Dr Andrew Magee

Dr Andrew Magee

Postdoctoral Researcher

School of Environmental and Life Sciences

Tempestuous winds and vulnerable island nations

Climate change presents us all with a lot of uncertainties. From tropical cyclones to floods – researcher Dr Andrew Magee is studying interactions between the ocean and atmosphere and historical variability of these extreme events to help better understand past, present and future risks.

Dr Andre Magee at Merewether Beach

Tropical cyclones are exceptionally erratic, in terms of where they form and how many form per season.

“My work looks to better understand what drives the variability of extreme weather events, mainly tropical cyclones from when and where to how many form per season in the Australian and South Pacific regions.

“I investigate how changes in the ocean and atmosphere influence the formation and movement of these cyclones,” said Andrew.

“By better understanding how these cyclones have varied in the past and understanding the drivers that result in more or less cyclones, we are able to gain a better picture of what may happen in the future.”

With an interest in the role that weather-related traditional knowledge can play in helping inform tropical cyclone prediction, Andrew has travelled extensively across the South Pacific region to observe more traditional means of weather forecasting.

“Fieldwork has taken me to Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga to collect weather-related traditional knowledge from Indigenous communities including how plant and animal behaviour can change in the days and months preceding a cyclone event. I’ve also investigated local perceptions on the delivery and reliability of current tropical cyclone information provided by local meteorological agencies.”

Reducing disaster risk across the Pacific

The Southwest Pacific tropical cyclone season typically runs from November to April and the island nations and territories in this area are extremely vulnerable to tropical cyclone related impacts, including extreme and damaging winds, intense storm surge, and prolonged rainfall and flooding, which adversely affect people, infrastructure and economies.

Years of research culminated in the development of the Long-Range Tropical Cyclone Outlook for the Southwest Pacific (TCO-SP). TCO-SP provides island-scale tropical cyclone outlooks months before the official start of the southwest Pacific tropical cyclone season.

Video: New tropical cyclone outlook model has potential to save lives in the Pacific

The new outlook model will better equip Pacific Island National Meteorological Services, government and aid agencies, decision-makers and the general public in communicating and preparing for future tropical cyclone seasons across the Southwest Pacific.

“The provision of accurate and timely seasonal tropical cyclone outlooks are essential for informed decision making, and if we can just make small incremental steps in reducing disaster risk and informing the population of the risks associated with the coming cyclone season, then it has the potential to save lives," said Andrew.

“Rising sea levels and changes to tropical cyclone related exposure and vulnerability will amplify future tropical cyclone related impacts for Pacific Island nations and territories. Our new outlook plays an important role in building a more resilient future for Pacific Island communities.”

Making an impact

The impact of Andrew’s work is wide-reaching – from Australia to the Pacific island nations and territories and around the world.

“My work has helped researchers and end-users better understand what drives current tropical cyclone risk and how considering a range of climate influences, is the most holistic way to evaluate these potential risks.

“This work means that people and communities can be better prepared for current and future weather events.

“Specific to the South Pacific region, we know these island nations are inherently vulnerable to the effects of tropical cyclones and other natural disasters.

“Understanding the how and why behind tropical cyclone behaviour enables us to produce more accurate forecasting, with the potential of improving preparedness and resilience for vulnerable communities of the Pacific islands.”

Andrew is a Pacific climate science expert panel member for the Australia-Pacific Climate Partnership and is currently engaged with governments, aid agencies and financial institutions across Asia-Pacific to assist in better understanding climate-related vulnerability and risks.

Weather and insurance

Andrew also works closely with key players in the Australian insurance industry to help them understand what climate variability and change might mean for insurers and consumers.

“Along with modelling natural peril risk (tropical cyclones, bushfire, flood, storm, coastal inundation) and applying geospatial analysis to a range of data sources at the address-level within Australia, I also assist with developing weather-related insurance products for farmers in Australia.”

