson K, Smith B, Bennett P, 'Engaging pet owners in disaster risk and preparedness communications: simplifying complex human-animal relations with archetypes', ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS-HUMAN AND POLICY DIMENSIONS, 14 236-251 (2015)
DOI 10.1080/17477891.2015.1047731
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
2015 Thompson K, McGreevy P, McManus P, 'A Critical Review of Horse-Related Risk: A Research Agenda for Safer Mounts, Riders and Equestrian Cultures', ANIMALS, 5 561-575 (2015)
DOI 10.3390/ani5030372
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 38
2015 Haigh L, Thompson K, 'Helmet Use Amongst Equestrians: Harnessing Social and Attitudinal Factors Revealed in Online Forums', ANIMALS, 5 576-591 (2015)
DOI 10.3390/ani5030373
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2015 Thompson K, Matthews C, 'Inroads into Equestrian Safety: Rider-Reported Factors Contributing to Horse-Related Accidents and Near Misses on Australian Roads', ANIMALS, 5 592-609 (2015)
DOI 10.3390/ani5030374
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
2015 Riley CB, Liddiard JR, Thompson K, 'A Cross-Sectional Study of Horse-Related Injuries in Veterinary and Animal Science Students at an Australian University', ANIMALS, 5 951-964 (2015)
DOI 10.3390/ani5040392
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
2015 O Keeffe VJ, Thompson KR, Tuckey MR, Blewett VL, 'Putting safety in the frame: Nurses sensemaking at work', Global Qualitative Nursing Research, 2 (2015)

Current patient safety policy focuses nursing on patient care goals, often overriding nurses¿ safety. Without understanding how nurses construct work health and safety (WHS), pati... [more]

Current patient safety policy focuses nursing on patient care goals, often overriding nurses¿ safety. Without understanding how nurses construct work health and safety (WHS), patient and nurse safety cannot be reconciled. Using ethnography, we examine social contexts of safety, studying 72 nurses across five Australian hospitals making decisions during patient encounters. In enacting safe practice, nurses used ¿frames¿ built from their contextual experiences to guide their behavior. Frames are produced by nurses, and they structure how nurses make sense of their work. Using thematic analysis, we identify four frames that inform nurses¿ decisions about WHS: (a) communicating builds knowledge, (b) experiencing situations guides decisions, (c) adapting procedures streamlines work, and (d) team working promotes safe working. Nurses¿ frames question current policy and practice by challenging how nurses¿ safety is positioned relative to patient safety. Recognizing these frames can assist the design and implementation of effective WHS management.

DOI 10.1177/2333393615592390
Citations Scopus - 7
2015 Smith B, Thompson K, Taylor M, 'What s the big deal? responder experiences of large animal rescue in australia', PLoS Currents, 7 (2015)

Background: The management of large animals during disasters and emergencies creates difficult operational environments for responders. The aims of this study were to identify the... [more]

Background: The management of large animals during disasters and emergencies creates difficult operational environments for responders. The aims of this study were to identify the exact challenges faced by Australian emergency response personnel in their interactions with large animals and their owners, and to determine the readiness for large animal rescue (LAR) in Australia. Methods: A survey tool collected the views and experiences of a broad cross section of emergency services personnel operating across Australia and across all hazards. Data were collected from 156 responders including Australian emergency services personnel, emergency managers such as federal agricultural departments, and local government. Results: Overall, many of the respondents had serious concerns, and felt that there were significant issues in relation to LAR in Australia. These included the coordination of emergency care for animals, physical management of large animals, inter-agency coordination, and dealing with animal owners. Very few respondents had received any formal training in LAR, with an overwhelming majority indicating they would attend formal training if it were made available. Discussion: Results help to guide the development of evidence-informed support tools to assist operational response and community engagement, and the production of professional development resources.

DOI 10.1371/currents.dis.71d34082943fa239dbfbf9597232c8a5
Citations Scopus - 4
2015 Thompson K, O'Dwyer L, Sharp A, Smith B, Reynolds CJ, Hadley T, Hazel S, 'What's in a Dog's Breakfast? Considering the Social, Veterinary and Environmental Implications of Feeding Food Scraps to Pets Using Three Australian Surveys', SUSTAINABILITY, 7 7195-7213 (2015)
DOI 10.3390/su7067195
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2015 Vlaholias E, Thompson K, Every D, Dawson D, 'Charity Starts ... at Work? Conceptual Foundations for Research with Businesses that Donate to Food Redistribution Organisations', SUSTAINABILITY, 7 7997-8021 (2015)
DOI 10.3390/su7067997
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 23
2014 Every D, Thompson K, Rainbird S, Whetton S, Procter N, Abdul-Halim S, Sebben B, ''We're so lucky': meeting challenges to deliver benefits to children in immigration detention', AUSTRALIAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCHER, 41 209-225 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s13384-013-0134-8
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014 Reynolds CJ, Mavrakis V, Davison S, Hoj SB, Vlaholias E, Sharp A, et al., 'Estimating informal household food waste in developed countries: The case of Australia', WASTE MANAGEMENT & RESEARCH, 32 (2014)
DOI 10.1177/0734242X14549797
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 29
2014 Smith B, Thompson K, Clarkson L, Dawson D, 'The Prevalence and implications of Human-Animal Co-Sleeping in an Australian Sample', ANTHROZOOS, 27 543-551 (2014)
DOI 10.2752/089279314X14072268687880
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
2014 Every D, Thompson K, 'Disaster resilience: Can the homeless afford it?', Australian Journal of Emergency Management, 29 52-56 (2014)

