Dr Temitope Egbelakin

Dr Temitope Egbelakin

Associate Professor and Executive Director

School of Architecture and Built Environment

Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Temitope Egbelakin is an Associate Professor at the University of Newcastle, Australia and leads the CIFAL Newcastle Centre in the School of Architecture & Built Environment. CIFAL Centre is a hub for capacity building and knowledge sharing between local and regional authorities, national governments, international organisations, the private sector, and civil society. It is an important resource in the United Nations long-term efforts towards the achievement of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). 

Dr. Temi is an international scholar and leader with significant experience in teaching, research and industry practice in multiple local and international contexts, thereby facilitating the transfer of knowledge (research outcomes and teaching) into the industry through the medium of professional activities and postgraduate qualifications. She has lead the development and implementation of several innovative projects, worked together with strategic partners, various local and international organisations as well as indigenous communities. Her interests and expertise include Disaster Resilience, Smart and Resilience Cities, Informatics, and Maintenance and Adaptive reuse of Buildings.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Auckland - NZ
  • Master of Science, National University of Singapore

Keywords

  • Adaptive Reuse
  • Climate Change
  • Construction Management
  • Disaster Resilience
  • Informatics
  • Natural Hazard & Diaster Resilience
  • Risk Governance
  • Smart and Resilience Cities

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
040604 Natural Hazards 50
120201 Building Construction Management and Project Planning 30
120299 Building not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor and Executive Director University of Newcastle
School of Architecture and Built Environment
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
4/01/2012 - 2/02/2019 Senior Lecturer Massey University
New Zealand
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (22 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Rebello K, Jaggi K, Costello S, Blake D, Oo M, Hughes J, Egbelakin T, 'Testing a criticality framework for road networks in Auckland, New Zealand', International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, 10 36-51 (2019)

© 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to trial the application of a criticality framework for roads in an urban environment. The failure or dis... [more]

© 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to trial the application of a criticality framework for roads in an urban environment. The failure or disruption of critical transport routes can have substantial impacts on the economy and societal well-being. Determining the criticality of transport routes is thus of crucial importance for infrastructure providers, city planners and emergency management officials, as it enables appropriate resilience assessments and targeted improvement/intervention and investment strategies to be conducted. Design/methodology/approach: The authors summarise the proposed criticality framework developed by Hughes (2016) for road networks and apply and validate the framework to an area containing 907 km of roads in the central Auckland area of New Zealand. Following an initial trial of the framework, alterations were made to the framework logic, which included the introduction of a new criticality level to account for some roads providing minimal direct societal and economic benefit and a rationalisation step to ensure that road sections always link to others with either an equal or higher criticality. Findings: The modified framework and five-level criticality scale, when applied to the study area in central Auckland, is suitable for determining critical roads and can therefore assist with future assessments of road infrastructure resilience. Originality/value: The framework also has the potential to be applied more widely and adapted so that it is applicable for determining the criticality of other infrastructure types and in other settings, which would allow improved assessments within and across sectors.

DOI 10.1108/IJDRBE-03-2018-0012
2019 Ashcroft D, Egbelakin T, Jing J, Rasheed EO, 'Cost comparison of seismic damage resisting systems for modules in multi-storey buildings', Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, 17 330-346 (2019)

© 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the economic viability of a new and innovative seismic damage resisting system (SDRS) device b... [more]

© 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the economic viability of a new and innovative seismic damage resisting system (SDRS) device by conducting a feasibility study. The SDRS device has been patented and specifically designed to be implemented in multi-storey modular buildings in seismic regions such as New Zealand. Design/methodology/approach: Using a case study approach, two sample modular multi-storey buildings were purposively selected for the study. A cost-comparison analysis was conducted using the SDRS device in the two buildings, by carrying out a measure and price exercise of the construction elements. Findings: The research results showed that the SDRS device is an economically viable option for mitigating seismic damage in modular multi-storey buildings in New Zealand. There is an average of 7.34 per cent of cost reduction when SDRS is used in modular multi-storey buildings when compared to other seismic resistance systems such as base isolation, moment resisting frames and friction damper systems. Practical implications: The economic viability of the SDRS presents an opportunity for its usage in modular design and construction of multi-storey buildings. SDRS system is also applicable to other building typologies and construction methods. The use of SDRS also aligns with the current national objective to provide more affordable and resilient housing within a limited time; the opportunity is considered significant in New Zealand, including for export and manufacturing. Originality/value: The confirmation of the SDRS device¿s economic feasibility is the original contribution of the authors.

