Dr Serene Yoong

Dr Serene Yoong

Conjoint Senior Lecturer

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

As a behavioural scientist and experienced dietitian with expertise in practice-based translational research, Dr Yoong has a vision to improve community health by implementing new research and best-practice guidelines into targeted settings.  Her research program focuses on developing and testing research translation strategies to support community and health service organisations in preventing obesity and other chronic disease risk factors. She is also interested in identifying ways of making research evidence more relevant to support community, policy and practice decisions. Despite being an early career researcher, Dr Yoong has been highy productive and influential, achieving both national and international recognition as a leading implementation scientist undertaking practice-based, translational research.

In 2014, Dr Yoong was a visiting academic with the World Health Organisation (WHO), invited to develop an evidence-brief of the impact of tobacco use on post-surgical outcomes. She has published a commissioned literature review with WHO examining the use of e-cigarettes in youth and adolescents, which has informed international policy and practice. In July 2015, Dr Yoong was also selected to attend the US Training and Dissemination Research in Health training program, a prestigious training opportunity supported by the US National Institute of Health and the US Department of Veterans Affairs.

Dr Yoong's research primarily involves undertaking randomised and other forms of controlled trials to identify effective interventions in community settings such as health care services, schools, childcare centres, and primary care. This research is informed by key service delivery evidence-practice gaps and the formation of active partnerships with relevant service providers, which aims to ensure that the proposed interventions, if shown to be effective, are relevant, feasible and capable of being implemented into routine practice.

In October 2014, Dr Yoong was awarded a National Heart Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship to undertake innovative web-based obesity prevention research in childcare services (commenced July 2015). This work has involved working with information technology partners to develop and integrate novel solutions into existing national information systems used by childcare centres to support staff to implement nutrition guidelines to improve children's diet.  The menu-planning program 'feedAustralia' has had significant impact on childcare practices, receiving federal funding for rollout nationally to all childcare services in Australia.

Dr Yoong was subsequently awarded an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Award to undertake work building on her previous fellowship. Her current research focuses on applying theory to identify mechanisms of complex interventions to support adaptation and scale up of effective interventions. Dr Yoong's work continue to focus on identifying technology based solutions to improve the implementation of policies and practices to improve children's healthy eating and physical activity.

Dr Yoong's research has also examined improving the utility of research evidence and systematic reviews. She is a member of the international Cochrane-Global Burden of Disease collaboration that seeks to inform and prioritise the conduct of systematic reviews in addressing the primary causes of disease. Dr Yoong has led a number of published bibliographic studies in international journals. In keeping with her interest in research translation and implementation of evidence-based solutions, she has published several articles highlighting the lack of reviews that focus on implementation research and examining the utility of meta-analyses in providing accurate estimates of intervention effectiveness when delivered as part of routine service delivery practice. 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Public health
  • child health
  • childcare
  • children
  • chronic disease prevention
  • dissemination
  • implementation science
  • nutrition guidelines
  • obesity
  • schools

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • Mandarin (Fluent)
  • Malay (Fluent)

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
2/4/2018 -  ARC DECRA fellow Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/5/2014 - 30/5/2015 Evaluation Officer (acting Project Manager) Hunter New England Health
Population Health
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2018 NSW Tall Poppy Award
AIPS (Australian Institute of Policy and Science)
2018 BUPA Emerging Early Career Award finalist
BUPA Health Foundation
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (179 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Sutherland R, Ooi JY, Finch M, Yoong SL, Nathan N, Wrigley J, et al., 'A cluster randomised controlled trial of a secondary school intervention to reduce intake of sugar-sweetened beverages: mid-intervention impact of switchURsip environmental strategies.', Health Promot J Austr, (2021)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.469
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Kathryn L Reilly, Serene Yoong
2021 Nathan N, McCarthy N, Hope K, Sutherland R, Lecathelinais C, Hall A, et al., 'The impact of school uniforms on primary school student's physical activity at school: outcomes of a cluster randomized controlled trial.', Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 18 17 (2021)
DOI 10.1186/s12966-021-01084-0
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Alix Hall, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan
2021 Jackson JK, Jones J, Nguyen H, Davies I, Lum M, Grady A, Yoong SL, 'Obesity Prevention within the Early Childhood Education and Care Setting: A Systematic Review of Dietary Behavior and Physical Activity Policies and Guidelines in High Income Countries.', Int J Environ Res Public Health, 18 (2021)
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18020838
Co-authors Alice Grady, Serene Yoong
2021 Yoong SL, Jackson J, Barnes C, Pearson N, Swindle T, O'Reilly S, et al., 'Changing landscape of nutrition and dietetics research? A bibliographic analysis of top-tier published research in 1998 and 2018.', Public Health Nutr, 1-10 (2021)
DOI 10.1017/S1368980021000136
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong
2021 Wolfenden L, Foy R, Presseau J, Grimshaw JM, Ivers NM, Powell BJ, et al., 'Designing and undertaking randomised implementation trials: Guide for researchers', The BMJ, 372 (2021)

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. Implementation science is the study o... [more]

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. Implementation science is the study of methods to promote the systematic uptake of evidence based interventions into practice and policy to improve health. Despite the need for high quality evidence from implementation research, randomised trials of implementation strategies often have serious limitations. These limitations include high risks of bias, limited use of theory, a lack of standard terminology to describe implementation strategies, narrowly focused implementation outcomes, and poor reporting. This paper aims to improve the evidence base in implementation science by providing guidance on the development, conduct, and reporting of randomised trials of implementation strategies. Established randomised trial methods from seminal texts and recent developments in implementation science were consolidated by an international group of researchers, health policy makers, and practitioners. This article provides guidance on the key components of randomised trials of implementation strategies, including articulation of trial aims, trial recruitment and retention strategies, randomised design selection, use of implementation science theory and frameworks, measures, sample size calculations, ethical review, and trial reporting. It also focuses on topics requiring special consideration or adaptation for implementation trials. We propose this guide as a resource for researchers, healthcare and public health policy makers or practitioners, research funders, and journal editors with the goal of advancing rigorous conduct and reporting of randomised trials of implementation strategies.

DOI 10.1136/bmj.m3721
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams
2021 Grady A, Barnes C, Lum M, Jones J, Yoong SL, 'Impact of Nudge Strategies on Nutrition Education Participation in Child Care: Randomized Controlled Trial', Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 53 151-156 (2021)

© 2020 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior Objective: To assess the impact of incorporating nudge strategies in the design of a nutrition education workshop invitation on... [more]

© 2020 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior Objective: To assess the impact of incorporating nudge strategies in the design of a nutrition education workshop invitation on workshop registration among early childhood education and care centers. Methods: A parallel-group randomized controlled trial was conducted with 88 centers. Centers received nudge strategies embedded within an enhanced invitation (intervention) or a generic invitation (control) to attend a nutrition education workshop. Center workshop registration and invitation recall and acceptability were compared between the 2 arms. Results: No statistically significant differences in workshop registration (25% vs 20%; P = 0.61), invitation recall (69% vs 62%; P = 0.58) or acceptability (mean: 8.38 vs 8.06; P = 0.50) were found between intervention and control centers, respectively. Conclusions and Implications: Low-intensity behavioral strategies embedded in the design of an invitation were insufficient to increase workshop registration significantly. Investigation and application of alternate evidence-based nudge strategies to encourage staff participation in nutrition education in early childhood education and care setting are recommended.

DOI 10.1016/j.jneb.2020.11.017
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Alice Grady
2021 Reeves P, Edmunds K, Szewczyk Z, Grady A, Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Economic evaluation of a web-based menu planning intervention to improve childcare service adherence with dietary guidelines', Implementation Science, 16 (2021)

© 2020, The Author(s). Background: Despite the known benefits of healthy eating in childhood, few Australian childcare services provide food that is consistent with dietary guidel... [more]

© 2020, The Author(s). Background: Despite the known benefits of healthy eating in childhood, few Australian childcare services provide food that is consistent with dietary guidelines. The effectiveness of a web-based menu planning intervention to increase childcare service provision of healthy foods and decrease provision of discretionary foods in long day-care services in Australia was assessed in a randomised controlled trial. Here we consider the costs, consequences, cost-effectiveness and budget impact of the intervention using data collected within the trial. Methods: The prospective trial-based economic evaluation involved 54 childcare services across New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Services were randomised to a 12-month intervention or usual care. The intervention involved access to a web-based menu planning and decision support tool and online resources. Effectiveness measures included mean number of food groups, overall menu and individual food group compliance with dietary guidelines, and mean servings of food groups at 12 months. Costs (reported in $AUD, 2017/18) were evaluated from both health sector and societal perspectives. The direct cost to support uptake of the intervention was calculated, as were costs to each childcare service. The incremental cost of the intervention was calculated as the net difference in the cost to undertake menu planning and review plus the direct cost of the intervention. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) including uncertainty intervals were estimated for differences in costs and effects between intervention and control groups. A relative value index was calculated to determine overall value for money. Results: Over the 12 months of the trial, we calculated a difference in cost between usual practice and intervention groups of - $482 (95% UI - $859, - $56). While the measured increase in menu and food group compliance within the trial did not reach statistical significance, there were significant improvements in mean servings of fruit and discretionary food, represented in the cost-consequence analysis. The calculated relative value index of 1.1 suggests that the intervention returns acceptable value for money for the outcomes generated. Conclusion: Compared to usual practice, web-based programmes may offer an efficient and sustainable alternative for childcare services to improve the provision of healthy foods to children in their care. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12616000974404

DOI 10.1186/s13012-020-01068-x
Co-authors Alice Grady, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, Andrew Searles
2021 Wolfenden L, Barnes C, Lane C, McCrabb S, Brown HM, Gerritsen S, et al., 'Consolidating evidence on the effectiveness of interventions promoting fruit and vegetable consumption: an umbrella review.', Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 18 11 (2021)
DOI 10.1186/s12966-020-01046-y
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Sam Mccrabb, Serene Yoong
2020 Jackson J, Wolfenden L, Grady A, Lum M, Leonard A, McCrabb S, et al., 'Early childhood education and care-based healthy eating interventions for improving child diet: a systematic review protocol.', Syst Rev, 9 181 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s13643-020-01440-4
Co-authors Jacklyn Jackson Uon, Sam Mccrabb, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Serene Yoong, Alix Hall
2020 Lum M, Grady A, Falkiner M, Jones J, Finch M, Green S, et al., 'Assessing the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in the family day care setting: A cross-sectional study.', Health Promot J Austr, (2020)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.420
Co-authors Alice Grady, Alix Hall, Serene Yoong
2020 Jones J, Wolfenden L, Grady A, Finch M, Bolsewicz K, Wedesweiler T, Yoong SL, 'Implementation of continuous free play schedules in Australian childcare services: A cross-sectional study', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 31 199-206 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Modifying the scheduling of physical activity opportunities to provide children with more frequent opportunities fo... [more]

© 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Modifying the scheduling of physical activity opportunities to provide children with more frequent opportunities for outdoor free play has been demonstrated to increase child physical activity while in care. The primary aim of this study was to describe the implementation of continuous free play schedules to allow children to access outdoor play areas, consistent with sector guidelines in a national sample of Australian childcare services. Secondary aims were to investigate the associations between the implementation of such schedules and service characteristics, and assess the perceived barriers and enablers to implementation. Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken with a random sample of 326 centre-based childcare services located across Australia. Childcare service characteristics, continuous free play scheduling and perceived barriers and enablers to implementation were assessed via a survey administered to service managers online or via telephone. Results: A total of 203 service managers (62%) reported implementing a continuous free play schedule, for three periods of 126¿minutes per period, each day on average. Service type (long day care services), size (services with higher numbers of child enrolments [=80 children]) and socio-economic area (services located in lower socio-economic areas) were associated with the implementation of a continuous free play schedule. The most prevalent barriers to implementation included insufficient staff to ensure adequate supervision of children (69%) and service layout being unsuitable (65%), while the most prevalent enablers included advice on how to overcome staffing or supervision issues (89%) and to re-orientate the service layout (54%). Conclusions: There is scope to support the implementation of continuous free play schedules consistent with childcare sector guidelines. So what?: Future intervention research that targets the reported barriers and enablers to implementation is needed.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.285
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady
2020 McCrabb S, Mooney K, Elton B, Grady A, Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, 'How to optimise public health interventions: a scoping review of guidance from optimisation process frameworks', BMC Public Health, 20 (2020)

© 2020, The Author(s). Background: Optimisation processes have the potential to rapidly improve the impact of health interventions. Optimisation can be defined as a deliberate, it... [more]

© 2020, The Author(s). Background: Optimisation processes have the potential to rapidly improve the impact of health interventions. Optimisation can be defined as a deliberate, iterative and data-driven process to improve a health intervention and/or its implementation to meet stakeholder-defined public health impacts within resource constraints. This study aimed to identify frameworks used to optimise the impact of health interventions and/or their implementation, and characterise the key concepts, steps or processes of identified frameworks. Methods: A scoping review of MEDLINE, CINAL, PsycINFO, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source databases was undertaken. Two reviewers independently coded the key concepts, steps or processes involved in each frameworks, and identified if it was a framework aimed to optimise interventions or their implementation. Two review authors then identified the common steps across included frameworks. Results: Twenty optimisation frameworks were identified. Eight frameworks were for optimising interventions, 11 for optimising implementation and one covered both intervention and implementation optimisation. The mean number of steps within the frameworks was six (range 3¿9). Almost half (n = 8) could be classified as both linear and cyclic frameworks, indicating that some steps may occur multiple times in a single framework. Two meta-frameworks are proposed, one for intervention optimisation and one for implementation strategy optimisation. Steps for intervention optimisation are: Problem identification; Preparation; Theoretical/Literature base; Pilot/Feasibility testing; Optimisation; Evaluation; and Long-term implementation. Steps for implementation strategy optimisation are: Problem identification; Collaborate; Plan/design; Pilot; Do/change; Study/evaluate/check; Act; Sustain/endure; and Disseminate/extend. Conclusions: This review provides a useful summary of the common steps followed to optimise a public health intervention or its implementation according to established frameworks. Further opportunities to study and/or validate such frameworks and their impact on improving outcomes exist.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-020-09950-5
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Sam Mccrabb
2020 Grady A, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Rissel C, Finch M, Flood V, et al., 'Effectiveness of a Web-Based Menu-Planning Intervention to Improve Childcare Service Compliance With Dietary Guidelines: Randomized Controlled Trial', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 22 (2020)
DOI 10.2196/13401
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Alice Grady
2020 Razak LA, Jones J, Clinton-McHarg T, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Morgan PJ, et al., 'Implementation of policies and practices to increase physical activity among children attending centre-based childcare: A cross-sectional study', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 31 207-215 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Supporting centre-based childcare services to create physical activity (PA) environments is a recommended strategy ... [more]