Climate education

As well as being involved in cutting-edge scientific research, Andrew is a passionate educator. Recently, Andrew was involved in a project to develop short-term training courses for meteorological and environmental organisations based in the Pacific.

“These three courses teach the fundamentals of Pacific meteorology, climatology and climate change, and are aimed at capacity building in a region that is exceptionally vulnerable to the effects of climate variability and change. This course helps equip meteorological  and environmental agency staff with the knowledge and skills to better understand key aspects of Pacific weather and climate, and aims to help decision-makers make more informed decisions in the face of a variable and changing climate.”

These courses are accredited by UNITAR and have been delivered to Pacific Island National Meteorological and Hydrological Services and other government organisations in the Pacific.

Preparing for the future

“I feel proud that my work helps improves our understanding of what cyclones looked like in the past and how our complex climate system influences tropical cyclone activity. This information will work behind the scenes to help improve the reliability and methodology of deriving more accurate forecasting.

“I will continue to work to understand how changes in future natural peril risk will impact people, places, business and infrastructure.”

Tempestuous winds and vulnerable island nations

From tropical cyclones to floods – Postdoctoral Fellow Dr Andrew Magee is studying the patterns and historical data of these weather events to help better understand current and future extremes and improve forecast accuracy.

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Career Summary

Biography

Dr Andrew Magee is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Water, Climate and Land (CWCL). Andrew is engaged in cutting-edge climate research with a particular focus on investigating the role and impact of climate variability and change on extreme weather events, mainly tropical cyclone activity in the Australian and southwest Pacific regions. By understanding the dynamics of Indo-Pacific climate variability, Andrew’s research continues to better our understanding of tropical cyclone activity. Current work aims to improve the skill of seasonal forecasting in the southwest Pacific region. 

Andrew also works closely with the Australian insurance industry to model how future changes in natural peril risk might impact consumers and the general insurance landscape. This involves developing parametric insurance products for agribusiness, considering past, current and future climate risk to protect farmers from potential climate extremes. Andrew also has experience in address-level risk modelling and natural peril modelling (tropical cyclones, floods etc…), which evaluates a wide range of climate change scenarios to understand the potential impact on people, places, business and infrastructure. 

Research Expertise

  • Tropical cyclones, theoretical, applied and statistical climatology, climate variability and climate change analysis.
  • Climate modelling and climate attribution analysis.
  • Natural peril and hazard risk modelling (e.g. tropical cyclones, storms, floods).
  • Extreme event analysis and development of parametric insurance products to consider past, present and future risk. 
  • ‘Big data’ analysis including meteorological, ocean and climate reanalysis datasets. 
  • Seasonal climate forecasting, including tropical cyclone forecasts and hindcasts.
  • Geospatial analysis: Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing (RS).

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), Queens University of Belfast - Ireland

Keywords

  • Applied Climatology
  • Climate Adaptation
  • Climate Dynamics
  • Climate Risk
  • Climatology
  • ENSO
  • Extreme Events
  • Geographical Information Systems
  • Indo-Pacific Climate Variability
  • Insurance
  • Natural Disasters
  • Natural Peril Modelling
  • Remote sensing
  • Statistical Climatology
  • Tropical Climatology
  • Tropical Cyclones
  • climate adaptation

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
040604 Natural Hazards 50
040105 Climatology (excl. Climate Change Processes) 35
040104 Climate Change Processes 15

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
27/8/2018 -  Postdoctoral Fellow Centre for Water, Climate and Land (CWCL), University of Newcastle
Australia
6/2/2017 - 31/12/2017 Associate Lecturer Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle | Australia
Australia
1/1/2018 - 24/8/2018 Conjoint Lecturer in Earth Science Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
15/1/2018 - 24/8/2018 Natural Perils Consultant Finity Consulting
Australia

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
7/1/2013 - 31/12/2017 Casual Academic Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Australia