DOI 10.1108/JEDT-04-2018-0076
2019 Haji Karimian S, Mbachu J, Egbelakin T, Shahzad W, 'Improving efficiency in roading projects: a New Zealand study', Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, 26 827-849 (2019)

© 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the key productivity constraints faced by New Zealand (NZ) road pavement maintenance and r... [more]

© 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the key productivity constraints faced by New Zealand (NZ) road pavement maintenance and rehabilitation contractors (RPMRCs) and the associated mitigation measures. Design/methodology/approach: Interview-based exploratory research strategy was used to survey senior managers and directors of medium- to large-sized road contracting firms in NZ. Empirical data were analyzed using the multi-attribute analytical technique. Findings: Results revealed 70 productivity constraints faced by the RPMRCs in NZ; in diminishing order of influence, these constraints were aggregated into eight broad categories as follows: finance, workforce, technology/process, statutory/regulatory compliance, project characteristics, project management/project team characteristics, unforeseen circumstances and other/external factors. The most important constraints in each of the eight broad categories were presented. Research limitations/implications: The key limitation of the research is that it was based on feedback from a limited number of participants which were less than the minimum required to represent the views of the potential participants in the sampling frame for the study. As a result, the findings may not be reliably generalized beyond the scope of the data used. Further research on the subject is recommended to ensure that the representation of the views of the individuals and companies that comprised the sampling frame is achieved. The current findings could be formulated as propositions or hypotheses to be tested in future confirmatory research. Practical implications: At the industry level, the findings could provide the basis for the skill development programs of the NZ RPMRCs. The application of the research findings by the RPMRCs and consultants could result in significant improvement in the productivity of the NZ roading sector and the sector¿s enhanced contribution to the economy. Originality/value: Currently, there is little research on the priority constraints to productivity and performance in the NZ roading sector. The findings contribute to knowledge by revealing critical factors constraining productivity performance of the NZ RMRCs and the associated improvement measures. New and more enriching viewpoints were provided on how contractors could leverage their limited resources to address the identified key constraints.

DOI 10.1108/ECAM-02-2018-0060
2019 Aigwi IE, Egbelakin T, Ingham J, Phipps R, Rotimi J, Filippova O, 'A performance-based framework to prioritise underutilised historical buildings for adaptive reuse interventions in New Zealand', Sustainable Cities and Society, 48 (2019)

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd While the efficacy of salvaging underutilised historical buildings to promote sustainable and resilient provincial urban areas in New Zealand has been identifi... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd While the efficacy of salvaging underutilised historical buildings to promote sustainable and resilient provincial urban areas in New Zealand has been identified from past studies, there is still an absence of a performance-based framework to rank optimal historical building alternatives for adaptive reuse interventions. This paper focuses on evaluating a performance-based Multiple Criteria Decision Assessment (MCDA) methodology to prioritise underutilised historical buildings for adaptive reuse intervention in a major provincial area in New Zealand, towards achieving a resilient town-centre regeneration for the area. A focus group workshop was conducted with relevant stakeholders involved in an existing town centre regeneration agenda for Whanganui, to explore and balance their opinions for optimal selection of a vacant historical building for adaptive reuse intervention from a group of proposed buildings. The participant mix comprised a combination of building professionals, historical building owners/developers/users, legal, heritage, and council/community representatives. The findings establish the usefulness of the validated framework in balancing the diverse interests of all stakeholders in the adaptive reuse decision-making process. Hence, this paper provides a significant contribution to the development of a methodology that integrates adaptive reuse stakeholders¿ diversified interests, for the selection of optimal case study building alternatives. The consensus of the multidisciplinary stakeholder group was found to be consistent and insensitive to reasonable changes in weighting. Also, the validated framework enabled the decision-makers to achieve a logical result, and support the visualisation of the impact of different priority aspects and criteria on adaptive reuse interventions in New Zealand.