Research in the US suggests that people experiencing homelessness are more at risk during natural disasters because they have limited access to the economic, social and community ... [more]

Research in the US suggests that people experiencing homelessness are more at risk during natural disasters because they have limited access to the economic, social and community resources needed for preparation, evacuation and full recovery. Although this vulnerability is recognised in Australian disaster management documents, little is currently known about the unique vulnerabilities of people experiencing homelessness, nor about specific, targeted interventions that can increase their resilience to natural disasters. This paper provides a literature review of research into the vulnerability of homeless people. The review identifies important issues to consider when planning responses to disasters and highlights suggestions for how greater disaster resilience support can be offered. The review also outlines some gaps in knowledge about homelessness, vulnerability and resilience that may impede effective disaster management for this group.

Citations Scopus - 8
2014 Due C, Thompson K, Every D, ''AN IMAGE OF HOPE IN A WEEK OF DESPAIR': REPRESENTATIONS OF SAM THE KOALA IN THE AUSTRALIAN MAINSTREAM NEWS MEDIA', MEDIA INTERNATIONAL AUSTRALIA, 47-55 (2014)
DOI 10.1177/1329878X1415100107
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2014 Thompson K, Every D, Rainbird S, Cornell V, Smith B, Trigg J, 'No pet or their person left behind: Increasing the disaster resilience of vulnerable groups through animal attachment, activities and networks', Animals, 4 214-240 (2014)

Increased vulnerability to natural disasters has been associated with particular groups in the community. This includes those who are considered de facto vulnerable (children, old... [more]

Increased vulnerability to natural disasters has been associated with particular groups in the community. This includes those who are considered de facto vulnerable (children, older people, those with disabilities etc.) and those who own pets (not to mention pets themselves). The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to vulnerable members of the community who own pets or other animals? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives. Despite different vulnerabilities, animals were found to be important to the disaster resilience of seven vulnerable groups in Australia. Animal attachment and animal-related activities and networks are identified as underexplored devices for disseminating or 'piggybacking' disaster-related information and engaging vulnerable people in resilience building behaviors (in addition to including animals in disaster planning initiatives in general). Animals may provide the kind of innovative approach required to overcome the challenges in accessing and engaging vulnerable groups. As the survival of humans and animals are so often intertwined, the benefits of increasing the resilience of vulnerable communities through animal attachment is twofold: human and animal lives can be saved together. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

DOI 10.3390/ani4020214
Citations Scopus - 35
2013 Every D, Whetton S, Rainbird S, Halim SA, Procter N, Sebben B, Thompson K, 'The social and economic impacts of immigration detention facilities: a South Australian case study', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL ISSUES, 48 173-196 (2013)
DOI 10.1002/j.1839-4655.2013.tb00277.x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2013 Thompson K, 'From initiate to insider: Renegotiating workplace roles and relations using staged humorous events', Organisation Management Journal, 10 122-138 (2013)

Like anthropologists entering the field as "outsiders," initiates to organizations need to learn new cultures as they transition to "insiders" ... [more]

Like anthropologists entering the field as "outsiders," initiates to organizations need to learn new cultures as they transition to "insiders" or veterans. Organizational research has identified the role that spontaneous humor plays in this transition. However, there has been little research into "staged" humorous events. At the same time, anthropological practice has identified various ethnographic research techniques designed to expedite entrée to a social group or organization. However, there has been no research on the implications of a colleague delivering an ethnography of a group back to itself. In this article, I detail a strategy that combined humor and the ethnography genre: the delivery of a workplace ethnography back to colleagues. Through a post hoc analysis, I explore the significance of this staged humorous event. In particular, I identify the impact of the ethnographic genre, inclusive narratives, and ambiguity as devices (in addition to the satirical tone). Through these devices, I was able to invite colleagues to engage with an alternative organizational vision in which I was an "insider." I consider the effect of staged humorous events such as humorous workplace ethnographies on workplace identities and relations in general, and the initiation of new workers in particular. This auto-ethnographic article is based on 9 months of opportunistic participant-observation with an Australian research center. Copyright © Eastern Academy of Management.