Awards

Recipient

Year Award
2013 CSIRO Climate Adaptation Flagship Scholar
CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)

Scholarship

Year Award
2017 Australian Climate and Water Summer Institute
Australian Climate and Water Exchange Research Initiative (OzEWEX)
2013 CSIRO Top-Up Scholarship
CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
2013 University of Newcastle Research Scholarship Central (UNRSC50:50)
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
2013 University of Newcastle International Postgraduate Research Scholarship (UNIPRS)
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
GEOS3220 Coastal Environments and Processes
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
Casual Academic 1/2/2016 - 16/12/2016
GEOS3250 Geographic Information Systems
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
Casual Academic 4/3/2013 - 16/12/2016
GEOS2161 GIS and Remote Sensing
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
Casual Academic 4/3/2013 - 16/12/2016
GEOS2161 GIS and Remote Sensing
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
Associate Lecturer 1/2/2017 - 31/12/2018
GEOS2050 River Basin Processes
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
Casual Academic 4/3/2013 - 16/12/2016
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Magee AD, Lorrey AM, Kiem AS, Colyvas K, 'A new island-scale tropical cyclone outlook for southwest Pacific nations and territories', Scientific Reports, 10 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-67646-7
Co-authors Anthony Kiem, Kim Colyvas
2020 Sharma KK, Verdon-Kidd DC, Magee AD, 'Decadal variability of tropical cyclogenesis and decay in the southwest Pacific', International Journal of Climatology, 40 2811-2829 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/joc.6368
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Danielle Verdon
2020 Thiaw W, Zucule J, Bekele E, Robjhon M, Kamsu-Tamo P-H, Magee A, Schreck C, 'Record-breaking tropical cyclone landfalls in southeastern Africa [in "State of the Climate 2019"]', BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY, 101 S361-S362 (2020)
DOI 10.1175/2020BAMSStateoftheClimate_Chapter7.1.
2020 Magee A, Schreck C, 'South Indian Ocean basin [IN "State of the Climate in 2019"]', BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY, 101 S221-S223 (2020)
DOI 10.1175/BAMS-D-20-0077.1
2020 Magee A, Chen L, Luo J-J, 'Indian Ocean dipole [in "State of the Climate in 2019"]', Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 101 S229-S232 (2020)
DOI 10.1175/BAMS-D-20-0077.1
2020 Magee A, Schreck C, 'North Indian Ocean Basin [in "State of the Climate in 2019"]', BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY, 101 s219-s221 (2020)
DOI 10.1175/BAMS-D-20-0077.1
2020 Sharma KK, Magee AD, Verdon-Kidd DC, 'Variability of southwest Pacific tropical cyclone track geometry over the last 70 years', International Journal of Climatology, (2020)
DOI 10.1002/joc.6636
Co-authors Danielle Verdon
2019 Magee AD, Verdon-Kidd DC, 'Historical Variability of Southwest Pacific Tropical Cyclone Counts since 1855', Geophysical Research Letters, 46 6936-6945 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1029/2019gl082900
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Danielle Verdon
2018 Magee AD, Verdon-Kidd D, 'On the relationship between Indian Ocean sea surface temperature variability and tropical cyclogenesis in the southwest Pacific', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLIMATOLOGY, 38 e774-e795 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/joc.5406
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Danielle Verdon
2017 Magee AD, Verdon-Kidd DC, Diamond HJ, Kiem AS, 'Influence of ENSO, ENSO Modoki, and the IPO on tropical cyclogenesis: A spatial analysis of the southwest Pacific region', International Journal of Climatology, 37 1118-1137 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/joc.5070
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Anthony Kiem, Danielle Verdon
2016 Magee AD, Verdon-Kidd DC, Kiem AS, 'An intercomparison of tropical cyclone best-track products for the southwest Pacific', Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 16 1431-1447 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Author(s). Recent efforts to understand tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the southwest Pacific (SWP) have led to the development of numerous TC databases. The methods used... [more]