© 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Supporting centre-based childcare services to create physical activity (PA) environments is a recommended strategy to improve child PA. This study aimed to describe the implementation of PA policies and practices by these services, and to examine the associations with service characteristics. Methods: Nominated supervisors of childcare services (n¿=¿309) in the Hunter New England region, New South Wales, Australia, completed a telephone interview. Using previously validated measures, the interview assessed the implementation of evidence-based practices shown to be associated with child PA. This includes: (a) provision of active play opportunities, (b) portable play equipment availability, (c) delivery of daily fundamental movement skills, (d) having at least 50% of staff trained in promoting child PA the past 5¿years and (e) having written PA and small screen recreation policies. Results: Although 98% (95% CI 96, 99) of childcare services provided active play opportunities for at least 25% of their daily opening hours, only 8% (95% CI 5, 11) of services fully implemented all policies and practices; with no service characteristic associated with full implementation. Long day care service had twice the odds of having a written PA policy (OR 2.0, 95% CI 0.7, 5.8), compared to preschools (adjusted for service size, socio-economic disadvantage and geographical location). Conclusions: Improvements could be made to childcare services¿ operations to support the promotion of child PA. So what?: To ensure the benefits to child health, childcare services require support to implement a number of PA promoting policies and practices that are known to improve child PA.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.268
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Serene Yoong
2020 Hammersley ML, Wyse RJ, Jones RA, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Stacey F, et al., 'Translation of two healthy eating and active living support programs for parents of 2-6year old children: a parallel partially randomised preference trial protocol (the 'time for healthy habits' trial)', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 20 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-020-08526-7
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden
2020 Nathan N, Murawski B, Hope K, Young S, Sutherland R, Hodder R, et al., 'The efficacy of workplace interventions on improving the dietary, physical activity and sleep behaviours of school and childcare staff: A systematic review', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 1-24 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. There is a need for effective interventions that improve the health and wellbeing of school and childcare staff. This rev... [more]

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. There is a need for effective interventions that improve the health and wellbeing of school and childcare staff. This review examined the efficacy of workplace interventions to improve the dietary, physical activity and/or sleep behaviours of school and childcare staff. A secondary aim of the review was to assess changes in staff physical/mental health, productivity, and students¿ health behaviours. Nine databases were searched for controlled trials including randomised and non-randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental trials published in English up to October 2019. PRISMA guidelines informed screening and study selection procedures. Data were not suitable for quantitative pooling. Of 12,396 records screened, seven articles (based on six studies) were included. Most studies used multi-component interventions including educational resources, work-based wellness committees and planned group practice (e.g., walking groups). Multiple outcomes were assessed, findings were mixed and on average, there was moderate risk of bias. Between-group differences in dietary and physical activity behaviours (i.e., fruit/vegetable intake, leisure-time physical activity) favoured intervention groups, but were statistically non-significant for most outcomes. Some of the studies also showed differences favouring controls (i.e., nutrient intake, fatty food consumption). Additional robust studies testing the efficacy of workplace interventions to improve the health of educational staff are needed.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph17144998
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, Flora Tzelepis, Serene Yoong, Beatrice Murawski, Rebecca Hodder, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan
2020 Grady A, Fielding A, Golley RK, Finch M, Hendrie GA, Burrows T, et al., 'Adaptation, acceptability and feasibility of a Short Food Survey to assess the dietary intake of children during attendance at childcare', Public Health Nutrition, 23 1484-1494 (2020) [C1]

© The Authors 2020. Objective: To (i) describe the adaptation of the Short Food Survey (SFS) for assessing the dietary intake of children (2-5 years) during attendance at Early Ch... [more]

© The Authors 2020. Objective: To (i) describe the adaptation of the Short Food Survey (SFS) for assessing the dietary intake of children (2-5 years) during attendance at Early Childhood Education and Care (SFS-ECEC); (ii) determine the acceptability and feasibility of the SFS-ECEC; and (iii) compare the SFS-ECEC to direct observations for assessing dietary intake of children in care.Design: The adapted forty-seven-item SFS-ECEC was completed by childcare educators to capture individual child's usual intake over the past month. Acceptability and feasibility were assessed via educator self-report and completion rates. Mean servings of food groups consumed in accordance with dietary guidelines reported in the SFS-ECEC were compared to those obtained by a single-day direct observation via visual estimation conducted by trained personnel. Mean differences, intra-class correlations, Bland-Altman plots, percentage agreement and Cohen's ¿ were examined.Setting: Early Childhood Education and Care, NSW, Australia.Participants: Educators and children.Results: 213 (98·61 %) SFS-ECECs were returned. Acceptability was high with 86·54 % of educators reporting the tool as easy to understand. Mean differences in servings of food groups between the SFS-ECEC and direct observation were statistically significantly different for five out of six foods and ranged 0·08-1·07, with intra-class correlations ranging 0·00-0·21. Agreement between the methods in the classification of children meeting or not meeting dietary guidelines ranged 42·78-93·01 %, with Cohen's ¿ ranging -0·03 to 0·14.Conclusions: The SFS-ECEC is acceptable and feasible for completion by childcare educators. While tool refinement and further validation is warranted, small mean differences suggest the tool may be useful in estimating group-level intakes.

DOI 10.1017/S136898001900404X
Co-authors Alison A Fielding, Tracy Burrows, Serene Yoong, Alice Grady
2020 Yoong SL, Lum M, Jones J, Kerr E, Falkiner M, Delaney T, et al., 'A systematic review of interventions to improve the dietary intake, physical activity and weight status of children attending family day care services', Public Health Nutrition, 23 2211-2220 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1368980019005275
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Sam Mccrabb, Serene Yoong, Alice Grady
2020 Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Kingsland M, Yoong SL, Nathan N, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, 'Improving the impact of public health service delivery and research: a decision tree to aid evidence-based public health practice and research', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 44 331-332 (2020)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.13023
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2020 Wyse R, Stacey F, Campbell L, Yoong S, Lecathelinais C, Wiggers J, et al., '5-Year Follow-Up of a Telephone Intervention to Increase Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Preschoolers: The 'Healthy Habits' Cluster Randomised Trial.', Nutrients, 12 (2020)
DOI 10.3390/nu12123702
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2020 Grady A, Barnes C, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Yoong SL, 'Barriers and Enablers to Adoption of Digital Health Interventions to Support the Implementation of Dietary Guidelines in Early Childhood Education and Care: Cross-Sectional Study.', J Med Internet Res, 22 e22036 (2020)
DOI 10.2196/22036
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Serene Yoong
2020 Yoong SL, Grady A, Wiggers JH, Stacey FG, Rissel C, Flood V, et al., 'Child-level evaluation of a web-based intervention to improve dietary guideline implementation in childcare centers: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.', Am J Clin Nutr, 111 854-863 (2020)
DOI 10.1093/ajcn/nqaa025
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers, Alice Grady
2020 Robson EK, Hodder RK, Kamper SJ, O'Brien KM, Williams A, Lee H, et al., 'Effectiveness of Weight-Loss Interventions for Reducing Pain and Disability in People With Common Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis.', J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, 50 319-333 (2020)
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2020.9041
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Hodder, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2020 Grady A, Stacey F, Seward K, Finch M, Jones J, Yoong SL, 'Menu planning practices in early childhood education and care factors associated with menu compliance with sector dietary guidelines', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 31 216-223 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Despite recommendations, early childhood education and care services do not plan menus in accordance with sector di... [more]

© 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Despite recommendations, early childhood education and care services do not plan menus in accordance with sector dietary guidelines. This study aimed to examine the following among Australian long day care services: (a) menu planning practices; (b) prevalence of menu compliance with sector dietary guidelines; and (c) menu planning practices associated with higher menu compliance with sector dietary guidelines. Methods: Long day care services within Hunter New England, NSW participated in a pen and paper survey assessing menu planning practices and socio-demographic and service characteristics. Two-week menus were assessed for compliance with sector dietary guidelines, based on the number of servings of food groups and discretionary foods provided per child, per day. Results: Staff from 72 services completed the survey and 69 provided their menu. Results indicated the service cook was fully responsible for planning the menu in 43% of services, and 57% had received written support to assist with menu planning. Service menus were compliant with an average of 0.68 out of six food groups and discretionary foods. In poisson regression models, a shorter menu cycle length (P¿=.04) and the receipt of training opportunities to support menu planning (P¿<.01) were significantly associated with higher menu compliance. Conclusions: Menu compliance with sector dietary guidelines is low among participating long day care services. So what?: The implementation of practices such as shortening of the menu cycle and the provision of training opportunities may assist in the planning of menus that are more compliant with dietary guidelines in this setting.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.286
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Alice Grady, Serene Yoong
2020 Yoong SL, Bolsewicz K, Grady A, Wyse R, Sutherland R, Hodder RK, et al., 'Adaptation of public health initiatives: expert views on current guidance and opportunities to advance their application and benefit', Health education research, 35 243-257 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyaa014
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Alice Grady, Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Sam Mccrabb, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, Alix Hall, Rachel Sutherland, John Attia, Nicole Nathan
2020 Barnes C, Grady A, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Pond N, McFayden T, et al., 'A pilot randomised controlled trial of a web-based implementation intervention to increase child intake of fruit and vegetables within childcare centres', Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 6 (2020)

© 2020, The Author(s). Background: As dietary behaviours developed during early childhood are known to track into adulthood, interventions that aim to improve child nutrition at a... [more]

© 2020, The Author(s). Background: As dietary behaviours developed during early childhood are known to track into adulthood, interventions that aim to improve child nutrition at a population level are recommended. Whilst early childhood education and care (ECEC) is a promising setting for interventions targeting children¿s nutrition behaviours, previous interventions have largely used high intensity, face-to-face approaches, limiting their reach, implementation and potential impact at a population level. Web-based modalities represent a promising means of supporting the delivery of childcare-based interventions whilst overcoming challenges of previous approaches; however, the feasibility of using such modalities to support implementation is largely unknown. As such, this study sought to collect feasibility and pilot data to inform the design of a web-based intervention together with health promotion officer support within childcare centres. Child dietary intake will also be assessed to provide an estimate of the impact of the implementation intervention. Methods: A superiority cluster randomised controlled trial with repeat cross-sectional data collection employing an effectiveness-implementation type-II hybrid design will be conducted with childcare centres within the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia. Type-II hybrid designs provide the opportunity to assess intervention efficacy whilst piloting the feasibility of the implementation strategies. Centres allocated to the intervention group will receive access to a web-based program together with health promotion officer support to implement targeted healthy eating practices to improve child diet in care. A number of outcomes will be assessed to inform the feasibility to conduct a larger trial, including childcare centre and parent recruitment and consent rates for each component of data collection, uptake of the implementation strategies, acceptability of the intervention and implementation strategies, appropriateness of the implementation strategies and the contextual factors influencing implementation. Discussion: This study will provide high-quality evidence regarding the potential feasibility of a web-based intervention and the impact of healthy eating practices on child diet in care. Web-based modalities provide a promising approach for population-wide implementation support to childcare centres given their potential reach and consistency with existing infrastructure. Trial registration: Prospectively registered with Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ACTRN12619001158156).

DOI 10.1186/s40814-020-00707-w
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong
2020 Pearson N, Naylor PJ, Ashe MC, Fernandez M, Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, 'Guidance for conducting feasibility and pilot studies for implementation trials', Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 6 1-12 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s40814-020-00634-w
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2020 Sutherland R, Nathan N, Brown A, Yoong S, Reynolds R, Walton A, et al., 'A cross-sectional study to determine the energy density and nutritional quality of primary-school children's lunchboxes', Public Health Nutrition, 23 1108-1116 (2020) [C1]

© The Authors 2020. Objective: The present study describes the energy content of primary-school children&apos;s lunchboxes and the proportion of lunchbox foods considered discreti... [more]

© The Authors 2020. Objective: The present study describes the energy content of primary-school children's lunchboxes and the proportion of lunchbox foods considered discretionary. Subgroup analyses by sex, socio-economic status, age and weight status were undertaken.Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted. Mean kilojoule content, number of items and categorisation of foods and drinks in lunchboxes as 'everyday' (healthy) or discretionary (sometimes) foods were assessed via a valid and reliable lunchbox observational audit.Setting: Twelve Catholic primary schools (Kindergarten-Grade 6) located in the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia.Participants: Kindergarten to Grade 6 primary-school students.Results: In total, 2143 children (57 %) had parental consent to have their lunchboxes observed. School lunchboxes contained a mean of 2748 kJ, of which 61·2 % of energy was from foods consistent with the Australian Dietary Guidelines and 38·8 % of energy was discretionary foods. The proportion of lunchboxes containing only healthy foods was 12 %. Children in Kindergarten-Grade 2 packed more servings of 'everyday' foods (3·32 v. 2·98, P < 0·01) compared with children in Grades 3-6. Children in Grades 3-6 had a higher percentage of energy from discretionary foods (39·1 v. 33·8 %, P < 0·01) compared with children in Kindergarten-Grade 2 and children from the most socio-economically disadvantaged areas had significantly higher total kilojoules in the school lunchbox compared with the least disadvantaged students (2842 v. 2544 kJ, P = 0·03).Conclusions: Foods packed within school lunchboxes may contribute to energy imbalance. The development of school policies and population-based strategies to support parents overcome barriers to packing healthy lunchboxes are warranted.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980019003379
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland
2020 Yoong SL, Hall A, Stacey F, Grady A, Sutherland R, Wyse R, et al., 'Nudge strategies to improve healthcare providers' implementation of evidence-based guidelines, policies and practices: a systematic review of trials included within Cochrane systematic reviews', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 15 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-020-01011-0
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Amy Anderson, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Alix Hall, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland
2020 Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, 'Sustained effects of infant-onset 20-year dietary intervention', LANCET CHILD & ADOLESCENT HEALTH, 4 342-343 (2020)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2020 Wolfenden L, Barnes C, Jones J, Finch M, Wyse RJ, Kingsland M, et al., 'Strategies to improve the implementation of healthy eating, physical activity and obesity prevention policies, practices or programmes within childcare services', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2020 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011779.pub3
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Flora Tzelepis, Rebecca Hodder, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Serene Yoong
2020 Pearson N, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Yoong SL, Kingsland M, Nathan N, et al., 'A cross-sectional study of packed lunchbox foods and their consumption by children in early childhood education and care services.', Nutr Diet, (2020)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12632
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland
2020 Grady A, Seward K, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Wiggers J, et al., 'A three-arm randomised controlled trial of high-and low-intensity implementation strategies to support centre-based childcare service implementation of nutrition guidelines: 12-month follow-up', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 1-20 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. The study aimed to compare the effectiveness of a suite of implementation strategies of varying intensities on centre-bas... [more]