DOI 10.1080/15416518.2013.801746
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Brindal E, Hendrie G, Thompson K, Blunden S, 'How do Australian junior primary school children perceive the concepts of "healthy" and "unhealthy"?', Health Education, 112 406-420 (2012)

Purpose: This paper aims to describe Australian children's perceptions of healthiness and sources of health knowledge in order to develop an understanding of young children&a... [more]

Purpose: This paper aims to describe Australian children's perceptions of healthiness and sources of health knowledge in order to develop an understanding of young children's perceptions, knowledge and sources of influence to guide future behaviour change and health promotion strategies. Design/methodology/approach: One-hour interactive focus groups were conducted in a South Australian primary school. Four small groups (n=28) of children aged five to nine participated in focus groups in which they were asked to discuss being healthy and their sources of health information as well as engaging in storying around the healthy or unhealthy behaviours of fictional characters. Findings: Children generally perceived themselves to be healthy. Perceptions of healthiness were equated with performing positive dietary (primarily eating fruit) and physical activity behaviours. Behaviours on an unhealthy day related to being sedentary and consuming "junk foods". Commonly cited sources of health information included family members, teachers and public health campaigns. Practical implications: Understanding how young children perceive health behaviour and how to deliver health education appropriately to children (including who delivers these programs) could improve the efficacy of future programs targeting this group. This study offers insight into junior primary children's perceptions of healthy diet and activity behaviours and can assist in the improvement of future health interventions and programs. Originality/value: Existing research on how younger children perceive healthiness is limited. The methods used in this study allowed the authors to explore these perceptions in a way that limited how much the topics of the conversation were predetermined. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

DOI 10.1108/09654281211253425
Citations Scopus - 9
2012 Thompson K, Offler N, Hirsch L, Every D, Thomas MJ, Dawson D, 'From broken windows to a renovated research agenda: A review of the literature on vandalism and graffiti in the rail industry', TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH PART A-POLICY AND PRACTICE, 46 1280-1290 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.tra.2012.04.002
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 20
2012 Thompson K, Hirsch L, Loose SM, Sharma-Brymer V, Rainbird S, Titchener K, et al., 'Riding a mile in their shoes: Understanding Australian metropolitan rail passenger perceptions and experiences of crowdedness using mixed-methods research', ROAD & TRANSPORT RESEARCH, 21 46-59 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2012 Thompson K, 'CLASSY PERFORMANCES: THE PERFORMANCE OF CLASS IN THE ANDALUSIAN BULLFIGHT FROM HORSEBACK (REJONEO)', JOURNAL OF SPANISH CULTURAL STUDIES, 13 167-188 (2012)
DOI 10.1080/14636204.2012.745322
Citations Scopus - 10
2011 Thompson K, Palmer C, Raven M, 'Drinkers, non-drinkers and deferrers: Reconsidering the beer/footy couplet amongst Australian Rules football fans', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ANTHROPOLOGY, 22 388-408 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1757-6547.2011.00152.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2011 Blunden SL, Thompson KR, Dawson D, 'Behavioural sleep treatments and night time crying in infants: Challenging the status quo', SLEEP MEDICINE REVIEWS, 15 327-334 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.smrv.2010.11.002
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 47
2011 Thompson K, Blunden S, Brindal E, Hendrie G, 'When food is neither good nor bad: Children's evaluations of transformed and combined food products', JOURNAL OF CHILD HEALTH CARE, 15 261-271 (2011)
DOI 10.1177/1367493511414449
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
2011 Palmer C, Thompson K, 'Erratum to Everyday risks and professional dilemmas: Fieldwork with alcohol-based (sporting) subcultures (Qualitative Research, (2010), 10, (421), 10.1177/1468794110366800)', Qualitative Research, 11 112 (2011)
DOI 10.1177/1468794110396956
2010 Thompson K, 'Narratives of Tradition The Invention of Mounted Bullfighting as "the Newest but Also the Oldest"', SOCIAL SCIENCE HISTORY, 34 523-561 (2010)
DOI 10.1017/S0145553200011421
Citations Web of Science - 5
2010 Thompson K, 'Narratives of tradition: The invention of mounted bullfighting as "the newest but also the oldest"', Social Science History, 34 523-561 (2010)

In this article I consider the bottom-up, narrative process through which traditions are invented, using rejoneo (mounted bullfighting) as a case study. I explore the construction... [more]

In this article I consider the bottom-up, narrative process through which traditions are invented, using rejoneo (mounted bullfighting) as a case study. I explore the construction of rejoneo as "the newest but also the oldest" form of bullfighting. To understand this apparent contradiction, I synthesize "narratives of tradition" with Eric Hobsbawm and Terence Ranger's (1995 [1983]) "invented tradition." In doing so, I consider rejoneo through multiple and overlapping narratives structured into historical "chapters" with common narrative elements of heroes, villains, tragic downfalls, and triumphant comebacks. These narratives are contextualized in periods of intense social, political, and economic transformation in Spain over the past three centuries. This article combines a review of the lay and expert understandings of the history of the Spanish bullfight with ethnographic fieldwork undertaken with mounted bullfighters in Andalusia from 2000 and 2001. It redresses a significant lack of attention to the mounted bullfight in relation to the footed bullfight, thereby contributing to a more comprehensive literature of bullfighting in Spain. Moreover, this article provides a model for understanding that one of the ways traditions are invented is through narratives of tradition, contextualized by the wider social, political, and economic forces emphasized by the invented traditions approach. © 2010 by Social Science History Association.

