Ms Rose Upton

Ms Rose Upton

Research student

Career Summary

Biography

Rose Upton is a Sessional Academic and a PhD Student in Conservation Biology in the School of Environmental and Life Sciences at the University of Newcastle. Her research is focused on the development of assisted reproductive technologies for amphibian populations in crisis. Her PhD focuses on the cryopreservation of sperm and IVF techniques, particularly in the endangered green and golden bell frog. Rose hopes her research can help reduce the dramatic decline of amphibians in Australia

Prior to commencing her PhD, Rose completed a Bachelor of Science (Honours Class I) at the University of Newcastle. Her work has been recognised by the university with the a Faculty of Science and IT Honours Faculty Medal. Rose has been awarded a full research scholarship by the University of Newcastle, and most recently was awarded a PhD Student Research Grant by the Australian Society of Herpetologists.


Keywords

  • amphibians
  • artificial reproductive technologies
  • conservation
  • cryopreservation
  • reproduction

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity 30
060899 Zoology not elsewhere classified 30
060803 Animal Developmental and Reproductive Biology 40

Awards

Honours

Year Award
2016 Bachelor of Science (Hons) Class I
Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle
2016 Faculty of Science and IT Medal
Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle

Prize

Year Award
2018 The MP Biomedicals award for best 3rd Year PhD Student Presentation
Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
ENVS2006 Australian Fauna
Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle
Demonstrator 1/4/2017 - 31/12/2019
0000 Experiment Fest (Biology)
Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle
Demonstrator 22/6/2018 - 29/6/2018
ENVS2004 Ecology
Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle
Laboratory Demonstrator 1/9/2016 - 31/12/2019
ENVS3003 Conservation Biology
Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle
Demonstrator 1/2/2017 - 28/2/2019
BIOL1003 Biology Professional Skills I
Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle
Laboratory Demonstrator/Tutorial 1/7/2018 - 31/12/2018
ENVS3002 Applied Environmental Science
Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle
Invited Speaker 1/9/2017 - 2/9/2017
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Clulow J, Upton R, Trudeau VL, Clulow S, 'Amphibian assisted reproductive technologies: moving from technology to application', Reproductive Sciences in Animal Conservation, Springer Nature, Cham, Switzerland 413-463 (2019) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-030-23633-5_14
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Clulow, Simon Clulow

Journal article (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Callen A, Hayward MW, Klop-Toker K, Allen BL, Ballard G, Beranek CT, et al., 'Response to comments on "Compassionate Conservation deserves a morally serious rather than dismissive response - reply to Callen et al., 2020"', BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION, 244 (2020)
DOI 10.1016/j.biocon.2020.108517
Co-authors Ryan Witt, John Clulow, Simon Clulow, Matthew Hayward, Alex Callen
2020 Callen A, Hayward MW, Klop-Toker K, Allen BL, Ballard G, Broekhuis F, et al., 'Envisioning the future with compassionate conservation : An ominous projection for native wildlife and biodiversity', Biological Conservation, 241 (2020)

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd The ¿Compassionate Conservation¿ movement is gaining momentum through its promotion of ¿ethical¿ conservation practices based on self-proclaimed principles of ... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd The ¿Compassionate Conservation¿ movement is gaining momentum through its promotion of ¿ethical¿ conservation practices based on self-proclaimed principles of ¿first-do-no-harm¿ and ¿individuals matter¿. We argue that the tenets of ¿Compassionate Conservation¿ are ideological - that is, they are not scientifically proven to improve conservation outcomes, yet are critical of the current methods that do. In this paper we envision a future with ¿Compassionate Conservation¿ and predict how this might affect global biodiversity conservation. Taken literally, ¿Compassionate Conservation¿ will deny current conservation practices such as captive breeding, introduced species control, biocontrol, conservation fencing, translocation, contraception, disease control and genetic introgression. Five mainstream conservation practices are used to illustrate the far-reaching and dire consequences for global biodiversity if governed by ¿Compassionate Conservation¿. We acknowledge the important role of animal welfare science in conservation practices but argue that ¿Compassionate Conservation¿ aligns more closely with animal liberation principles protecting individuals over populations. Ultimately we fear that a world of ¿Compassionate Conservation¿ could stymie the global conservation efforts required to meet international biodiversity targets derived from evidenced based practice, such as the Aichi targets developed by the Convention on Biological Diversity and adopted by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and the United Nations.