DOI 10.1016/j.scs.2019.101547
2018 Potter EM, Egbelakin T, Phipps R, Balaei B, 'Emotional intelligence and transformational leadership behaviours of construction project managers', Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, 23 73-89 (2018)

© 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: Existing research has highlighted the need for influential leaders to respond to the evolving social, economic and environmental const... [more]

© 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: Existing research has highlighted the need for influential leaders to respond to the evolving social, economic and environmental constraints on the construction industry. Studies on leadership in other sectors have shown that influential leaders tend to demonstrate a high level of emotional intelligence. Little or no research examining relationships between leadership style and emotional intelligence has been conducted specific to construction project managers. This study aims to identify the prevalent leadership style adopted by construction project managers and investigate potential correlations between leadership style and emotional intelligence. Design/methodology/approach: An online questionnaire including a mix of open and closed questions was adopted to address the research objectives. The group studied comprised project managers currently working in the construction industry in New Zealand and the UK. Findings: The research found that transformational leadership style is prevalent among project managers examined in this study. Significant positive relationships were found between project managers¿ emotional intelligence and their likelihood of adopting a transformational leadership style. Originality/value: The research results provide the construction industry with a benchmark against which individuals with high emotional intelligence, and so most suited to the challenges of the project management role, can be identified and trained. Recommendations including suitable methods for identifying, recruiting and training project managers, as well as secondment and mentoring options, were suggested for improving leadership capabilities in the construction industry.

DOI 10.1108/JFMPC-01-2017-0004
Citations Scopus - 3
2018 Aigwi IE, Egbelakin T, Ingham J, 'Efficacy of adaptive reuse for the redevelopment of underutilised historical buildings: Towards the regeneration of New Zealand s provincial town centres', International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, 36 385-407 (2018)

© 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: Most provincial town centres in New Zealand typically feature old and vacant historical buildings, the majority of which possess herit... [more]

© 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: Most provincial town centres in New Zealand typically feature old and vacant historical buildings, the majority of which possess heritage values. The growing perception that it is cheaper to repurpose vacant historical buildings rather than demolishing and rebuilding them is one of the factors that have made the adaptive reuse approach so popular. However, will this also be the case for provincial town centres in New Zealand? The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore the key factors that could influence the efficacy of adaptive reuse, and check for significant differences in the effect that each perceived factor would have on the adaptive reuse efficacy as a justifiable resilient and sustainable approach towards the regeneration of a major provincial town centre in New Zealand that is currently experiencing inner-city shrinkage. Design/methodology/approach: A focus group workshop was conducted with 22 stakeholders involved in an existing town centre regeneration agenda for Whanganui. Closed-ended questionnaires were administered to the workshop participants to measure their opinions regarding the efficacy of the adaptive reuse approach for the regeneration of Whanganui¿s town centre. The participant mix comprised a combination of structural engineers, quantity surveyors, architects, estate valuers, building owners/developers, legal representatives, heritage representatives and local government council representatives. Findings: The study reported a high proportion of respondents that strongly agreed to the positive impacts of adaptive reuse with regards to the discussed priority aspects, hence, justifying the efficacy of the approach, towards delivering a vibrant town centre for Whanganui. Also, the Friedman¿s analysis suggests that no significant differences existed among all perceived adaptive reuse efficacy criteria by the workshop participants, therefore justifying the approach. Originality/value: This paper¿s originality pertains to the practicality of changing the use of vacant historical buildings in Whanganui, which is one of New Zealand¿s major provincial town centres, to renegotiate resilience and sustainable urban regeneration for the area.

DOI 10.1108/IJBPA-01-2018-0007
Citations Scopus - 7
2018 Giaretton M, Egbelakin TK, Ingham JM, Dizhur D, 'Multidisciplinary Tool for Evaluating Strengthening Designs for Earthquake-Prone Buildings', EARTHQUAKE SPECTRA, 34 1481-1496 (2018)
DOI 10.1193/091717EQS183M
2018 Al Adem S, Childerhouse P, Egbelakin T, Wang B, 'International and local NGO supply chain collaboration: An investigation of the Syrian refugee crises in Jordan', JOURNAL OF HUMANITARIAN LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, 8 295-322 (2018)
DOI 10.1108/JHLSCM-05-2017-0020
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2018 Egbelakin T, Yakubu IE, Bowden J, 'ENHANCING SEISMIC REGULATORY COMPLIANCE PRACTICES FOR NON-STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS IN NEW ZEALAND', BULLETIN OF THE NEW ZEALAND SOCIETY FOR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING, 51 47-54 (2018)
DOI 10.5459/bnzsee.51.1.47-54
2018 Egbelakin T, Poshdar M, Walsh KQ, Ingham J, Johnston D, Becker J, et al., 'PREPAREDNESS OF SMALL TO MEDIUM-SIZED ENTERPRISES TO EARTHQUAKE DISASTER: NAPIER AND DUNEDIN CASE STUDIES', BULLETIN OF THE NEW ZEALAND SOCIETY FOR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING, 51 171-182 (2018)
DOI 10.5459/bnzsee.51.4.171-182
2017 Egbelakin T, Wilkinson S, Ingham J, Potangaroa R, Sajoudi M, 'Incentives and Motivators for Improving Building Resilience to Earthquake Disaster', Natural Hazards Review, 18 (2017)