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. The study aimed to compare the effectiveness of a suite of implementation strategies of varying intensities on centre-based childcare service implementation of nutrition guideline recommendations at 12-month follow-up. A six-month three-arm parallel group randomised controlled trial was undertaken with 69 services, randomised to one of three arms: high-intensity strategies (executive support; group face-to-face training; provision of resources; multiple rounds of audit and feedback; ongoing face-to-face and phone support); low-intensity strategies (group face-to-face training; provision of resources; single round of audit and feedback); or usual care control. Across all study arms, only three high-intensity services were compliant with overall nutrition guidelines. A significant group interaction was found between the three arms for compliance with individual food groups. Relative to control, a significantly greater proportion of low-intensity services were compliant with dairy, and a significantly greater proportion of high-intensity services were compliant with fruit, vegetables, dairy, breads and cereals, and discretionary foods. No significant differences between the high-and low-intensity for individual food group compliance were found. High-intensity implementation strategies may be effective in supporting childcare service implementation of individual food group recommendations. Further research is warranted to identify strategies effective in increasing overall nutrition compliance.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph17134664
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Alice Grady
2019 Wyse R, Gabrielyan G, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Swigert J, Delaney T, et al., 'Can changing the position of online menu items increase selection of fruit and vegetable snacks? A cluster randomized trial within an online canteen ordering system in Australian primary schools', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 109 1422-1430 (2019) [C1]

Copyright © American Society for Nutrition 2019. All rights reserved. Background: Manipulating the position of food items within the physical food environment has consistently bee... [more]

Copyright © American Society for Nutrition 2019. All rights reserved. Background: Manipulating the position of food items within the physical food environment has consistently been found to influence item selection. However, the extent to which this strategy is effective in an online food environment is unknown. Objective: This study investigated whether an intervention to position fruit and vegetable snack items as the first and last menu items in an online school canteen ordering system increased the selection of those items. It was hypothesized that at follow-up, a higher proportion of online lunch orders in intervention schools would contain the target items (fruit and vegetable snacks) in comparison to control schools. Design: Six primary schools in New South Wales, Australia, were recruited to a clustered randomized controlled trial conducted over an 8-wk period. Intervention schools received a redesigned menu where the target items were positioned first and last on the online menu. Control schools received no change to their online menu. Results: During the baseline period 1938 students (1203 intervention, 735 control) placed at least one online lunch order and were included in the study, with 16,109 orders placed throughout the study. There was no significant difference between groups over time in the proportion of orders that contained a ¿Fruit and Veggie Snack¿ item (OR = 1.136 [95% CI: 0.791, 1.632] P = 0.490). Conclusions: Evidence from this large trial with robust study design and objectively collected data suggests that positioning fruit and vegetable snack items first and last within an online canteen menu does not increase the selection of these items. Further research is warranted to confirm this finding with other target menu items (e.g., treats) and across other purchasing contexts and online food ordering platforms. This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, http://www.anzctr.org.au/ as ACTRN12616001520426.

DOI 10.1093/ajcn/nqy351
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2019 Grady A, Wolfenden L, Rissel C, Green S, Reilly K, Yoong SL, 'Effectiveness of a dissemination strategy on the uptake of an online menu planning program: A controlled trial', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 30 20-25 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Online systems offer opportunities to provide effective, ongoing support to childcare services to implement dietary... [more]

© 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Online systems offer opportunities to provide effective, ongoing support to childcare services to implement dietary guidelines. The study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a dissemination strategy on childcare service: (i) adoption; and (ii) use of an online menu planning program designed to increase compliance with dietary guidelines. Methods: A nonrandomised controlled trial was conducted with long day care services across Australia. All services received an email invitation to access an online evidence-based menu planning program. Services in the intervention also received training, telephone contact and provision of a portable computer tablet to encourage program adoption and use. Outcomes were assessed at the 6-month follow-up using analytics data recorded by the online program. Outcomes included the proportion of services having accessed the program (adoption) and the proportion of services with a current menu entered in the program (use as intended). Results: Twenty-seven interventions and 19 control services took part. At the 6-month follow-up, 100% vs 58% of services had adopted the online menu planning program (OR: 14.67, 95% CI: 2.43-infinity; P¿<¿0.01) and 41% vs 5% of services had a current menu entered in the program (OR: 9.99, 95% CI: 1.01-534.57; P¿<¿0.01) in the intervention and control arms respectively. Conclusions: This study highlights the need for strategies to support adoption and use of an online menu planning program in childcare services if the potential benefits of such a program are to be achieved. Future research should explore the effectiveness of differing strategies to increase adoption and use of online programs at scale. So what?: Strategies to support childcare service uptake and use of online programs are required in order for the potential public health benefits of such technologies to be realised.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.220
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Alice Grady, Kathryn L Reilly, Luke Wolfenden
2019 Pond N, Finch M, Sutherland R, Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Kingsland M, et al., 'Cluster randomised controlled trial of an m-health intervention in centre-based childcare services to reduce the packing of discretionary foods in children's lunchboxes: study protocol for the ' SWAP IT Childcare' trial', BMJ OPEN, 9 (2019)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026829
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2019 Chai LK, Yoong SL, Bucher T, Collins CE, Shrewsbury VA, 'Children's Intake of Food from Non-Fast-Food Outlets and Child-Specific Menus: A Survey of Parents.', Children, 6 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/children6110123
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tamara Bucher, Serene Yoong, Vanessa Shrewsbury
2019 Razak LA, Clinton-McHarg T, Jones J, Yoong SL, Grady A, Finch M, et al., 'Barriers to and facilitators of the implementation of environmental recommendations to encourage physical activity in center-based childcare services: A systematic review', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 16 1175-1186 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Human Kinetics, Inc. Background: Identifying factors influencing the implementation of evidence-based environmental recommendations to promote physical activity in childcar... [more]

© 2019 Human Kinetics, Inc. Background: Identifying factors influencing the implementation of evidence-based environmental recommendations to promote physical activity in childcare services is required to develop effective implementation strategies. This systematic review aimed to: (1) identify barriers and facilitators reported by center-based childcare services impacting the implementation of environmental recommendations to increase physical activity among children, (2) synthesize these factors according to the 14 domains of the "Theoretical Domains Framework," and (3) report any associations between service or provider characteristics and the reported implementation of such recommendations. Methods: Electronic searches were conducted in 6 scientific databases (eg, MEDLINE) and Google Scholar to identify studies reporting data from childcare staff or other stakeholders responsible for childcare operations. Included studies were based on childcare settings and published in English. From 2164 identified citations, 19 articles met the inclusion criteria (11 qualitative, 4 quantitative, and 4 mixed methods). Results: Across all articles, the majority of factors impacting implementation fell into the "environmental context and resources" domain (eg, time, equipment, and space; n = 19) and the "social influences" domain (eg, support from parents, colleagues, supervisors; n = 11). Conclusion: The current review provides guidance to improve the implementation of environmental recommendations in childcare services by addressing environmental, resource, and social barriers.

DOI 10.1123/jpah.2019-0050
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Serene Yoong
2019 Williams A, van Dongen JM, Kamper SJ, O'Brien KM, Wolfenden L, Yoong SL, et al., 'Economic evaluation of a healthy lifestyle intervention for chronic low back pain: A randomized controlled trial', European Journal of Pain (United Kingdom), 23 621-634 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 European Pain Federation - EFIC® Background: Economic evaluations which estimate cost-effectiveness of potential treatments can guide decisions about real-world healthcare ... [more]

© 2018 European Pain Federation - EFIC® Background: Economic evaluations which estimate cost-effectiveness of potential treatments can guide decisions about real-world healthcare services. We performed an economic evaluation of a healthy lifestyle intervention targeting weight loss, physical activity and diet for patients with chronic low back pain, who are overweight or obese. Methods: Eligible patients with chronic low back pain (n¿=¿160) were randomized to an intervention or usual care control group. The intervention included brief advice, a clinical consultation and referral to a 6-month telephone-based healthy lifestyle coaching service. The primary outcome was quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Secondary outcomes were pain intensity, disability, weight and body mass index. Costs included intervention costs, healthcare utilization costs and work absenteeism costs. An economic analysis was performed from the societal perspective. Results: Mean total costs were lower in the intervention group than the control group (-$614; 95%CI: -3133 to 255). The intervention group had significantly lower healthcare costs (-$292; 95%CI: -872 to -33), medication costs (-$30; 95%CI: -65 to -4) and absenteeism costs (-$1,000; 95%CI: -3573 to -210). For all outcomes, the intervention was on average less expensive and more effective than usual care, and the probability of the intervention being cost-effective compared to usual care was relatively high (i.e., 0.81) at a willingness-to-pay of $0/unit of effect. However, the probability of cost-effectiveness was not as favourable among sensitivity analyses. Conclusions: The healthy lifestyle intervention seems to be cost-effective from the societal perspective. However, variability in the sensitivity analyses indicates caution is needed when interpreting these findings. Significance: This is an economic evaluation of a randomized controlled trial of a healthy lifestyle intervention for chronic low back pain. The findings suggest that a healthy lifestyle intervention may be cost-effective relative to usual care.

DOI 10.1002/ejp.1334
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Hodder, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden
2019 Nathan N, Janssen L, Sutherland R, Hodder RK, Evans CEL, Booth D, et al., 'The effectiveness of lunchbox interventions on improving the foods and beverages packed and consumed by children at centre-based care or school: a systematic review and meta-analysis', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-019-0798-1
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, Kathryn L Reilly, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland
2019 McCrabb S, Lane C, Hall A, Milat A, Bauman A, Sutherland R, et al., 'Scaling-up evidence-based obesity interventions: A systematic review assessing intervention adaptations and effectiveness and quantifying the scale-up penalty', OBESITY REVIEWS, 20 964-982 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/obr.12845
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Sam Mccrabb, Serene Yoong, Alix Hall, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden
2019 Grady A, Dodds P, Jones J, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, 'Prevalence of night sleep duration, sleep quality and sleep hygiene practices among children attending childcare services in New South Wales, Australia', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 55 59-65 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians) Aim: To describe parent-reported child: (i) sleep duration; (ii) sleep quality; (iii) s... [more]

© 2018 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians) Aim: To describe parent-reported child: (i) sleep duration; (ii) sleep quality; (iii) sleep hygiene practices; and (iv) the proportion of children meeting sleep duration recommendations. Methods: A convenience sample of parents of Australian pre-school-aged children (3¿5 years) were surveyed from the Hunter New England region of New South Wales. The cross-sectional survey was conducted via computer-assisted telephone interview. The survey assessed parent and child demographic characteristics and parent-reported child sleep duration, quality and sleep hygiene practices. Results: A total of 488 eligible parents or guardians took part in the study. Parents reported that children slept an average of 11.03 h per night. Approximately 96% of children met daily sleep duration recommendations from sleep guidelines for their age group. The majority of parents reported that their child had ¿good¿ sleep quality (86.89%). Almost 40% reported that their child woke at least once a night. Sleep hygiene practices were relatively well established; however, a small proportion of parents indicated that they had no rules surrounding bedtime (13.52%) or television use before bed (14.52%). Conclusions: The current study describes the sleep duration, quality and sleep hygiene practices of a sample of pre-school-aged children in New South Wales, Australia. Future research using objective measures of sleep duration and hygiene, as well as assessing a broader spectrum of sleep hygiene practices, is needed.

DOI 10.1111/jpc.14106
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Alice Grady
2019 Robson E, Kamper S, Saragiotto B, Williams C, O'Brien K, Williams A, et al., 'ECONOMIC EVALUATION OFA HEALTH BEHAVIOUR INTERVENTION FOR MUSCULOSKELETAL CONDITIONS (vol 25, pg 1, 2018)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 26 102-103 (2019)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2019 Kamper S, Williams A, Lee H, O'Brien K, Wiggers J, Yoong SL, et al., 'CAUSAL MECHANISMS OF A HEALTH BEHAVIOUR INTERVENTION FOR PATIENTS WITH MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN (vol 25, pg 1, 2018)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 26 103-104 (2019)
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2019 Sutherland R, Brown A, Nathan N, Janssen L, Reynolds R, Walton A, et al., 'Protocol for an effectiveness- implementation hybrid trial to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an m-health intervention to decrease the consumption of discretionary foods packed in school lunchboxes: the 'SWAP IT' trial', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 19 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-019-7725-x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Andrew Searles, John Wiggers, Kathryn L Reilly, Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland
2019 Delaney T, Sutherland R, Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Janssen L, et al., 'A cross-sectional study of the nutritional quality of student canteen purchases from New South Wales primary-school canteens', Public Health Nutrition, 22 3092-3100 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 The Authors. Objective: To assess the nutritional quality of student canteen purchases at recess and lunch, including: (i) the mean energy (kilojoules), saturated fat (gram... [more]

© 2019 The Authors. Objective: To assess the nutritional quality of student canteen purchases at recess and lunch, including: (i) the mean energy (kilojoules), saturated fat (grams), total sugar (grams) and Na (milligrams) and percentage of energy from saturated fat and total sugar; and (ii) the proportion and types of foods purchased that are healthier (green) and less healthy (amber/red) according to a state school canteen policy.Design: A cross-sectional study of student canteen food and beverage recess and lunch purchases.Setting: Twenty-six randomly selected government primary schools that were non-compliant with a state school canteen policy from a region of New South Wales, Australia, were approached to participate.Participants: Students (aged 5-12 years) of participating schools.Results: Eighteen schools (69 %) consented to participate. On average students' recess purchases contained 571·2 kJ energy, 1·6 g saturated fat, 11·6 g total sugar and 132·4 mg Na with 10·0 % of energy from saturated fat and 37·8 % of energy from total sugar. Students' lunch purchases contained 685·4 kJ energy, 1·8 g saturated fat, 12·7 g total sugar and 151·4 mg Na with 9·5 % of energy from saturated fat and 31·8 % of energy from total sugar. Less healthy items represented 72 and 76 % of all items purchased at recess and lunch, respectively, with 'savoury snacks' and 'sugar-sweetened ice blocks and slushies' being the most common recess and lunch purchases, respectively.Conclusions: There is considerable scope to improve the nutritional quality of student purchases from primary-school canteens, with a high percentage of energy from total sugar. Future research is required to identify effective strategies to enhance compliance with canteen policies and support the purchase of healthier foods from school canteens.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980019001903
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, Kathryn L Reilly, John Wiggers, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong
2019 Williams A, Lee H, Kamper SJ, O Brien KM, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Causal mechanisms of a healthy lifestyle intervention for patients with musculoskeletal pain who are overweight or obese', Clinical Rehabilitation, 33 1088-1097 (2019) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2019. Purpose: To assess the causal mechanisms of a healthy lifestyle intervention for patients with chronic low back pain and knee osteoarthritis, who are overwei... [more]

© The Author(s) 2019. Purpose: To assess the causal mechanisms of a healthy lifestyle intervention for patients with chronic low back pain and knee osteoarthritis, who are overweight or obese. Methods: We conducted causal mediation analyses of aggregated data from two randomized controlled trials (RCTs); which included 160 patients with chronic low back pain, and 120 patients with knee osteoarthritis. The intervention consisted of brief advice and referral to a six-month telephone-based healthy lifestyle coaching service. We used causal mediation to estimate the indirect, direct and path-specific effects of hypothesized mediators including: self-reported weight, diet, physical activity, and pain beliefs. Outcomes were pain intensity, disability, and quality of life (QoL). Results: The intervention did not reduce weight, improve diet or physical activity or change pain beliefs, and these mediators were not associated with the outcomes. Sensitivity analyses showed that our estimates were robust to the possible effects of unknown and unmeasured confounding. Conclusions: Our findings show that the intervention did not cause a meaningful change in the hypothesized mediators, and these mediators were not associated with patient-reported outcomes.