DOI 10.1016/j.biocon.2019.108365
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Matthew Hayward, Ryan Witt, Alex Callen, John Clulow, Simon Clulow
2019 Gould J, Valdez JW, Upton R, 'Adhesive defence mucus secretions in the red triangle slug (Triboniophorus graeffei) can incapacitate adult frogs', ETHOLOGY, 125 587-591 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/eth.12875
Co-authors John Gould
2019 Hayward MW, Jachowski D, Bugir CK, Clulow J, Krishnamurthy R, Griffin AS, et al., 'The search for novelty continues for rewilding', BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION, 236 584-585 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.biocon.2019.05.041
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Andrea Griffin, Matthew Hayward, John Clulow, Anita Chalmers, Alex Callen
2019 Hayward MW, Scanlon RJ, Callen A, Howell LG, Klop-Toker KL, Di Blanco Y, et al., 'Reintroducing rewilding to restoration Rejecting the search for novelty', Biological Conservation, 233 255-259 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.biocon.2019.03.011
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Alex Callen, John Rodger, Anita Chalmers, Andrea Griffin, John Clulow, Simon Clulow, Matthew Hayward, John Gould
2019 Hayward MW, Callen A, Allen BL, Ballard G, Broekhuis F, Bugir C, et al., 'Deconstructing compassionate conservation', Conservation Biology, 33 760-768 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Society for Conservation Biology Compassionate conservation focuses on 4 tenets: first, do no harm; individuals matter; inclusivity of individual animals; and peaceful coex... [more]

© 2019 Society for Conservation Biology Compassionate conservation focuses on 4 tenets: first, do no harm; individuals matter; inclusivity of individual animals; and peaceful coexistence between humans and animals. Recently, compassionate conservation has been promoted as an alternative to conventional conservation philosophy. We believe examples presented by compassionate conservationists are deliberately or arbitrarily chosen to focus on mammals; inherently not compassionate; and offer ineffective conservation solutions. Compassionate conservation arbitrarily focuses on charismatic species, notably large predators and megaherbivores. The philosophy is not compassionate when it leaves invasive predators in the environment to cause harm to vastly more individuals of native species or uses the fear of harm by apex predators to terrorize mesopredators. Hindering the control of exotic species (megafauna, predators) in situ will not improve the conservation condition of the majority of biodiversity. The positions taken by so-called compassionate conservationists on particular species and on conservation actions could be extended to hinder other forms of conservation, including translocations, conservation fencing, and fertility control. Animal welfare is incredibly important to conservation, but ironically compassionate conservation does not offer the best welfare outcomes to animals and is often ineffective in achieving conservation goals. Consequently, compassionate conservation may threaten public and governmental support for conservation because of the limited understanding of conservation problems by the general public.

DOI 10.1111/cobi.13366
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Ryan Witt, Alex Callen, Andrea Griffin, John Clulow, Matthew Hayward, Simon Clulow
2019 Browne RK, Silla AJ, Upton R, Della-Togna G, Marcec-Greaves R, Shishova NV, et al., 'Sperm collection and storage for the sustainable management of amphibian biodiversity', Theriogenology, 133 187-200 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.theriogenology.2019.03.035
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Simon Clulow, John Clulow
2018 Upton R, Clulow S, Mahony MJ, Clulow J, 'Generation of a sexually mature individual of the Eastern dwarf tree frog, Litoria fallax, from cryopreserved testicular macerates: proof of capacity of cryopreserved sperm derived offspring to complete development', CONSERVATION PHYSIOLOGY, 6 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/conphys/coy043
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Simon Clulow, John Clulow
2018 Hall SE, Upton RMO, McLaughlin EA, Sutherland JM, 'Phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) follicular signalling is conserved in the mare ovary', Reproduction, Fertility and Development, 30 624-633 (2018) [C1]

© CSIRO 2018. The mare ovary is unique in its anatomical structure; however, the signalling pathways responsible for physiological processes, such as follicular activation, remain... [more]