DOI 10.1215/01455532-2010-014
Citations Scopus - 13
2010 Thompson K, 'Binaries, Boundaries and Bullfighting: Multiple and Alternative Human-Animal Relations in the Spanish Mounted Bullfight', ANTHROZOOS, 23 317-336 (2010)
DOI 10.2752/175303710X12750451259291
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 10
2010 Thompson K, 'Because looks can be deceiving: media alarm and the sexualisation of childhood - do we know what we mean?', JOURNAL OF GENDER STUDIES, 19 395-400 (2010)
DOI 10.1080/09589236.2010.533492
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
2010 Palmer C, Thompson K, 'Everyday risks and professional dilemmas: fieldwork with alcohol-based (sporting) subcultures', QUALITATIVE RESEARCH, 10 421-440 (2010)
DOI 10.1177/1468794110366800
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 27
2007 Palmer C, Thompson K, 'The paradoxes of football spectatorship: On-field and online expressions of social capital among the "grog squad"', SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT JOURNAL, 24 187-205 (2007)
DOI 10.1123/ssj.24.2.187
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 47
'Sport, Animals, and Society
DOI 10.4324/9780203763407
Show 66 more journal articles

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Vlaholias EG, Thompson K, Every D, Dawson D, 'Reducing food waste through charity: Exploring the giving and receiving of redistributed food' (2015)

Food waste is a problem with serious environmental, social, financial, and moral implications. Reducing the amount of food sent to landfill is a key challenge to increase environm... [more]

Food waste is a problem with serious environmental, social, financial, and moral implications. Reducing the amount of food sent to landfill is a key challenge to increase environmental sustainability. Over the past decade the food redistribution sector has grown with the rise of several new food bank and food rescue organisations. These organisations collect excess food and distribute it to welfare agencies that feed people in need. However, it is possible that by diverting food from landfill, a social problem is created or furthered for the people that receive this wasted food. Without first knowing if food redistribution organisations are causing unintentional harm to the recipients, we cannot develop and enhance them as a commercial food waste reduction strategy. There is a scarcity of critical research that explores the donors and recipients' experiences of giving and receiving redistributed food. Using ethnographic research methods of participant observation and interviews, this paper examines the perspectives of the multiple parties involved at each level of food redistribution. The findings of this study will recommend suitable methods to target and motivate people from the food industry to become donors. Furthermore, i will suggest ways to improve the experiences of recipients accessing the redistributed food. As a result, this paper will provide insight to optimise food redistribution organisations, with implications for the future policy and practice of food waste and food poverty interventions.

DOI 10.3920/978-90-8686-820-9_33
Citations Scopus - 5
2014 Hirsch L, Thompson K, 'I can sit but I'd rather stand: Commuter's experience of crowdedness and fellow passenger behaviour in carriages on Australian metropolitan trains', ATRF 2011 - 34th Australasian Transport Research Forum (2014)

For many people in Australia, crowding is a major issue and an unavoidable aspect of their daily rail commute. Australian passenger experiences, perceptions of, and their reaction... [more]

For many people in Australia, crowding is a major issue and an unavoidable aspect of their daily rail commute. Australian passenger experiences, perceptions of, and their reactions to crowding are not well understood. To gain an understanding of passenger perceptions and tolerance of railway crowding and the impact of passenger behaviour on the crowding experience, qualitative (Stage 1) and quantitative (Stage 2) fieldwork was undertaken between 2009 and 2010 across the five metropolitan railways in Australia. Some results from Stage 1, a two-part qualitative study are given. This involved ethnographic participant observations on trains in five States and 20 focus groups with a total of 179 Australian rail passengers. Focus group participants discussed their reactions to being in close proximity to others in a closed environment and these are examined. This paper will explore the ways in which passengers experience, tolerate and construct perceptions of crowdedness through both avoidance techniques and interactions with fellow passengers.

Citations Scopus - 11
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Dr Kirrilly Thompson

Position

Research Fellow
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email kirrilly.thompson@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (04)13616650
Mobile 0413616650

Office

Room Newcastle Public Health Unit, (HNE LHD)
Location Wallsend

,
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