DOI 10.1177/0269215519831419
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Serene Yoong
2019 Finch M, Seward K, Wedesweiler T, Stacey F, Grady A, Jones J, et al., 'Challenges of Increasing Childcare Center Compliance With Nutrition Guidelines: A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Intervention Providing Training, Written Menu Feedback, and Printed Resources', American Journal of Health Promotion, 33 399-411 (2019) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2018. Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of an intervention including training, provision of written menu feedback, and printed resources on increasing childcare... [more]

© The Author(s) 2018. Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of an intervention including training, provision of written menu feedback, and printed resources on increasing childcare compliance with nutrition guidelines. Design: Parallel group randomized controlled trial. Setting: Hunter New England region, New South Wales, Australia. Participants: Forty-four childcare centers that prepare and provide food on-site to children while in care. Intervention: The intervention was designed using the Theoretical Domains Framework, targeted managers, and cooks and included implementation strategies that addressed identified barriers. Measures: Outcomes included the proportion of menus providing food servings (per child) compliant with overall nutrition guideline recommendations and each individual food group assessed via menu assessments. Cook knowledge of recommendations, intervention acceptability, adverse events, and barriers were also assessed via questionnaires with cooks and managers. Analysis: Logistic regression models, adjusted for baseline values of the outcome. Results: At baseline and follow-up, zero centers in the intervention and control groups were compliant with the overall menu guidelines or for the vegetable and meat food groups. Follow-up between-group differences in compliance for discretionary (33.3 vs 5, P =.18), dairy (41.7 vs 15, P =.16), breads and cereals (8.3 vs 10 P = 1.00), and fruit (16.7 vs 10, P =.48) were all nonsignificant. Relative to the control group, intervention centers showed a significantly greater increase in percentage of cooks with correct knowledge for vegetable servings (93.3 vs 36.4, P =.008). Conclusion: Although the application of the theoretical framework produced a broader understanding of the determinants of menu compliance, due to the complexity of guidelines, limited follow-up support, lower training uptake, and low intervention dose, the intervention was not effective in supporting the practice change required.

DOI 10.1177/0890117118786859
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2019 Finch M, Stacey F, Jones J, Yoong SL, Grady A, Wolfenden L, 'A randomised controlled trial of performance review and facilitated feedback to increase implementation of healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices in centre-based childcare', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-019-0865-7
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden
2019 Yoong SL, Grady A, Stacey F, Polimeni M, Clayton O, Jones J, et al., 'A pilot randomized controlled trial examining the impact of a sleep intervention targeting home routines on young children's (3-6 years) physical activity.', Pediatric obesity, 14 e12481 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ijpo.12481
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2019 Sutherland R, Nathan N, Brown A, Yoong S, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'A randomized controlled trial to assess the potential efficacy, feasibility and acceptability of an m-health intervention targeting parents of school aged children to improve the nutritional quality of foods packed in the lunchbox 'SWAP IT'', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 16 1-13 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-019-0812-7
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Alix Hall, Rachel Sutherland
2019 Reilly K, Nathan N, Grady A, Wu JHY, Wiggers J, Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, 'Barriers to implementation of a healthy canteen policy: A survey using the theoretical domains framework', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 30 9-14 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Improving implementation of school healthy canteen policies requires a comprehensive understanding of implementatio... [more]

© 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Improving implementation of school healthy canteen policies requires a comprehensive understanding of implementation barriers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess a range of barriers, as reported by canteen managers, using a quantitative survey instrument developed based on a theoretical framework. Methods: A cross sectional survey of primary school canteen managers from the Hunter New England region of New South Wales was conducted of eligible schools in the study region identified as having an operational canteen. Survey items assessed canteen manager employment status, canteen characteristics and potential barriers to healthy canteen policy implementation, aligned to the 14 domains of the theoretical domains framework via a 5-point Likert scale ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). The mean domain scores of canteen managers were calculated, less than four indicating the canteen manager considered the domain was a barrier. Canteen managers were also asked to provide the current canteen menu for audit by a dietitian. Results: Of the 184 participants, 20% (n¿=¿36) were assessed as having menus compliant with the state policy. The five most common domains identified as potential barriers to policy implementation were behavioural regulation (n¿=¿117, 65%), skills (n¿=¿105, 57%), beliefs about capabilities (n¿=¿100, 55%), reinforcement (n¿=¿95, 52%) and goals (n¿=¿95, 52%). Canteen managers who reported optimism as a barrier had significantly lower odds of having a menu compliant with the state policy (OR¿=¿0.39; 95% CI 0.16-0.95, P¿=¿0.038). Conclusions: This study provides further evidence of perceived and actual barriers that canteen managers face when attempting to implement a healthy canteen policy, and highlights the need to address differences in canteen characteristics when planning implementation support. So what?: For public health benefits of nutrition policies within schools to be realised, the barriers to implementation need to be identified and used to help guide implementation support strategies.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.218
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Alice Grady
2019 Reilly K, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Wiggers JH, Delaney T, Reynolds RC, et al., 'Secondary school implementation of a healthy eating policy', HEALTH PROMOTION JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 32 21-25 (2019)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.310
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly
2019 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Reilly K, Delaney T, Janssen LM, Reynolds R, et al., 'Two-year follow-up of a randomised controlled trial to assess the sustainability of a school intervention to improve the implementation of a school-based nutrition policy', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 30 26-33 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: School-based nutrition policies can have a positive effect on the school food environment. The primary aim of this ... [more]

© 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: School-based nutrition policies can have a positive effect on the school food environment. The primary aim of this study was to assess the primary school adherence to a mandatory state-wide healthy canteen policy 12¿months after an effective multi-strategic implementation intervention concluded. Methods: Primary schools were randomised to (a) a 12-14¿months multi-strategic intervention or (b) no-intervention (control). The intervention aimed to improve implementation of a state-wide canteen policy by encouraging schools to remove unhealthy food and beverages (classified as ¿¿red¿¿ or ¿¿banned¿¿) from canteen menus and replace with healthy items (classified as ¿¿green¿¿). No implementation support was provided to either group by the research team between the 12 and 24¿months data collection period. Results: Seventy schools participated, of which 56 schools were assessed at 24-month follow-up. Intervention schools were less likely to have a menu which contained ¿¿red/banned¿¿ items at 24-month follow-up (RR¿=¿2.28; 95% CI: 1.18-4.40; P¿=¿0.01). Intervention schools, however, were not more likely than controls to have a menu which contained >50% ¿¿green¿¿ items at 24-month follow-up (RR¿=¿1.29; 95% CI: 0.98-1.70; P¿=¿0.10). Intervention schools were more likely to adhere to both policy components (no red/banned items and >50% green items on the menu) than control schools (RR¿=¿2.61; 95% CI: 1.29-5.29; P¿=¿0.006). Among intervention schools that were fully adherent to the policy following implementation support (12-month post baseline), all were also adherent at the 24-month follow-up. Conclusion: The intervention was effective in achieving long-term school adherence to a state-wide canteen policy at 24-month follow-up. So what?: The findings suggest that sustained improvements in implementation of school nutrition policies is possible following a period (12¿months) of comprehensive implementation support.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.238
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Kathryn L Reilly, Rebecca Wyse, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Jenna Hollis
2019 Wolfenden L, Chai LK, Jones J, McFadyen T, Hodder R, Kingsland M, et al., 'What happens once a program has been implemented? A call for research investigating strategies to enhance public health program sustainability', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 43 3-4 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12867
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong
2019 Wolfenden L, Jones J, Parmenter B, Razak LA, Wiggers J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'Efficacy of a free-play intervention to increase physical activity during childcare: A randomized controlled trial', Health Education Research, 34 98-112 (2019) [C1]

© ° The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. The primary aim of this study was t... [more]

© ° The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. The primary aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a childcare-based intervention in increasing child physical activity by allowing children unrestricted access to outdoor areas for free-play when structured activity is not taking place. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in six childcare services. Intervention services provided children unrestricted access outdoors for active free-play, while control services provided their usual scheduled periods of outdoor play. Consent was obtained from 231 children. Child moderate to vigorous activity (MVPA), the primary trial outcome, was assessed via accelerometer at baseline and 3 months post baseline. Intervention effects were examined using Generalised Linear Mixed Models. Controlling for child age, gender and baseline outcome measure, at follow-up there were no significant differences between groups in minutes of MVPA in-care (mean difference: 4.85; 95% CI: -3.96, 13.66; P = 0.28), proportion of wear time in-care spent in MVPA (mean difference: 1.52%; 95% CI: -0.50, 3.53; P = 0.14) or total physical activity in-care (mean difference in counts per minute: 23.18; 95% CI: -4.26, 50.61; P = 0.10), nor on measures of child cognition (P = 0.45-0.91). It was concluded that interventions addressing multiple aspects of the childcare and home environment might provide the greatest potential to improve child physical activity.

DOI 10.1093/her/cyy041
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Philip Morgan
2019 Yoong SL, Grady A, Seward K, Finch M, Wiggers J, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'The Impact of a Childcare Food Service Intervention on Child Dietary Intake in Care: An Exploratory Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial', American Journal of Health Promotion, 33 991-1001 (2019) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2019. Purpose: To assess the efficacy of a food service implementation intervention designed to increase provision of foods consistent with nutrition guidelines on... [more]

© The Author(s) 2019. Purpose: To assess the efficacy of a food service implementation intervention designed to increase provision of foods consistent with nutrition guidelines on child consumption of fruit, vegetables, breads/cereals, meat/alternatives, dairy, and diet quality in care. Design: Exploratory cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting: Twenty-five childcare centers in New South Wales, Australia. Sample: Three hundred ninety-five children aged 2 to 5 years. Intervention: Centers were randomized to the intervention or control group. Intervention development was guided by the Theoretical Domains Framework and included securing executive support, provision of group training, resources, audit and feedback, and one-on-one support. The intervention was delivered across six months and the study was conducted between March and December 2016. Measures: Child diet was assessed by educators using a validated questionnaire modified for completion in childcare center. Analysis: Data were analyzed in SAS using generalized linear mixed models adjusted for clustering. Results: Children in the intervention group consumed significantly higher number of serves of vegetables (0.4 serves; P <.001), wholegrain cereals (0.7 serves; P =.02), and meat/alternatives (0.5 serves; P <.001), and had higher diet quality scores (10.3; P <.001). Conclusions: A food service intervention targeting the provision of food significantly improved child dietary intake in care. Such findings are relevant to health promotion practitioners responsible for supporting improvements in child diet.

DOI 10.1177/0890117119837461
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2019 Wyse R, Delaney T, Gibbins P, Ball K, Campbell K, Yoong SL, et al., 'Cluster randomised controlled trial of an online intervention to improve healthy food purchases from primary school canteens: a study protocol of the 'click & crunch' trial', BMJ OPEN, 9 (2019)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-030538
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Kathryn L Reilly, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, John Attia, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rebecca Wyse
2019 Delaney T, Jackson JK, Jones J, Hall A, Dives A, Wedesweiler T, et al., 'A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial of an Intervention to Increase Physical Activity of Preschool-Aged Children Attending Early Childhood Education and Care: Study Protocol for the 'Everybody Energise' Trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2019)
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16214275
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Alix Hall, Nicole Nathan
2019 Wolfenden L, Reilly K, Kingsland M, Grady A, Williams CM, Nathan N, et al., 'Identifying opportunities to develop the science of implementation for community-based non-communicable disease prevention: A review of implementation trials', Preventive Medicine, 118 279-285 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Implementation of interventions in community organisations such as schools, childcare centres, and sporting clubs are recommended to target a range of modifiable risks of n... [more]

© 2018 Implementation of interventions in community organisations such as schools, childcare centres, and sporting clubs are recommended to target a range of modifiable risks of non-communicable diseases. Poor implementation, however, is common and has contributed to the failure of non-communicable disease interventions globally. This study aimed to characterise experimental research regarding strategies to improve implementation of chronic disease prevention programs in community settings. The review used data collected in three comprehensive systematic reviews undertaken between August 2015 and July 2017. Randomised controlled trials, including cluster design, and non-randomised trials with a parallel control group were included. The data were extracted to describe trial characteristics, implementation strategies employed, implementation outcomes and study quality. Of the 40 implementation trials included in the study, unhealthy diet was the most common risk factor targeted (n = 20). The most commonly reported implementation strategies were educational meetings (n = 38, 95%), educational materials (n = 36, 90%) and educational outreach visits (n = 29, 73%). Few trials were conducted ¿at-scale¿ (n = 8, 20%) or reported adverse effects (n = 5, 13%). The reporting of implementation related outcomes; intervention adoption (n = 13, 33%); appropriateness (n = 11, 28%); acceptability (n = 8, 20%); feasibility (n = 8, 20%); cost (n = 3, 8%); and sustainability (n = 2, 5%); was limited. For the majority of trials, risk of bias was high for blinding of study personnel/participants and outcome assessors. Testing of strategies to improve implementation of non-communicable disease prevention strategies in community settings, delivered ¿at-scale¿, utilising implementation frameworks, including a comprehensive range of implementation outcomes should be priority areas for future research in implementation science.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.11.014
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly, Rebecca Hodder, Luke Wolfenden
2019 Yoong SL, Nathan N, Reilly K, Sutherland R, Straus S, Barnes C, et al., 'Adapting implementation strategies: a case study of how to support implementation of healthy canteen policies', Public Health, 177 19-25 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 The Royal Society for Public Health Objectives: Although evidence-based interventions (EBIs) and effective strategies to implement them exist, they cannot be used by policy... [more]

© 2019 The Royal Society for Public Health Objectives: Although evidence-based interventions (EBIs) and effective strategies to implement them exist, they cannot be used by policy makers and practitioners if they do not align with end users¿ needs. As such, adaptations to EBIs and implementation approaches are likely to occur to increase ¿fit¿ with end users¿ capacity. This article describes an approach undertaken by a population health service delivery unit in one Australian state to develop an adapted implementation strategy to support the implementation of the mandatory healthy canteen policy (EBI) to all schools located in the service delivery region. Study design: This is a case study of adapting an intervention to improve implementation of the healthy canteen policy. Methods and results: This is a six-step pragmatic, empirically driven approach. The steps include (i) adapt, where appropriate, the EBI to facilitate implementation; (ii) identify end users¿ capacity for implementation; (iii) identify opportunities to adapt the implementation interventions while preserving meaningful intervention impact; (iv) undertake program adaptation; (v) develop training and resources to support delivery of implementation strategies and; (vi) evaluate the adapted intervention. This article describes the application of these steps by the authors to develop an adapted support strategy consistent with end users¿ needs. Conclusions: This study provides some guidance on how to adapt implementation support approaches particularly when EBIs cannot be adapted. Future empirical research providing guidance on making practical adaptation decisions are needed.