© CSIRO 2018. The mare ovary is unique in its anatomical structure; however, the signalling pathways responsible for physiological processes, such as follicular activation, remain uncharacterised. This provided us with the impetus to explore whether signalling molecules from important folliculogenesis pathways, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT), are conserved in the mare ovary. Messenger RNA expression of six genes important in follicle development was measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and protein localisation of key pathway members (PI3K, AKT1, phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), JAK1, STAT3 and suppressor of cytokine signalling 4 (SOCS4)) was compared in tissue from fetal and adult mare ovaries. Tissue from adult ovaries exhibited significantly increased levels of mRNA expression of PI3K, AKT1, PTEN, JAK1, STAT3 and SOCS4 compared with tissue from fetal ovaries. PI3K, AKT1, JAK1 and STAT3 demonstrated redistributed localisation, from pregranulosa cells in fetal development, to both the oocyte and granulosa cells of follicles in the adult ovary, whilst negative feedback molecules PTEN and SOCS4 were only localised to the granulosa cells in the adult ovary. These findings suggest that the PI3K/AKT and JAK/STAT signalling pathways are utilised during folliculogenesis in the mare, similarly to previously studied mammalian species, and may serve as useful biomarkers for assessment of ovary development in the horse.

DOI 10.1071/RD17024
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Jessie Sutherland, Eileen Mclaughlin
2018 Clulow J, Pomering M, Herbert D, Upton R, Calatayud N, Clulow S, et al., 'Differential success in obtaining gametes between male and female Australian temperate frogs by hormonal induction: A review', GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY, 265 141-148 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ygcen.2018.05.032
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Simon Clulow, John Clulow
2018 Upton R, Clulow S, Seeto R, Wong L, Mahony M, Clulow J, 'Successful sperm cryopreservation and generated offspring of the endangered frog, Litoria aurea', Cryobiology, 85 148-149 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2018.10.114
2018 Campbell L, Upton R, Doody SJ, Nixon B, Clulow J, Clulow S, 'Model protocol for cryopreservation of lizard sperm using the phosphodiesterase inhibitor caffeine', Cryobiology, 85 150-150 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2018.10.120
Show 9 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Upton R, Clulow S, Seeto R, Wong L, Mahony M, Clulow J, '55th Annual Meeting for the Society for Cryobiology', Successful sperm cryopreservation and generated offspring of the endangered frog, Litoria aurea, Madrid (2018)
Co-authors John Clulow, Simon Clulow
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $5,534

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20201 grants / $2,009

Inspiring Australia$2,009

$2009 detailed here is only part of the total sum received from the Inspiring Australia grant to allow community driven mural event to run during National Biodiversity Month.

Funding body: Inspiring Australia

Funding body Inspiring Australia
Project Team

Peter Howley, Rose Upton, Alex Callen, Michelle Kelly, Matt Hayward

Scheme Inspiring Australia NSW
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20192 grants / $3,525

The Australian Society of Herpetologists PhD Research Grant$2,000

Funding body: The Australian Socirty of Herpetologists

Funding body The Australian Socirty of Herpetologists
Scheme Student Research Grant (PhD)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Society for Cryobiology Travel Award$1,525

Funding body: Society for Cryobiology

Funding body Society for Cryobiology
Scheme Travel Awards
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
Edit

Research Projects

Sperm Cryopreservation and IVF in Australian Pelodryadids 2016 -

The project aims to develop protocols for the long term storage of Australian tree frog species spermatozoa, with an emphasis on the endangered green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea). It is hoped that development of these protocols will contribute to genetic rescue of endangered species with the use of genome resource banking.


Biomes 2020 -

To celebrate National Biodiversity Month in September, the Conservation Biology Research Group at the University of Newcastle is hosting Biomes, a month long immersive exhibition to empower the community to contribute to the important role of biodiversity conservation in order to improve human health and well being.

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has heralded the decade from 2020 as pivotal in preserving biodiversity to reduce poverty and secure global food and water resources. In a world experiencing increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters, Biomes celebrates stories that have brought biodiversity back from the brink of extinction to empower the community to take their own action. 


Edit

Ms Rose Upton

Contact Details

Email rose.upton@uon.edu.au
Edit