© 2017 American Society of Civil Engineers. Encouraging property owners to adopt measures to improve the resilience of their buildings to seismic hazard has been a major challenge... [more]

© 2017 American Society of Civil Engineers. Encouraging property owners to adopt measures to improve the resilience of their buildings to seismic hazard has been a major challenge in many earthquake-prone countries. Owners of buildings vulnerable to seismic hazard are often found unwilling or lacking in motivation to strengthen their properties, despite the availability of several earthquake risk mitigation mechanisms. This study sought to investigate essential motivational factors that would enable building owners to voluntarily strengthen their vulnerable buildings. Using 208 structured questionnaires and structural equation modeling for data analysis, the research findings uncovered a set of intrinsic and extrinsic motivators necessary to enhance earthquake mitigation decisions. The intrinsic motivators include using information communication networks such as policy entrepreneurs and community engagement in risk mitigation. Extrinsic motivators comprise financial, regulatory, technological, and property market-based incentives. The model developed in this study and findings provide guidance to local council officials and professionals involved in earthquake risk management on the mix of incentives that will foster the collective protective actions necessary to improve the built environment's resilience to seismic disasters.

DOI 10.1061/(ASCE)NH.1527-6996.0000249
Citations Scopus - 2
2017 Mbachu J, Egbelakin T, Rasheed EO, Shahzad WM, 'Influence of key role players on productivity outcomes in the residential building lifecycle', Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, 15 528-551 (2017)

© 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: This study aims to answer the ¿what¿ and ¿how¿ questions about the key role players¿ influence on the overall productivity outcomes ... [more]

© 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: This study aims to answer the ¿what¿ and ¿how¿ questions about the key role players¿ influence on the overall productivity outcomes in the lifecycle of residential buildings procured through the traditional route. Design/methodology/approach: A mix of exploratory and descriptive research methods was used to obtain feedback from 179 role-players involved in various phases of the residential building lifecycle (RBLC) in New Zealand. Empirical data were analysed using content analysis, multi-attribute method and Friedman¿s two-way analysis of variance. Findings: Results showed that designers, building owners, main contractors and project managers were the greatest influencers of the productivity outcomes in the RBLC. The priority drivers of these key role-players¿ influences on the RBLC productivity outcomes comprised poor brief interpretation, inclination to lowest tender, inadequate prior risk analysis and miscommunication of owner¿s requirements and preferences to service providers, respectively. By taking proactive steps to redress their productivity inhibiting acts/omissions as identified in this study, the various role-players could contribute to significant improvement of productivity outcomes in the building lifecycle. Research limitations/implications: It was not possible to interview all participants that made up the representative random samples from each role-player group due largely to workload related excuses. As a result, the findings and the conclusions may not be generalised beyond the study scope. However, the study achieved its purpose, as the main intent was to provide hypothetical constructs that could guide further confirmatory/experimental studies for residential buildings as well as for other building types. Practical implications: A succinct and easy-to-follow model was developed as implementation pathway for operationalising the key findings of the study in the industry. The model highlights the Owner-Architect-Contractor Influence Triangle (OACIT) as the 20 per cent of the solutions that could deliver 80 per cent of the productivity improvement in the RBLC. Originality/value: This study re-examines productivity issues not only from a life-cycle perspective but also from the perspectives of the majority of the key role-players. In addition, the OACIT concept offers a novel productivity improvement tool; it stresses that productivity in the traditionally procured building lifecycle could be optimised if the architect could focus greater attention on brief articulation and the issuance and review of design and specification information. Also, the owner should adopt productivity-enhancing procurement and contract strategies and emphasise more on value-addition and less on lowest tender price.