DOI 10.1016/j.puhe.2019.07.003
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2019 Williams A, Kamper S, Wiggers J, O'Brien K, Lee H, Wolfenden L, et al., 'DO MUSCULOSKELETAL CONDITIONS INCREASE THE RISK OF CHRONIC DISEASE: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEWAND META- ANALYSIS OF COHORT STUDIES (vol 25, pg 1, 2018)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 26 114-114 (2019)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2019 Wolfenden L, Bolsewicz K, Grady A, McCrabb S, Kingsland M, Wiggers J, et al., 'Optimisation: Defining and exploring a concept to enhance the impact of public health initiatives', Health Research Policy and Systems, 17 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12961-019-0502-6
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Alix Hall, John Attia, Rachel Sutherland, Rebecca Hodder, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Sam Mccrabb, John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan
2018 Lee H, Hall A, Nathan N, Reilly KL, Seward K, Williams CM, et al., 'Mechanisms of implementing public health interventions: A pooled causal mediation analysis of randomised trials', Implementation Science, 13 1-11 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-018-0734-9
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Alix Hall, Kathryn L Reilly
2018 O'Brien KM, Hodder RK, Wiggers J, Williams A, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Effectiveness of telephone-based interventions for managing osteoarthritis and spinal pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis', PEERJ, 6 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.7717/peerj.5846
Citations Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong, Flora Tzelepis, Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers
2018 Abdul Razak L, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, Morgan P, Jones J, Finch M, et al., 'Impact of scheduling multiple free-play periods in childcare on child moderate-to-vigorous physical activity: a cluster randomised trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 15 1-13 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-018-0665-5
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong, Philip Morgan, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2018 Yoong SL, Stockings E, Chai LK, Tzelepis F, Wiggers J, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Prevalence of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) use among youth globally: A systematic review and meta-analysis of country level data', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42 303-308 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The Authors. Objective: To describe the prevalence and change in prevalence of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) use in youth by country and combustible smoking s... [more]

© 2018 The Authors. Objective: To describe the prevalence and change in prevalence of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) use in youth by country and combustible smoking status. Methods: Databases and the grey literature were systematically searched to December 2015. Studies describing the prevalence of ENDS use in the general population aged =20 years in a defined geographical region were included. Where multiple estimates were available within countries, prevalence estimates of ENDS use were pooled for each country separately. Results: Data from 27 publications (36 surveys) from 13 countries were included. The prevalence of ENDS ever use in 2013¿2015 among youth were highest in Poland (62.1%; 95%CI: 59.9-64.2%), and lowest in Italy (5.9%; 95%CI: 3.3-9.2%). Among non-smoking youth, the prevalence of ENDS ever use in 2013¿2015 varied, ranging from 4.2% (95%CI: 3.8-4.6%) in the US to 14.0% in New Zealand (95%CI: 12.7-15.4%). The prevalence of ENDS ever use among current tobacco smoking youth was the highest in Canada (71.9%, 95%CI: 70.9-72.8%) and lowest in Italy (29.9%, 95%CI: 18.5-42.5%). Between 2008 and 2015, ENDS ever use among youth increased in Poland, Korea, New Zealand and the US; decreased in Italy and Canada; and remained stable in the UK. Conclusions: There is considerable heterogeneity in ENDS use among youth globally across countries and also between current smokers and non-smokers. Implications for public health: Population-level survey data on ENDS use is needed to inform public health policy and messaging globally.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12777
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 26
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Christopher Oldmeadow, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, John Attia, Luke Wolfenden
2018 Wolfenden L, Stockings E, Yoong SL, 'Regulating e-cigarettes in Australia: implications for tobacco use by young people', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 208 8-+ (2018)
DOI 10.5694/mja17.00787
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2018 O'Brien KM, Wiggers J, Williams A, Campbell E, Hodder RK, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Telephone-based weight loss support for patients with knee osteoarthritis: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial', Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, 26 485-494 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Osteoarthritis Research Society International Objective: To determine the effectiveness of telephone-based weight loss support in reducing the intensity of knee pain in pat... [more]

© 2018 Osteoarthritis Research Society International Objective: To determine the effectiveness of telephone-based weight loss support in reducing the intensity of knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis, who are overweight or obese, compared to usual care. Design: We conducted a parallel randomised controlled trial (RCT), embedded within a cohort multiple RCT of patients on a waiting list for outpatient orthopaedic consultation at a tertiary referral hospital in NSW, Australia. Patients with knee osteoarthritis, classified as overweight or obese [body mass index (BMI) between =27 kg/m2 and <40 kg/m2] were randomly allocated to receive referral to an existing non-disease specific government funded 6-month telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle service or usual care. The primary outcome was knee pain intensity measured using an 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS) over 6-month follow-up. A number of secondary outcomes, including self-reported weight were measured. Data analysis was by intention-to-treat according to a pre-published analysis plan. Results: Between May 19 and June 30 2015, 120 patients were randomly assigned to the intervention (59 analysed, one post-randomisation exclusion) or usual care (60 analysed). We found no statistically significant between group differences in pain intensity [area under the curve (AUC), mean difference 5.4, 95%CI: -13.7 to 24.5, P = 0.58] or weight change at 6 months (self-reported; mean difference -0.4, 95%CI: -2.6 to 1.8, P = 0.74). Conclusions: Among patients with knee osteoarthritis who are overweight, telephone-based weight loss support, provided using an existing 6-month weight management and healthy lifestyle service did not reduce knee pain intensity or weight, compared with usual care. Trial registration number: ACTRN12615000490572

DOI 10.1016/j.joca.2018.01.003
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2018 Nathan N, Elton B, Babic M, McCarthy N, Sutherland R, Presseau J, et al., 'Barriers and facilitators to the implementation of physical activity policies in schools: A systematic review', Preventive Medicine, 107 45-53 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.11.012
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong
2018 Williams A, Wiggers J, O'Brien KM, Wolfenden L, Yoong SL, Hodder RK, et al., 'Effectiveness of a healthy lifestyle intervention for chronic low back pain: a randomised controlled trial.', Pain, 159 1137-1146 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001198
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2018 Reilly KL, Reeves P, Deeming S, Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Wiggers J, 'Economic analysis of three interventions of different intensity in improving school implementation of a government healthy canteen policy in Australia: Costs, incremental and relative cost effectiveness', BMC Public Health, 18 1-9 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5315-y
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly
2018 Wolfenden L, Goldman S, Stacey FG, Grady A, Kingsland M, Williams CM, et al., 'Strategies to improve the implementation of workplace-based policies or practices targeting tobacco, alcohol, diet, physical activity and obesity.', Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 11 CD012439 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012439.pub2
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Rebecca Hodder
2018 Grady A, Seward K, Finch M, Fielding A, Stacey F, Jones J, et al., 'Barriers and Enablers to Implementation of Dietary Guidelines in Early Childhood Education Centers in Australia: Application of the Theoretical Domains Framework.', Journal of nutrition education and behavior, 50 229-237.e1 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jneb.2017.09.023
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Alison A Fielding, Serene Yoong
2018 Williams A, Kamper SJ, Wiggers JH, O'Brien KM, Lee H, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Musculoskeletal conditions may increase the risk of chronic disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies', BMC Medicine, 16 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12916-018-1151-2
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers
2018 Yoong SL, Stockings E, Wolfenden L, 'Regulating e-cigarettes in Australia: Implications for tobacco use by young people', Medical Journal of Australia, 208 415-415.e1 (2018)
DOI 10.5694/mja17.01280
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2018 Lee SXJ, Burrows T, Yoong S, Wyse R, 'Association of parental investment of time and cost in food provisioning with adherence to dietary guidelines for the consumption of fruits, vegetables and non-core foods in pre-schoolers', Public Health Nutrition, 21 2434-2442 (2018) [C1]

Copyright © The Authors 2018. Objective To assess whether parent-reported time and cost for provision of food is associated with consumption of fruits, vegetables and non-core foo... [more]

Copyright © The Authors 2018. Objective To assess whether parent-reported time and cost for provision of food is associated with consumption of fruits, vegetables and non-core foods in pre-schoolers.Design Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the Healthy Habits randomised controlled trial. Two subscales of the Children's Dietary Questionnaire (CDQ) were used to assess fruit and vegetable, and non-core food consumption.Setting Thirty pre-schools in the Hunter Region of New South Wales, Australia.Subjects Parents (n 396) with a child aged 3-5 years attending a participating pre-school were recruited. Parents needed to reside with that child for at least four days per week and have primary responsibility for providing meals and snacks to their child.Results Sixty-three per cent of children had a parent-reported subscale score indicating adherence to dietary guidelines for fruit and vegetable intake, while 64% of children had a subscale score indicating they were exceeding dietary guidelines for non-core foods. Regression models revealed significant positive associations between higher CDQ scores for non-core foods (indicating higher consumption levels) and minutes that parents spent preparing food (P=0·032 and 0·025) and amount spent on purchasing food (P=0·043 and 0·020). The magnitude of the effects was small (estimate=0·003 and 0·001).Conclusions Time and cost spent by parents on provision of food was not significantly associated with child fruit and vegetable consumption. Further explorations into time spent on food preparation and cost of food procurement are warranted to help address the increased consumption of non-core foods by pre-school children.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980018001465
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Tracy Burrows
2018 Ooi JY, Sutherland R, Nathan N, Yoong SL, Janssen L, Wrigley J, Wolfenden L, 'A cluster randomised controlled trial of a sugar-sweetened beverage intervention in secondary schools: Pilot study protocol', Nutrition and Health, 24 217-229 (2018)

© The Author(s) 2018. Background: Due to the rising prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents, reducing childhood overweight and obesity rates is a public-h... [more]

© The Author(s) 2018. Background: Due to the rising prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents, reducing childhood overweight and obesity rates is a public-health priority. A significant source of excess sugar and energy in children¿s diets comes from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), with adolescents having the highest intake of all age groups. However, existing interventions targeting SSB intake in adolescents have multiple limitations. Schools have proven to be an appropriate setting for improving student health. Aim: To assess the effectiveness of a school-based SSB intervention in reducing daily SSB consumption and daily percentage energy from SSBs of secondary-school students. Methods: A pilot study (switchURsip) was designed based on the Health Promoting Schools framework components. A convenience sample of schools in New South Wales, Australia will be used to recruit six schools (three intervention; three control). The study incorporates strategies that focus on factors associated with SSB intake in adolescents. These strategies include: lesson plans on SSB; communication with students and parents; school challenge to build peer support; and school nutrition environment modifications. Support strategies to facilitate implementation are executive leadership and school committees, auditing and feedback, providing resources, staff professional learning and communication and marketing. Conclusion: The high intake of SSB in adolescents has been consistently linked to having overweight and obesity, hence, interventions in this area should be prioritised. This pilot study intends to address identified evidence gaps by piloting the first intervention in Australia of its kind to reduce SSB intake in adolescents.

DOI 10.1177/0260106018791856
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland
2018 McFadyen T, Chai LK, Wyse R, Kingsland M, Yoong SL, Clinton-McHarg T, et al., 'Strategies to improve the implementation of policies, practices or programmes in sporting organisations targeting poor diet, physical inactivity, obesity, risky alcohol use or tobacco use: a systematic review', BMJ open, 8 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019151
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams
2018 Seward K, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Wiggers J, Wyse R, Jones J, Yoong SL, 'Improving the implementation of nutrition guidelines in childcare centres improves child dietary intake: findings of a randomised trial of an implementation intervention.', Public health nutrition, 21 607-617 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/s1368980017003366
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2018 Clinton-McHarg T, Janssen L, Delaney T, Reilly K, Regan T, Nathan N, et al., 'Availability of food and beverage items on school canteen menus and association with items purchased by children of primary-school age', Public Health Nutrition, 21 2907-2914 (2018) [C1]

© The Authors 2018Â. Objective To (i) describe the proportion of foods and beverages available on school canteen menus classified as having high (&apos;green&apos;), moderate (&ap... [more]

© The Authors 2018Â. Objective To (i) describe the proportion of foods and beverages available on school canteen menus classified as having high ('green'), moderate ('amber') or low ('red') nutritional value; (ii) describe the proportion of these items purchased by students; and (iii) examine the association between food and beverage availability on school canteen menus and food and beverage purchasing by students.Design A cross-sectional study was conducted as part of a larger randomised controlled trial (RCT).Setting A nested sample of fifty randomly selected government schools from the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia, who had participated in an RCT of an intervention to improve the availability of healthy foods sold from school canteens, was approached to participate.Subjects School principals, canteen managers and students.Results The average proportion of green, amber and red items available on menus was 47·9, 47·4 and 4·7 %, respectively. The average proportion of green, amber and red items purchased by students was 30·1, 61·8 and 8·1 %, respectively. There was a significant positive relationship between the availability and purchasing of green (R 2=0·66), amber (R 2=0·57) and red menu items (R 2=0·61). In each case, a 1 % increase in the availability of items in these categories was associated with a 1·21, 1·35 and 1·67 % increase in purchasing of items of high, moderate and low nutritional value, respectively.Conclusions The findings provide support for school-based policies to improve the relative availability of healthy foods for sale in these settings.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980018001726
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Kathryn L Reilly
2018 Williams A, van Dongen JM, Kamper SJ, O Brien KM, Wolfenden L, Yoong SL, et al., 'Economic evaluation of a healthy lifestyle intervention for chronic low back pain: a randomised controlled trial (2018)
DOI 10.1101/296285
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2018 Williams A, Lee H, Kamper SJ, O Brien KM, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Causal mechanisms of a healthy lifestyle intervention for patients with musculoskeletal pain who are overweight or obese (2018)
DOI 10.1101/286757
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2018 Hodder RK, O'Brien KM, Stacey FG, Wyse RJ, Clinton-Mcharg T, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2018 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub5
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, Erica James, Rebecca Wyse, Flora Tzelepis, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Kate Bartlem
2018 Grady A, Yoong S, Sutherland R, Lee H, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, 'Improving the public health impact of eHealth and mHealth interventions', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 42 118-119 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12771
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Alice Grady, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2018 Reilly KL, Nathan N, Wiggers J, Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, 'Scale up of a multi-strategic intervention to increase implementation of a school healthy canteen policy: Findings of an intervention trial', BMC Public Health, 18 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Implementation interventions delivered in schools to improve food provision have been found to improve student diet and reduce child obesity risk... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Implementation interventions delivered in schools to improve food provision have been found to improve student diet and reduce child obesity risk. If the health benefits of food availability policies are to be realised, interventions that are effective need to be implemented at scale, across an entire population of schools. This study aims to assess the potential effectiveness of an intervention in increasing the implementation, at scale, of a healthy canteen policy by Australian primary schools. Methods: A non-controlled before and after study was conducted in primary schools located in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia. Schools received a multi-component intervention adapted from a previous efficacious and cost-effective randomised control trial. The primary trial outcome was the proportion of canteen menus compliant with the state healthy canteen policy, assessed via menu audit at baseline and follow-up by dietitians. Secondary outcomes included policy reach and adoption and maintenance policy implementation. Results: Of the 173 schools eligible for inclusion in the trial, 168 provided menus at baseline and 157 menus were collected at follow-up. At follow-up, multiple imputation analysis found 35% (55/157) of schools compared to 17% (29/168) at baseline (OR = 2.8 (1.6-4.7), p = < 0.001) had menus compliant with the state healthy canteen policy. As an assessment of the impact of the intervention on policy reach, canteen manager and principal knowledge of the policy increased from 64% (n = 76) and 38% (n = 44) respectively at baseline to 69% (n = 89) and 60% (n = 70) at follow-up (p = 0.393, p = 0.026). Adoption of the policy increased from 80% (n = 93) at baseline to 90% (n = 104) at follow-up (p = 0.005) for principals, and from 86% (n = 105) to 96% (n = 124) (p = 0.0001) for canteen managers. Multiple imputation analysis showed intervention effects were maintained six-months post intervention (33% of menus compliant OR = 2.6 (1.5-4.5), p = < 0.001 compared to baseline). Conclusions: This study found school canteen compliance with a healthy food policy increased in association with a multi-strategy intervention delivered at scale. The study provides evidence for public health policy makers and practitioners regarding strategies and modes of support required to support improvement in nutrition policy implementation across entire populations of schools.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5786-x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan
2018 Reilly K, Nathan N, Wu JHY, Delaney T, Wyse R, Cobcroft M, et al., 'Assessing the potential impact of a front-of-pack nutritional rating system on food availability in school canteens: A randomised controlled trial', Appetite, 121 309-315 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Background Front-of-pack graphical nutritional rating of products is becoming an important strategy in many countries to improve healthy food purchases by consumers. Eviden... [more]