© 2016 Author(s). Recent efforts to understand tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the southwest Pacific (SWP) have led to the development of numerous TC databases. The methods used to compile each database vary and are based on data from different meteorological centres, standalone TC databases and archived synoptic charts. Therefore the aims of this study are to (i) provide a spatiooral comparison of three TC best-track (BT) databases and explore any differences between them (and any associated implications) and (ii) investigate whether there are any spatial, temporal or statistical differences between pre-satellite (1945-1969), postsatellite (1970-2011) and post-geostationary satellite (1982-2011) era TC data given the changing observational technologies with time. To achieve this, we compare three besttrack TC databases for the SWP region (0-35° S, 135° E-120° W) from 1945 to 2011: the Joint TyphoonWarning Center (JTWC), the International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS) and the Southwest Pacific Enhanced Archive of Tropical Cyclones (SPEArTC). The results of this study suggest that SPEArTC is the most complete repository of TCs for the SWP region. In particular, we show that the SPEArTC database includes a number of additional TCs, not included in either the JTWC or IBTrACS database. These SPEArTC events do occur under environmental conditions conducive to tropical cyclogenesis (TC genesis), including anomalously negative 700 hPa vorticity (VORT), anomalously negative vertical shear of zonal winds (VSZW), anomalously negative 700 hPa geopotential height (GPH), cyclonic (absolute) 700 hPa winds and low values of absolute vertical wind shear (EVWS). Further, while changes in observational technologies from 1945 have undoubtedly improved our ability to detect and monitor TCs, we show that the number of TCs detected prior to the satellite era (1945-1969) are not statistically different to those in the postsatellite era (post-1970). Although data from pre-satellite and pre-geostationary satellite periods are currently inadequate for investigating TC intensity, this study suggests that SPEArTC data (from 1945) may be used to investigate longterm variability of TC counts and TC genesis locations.

DOI 10.5194/nhess-16-1431-2016
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Danielle Verdon, Anthony Kiem
2016 Magee AD, Verdon-Kidd DC, Kiem AS, Royle SA, 'Tropical cyclone perceptions, impacts and adaptation in the Southwest Pacific: An urban perspective from Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga', Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 16 1091-1105 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Author(s). The destruction caused by tropical cyclone (TC) Pam in March 2015 is considered one of the worst natural disasters in the history of Vanuatu. It has highlighted ... [more]

© 2016 Author(s). The destruction caused by tropical cyclone (TC) Pam in March 2015 is considered one of the worst natural disasters in the history of Vanuatu. It has highlighted the need for a better understanding of TC impacts and adaptation in the Southwest Pacific (SWP) region. Therefore, the key aims of this study are to (i) understand local perceptions of TC activity, (ii) investigate impacts of TC activity and (iii) uncover adaptation strategies used to offset the impacts of TCs. To address these aims, a survey (with 130 participants from urban areas) was conducted across three SWP small island states (SISs): Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga (FVT). It was found that respondents generally had a high level of risk perception and awareness of TCs and the associated physical impacts, but lacked an understanding of the underlying weather conditions. Responses highlighted that current methods of adaptation generally occur at the local level, immediately prior to a TC event (preparation of property, gathering of food, finding a safe place to shelter). However higher level adaptation measures (such as the modification to building structures) may reduce vulnerability further. Finally, we discuss the potential of utilising weather-related traditional knowledge and non-traditional knowledge of empirical and climate-model-based weather forecasts to improve TC outlooks, which would ultimately reduce vulnerability and increase adaptive capacity. Importantly, lessons learned from this study may result in the modification and/or development of existing adaptation strategies.