DOI 10.1108/JEDT-02-2017-0014
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Yakubu IE, Egbelakin T, Dizhur D, Ingham J, Park KS, Phipps R, 'Why are older inner-city buildings vacant? Implications for town centre regeneration', Journal of Urban Regeneration and Renewal, 11 44-59 (2017)

© Henry Stewart Publications. The historic precincts of suburban cities in New Zealand are characterised by partially occupied, vacant or abandoned buildings, which are located in... [more]

© Henry Stewart Publications. The historic precincts of suburban cities in New Zealand are characterised by partially occupied, vacant or abandoned buildings, which are located in key locations of the central business districts (CBDs). Increasing unoccupied spaces and low demand for older buildings are detrimental to the socio-economic growth of many provincial towns in New Zealand. The study discussed in this paper sought to: 1) investigate the proportion of totally/partially existing vacant older buildings within the town centre of suburb-#; 2) identify the underlying factors that contributed to emergence of the vacant buildings and the consequences of the prevalent vacancy rate on suburban town centres; and 3) recommend possible ways to increase the demand for these buildings. Using a mixed-methods approach for data collection, the research findings showed a vacancy rate of approximately 86 per cent (n = 47) of older heritage buildings located in the main high street of suburb-#. Additionally, several factors were identified to be responsible for the high vacancy rate of the older buildings: 1) building conditions; 2) social factors; 3) economic factors; and 4) building regulations. The research findings provided significant suggestions on how property redevelopment coupled with town centre regeneration can be used as a responsive strategy that can attend to the changing needs of owners, occupiers and visitors, as well as ensure compliance to commercial and regulatory demands of seismic strengthening of older heritage buildings.

Citations Scopus - 3
2017 Rasheed EO, Byrd H, Money B, Mbachu J, Egbelakin T, 'Why are naturally ventilated office spaces not popular in New Zealand?', Sustainability (Switzerland), 9 (2017)

© 2017 by the authors. In this paper, we investigated the reason(s) why natural ventilation is not as popular as air-conditioned or mixed-mode ventilation systems in Green-rated o... [more]

© 2017 by the authors. In this paper, we investigated the reason(s) why natural ventilation is not as popular as air-conditioned or mixed-mode ventilation systems in Green-rated office buildings in New Zealand. To achieve this, we had three objectives. Firstly, we reviewed the Green Star criteria for thermal comfort in office buildings to ascertain which ventilation system the NZ Green Star rating tool promotes. Secondly, we ascertained the perception of occupants in office buildings regarding thermal comfort. This was followed by an interview with building experts regarding factors that affect the use of natural ventilation in New Zealand offices. The findings showed that the NZ Green Star thermal comfort criteria encourage the use of mechanical ventilation over natural ventilation which results in designers opting for air conditioning systems in office designs. We observed that occupants of naturally ventilated spaces were least satisfied with the thermal comfort of their offices when compared with occupants of mixed-mode and air-conditioned offices. This study fulfils the need to encourage the use of natural ventilation in office environments by designers and building owners. Further study on other aspects of the indoor environment quality that is related to naturally ventilated systems such as lighting and noise is required in a bid to ascertain its viability in office environments.

DOI 10.3390/su9060902
Citations Scopus - 4
2015 Egbelakin T, Wilkinson S, Potangaroa R, Rotimi J, 'Stakeholders practices: a challenge to earthquake risk mitigation decisions', International Journal of Strategic Property Management, 19 395-408 (2015)

© 2015 Vilnius Gediminas Technical University (VGTU) Press. Enhancing building owners¿ earthquake risk preparedness has been a major challenge in many seismically active regions. ... [more]

© 2015 Vilnius Gediminas Technical University (VGTU) Press. Enhancing building owners¿ earthquake risk preparedness has been a major challenge in many seismically active regions. Many property owners are found unwilling to adopt adequate risk mitigation measures in their earthquake-prone buildings, despite the availability of various technical design solutions and the enactment of intervening legislative frameworks necessary to facilitate successful earthquake risk preparedness. This paper examined the rationale behind building owners¿ unwillingness to adopt adequate mitigation measures with a view to improve current stakeholders¿ practices in earthquake risk mitigation. Using a mixed-method approach, comprising both qualitative and quantitative methods, an examination of the decision-making process and different stakeholders involved in earthquake risk mitigation and the property market, provided insights into the causal agents and stakeholder practices that pose challenges to property owners¿ mitigation decisions. Stake-holder practices acting as impediments revealed are property valuation assessment of retrofitted and non-retrofitted EPBs, lack of demand for improved performance in older buildings, high earthquake insurance policy premiums and deductibles, and lack of a risk assessment information system. An in-depth understanding of these challenges highlights the need for a holistic approach that should incorporate market-based incentives necessary for successful earthquake preparedness by building owners, and for designing effective strategies for improving earthquake risk mitigation.