© 2017 Background Front-of-pack graphical nutritional rating of products is becoming an important strategy in many countries to improve healthy food purchases by consumers. Evidence of the effectiveness of such on facilitating healthy food choices by school food service providers has not been reported. The primary aim of the study was to assess the impact of providing front-of-pack nutritional rating information on school canteen managers¿ likely food selections. Secondary outcomes were canteen manager awareness, attitudes and reported barriers to using the front-of-pack information. Methods A randomised controlled trial involving primary school canteen managers was conducted in a single region in New South Wales, Australia. Eligible participants were randomised to an intervention or control group and asked in a telephone interview which of 12 common food products sold in school canteens they would sell. Both groups received product name and brand information. The intervention group also received information regarding the nutritional rating of products. Results Canteen managers in the intervention group were significantly more likely than those in the control group to indicate they would sell three of the six ¿healthier¿ products (p = 0.036, 0.005, 0.009). There was no difference between groups in the likelihood of making available for sale any of the six ¿less healthy¿ products. The majority of canteen managers who had heard of a product nutritional rating system agreed that it was helpful in identifying ¿healthier¿ foods (88%, n = 31). Conclusions The inclusion of product nutritional rating information has the potential to improve the availability of some ¿healthier¿ items on canteen menus and contribute to improving child dietary intake. Further research is required to determine whether the use of product nutritional rating information actually makes a difference to canteen manager choices.

DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2017.11.103
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers, Kathryn L Reilly
2017 Seward K, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Finch M, Wyse R, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Measuring implementation behaviour of menu guidelines in the childcare setting: confirmatory factor analysis of a theoretical domains framework questionnaire (TDFQ)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0499-6
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2017 Jones J, Yoong SL, Wyse R, Ward DS, Wolfenden L, 'Improving the impact of obesity prevention interventions in the childcare setting: The need for a systematic application of implementation science', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 53 211-213 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/jpc.13464
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2017 McFadyen T, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Tindall J, Yoong SL, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'The Feasibility and Acceptability of a Web-Based Alcohol Management Intervention in Community Sports Clubs: A Cross-Sectional Study.', JMIR Res Protoc, 6 e123 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/resprot.6859
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Wolfenden L, Nathan NK, Sutherland R, Yoong SL, Hodder RK, Wyse RJ, et al., 'Strategies for enhancing the implementation of school-based policies or practices targeting risk factors for chronic disease', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011677.pub2
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Alison A Fielding, Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong, Flora Tzelepis, Rebecca Wyse, Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2017 Delaney T, Wyse R, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Ball K, et al., 'Cluster randomized controlled trial of a consumer behavior intervention to improve healthy food purchases from online canteens.', The American journal of clinical nutrition, 106 1311-1320 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.117.158329
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse
2017 Seward K, Finch M, Yoong SL, Wyse R, Jones J, Grady A, et al., 'Factors that influence the implementation of dietary guidelines regarding food provision in centre based childcare services: A systematic review', Preventive Medicine, 105 197-205 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Children attending centre based childcare services consume as much as two thirds of their daily dietary requirements while in care. However, such services often fail to pro... [more]

© 2017 Children attending centre based childcare services consume as much as two thirds of their daily dietary requirements while in care. However, such services often fail to provide foods that are consistent with guideline recommendations. Developing strategies to improve childcare service adherence to menu dietary guidelines requires a comprehensive understanding of factors that may impede or promote implementation. The primary aim of this systematic review is to describe factors (barriers and facilitators) that may influence the implementation of menu dietary guidelines regarding food provision in centre-based childcare services and to map these factors to a theoretical framework. Over 7000 citations were identified from all sources. Duplicate abstracts were removed and selection criteria applied. Twelve studies (1994¿2015) were included in the review. Dual data extraction was conducted and the reported factors were synthesised using the theoretical domains framework (TDF). Barriers and facilitators identified in qualitative studies were classified into 8 and 10 of the 14 TDF domains. Barriers and facilitators reported in quantitative studies covered 6 and 3 TDF domains respectively. The most common domain of which both barriers and facilitators to the implementation of menu dietary guidelines were identified was ¿environmental context and resources¿. This is the first study that comprehensively assesses literature to identify factors that influence the implementation of menu dietary guidelines in childcare services utilising a theoretical framework. Findings provide guidance to support researchers and policy makers design strategies to improve menu dietary guideline implementation and, as such have the potential to improve food provision in care.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.09.024
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan
2017 Yoong SL, Grady A, Wiggers J, Flood V, Rissel C, Finch M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an online menu planning intervention to improve childcare service adherence to dietary guidelines: a study protocol', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017498
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Alison A Fielding, Alice Grady, Andrew Searles, John Wiggers
2017 Delaney T, Wyse R, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Ball K, et al., 'Cluster randomised controlled trial of a consumer behaviour intervention to improve healthy food purchases from online canteens: study protocol', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-014569
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Hodder RK, Stacey FG, Wyse RJ, O'Brien KM, Clinton-McHarg T, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub3
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Flora Tzelepis, Erica James, Rebecca Hodder, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Kate Bartlem, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Rebecca Wyse
2017 Stacey FG, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Grady A, Jessop K, Wedesweiler T, et al., 'Evidence of the Potential Effectiveness of Centre-Based Childcare Policies and Practices on Child Diet and Physical Activity: Consolidating Evidence from Systematic Reviews of Intervention Trials and Observational Studies', Current Nutrition Reports, 6 228-246 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s13668-017-0212-z
Citations Scopus - 14
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Kate Bartlem, Alice Grady, Rachel Sutherland
2017 Yoong S, 'Preschool bedtime associated with adolescent obesity', Journal of Pediatrics, 180 291-294 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.10.060
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2017 Ben Charif A, Zomahoun HTV, LeBlanc A, Langlois L, Wolfenden L, Yoong SL, et al., 'Effective strategies for scaling up evidence-based practices in primary care: A systematic review', Implementation Science, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-017-0672-y
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Hodder RK, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Nepal S, Dray J, et al., 'Systematic review of universal school-based resilience interventions targeting adolescent tobacco, alcohol or illicit substance use: A meta-analysis', Preventive Medicine, 100 248-268 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Universal school-based interventions that address adolescent ¿resilience¿ may represent a means of reducing adolescent substance use, however previous systema... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Universal school-based interventions that address adolescent ¿resilience¿ may represent a means of reducing adolescent substance use, however previous systematic reviews have not examined the effectiveness of such an intervention approach. A systematic review was undertaken to 1) assess whether universal school-based ¿resilience¿ interventions are effective in reducing the prevalence of tobacco, alcohol or illicit substance use by adolescents, and 2) describe such effectiveness per intervention characteristic subgroups. Eligible studies were peer-reviewed reports (1994¿2015) of randomised controlled trials including participants aged 5¿18¿years that reported adolescent tobacco, alcohol or illicit substance use, and implemented a universal school-based ¿resilience¿ intervention (i.e. those addressing both individual (e.g. self-esteem) and environmental (e.g. school connectedness) protective factors of resilience). Trial effects for binary outcomes were synthesised via meta-analyses and effect sizes reported as odds ratios. Subgroup (by intervention type, prevention approach, setting, intervention duration, follow-up length) and sensitivity analyses (excluding studies at high risk of bias) were conducted. Nineteen eligible studies were identified from 16,619 records (tobacco: n¿=¿15, alcohol: n¿=¿17, illicit: n¿=¿11). An overall intervention effect was found for binary measures of illicit substance use (n¿=¿10; OR: 0.78, 95%CI: 0.6¿0.93, p¿=¿0.007,Tau2¿=¿0.0, I2¿=¿0%), but not tobacco or alcohol use. A similar result was found when studies assessed as high risk of bias were excluded. Overall intervention effects were evident for illicit substance use within multiple intervention characteristic subgroups, but not tobacco and alcohol. Such results support the implementation of universal school-based interventions that address ¿resilience¿ protective factors to reduce adolescent illicit substance use, however suggest alternate approaches are required for tobacco and alcohol use. PROSPERO registration: CRD42014004906.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.04.003
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray, Megan Freund, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Serene Yoong
2017 Nathan N, Wiggers J, Wyse R, Williams CM, Sutherland R, Yoong SL, et al., 'Factors associated with the implementation of a vegetable and fruit program in a population of Australian elementary schools', Health Education Research, 32 197-205 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyx038
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2017 Wolfenden L, Yoong SL, Williams CM, Grimshaw J, Durrheim DN, Gillham K, Wiggers J, 'Embedding researchers in health service organizations improves research translation and health service performance: the Australian Hunter New England Population Health example.', Journal of clinical epidemiology, 85 3-11 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.03.007
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, David Durrheim, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Jones J, Wyse R, Wiggers J, Yoong SL, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'Dietary intake and physical activity levels of children attending Australian childcare services.', Nutr Diet, 74 446-453 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12375
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Alison A Fielding, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Jenna Hollis, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Wyse R, Yoong SL, Dodds P, Campbell L, Delaney T, Nathan N, et al., 'Online canteens: Awareness, use, barriers to use, and the acceptability of potential online strategies to improve public health nutrition in primary schools', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 28 67-71 (2017) [C1]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2017. Issue addressed: This study of primary school principals assessed the awareness, use, barriers to use and acceptability of online c... [more]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2017. Issue addressed: This study of primary school principals assessed the awareness, use, barriers to use and acceptability of online canteens. Methods: A telephone survey of 123 primary school principals within the Hunter New England Region of New South Wales, Australia was conducted from September 2014 to November 2014. Results: Fifty-six percent of principals were aware of the existence of online canteens, with 8% having implemented such a system, and 38% likely to do so in the future. Medium/large schools were more likely to be aware of or to use online canteens, however there were no differences in awareness or use in relation to school rurality or socioeconomic advantage. Principals cited parent internet access as the most commonly identified perceived barrier to online canteen use, and the majority of principals (71-93%) agreed that it would be acceptable to implement a range of consumer behaviour strategies via an online canteen. Conclusions: Study findings suggest that despite relatively low levels of current use, online canteens have the potential to reach a large proportion of school communities in the future, across geographical and socioeconomic divides, and that the nutrition interventions which they have the capacity to deliver are considered acceptable to school principals. So what? Online canteens may represent an opportunity to deliver nutrition interventions to school communities. Future research should examine the feasibility and potential effectiveness of interventions delivered via this modality.

DOI 10.1071/HE15095
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Rebecca Wyse
2017 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Janssen LM, Wiggers J, Reilly K, Delaney T, et al., 'Multi-strategic intervention to enhance implementation of healthy canteen policy: a randomised controlled trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0537-9
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Megan Freund
2017 Lee H, Wiggers J, Kamper SJ, Williams A, O'Brien KM, Hodder RK, et al., 'Mechanism evaluation of a lifestyle intervention for patients with musculoskeletal pain who are overweight or obese: protocol for a causal mediation analysis', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-014652
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2016 Nathan N, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Reilly K, Delaney T, Janssen L, et al., 'Effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention to enhance implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: a randomised controlled trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0431-5
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly
2016 Finch M, Jones J, Yoong S, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Effectiveness of centre-based childcare interventions in increasing child physical activity: A systematic review and meta-analysis for policymakers and practitioners', Obesity Reviews, 17 412-428 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 World Obesity. Context: The review describes the effectiveness of physical activity interventions implemented in centre-based childcare services and (i) examines characteri... [more]

© 2016 World Obesity. Context: The review describes the effectiveness of physical activity interventions implemented in centre-based childcare services and (i) examines characteristics of interventions that may influence intervention effects; (ii) describes the effects of pragmatic interventions and non-pragmatic interventions; (iii) assesses adverse effects; and (iv) describes cost-effectiveness of interventions Methods: Data sources were Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ERIC, CINAHL, SCOPUS and SPORTDISCUS. Studies selected included randomized controlled trials conducted in centre-based childcare including an intervention to increase objectively measured physical activity in children aged less than 6years. Data were converted into standardized mean difference (SMD) and analysed using a random effects model. Results: Overall interventions significantly improved child physical activity (SMD 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.12-0.76). Significant effects were found for interventions that included structured activity (SMD 0.53; 95% CI: 0.12-0.94), delivery by experts (SMD 1.26; 95% CI: 0.20-2.32) and used theory (SMD 0.76; 95% CI: 0.08-1.44). Non-pragmatic (SMD 0.80; 95% CI: 0.12-1.48) but not pragmatic interventions (SMD 0.10; 95% CI:-0.13-0.33) improved child physical activity. One trial reported adverse events, and no trials reported cost data. Conclusions: Intervention effectiveness varied according to intervention and trial design characteristics. Pragmatic trials were not effective, and information on cost and adverse effects was lacking. Evidence gaps remain for policymakers and practitioners regarding the effectiveness and feasibility of childcare-based physical activity interventions.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12392
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2016 Wolfenden L, Grimshaw J, Williams CM, Yoong SL, 'Time to consider sharing data extracted from trials included in systematic reviews', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 5 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s13643-016-0361-y
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong
2016 Yoong SL, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Reilly K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'CAFE: a multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: a randomised controlled trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0453-z
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Rebecca Wyse, Kathryn L Reilly
2016 O'Brien KM, Wiggers J, Williams A, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, et al., 'Randomised controlled trial of referral to a telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle programme for patients with knee osteoarthritis who are overweight or obese: a study protocol', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010203
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2016 Wolfenden L, Finch M, Wyse R, Clinton-McHarg T, Yoong SL, 'Time to focus on implementation: the need to re-orient research on physical activity in childcare services', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 40 209-210 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12518
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Serene Yoong
2016 Clinton-McHarg T, Yoong SL, Tzelepis F, Regan T, Fielding A, Skelton E, et al., 'Psychometric properties of implementation measures for public health and community settings and mapping of constructs against the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research: a systematic review', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0512-5
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Eliza Skelton, Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Alison A Fielding
2016 Williams A, Wiggers J, O'Brien KM, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Campbell E, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of a lifestyle behavioural intervention for patients with low back pain, who are overweight or obese: study protocol', BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS, 17 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-0922-1
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2016 Karimkhani C, Trikha R, Aksut B, Jones T, Boyers LN, Schlichte M, et al., 'Identifying gaps for research prioritisation: Global burden of external causes of injury as reflected in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.', Injury, 47 1151-1157 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.injury.2015.12.019
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2016 Wolfenden L, Milat AJ, Lecathelinais C, Skelton E, Clinton-McHarg T, Williams C, et al., 'A bibliographic review of public health dissemination and implementation research output and citation rates', Preventive Medicine Reports, 4 441-443 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors The aim of this study was to describe the research output and citation rates (academic impact) of public health dissemination and implementation research accord... [more]