DOI 10.5194/nhess-16-1091-2016
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Danielle Verdon, Anthony Kiem
Magee AD, Kiem AS, 'Using indicators of ENSO, IOD, and SAM to improve lead time and accuracy of tropical cyclone outlooks for Australia', Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 1-40
DOI 10.1175/jamc-d-20-0131.1
Co-authors Anthony Kiem
Magee AD, Verdon-Kidd DC, Kiem AS, 'An intercomparison of tropical cyclone best-track products for the Southwest Pacific
DOI 10.5194/nhess-2016-39
Show 11 more journal articles

Conference (16 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Magee A, Lorrey A, Kiem A, Colyvas K, 'Island-nation scale tropical cyclone forecasts for the southwest Pacific region', Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia (2020)
Co-authors Kim Colyvas, Anthony Kiem
2019 Sharma K, Verdon-Kidd D, Magee A, 'Decadal variability of tropical cyclogenesis and decay in the southwest Pacific', Darwin, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Danielle Verdon
2019 Magee A, Kiem A, 'Revisiting the Australian/New Zealand Standard for Wind Actions (AS/NZS 1170.2:2011): Do current wind standards sufficiently capture local wind climates?', MODSIM2019, 23rd International Congress on Modelling and Simulation, Canberra, Australia (2019) [E1]
Co-authors Anthony Kiem
2019 Magee A, Verdon-Kidd D, 'A new hindcast model of southwest Pacific tropical cyclones', Darwin, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Danielle Verdon
2018 Verdon-Kidd D, Magee AD, Neville B, 'Northern Australia bushfire risk modulated by Indo-Pacific climate modes', University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Danielle Verdon
2018 Magee AD, Verdon-Kidd D, 'On the relationship between Indian Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures and Tropical Cyclogenesis in the Southwest Pacific', University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Danielle Verdon
2018 Sharma K, Verdon-Kidd D, Magee A, 'Constraining the Forecast of Tropical Cyclone Tracks in the Southwest Pacific', University of NSW (UNSW), Sydney (2018)
Co-authors Danielle Verdon
2017 Magee A, Verdon-Kidd D, 'Semicentennial variability of southwest Pacific TC counts: a hindcast application of Poisson regression modelling', Semicentennial variability of southwest Pacific TC counts: a hindcast application of Poisson regression modelling, Australian National University (ANU), Australia. (2017)
Co-authors Danielle Verdon
2017 Magee A, Verdon-Kidd D, Diamond H, Kiem AS, 'A new link between interdecadal climate variability and tropical cyclogenesis in the southwest Pacific', Canberra, Australia (2017)
Co-authors Danielle Verdon, Anthony Kiem
2017 Magee A, Verdon-Kidd D, 'Semicentennial variability of southwest Pacific TC counts: a hindcast application of Poisson regression modelling', Semicentennial variability of southwest Pacific TC counts: a hindcast application of Poisson regression modelling, Australian National University (ANU), Australia. (2017)
Co-authors Danielle Verdon
2015 Magee A, Verdon-Kidd DC, Kiem AS, 'Pre-Satellite era vs. Post-Satellite era tropical cyclone (TC) data: An analysis of three TC databases for the Southwest Pacific', Santiago, Chile (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Danielle Verdon, Anthony Kiem
2015 Magee A, Verdon-Kidd DC, Kiem AS, 'Temporal variability of tropical cyclogenesis: a climatology of the South Pacific', EGU General Assembly 2015, Vienna, Austria (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Danielle Verdon, Anthony Kiem
2015 Magee A, Verdon-Kidd DC, Kiem AS, 'The usefulness of pre-satellite era tropical cyclone data: an intercomparison of three best-track products for the southwest Pacific', AMOS Annual Conference 2015 - Research to Community - Communicating our science, Brisbane, Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Danielle Verdon, Anthony Kiem
2015 Magee A, Verdon-Kidd DC, Kiem AS, 'Can Indian Ocean SST variability impact TC activity in the South Pacific? A Spatial Analysis', Vienna, Austria (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Danielle Verdon, Anthony Kiem
2014 Magee AD, Verdon-Kidd D, Kiem A, 'Climate Modes and Tropical Cyclogenesis: A Spatial Analysis in the South Pacific', Hobart, Australia. (2014)
Co-authors Danielle Verdon, Anthony Kiem
2014 Magee AD, Verdon-Kidd D, 'The Importance of Indigenous Knowledge in Climate Adaptation: Pacific Islanders Insight into Tropical Cyclone Activity', Gold Coast, Australia. (2014)
Co-authors Danielle Verdon
Show 13 more conferences