DOI 10.3846/1648715X.2015.1101029
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2015 Egbelakin T, Wilkinson S, Ingham J, 'Integrated framework for enhancing earthquake risk mitigation decisions', International Journal of Construction Supply Chain Management, 5 34-51 (2015)

© 2015, School of Engineering, Auckland University of Technology. All Rights Reserved. The increasing scale of losses from earthquake disasters has reinforced the need for propert... [more]

© 2015, School of Engineering, Auckland University of Technology. All Rights Reserved. The increasing scale of losses from earthquake disasters has reinforced the need for property owners to become proactive in seismic risk reduction programs. However, despite advancement in seismic design methods and legislative frameworks, building owners are found unwilling or lack motivation to adopt adequate mitigation measures that will reduce their vulnerability to earthquake disasters. Various theories and empirical findings have been used to explain the adoption of protective behaviours including seismic mitigation decisions, but their application has been inadequate to enhance building owners¿ protective decisions. A holistic framework that incorporates the motivational orientations of decision-making, coupled with the social, cultural, economic, regulatory, institutional and political realms of earthquake risk mitigation to enhance building owners¿ decisions to voluntarily implement adequate mitigation measures, is proposed. This framework attempts to address any multi-disciplinary barriers that exist in earthquake disaster management, by ensuring that stakeholders involved in seismic mitigation decisions work together to foster seismic rehabilitation of EPBs, as well as illuminate strategies that will initiate, promote and sustain the adoption of long-term earthquake mitigation.

DOI 10.14424/ijcscm502015-34-51
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Egbelakin T, Wilkinson S, Ingham J, 'Economic impediments to successful seismic retrofitting decisions', Structural Survey, 32 449-466 (2014)

© 2014 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine why building owners are often reluctant to adopt adequate mitigation measures despite the... [more]

© 2014 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine why building owners are often reluctant to adopt adequate mitigation measures despite the vulnerability of their buildings to earthquake disasters, by exploring the economic-related barriers to earthquake mitigation decisions.Design/methodology/approach: A case study research method was adopted and interviews chosen as the method of data collection.Findings: Critical economic-related impediments that inhibited seismic retrofitting of earthquake-prone buildings were revealed in this study. Economic-related barriers identified include perception about financial involvement in retrofitting, property market conditions, high insurance premiums and deductibles, and the high cost of retrofitting. The availability of financial incentives such as low interest loans, tax deductibles, the implementation of a risk-based insurance premium scale and promoting increased knowledge and awareness of seismic risks and mitigation measures in the property market place are likely to address the economic-related challenges faced by property owners when undertaking seismic retrofitting projects. The provision of financial incentives specifically for seismic retrofitting should be introduced in policy-implementation programme tailored to local governments¿ level of risks exposure and available resources.Practical implications: The recommendations provided in this study suggest strategies and answers to questions aimed at understanding the types of incentives that city councils and environmental hazard managers should focus on in their attempt to ensure that property owners actively participate in earthquake risk mitigation.Originality/value: This paper adopts a holistic perspective for investigating earthquake risk mitigation by examining the opinions of the different stakeholders involved in seismic retrofit decisions.

DOI 10.1108/SS-01-2014-0002
Citations Scopus - 7
2013 Egbelakin T, Wilkinson S, Potangaroa R, Ingham J, 'Improving regulatory frameworks for earthquake risk mitigation', Building Research and Information, 41 677-689 (2013)

© 2013 The Author(s). New Zealand¿s devastating Canterbury earthquakes provided an opportunity to examine the efficacy of existing regulations and policies relevant to seismic str... [more]

© 2013 The Author(s). New Zealand¿s devastating Canterbury earthquakes provided an opportunity to examine the efficacy of existing regulations and policies relevant to seismic strengthening of vulnerable buildings. The mixed-methods approach adopted, comprising both qualitative and quantitative approaches, revealed that some of the provisions in these regulations pose as constraints to appropriate strengthening of earthquake-prone buildings. Those provisions include the current seismic design philosophy, lack of mandatory disclosure of seismic risks and ineffective timeframes for strengthening vulnerable buildings. Recommendations arising from these research findings and implications for pre-disaster mitigation for future earthquake and Canterbury¿s post-disaster reconstruction suggest: (1) a reappraisal of the requirements for earthquake engineering design and construction, (2) a review and realignment of all regulatory frameworks relevant to earthquake risk mitigation, and (3) the need to develop a national programme necessary to achieve consistent mitigation efforts across the country. These recommendations are important in order to present a robust framework where New Zealand communities such as Christchurch can gradually recover after a major earthquake disaster, while planning for pre-disaster mitigation against future earthquakes.