© 2016 The Authors The aim of this study was to describe the research output and citation rates (academic impact) of public health dissemination and implementation research according to research design and study type. A cross sectional bibliographic study was undertaken in 2013. All original data-based studies and review articles focusing on dissemination and implementation research that had been published in 10 randomly selected public health journals in 2008 were audited. The electronic database ¿Scopus¿ was used to calculate 5-year citation rates for all included publications. Of the 1648 publications examined, 216 were original data-based research or literature reviews focusing on dissemination and implementation research. Of these 72% were classified as descriptive/epidemiological, 26% were intervention and just 1.9% were measurement research. Cross-sectional studies were the most common study design (47%). Reviews, randomized trials, non-randomized trials and decision/cost-effectiveness studies each represented between 6 and 10% of all output. Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials and cohort studies were the most frequently cited study designs. The study suggests that publications that had the greatest academic impact (highest citation rates) made up only a small proportion of overall public health dissemination and implementation research output.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2016.08.006
Citations Scopus - 15
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Eliza Skelton
2016 Seward K, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Wiggers J, Wyse R, Jones J, et al., 'Multistrategy childcare-based intervention to improve compliance with nutrition guidelines versus usual care in long day care services: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010786
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2016 Paul C, Wolfenden L, Tzelepis F, Yoong S, Bowman J, Wye P, et al., 'Nicotine replacement therapy as a smoking cessation aid among disadvantaged smokers: What answers do we need?', Drug and Alcohol Review, 35 785-789 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs In Australia and New Zealand, population groups who experience social disadvantage smoke at much higher rates t... [more]

© 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs In Australia and New Zealand, population groups who experience social disadvantage smoke at much higher rates than the general population. As there are limited data specific to these groups regarding the success of nicotine replacement therapy for smoking cessation, this commentary will provide an overview of the relevant international literature supplemented with observational data relevant to the policy contexts in Australia and New Zealand. [Paul C, Wolfenden L, Tzelepis F, Yoong S, Bowman J, Wye P, Sherwood E, Rose S, Wiggers J. Nicotine replacement therapy as a smoking cessation aid among disadvantaged smokers: What answers do we need? Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:785¿789].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12362
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Serene Yoong
2016 Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Wiggers J, Nathan N, Yoong SL, 'Improving the translation of health promotion interventions using effectiveness-implementation hybrid designs in program evaluations', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 27 204-207 (2016) [C1]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2016. Bridging the gap between research-based evidence and public health policy and practice is a considerable challenge to public health... [more]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2016. Bridging the gap between research-based evidence and public health policy and practice is a considerable challenge to public health improvement this century, requiring a rethinking of conventional approaches to health research production and use. Traditionally the process of research translation has been viewed as linear and unidirectional, from epidemiological research to identify health problems and determinants, to efficacy and effectiveness trials and studies of strategies to maximise the implementation and dissemination of evidence-based interventions in practice. A criticism of this approach is the considerable time it takes to achieve translation of health research into practice. Hybrid evaluation designs provide one means of accelerating the research translation process by simultaneously collecting information regarding intervention impacts and implementation and dissemination strategy. However, few health promotion research trials employ such designs and often fail to report information to enable assessment of the feasibility and potential impact of implementation and dissemination strategies. In addition to intervention effects, policy makers and practitioners also want to know the impact of implementation strategies. This commentary will define the three categories of effectiveness-implementation hybrid designs, describe their application in health promotion evaluation, and discuss the potential implications of more systematic use of such designs for the translation of health promotion and evaluation.So what?Greater use of effectiveness-implementation hybrid designs may accelerate research translation by providing more practice- and policy-relevant information to end-users, more quickly.

DOI 10.1071/HE16056
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2016 Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Morgan P, Abdul Razak L, Jones J, Finch M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of multiple periods of outdoor free-play to increase moderate-to-vigorous physical activity among 3 to 6 year old children attending childcare: study protocol', BMC Public Health, (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3604-x
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2016 Yoong SL, Dodds P, Hure A, Clinton-Mcharg T, Skelton E, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Healthier options do not reduce total energy of parent intended fast food purchases for their young children: A randomised controlled trial', Nutrition and Dietetics, 73 146-152 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia. Aim: This study aimed to assess the impact of including healthier options on fast food restaurant menus on total energy of parent-repor... [more]

© 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia. Aim: This study aimed to assess the impact of including healthier options on fast food restaurant menus on total energy of parent-reported intended purchases and frequency to eat at fast food outlets for young children. Methods: Parents from an existing health survey cohort were approached to participate. They were eligible to participate if they resided in the Hunter region in NSW, could understand English and had a child aged between 3 and 12 years. Parents were randomised using a random number function embedded in the computer assisted telephone interview software, to receive one of two hypothetical fast food menus: one with healthier options and the other without healthier options (standard menu). After receiving these menus, participants completed a second telephone survey. Parents reported intended food purchases for their nominated child and intended number of visits to the fast food outlet with the hypothetical menu. Results: There was no significant difference in total energy of parent-reported intended purchases for their child, between the standard menu with (n = 101) and without (n = 113) healthier options (P = 0.60). There was also no difference in the frequency of intending to eat at the fast food restaurant between the two groups (P = 0.80). Conclusions: The provision of healthier options in itself may not reduce the total energy of intended purchases of parents for young children at fast food restaurants.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12204
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Eliza Skelton, Luke Wolfenden, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2016 Wolfenden L, Regan T, Williams CM, Wiggers J, Kingsland M, Milat A, et al., 'Strategies to improve the implementation of workplace-based policies or practices targeting tobacco, alcohol, diet, physical activity and obesity', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2016 (2016)

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The primary a... [more]

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The primary aim of this review is to determine the effectiveness of implementation strategies for policies, practices or programmes that aim to improve health behaviours or reduce unhealthy behaviours commonly associated with risk factors for chronic disease in the workplace. Specifically, this review will target interventions that address diet, physical inactivity, obesity, risky alcohol use and tobacco use. In addition, this review will determine: the effectiveness of implementation strategies on health behaviour outcomes (nutrition, physical activity, obesity, alcohol use and smoking); the cost-effectiveness of these strategies; the existence of adverse outcomes resulting from the implementation of these strategies.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012439
Citations Scopus - 20
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams
2016 Wolfenden L, Jones J, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse RJ, Kingsland M, et al., 'Strategies to improve the implementation of healthy eating, physical activity and obesity prevention policies, practices or programmes within childcare services', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011779.pub2
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 68
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Wolfenden L, Milat AJ, Lecathelinais C, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Bryant J, et al., 'What is generated and what is used: A description of public health research output and citation', European Journal of Public Health, 26 523-525 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved. The aim of this short report was to describe the ... [more]

© 2016 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved. The aim of this short report was to describe the output and citation rates of public health. Data-based publications and literature reviews from the year 2008, and their 5-year citation rates were extracted from 10 randomly selected public health journals. In total, 86.2% of publications were descriptive/epidemiological studies, 56.8% used cross-sectional (56.8%) designs and 77.8% were classified as research translation stage 2. Reviews and publications describing randomized controlled trials were the most highly cited, but were infrequently published. Strategies to address the discordance between public health research output and research citation may improve the impact of public health research.

DOI 10.1093/eurpub/ckw047
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2016 Yoong SL, Chai LK, Williams CM, Wiggers J, Finch M, Wolfenden L, 'Systematic review and meta-analysis of interventions targeting sleep and their impact on child body mass index, diet, and physical activity', Obesity, 24 1140-1147 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Obesity Society. Objective This review aimed to examine the impact of interventions involving an explicit sleep component on child body mass index (BMI), diet, and phys... [more]

© 2016 The Obesity Society. Objective This review aimed to examine the impact of interventions involving an explicit sleep component on child body mass index (BMI), diet, and physical activity. Methods A systematic search was undertaken in six databases to identify randomized controlled trials examining the impact of interventions with a sleep component on child BMI, dietary intake, and/or physical activity. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted assessing the impact of included interventions on child BMI. Results Of the eight included trials, three enforced a sleep protocol and five targeted sleep as part of multicomponent behavioral interventions either exclusively or together with nutrition and physical activity. Meta-analysis of three studies found that multicomponent behavioral interventions involving a sleep component were not significantly effective in changing child BMI (n = 360,-0.04 kg/m2 [-0.18, 0.11], I2 = 0%); however, only one study included in the meta-analysis successfully changed sleep duration in children. There were some reported improvements to adolescent diet, and only one trial examined the impact on child physical activity, where a significant effect was observed. Conclusions Findings from the included studies suggest that where improvements in child sleep duration were achieved, a positive impact on child BMI, nutrition, and physical activity was also observed.

DOI 10.1002/oby.21459
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2016 O Brien KM, Williams A, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Campbell E, et al., 'Effectiveness of a healthy lifestyle intervention for low back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee: Protocol and statistical analysis plan for two randomised controlled trials', Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 20 477-489 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1590/bjpt-rbf.2014.0189
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Attia, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher Oldmeadow, Christopher M Williams
2016 Yoong SL, Jones J, Marshall J, Wiggers J, Seward K, Finch M, et al., 'A theory-based evaluation of a dissemination intervention to improve childcare cooks' intentions to implement nutritional guidelines on their menus', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0474-7
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Alison A Fielding, Serene Yoong
2016 Yoong SL, Finch M, Nathan N, Wiggers J, Lecathelinais C, Jones J, et al., 'A longitudinal study assessing childcare services' adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 52 765-770 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians) Aim: Despite ongoing investments to improve the obesogenic environments of childcare se... [more]

© 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians) Aim: Despite ongoing investments to improve the obesogenic environments of childcare settings, little is known regarding how these services have changed their physical activity and nutrition-promoting practices. This study aims to describe changes in the proportion of Australian childcare services that have adopted best-practice healthy eating and physical activity practices between 2006 and 2013 and to assess whether adoption varied by socio-economic status and locality. Methods: A randomly selected sample of nominated supervisors (n = 358) from childcare services located in New South Wales, Australia, participated in a telephone survey in 2006, 2009, 2010 and 2013. Supervisors reported on their service's adoption of six practices: (i) having written nutrition and physical activity policies; (ii) staff trained in physical activity and nutrition in the past year; (iii) scheduled time for fundamental movement skills and (iv) outdoor play; (v) weekly or less screen time opportunities; and (vi) serving only non-sweetened beverages. Results: A significant increase in the prevalence of services adopting all but one practice, between 2006 and 2013 was identified. Ninety one percent of services adopted four or more practices, a significant increase from 38% in 2006. There were no differences in the proportion of services adopting each practice by locality and socio-economic status. Conclusions: Government investment in obesity prevention programmes can equitably improve childcare service's adoption of healthy eating and physical activity promoting practices on a jurisdiction-wide basis. The establishment of a routine system to monitor adoption of a broader range of practices by childcare services is warranted.

DOI 10.1111/jpc.13252
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong
2016 Reilly K, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Sutherland R, Wyse R, Yoong SL, 'Validity of four measures in assessing school canteen menu compliance with state-based healthy canteen policy', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 27 215-221 (2016) [C1]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2016. Issue addressed In order to assess the impact of healthy school canteen policies on food availability for students, valid methods o... [more]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2016. Issue addressed In order to assess the impact of healthy school canteen policies on food availability for students, valid methods of measuring compliance are needed that can be applied at scale. The aim of this study is to assess the validity and direct cost of four methods to assess policy compliance: 1) principal and 2) canteen manager self-report via a computer-assisted telephone interview; and 3) comprehensive and 4) quick menu audits by dietitians, compared with observations. Methods A cross-sectional study took place in the Hunter region of NSW, Australia, in a sample of 38 primary schools that had previously participated in a randomised controlled trial to improve healthy canteen policy compliance. Policy compliance was assessed using the four methods specified above. Percentage agreement, kappa, sensitivity and specificity compared with observations was calculated together with the direct time taken and costs of each method. Indirect costs (including set-up costs) for all measures have not been included. Results Agreement with observations was substantial for the quick menu audit (kappa=0.68), and moderate for the comprehensive menu audit (kappa=0.42). Principal and canteen manager self-report resulted in poor agreement and low specificity with the gold standard. The self-reported measures had the lowest cost, followed by the quick menu audit and lastly the comprehensive menu audit. Conclusion The quick menu audit represents a valid and potentially low-cost method of supporting policy implementation at scale. So what? This study demonstrates that a quick menu audit represents a valid measure of undertaking assessment of school canteen policy compliance at a population level.