Other (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Magee A, Lau S, 'Trends and cycles: Climate change vs. ENSO, IOD and SAM', (2020) [O1]
2019 Magee A, 'Climate change financing issues', (2019) [O1]
2019 Magee A, 'Quantification of future changes to cyclone costs', (2019) [O1]
2019 Magee A, 'Assessment of physical climate risk: A case study based around cyclones', (2019) [O1]
2019 Magee A, 'ABC Newcastle Radio Interview - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Writeshop in Apia, Samoa', (2019) [O1]
2018 Magee AD, 'Looking back to look forward - Tropical cyclones in a changing climate', (2018) [O1]
2018 Magee A, 'Indo-Pacific climate variability and Tropical Cyclones: A review of past, present and future variability', (2018) [O1]
Show 4 more others

Report (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Kiem A, Magee A, 'Investigation into the extreme wind event near Oakey, Queensland on 25th October 2018', HENSOLDT Sensors GmbH, 45 (2019)
Co-authors Anthony Kiem
2019 Kiem A, Magee A, 'Assessing the suitability of government-specified standards for use in determining design wind speeds at locations that are exposed to severe convective storms', HENSOLDT Sensors GmbH, 28 (2019)
Co-authors Anthony Kiem
2018 Magee A, Kiem A, 'Development of training material for short-term courses in Pacific meteorology, climate and climate change - Course 2: Climate', Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP), 30 (2018)
Co-authors Anthony Kiem
2018 Magee A, Kiem A, 'Development of training material for short-term courses in Pacific meteorology, climate and climate change - Course 1: Weather', Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP), 30 (2018)
Co-authors Anthony Kiem
2018 Magee A, Kiem A, 'Development of training material for short-term courses in Pacific meteorology, climate and climate change - Course 3: Climate Change', Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP), 30 (2018)
Co-authors Anthony Kiem
Show 2 more reports

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Magee AD, An Investigation of Indo-Pacific Climate Variability and Tropical Cyclogenesis in the Southwest Pacific, University of Newcastle, Australia (2016)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 11
Total funding $361,124

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20202 grants / $90,000

Using GSMaP and Today’s Earth data to detect the timing, spatial coverage and intensity of meteorological, agricultural and hydrological droughts$50,000

Funding body: Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

Funding body Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Project Team

Anthony Kiem, Andrew Magee, Greg Hancock, Maki Kikuchi

Scheme Research Proposals for the 2nd Research Announcement on the Earth Observations (EO-RA2)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Strengthening Climate and Disaster Resilience of Investments in the Pacific$40,000

Funding body: Asian Development Bank

Funding body Asian Development Bank
Scheme Strengthening Climate and Disaster Resilience of Investments in the Pacific
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding C3212 - International Not for profit
Category 3212
UON N

20196 grants / $209,736

Australia Pacific Climate Partnership Support Unit - Climate Science Expert$84,000

Funding body: Department of Foreign Affairs (DFAT)

Funding body Department of Foreign Affairs (DFAT)
Scheme Australia Pacific Climate Partnership Support Unit - Climate Science
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding C2120 - Aust Commonwealth - Other
Category 2120
UON N

Investigation into the extreme wind event at Oakey, Queensland on 25th October 2018$75,000

Funding body: Hensoldt Sensors GmbH

Funding body Hensoldt Sensors GmbH
Project Team Associate Professor Anthony Kiem, Doctor Andrew Magee
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1801425
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