DOI 10.1080/09613218.2013.819546
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 10
2011 Egbelakin T, Wilkinson S, Potangaroa R, Ingham J, 'Enhancing seismic risk mitigation decisions: A motivational approach', Construction Management and Economics, 29 1003-1016 (2011)

Implementing seismic risk mitigation is a major challenge in many earthquake-prone regions, despite the availability of a significant number of risk reduction measures such as tec... [more]

Implementing seismic risk mitigation is a major challenge in many earthquake-prone regions, despite the availability of a significant number of risk reduction measures such as technical design solutions and regulatory frameworks that include building codes, policies and regulations necessary to facilitate successful risk reduction activities. However, building owners have been found unwilling to retrofit their earthquake-prone buildings. The objective of this research is to investigate how to enhance buildings owners' earthquake hazard preparedness decisions by adopting a motivational approach in order to reduce their vulnerability to earthquake risks. A multiple case studies approach was adopted and interviews conducted with the various stakeholders involved in seismic adjustments decisions. Significant intrinsic and extrinsic interventions such as intensifying and promoting the use of critical awareness motivators, financial and property market-based incentives necessary to enhance building owners' decisions were revealed from the analysis of the qualitative data. These revealed intrinsic and extrinsic interventions offer plausible explanations regarding how human motivational orientation can be used to influence disaster preparedness decisions by increasing the salience of seismic risk issues. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/01446193.2011.629664
Citations Scopus - 13
2011 Egbelakin TK, Wilkinson S, Potangaroa R, Ingham J, 'Challenges to successful seismic retrofit implementation: a socio-behavioural perspective', BUILDING RESEARCH AND INFORMATION, 39 286-300 (2011)
DOI 10.1080/09613218.2011.552264
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 14
2010 Egbelakin TK, Wilkinson S, 'Sociological and behavioural impediments to earthquake hazard mitigation', International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, 1 310-321 (2010)

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the behavioural and sociological impediments to successful implementation of earthquake hazard mitigation and to recommend possibl... [more]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the behavioural and sociological impediments to successful implementation of earthquake hazard mitigation and to recommend possible intervention strategies. Design/methodology/approach: Data were gathered through a case study methodology and interviews adopted as the research strategy. A semi-structured questionnaire was chosen as a data-collection instrument, with 33 interviews conducted for various stakeholders involved in seismic retrofit decision-making process. Findings: The research main findings include the role of risk perception in diminishing earthquake hazard mitigation, difficulties in assessing benefits and values of seismic retrofit implementation and the hazard mitigation approach adopted by governmental organisations. The findings suggested that stakeholders involved in retrofit decision-making should have a good understanding of the risks faced as well as the implications of their decisions. Originality/value: The paper investigates earthquake hazard mitigation of commercial buildings at the stakeholders-level by adopting a multidisciplinary approach that incorporated decision sciences, policy perspectives and socio-behavioural perspectives. The findings highlight the significance of stakeholders approach to foster adequate mitigation of earthquake risks. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

DOI 10.1108/17595901011080896
Citations Scopus - 9
2008 Ling FYY, Low SP, Wang S, Egbelakin T, 'Models for predicting project performance in China using project management practices adopted by foreign AEC firms', Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 134 983-990 (2008)

China is a new market to many international architectural, engineering, and construction (AEC) firms and it is not known what would be the likely project outcomes, based on differ... [more]

China is a new market to many international architectural, engineering, and construction (AEC) firms and it is not known what would be the likely project outcomes, based on different project management (PM) practices adopted. This research developed and tested five models to predict the likely project success levels, based on PM practices adopted by foreign AEC firms in China. Based on data obtained from 33 projects, multiple linear regression (MLR) models for predicting the performance of foreign managed projects in China were constructed. The models were tested against 13 new cases, and the results show that they are able to predict project outcomes with some level of accuracy. The models show that certain scope management practices can be used to predict owner satisfaction, profit margin, and cost and quality performance of the project. Construction industry practitioners who are managing projects in China may benefit from the findings by focusing more on upstream management, like managing project scope, in order to ensure project success. It is recommended that construction industry practitioners use the MLR models to make preliminary assessment of the possibility of project success based on the type of PM practices they intend to adopt in China. From the results, they can then decide if they should change their practices or abort the project. © 2008 ASCE.

DOI 10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9364(2008)134:12(983)
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 28
Show 19 more journal articles

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Rajan A, Kuang YC, Ooi MPL, Demidenko SN, Egbelakin T, 'Application of moment-based measurement uncertainty evaluation to reliability analysis of structural systems', I2MTC 2018 - 2018 IEEE International Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference: Discovering New Horizons in Instrumentation and Measurement, Proceedings (2018)

© 2018 IEEE. System and measurement uncertainties play a key role in finding the reliability of complex and safety-critical structural systems such as buildings and bridges. Curre... [more]

© 2018 IEEE. System and measurement uncertainties play a key role in finding the reliability of complex and safety-critical structural systems such as buildings and bridges. Current mainstream techniques in structural reliability analysis use an iterative first-order reliability method that performs an indirect uncertainty evaluation by finding the most probable failure point. However, such an approach could lead to high computational time due to slower convergence, and in some cases, poor convergence that leads to unreliable results. In order to address the shortcomings, this paper applies a new high-order moment propagation technique (that was initially developed for the measurement uncertainty analysis) to structural reliability analysis problems aiming to obtain results that are simultaneously accurate and computational efficient. The proposed approach was implemented on a three-story elastic frame structure, and the presented results prove that the application of a technique from the field of measurement uncertainly can indeed be applied to complex problems in the structural reliability analysis in order to reduce the trade-off between accuracy and computational efficiency.

DOI 10.1109/I2MTC.2018.8409598
2018 Tibay V, Miller J, Chang-Richards A, Egbelakin T, Seville E, Wilkinson S, 'Business resilience: A study of Auckland hospitality sector', Procedia Engineering (2018)

© 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Businesses in the hospitality sector play an important role in the New Zealand economy. As most businesses in this sector are of sma... [more]

© 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Businesses in the hospitality sector play an important role in the New Zealand economy. As most businesses in this sector are of small size and subject to external disruptions, being resilient is crucial for their coping and survival during a time of crisis. This research aims to measure the resilience of hospitality businesses in the largest city Auckland. A triangulation approach was adopted, including a questionnaire survey and face-to-face interviews. It was found that the key resilience attributes for the studied businesses include: leadership and management, core competence of staff, market sensitivity, situational awareness and having preparedness plans. Resilience was viewed by these businesses as being able to stay viable and withstand the expected fluctuations such as low-demand seasons and unexpected financial issues. However, amongst the surveyed businesses, there is a lack of planning for unexpected events such as large scale disasters, an issue which needs to be brought forward along with the formulation of disaster risk reduction plans.

DOI 10.1016/j.proeng.2018.01.157
Citations Scopus - 2
2007 Ling FYY, Low SP, Egbelakin TK, Wang SQ, 'Singapore contractors and consultants' project management practices in China', CME 2007 Conference - Construction Management and Economics: 'Past, Present and Future' (2007)

China's construction industry presents many opportunities to foreign architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) firms. This paper reviews the general management practi... [more]

China's construction industry presents many opportunities to foreign architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) firms. This paper reviews the general management practices adopted by foreign firms and investigates specific project management practices adopted by them on construction sites in China. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire from Singaporean AEC firms that had undertaken projects in China. A wide range of management practices are adopted by foreign firms in China. The most effective market entry modes are entering China as wholly owned foreign enterprises and forming project joint ventures with Chinese firms. The key business strategies include understanding clients' requirements, and offering superior products and services. At the construction site level, many project management practices focus on improving quality and communication. Unfortunately, risk management is not adequately implemented. It is recommended that foreign firms adopt some of the significant management practices uncovered in this study so that their projects in China may achieve better performance.

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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Minimizing Construction Material Waste Generation in the NSW Construction Industry Building Construction Managmnt, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment- The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Improving Productivity and Profitability of Precast Concrete Organisations Building Construction Managmnt, Massey University Principal Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
New Zealand 23
Australia 2
China 1
United Kingdom 1
Malaysia 1
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Dr Temitope Egbelakin

Position

Associate Professor and Executive Director
School of Architecture and Built Environment
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Contact Details

Email t.egbelakin@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40553028
Links Facebook
Research Networks

Office

Room A-116
Building Architecture Building
Location Callaghan Campus
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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