Assessing potential impacts and challenges of future tropical cyclone risk on the Australian insurance industry$31,636

Funding body: Finity Consulting Pty Limited

Funding body Finity Consulting Pty Limited
Project Team Doctor Andrew Magee
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1900248
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

Assessment of the reliability of the Standards Australia (2011) regional wind speed approach for estimating extreme wind speeds at specific sites around Australia$15,000

Funding body: Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Project Team

Andrew Magee, Anthony Kiem

Scheme 2019 Faculty Matched Industry Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Travel grant to attend Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) writeshop on Pacific Climate Change Science in Apia, Samoa$3,000

Funding body: Secretariat of the Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)

Funding body Secretariat of the Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)
Scheme Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) writeshop on Pacific Climate Change Science in Apia, Samoa
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C3212 - International Not for profit
Category 3212
UON N

Travel grant to assist in collating the National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) 2019 southwest Pacific Tropical Cyclone Outlook$1,100

Funding body: National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA)

Funding body National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA)
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20181 grants / $27,178

Capacity building in Pacific meteorology and climate change$27,178

Funding body: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP).

Funding body Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP).
Project Team Associate Professor Anthony Kiem, Doctor Andrew Magee
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800952
Type Of Funding C3231 - International Govt - Own Purpose
Category 3231
UON Y

20171 grants / $6,000

Grant to attend Australian Climate and Water Summer Institute$6,000

Funding body: Australian Energy and Water Exchange Research Initiative (OzEWEX)

Funding body Australian Energy and Water Exchange Research Initiative (OzEWEX)
Scheme Australian Climate and Water Summer Institute
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20141 grants / $28,210

Relationship between Climatic Variability and Tropical Cyclones in the South Pacific$28,210

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Project Team

Associate Professor Anthony Kiem, Mr Andrew Magee, Mr Steven Crimp, Doctor Danielle Verdon-Kidd

Scheme Postgraduate Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Characterising and Attributing Variability of Cyclone Tracks in the Southwest Pacific Earth Sciences, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 Honours Quantifying the relationship between Indian Ocean sea surface temperature variability and bushfire in monsoonal north Australia Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle | Australia Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 10
New Zealand 3
United States 3
China 1
United Kingdom 1
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News

The University's Centre for Water, Climate and Land will partner with Japan’s Space Agency JAXA in an Australian first for Climate Research

September 23, 2020

This research will help better detect the beginning, end, spatial coverage, and intensity of droughts in Australia. This is a necessary first step in the development of adaptation strategies that reduce the economic, environmental, and social costs of droughts.

New outlook model indicates average to above average tropical cyclone activity and risk for Australia

September 22, 2020

With a 94% chance that La Niña conditions will develop before the start of the tropical cyclone season - in Australia there are typically more cyclones during La Niña - a new outlook model is predicting average to above average tropical cyclone numbers for Australia this season (November 2020 – Apr

New tropical cyclone outlook model has potential to save lives in the Pacific

July 21, 2020

People in Fiji, New Zealand, Solomon Islands, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea, Tonga and other island nations in the Southwest Pacific will have months more to prepare for tropical cyclones, thanks to a new outlook model published today in Scientific Reports.

SURVEY - Drought and wellbeing

November 27, 2018

Drought affected rural residents are invited to participate in an online survey which will help inform programs and initiatives targeted at improving resilience to drought.

Capacity building in Pacific meteorology and climate change

August 6, 2018

A new collaboration between the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) and UON's Centre for Water, Climate and Land commenced in August 2018 to develop and provide short-term training courses in Pacific meteorology and climate change

Dr Andrew Magee

Positions

Postdoctoral Researcher
Centre for Water, Climate and Land (CWCL)
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Casual Academic
Centre for Water, Climate and Land (CWCL)
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email andrew.magee@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 8657

Office

Room G106-A
Building Earth Sciences
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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