DOI 10.1071/HE16053
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly
2015 Wolfenden L, Jones J, Finch M, Wyse RJ, Yoong SL, Steele EJ, et al., 'Strategies to improve the implementation of healthy eating, physical activity and obesity prevention policies, practices or programmes within childcare services', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2015 (2015)

© 2015 The Cochrane Collaboration. This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The primary aim of the review is to examine the effec... [more]

© 2015 The Cochrane Collaboration. This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The primary aim of the review is to examine the effectiveness of strategies aimed at improving the implementation by childcare services of policies, practices or programmes that promote child healthy eating, physical activity and/or obesity prevention. The secondary aims of the review are to: describe the impact of such strategies on childcare service staffknowledge, skills or attitudes; describe the cost or cost-effectiveness of such strategies; describe any adverse effects of such strategies on childcare services, service staffor children; examine the effect of such strategies on child diet, physical activity or weight status.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011779
Citations Scopus - 72
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Williams CM, Nathan NK, Wyse RJ, Yoong SL, Delaney T, Wiggers J, et al., 'Strategies for enhancing the implementation of school-based policies or practices targeting risk factors for chronic disease', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2015 (2015)

© 2015 The Cochrane Collaboration. This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The primary aims of the review are to examine the eff... [more]

© 2015 The Cochrane Collaboration. This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The primary aims of the review are to examine the effectiveness of strategies aiming to improve the implementation of school-based policies, programs or practices that aim to promote healthy or reduce unhealthy behaviours relating to child diet, physical activity, obesity, or tobacco or alcohol use. Secondary objectives of the review are to: examine the effectiveness of implementation strategies on health behavioural (e.g. fruit and vegetable consumption) and anthropometric outcomes (e.g. BMI, weight); describe the impact of such strategies on the knowledge, skills or attitudes of stakeholders involved in implementing health promoting policies, programs or practices; describe the cost or cost effectiveness of such strategies; describe any unintended adverse effects of strategies on schools, school staff or children.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011677
Citations Scopus - 43
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, Megan Freund, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Hodder, Rachel Sutherland, Rebecca Wyse
2015 Jones J, Wyse R, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, Wiggers J, Marshall J, et al., 'Effectiveness of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services: a randomised controlled trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 10 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-015-0340-z
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Megan Freund, Luke Wolfenden, Alison A Fielding, Jenna Hollis, Patrick Mcelduff, Rebecca Wyse, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2015 Pederson H, Okl T, Boyers LN, Karimkhani C, Rosenfeld RM, Nasser M, et al., 'Identifying otolaryngology systematic review research gaps: Comparing global burden of disease 2010 results with cochrane database of systematic review content', JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, 141 67-72 (2015) [C1]

Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. IMPORTANCE: Burden of disease should inform research prioritization. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether systematic r... [more]

Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. IMPORTANCE: Burden of disease should inform research prioritization. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether systematic reviews and protocols published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) appropriately reflect disease burden for otolaryngologic conditions as measured by the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2010 project. DESIGN: Two investigators independently assessed 10 otolaryngologic conditions in CDSR for systematic review and protocol representation from March to June 2014. The otolaryngologic diseases were matched to their respective GBD 2010 disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) to assess their correlation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Relationship of CDSR representation (based on systematic reviews and protocols) with percentage of total 2010 DALYs, 2010 DALY rank, and DALY percentage change from 1990 to 2010 for 10 otolaryngologic conditions. RESULTS: All 10 otolaryngologic conditions were represented by at least 1 systematic review in CDSR. The number of reviews and protocols in CDSR was well matched with GBD 2010 disability metrics for only 1 disease, mouth cancer. Upper respiratory infections, otitis media, thyroid cancer, and cleft lip and cleft palate were overrepresented in CDSR, and esophageal cancer, "other hearing loss," nasopharynx cancer, larynx cancer, and "cancer of other part of pharynx and oropharynx" were underrepresented. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: The representation of otolaryngologic conditions in CDSR correlates poorly with DALY metrics. The results of this study may guide future research prioritization and allocation of funds.

DOI 10.1001/jamaoto.2014.2700
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Yoong SL, Hall A, Williams CM, Skelton E, Oldmeadow C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Alignment of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane database of systematic reviews and the database of abstracts and reviews of effectiveness with global burden-of-disease data: A bibliographic analysis', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 69 708-714 (2015) [C1]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burde... [more]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burden of disease. This study aims to assess if the volume of research output from systematic reviews proportionally aligns with burden of disease assessed using percentages of mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods: A cross-sectional audit of reviews published between January 2012 and August 2013 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) was undertaken. Percentages of mortality and DALYs were obtained from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. Standardised residual differences (SRD) based on percentages of mortality and DALYs were calculated, where conditions with SRD of more than or less than three were considered overstudied or understudied, respectively. Results: 1029 reviews from CDSR and 1928 reviews from DARE were examined. There was a significant correlation between percentage DALYs and systematic reviews published in CDSR and DARE databases (CDSR: r=0.68, p=0.001; DARE: r=0.60, p < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between percentage mortality and number of systematic reviews published in either database (CDSR: r=0.34, p=0.14; DARE: r=0.22, p=0.34). Relative to percentage of mortality, mental and behavioural disorders, musculoskeletal conditions and other non-communicable diseases were overstudied. Maternal disorders were overstudied relative to percentages of mortality and DALYs in CDSR. Conclusions: The focus of systematic reviews is moderately correlated with DALYs. A number of conditions may be overstudied relative to percentage of mortality particularly in the context of health and medical reviews.

DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-205389
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Alix Hall, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Eliza Skelton, Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Mackenzie LJ, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Yoong SL, 'A cross-sectional study of radiation oncology outpatients' concern about, preferences for, and perceived barriers to discussing anxiety and depression.', Psycho-oncology, 24 1392-1397 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.3806
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Lisa Mackenzie, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Finch M, Yoong SL, Thomson RJ, Seward K, Cooney M, Jones J, et al., 'A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of an implementation intervention to increase healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies, and practices in centre-based childcare services: Study protocol', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C3]

© 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved. Background: Promotion of healthy eating and physical activity in early childhood is recommended as a global chronic disease prev... [more]

© 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved. Background: Promotion of healthy eating and physical activity in early childhood is recommended as a global chronic disease prevention strategy. Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to provide children with opportunities to improve healthy eating and physical activity. Evidence to inform implementation of childcare obesity prevention guidelines into routine practice in childcare, however, is lacking. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of an intervention, delivered to childcare staff, aiming to increasing service implementation of healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices. Methods and analysis: A pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial will be undertaken with 165 childcare services in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia. Services will be randomised to receive either a 10-month evidence-based performance review intervention with other resources to support practice change, or to a waitlist control group. The primary trial outcome is the proportion of services implementing all of the following recommended healthy eating and physical activity promoting practices: written nutrition, physical activity and small screen recreation policies; providing information to families regarding healthy eating (including breastfeeding), physical activity and small screen time; providing twice weekly healthy eating learning experiences to children; providing water and only plain milk to children; providing fundamental movement skills activities for children every day; and limiting and using electronic screen time more for educational purposes and learning experiences. Effectiveness will be assessed using a telephone interview of practice implementation with childcare staff at baseline and 12 months following baseline. Ethics and dissemination: The study was approved by the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee and the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee. Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000972628.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006706
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Alison A Fielding, Serene Yoong
2015 Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, Rowland BC, Dodds P, Gillham K, Yoong SL, et al., 'Improving availability, promotion and purchase of fruit and vegetable and non sugar-sweetened drink products at community sporting clubs: A randomised trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12 (2015) [C1]

© Wolfenden et al. Background: Amateur sporting clubs represent an attractive setting for health promotion. This study assesses the impact of a multi-component intervention on the... [more]

© Wolfenden et al. Background: Amateur sporting clubs represent an attractive setting for health promotion. This study assesses the impact of a multi-component intervention on the availability, promotion and purchase of fruit and vegetable and non sugar -sweetened drink products from community sporting club canteens. We also assessed the impact the intervention on sporting club revenue from the sale of food and beverages. Method: A repeat cross-sectional, parallel group, cluster randomized controlled trial was undertaken with amateur community football clubs in New South Wales, Australia. The intervention was conducted over 2.5 winter sporting seasons and sought to improve the availability and promotion of fruit and vegetables and non sugar-sweetened drinks in sporting club canteens. Trial outcomes were assessed via telephone surveys of sporting club representatives and members. Results: Eighty five sporting clubs and 1143 club members participated in the study. Relative to the control group, at follow-up, clubs allocated to the intervention were significantly more likely to have fruit and vegetable products available at the club canteen (OR = 5.13; 95% CI 1.70-15.38), were more likely to promote fruit and vegetable selection using reduced pricing and meal deals (OR = 34.48; 95% CI 4.18-250.00) and members of intervention clubs were more likely to report purchase of fruit and vegetable (OR = 2.58 95% CI; 1.08-6.18) and non sugar -sweetened drink (OR = 1.56; 95% CI 1.09-2.25) products. There was no significant difference between groups in the annual club revenue from food and non-alcoholic beverage sales. Conclusion: The findings demonstrate that the intervention can improve the nutrition environment of sporting clubs and the purchasing behaviour of members. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12609000224224.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0193-5
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2015 Yoong SL, Clinton-Mcharg T, Wolfenden L, 'Systematic reviews examining implementation of research into practice and impact on population health are needed', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 68 788-791 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Objectives To examine the research translation phase focus (T1-T4) of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and D... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Objectives To examine the research translation phase focus (T1-T4) of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE). Briefly, T1 includes reviews of basic science experiments; T2 includes reviews of human trials leading to guideline development; T3 includes reviews examining how to move guidelines into policy and practice; and T4 includes reviews describing the impact of changing health practices on population outcomes. Study Design and Setting A cross-sectional audit of randomly selected reviews from CDSR (n = 500) and DARE (n = 500) was undertaken. The research translation phase of reviews, overall and by communicable disease, noncommunicable disease, and injury subgroups, were coded by two researchers. Results A total of 898 reviews examined a communicable, noncommunicable, or injury-related condition. Of those, 98% of reviews within CDSR focused on T2, and the remaining 2% focused on T3. In DARE, 88% focused on T2, 8.7% focused on T1, 2.5% focused on T3, and 1.3% focused on T4. Almost all reviews examining communicable (CDSR 100%, DARE 93%), noncommunicable (CDSR 98%, DARE 87%), and injury (CDSR 95%, DARE 88%) were also T2 focused. Conclusion Few reviews exist to guide practitioners and policy makers with implementing evidence-based treatments or programs.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2014.12.008
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Wolfenden L, Finch M, Nathan N, Weaver N, Wiggers J, Yoong SL, et al., 'Factors associated with early childhood education and care service implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in Australia: a cross-sectional study', Translational Behavioral Medicine, 5 327-334 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Society of Behavioral Medicine. Many early childhood education and care (ECEC) services fail to implement recommended policies and practices supportive of healthy eating a... [more]

© 2015, Society of Behavioral Medicine. Many early childhood education and care (ECEC) services fail to implement recommended policies and practices supportive of healthy eating and physical activity. The purpose of this study was to assess whether certain theoretically-based factors are associated with implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in a sample of ECEC services. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with Service Managers of ECEC services. The survey assessed the operational characteristics, policy, and practice implementation, and 13 factors were suggested by Damschroder¿s Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to impede or promote implementation. Logistic regression analyses found a significant association between implementation factor score and full implementation (OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.18¿1.61; p = <0.01), indicating that for every one point increase in implementation score, ECEC services were 38¿% more likely to be fully implementing the policies and practices. The findings highlight the opportunities for improving implementation of obesity prevention interventions in this setting by developing interventions that address such factors.

DOI 10.1007/s13142-015-0319-y
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Natasha Weaver, Rebecca Wyse, Rachel Sutherland
2015 Wolfenden L, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, 'Local implementation of obesity policy', The Lancet, 386 1039 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)00141-5
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2015 Waller A, Carey M, Mazza D, Yoong S, Grady A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Patient-reported areas for quality improvement in general practice: A cross-sectional survey', British Journal of General Practice, 65 e312-e318 (2015) [C1]

©British Journal of General Practice. Background: GPs are often a patient&apos;s first point of contact with the health system. The increasing demands imposed on GPs may have an i... [more]

©British Journal of General Practice. Background: GPs are often a patient's first point of contact with the health system. The increasing demands imposed on GPs may have an impact on the quality of care delivered. Patients are well placed to make judgements about aspects of care that need to be improved. Aim: To determine whether general practice patients perceive that the care they receive is 'patient-centred' across eight domains of care, and to determine the association between sociodemographic, GP and practice characteristics, detection of preventive health risks, and receipt of patient-centred care. Design and setting: Cross-sectional survey of patients attending Australian general practice clinics. Method: Patients completed a touchscreen survey in the waiting room to rate the care received from their GP across eight domains of patient-centred care. Patients also completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and self-reported health risk factors. GPs completed a checklist for each patient asking about the presence of health risk factors. Results: In total1486 patients and 51 GPs participated. Overall, 83% of patients perceived that the care they received was patient-centred across all eight domains. Patients most frequently perceived the 'access to health care when needed' domain as requiring improvement (8.3%). Not having private health insurance and attending a practice located in a disadvantaged area were significantly associated with perceived need for improvements in care (P<0.05). Conclusion: Patients in general practice report that accessibility is an aspect of care that could be improved. Further investigation of how indicators of lower socioeconomic status interact with the provision of patient-centred care and health outcomes is required.

DOI 10.3399/bjgp15X684841
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Amy Waller, Alice Grady, Serene Yoong
2015 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SL, Lecathelinais C, Bell AC, et al., 'Adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices by Australian primary schools: 2006 to 2013', HEALTH EDUCATION RESEARCH, 30 262-271 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyu068
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2015 Yoong SL, Nathan NK, Wyse RJ, Preece SJ, Williams CM, Sutherland RL, et al., 'Assessment of the School Nutrition Environment: A Study in Australian Primary School Canteens', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 49 215-222 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Introduction Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children&apos;s diets, as they offer structured oppo... [more]

© 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Introduction Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children's diets, as they offer structured opportunities for ongoing intervention. Modifications to the school food environment can increase purchasing of healthier foods and improve children's diets. This study examines the availability of healthy food and drinks, implementation of pricing and promotion strategies in Australian primary school canteens, and whether these varied by school characteristics. Methods In 2012 and 2013, canteen managers of primary schools in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales reported via telephone interview the pricing and promotion strategies implemented in their canteens to encourage healthier food and drink purchases. A standardized audit of canteen menus was performed to assess the availability of healthy options. Data were analyzed in 2014. Results Overall, 203 (79%) canteen managers completed the telephone interview and 170 provided menus. Twenty-nine percent of schools had menus that primarily consisted of healthier food and drinks, and 11% did not sell unhealthy foods. Less than half reported including only healthy foods in meal deals (25%), labeling menus (43%), and having a comprehensive canteen policy (22%). A significantly larger proportion of schools in high socioeconomic areas (OR=3.0) and large schools (OR=4.4) had primarily healthy options on their menus. School size and being a Government school were significantly associated with implementation of some pricing and promotion strategies. Conclusions There is a need to monitor canteen environments to inform policy development and research. Future implementation research to improve the food environments of disadvantaged schools in particular is warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.02.002
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2015 Carey M, Turon H, Goergen S, Sanson-Fisher R, Yoong SL, Jones K, 'Patients experiences of the management of lower back pain in general practice: use of diagnostic imaging, medication and provision of self-management advice', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 21 342-346 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/PY14057
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Heidi Turon, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, Rowland BC, Dodds P, Gillham K, Yoong SL, et al., 'Improving availability, promotion and purchase of fruit and vegetable and non sugar-sweetened drink products at community sporting clubs: a randomised trial.', The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, 12 35 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0193-5
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2015 Carey M, Yoong SL, Grady A, Bryant J, Jayakody A, Sanson-Fisher R, Inder KJ, 'Unassisted detection of depression by GPs: Who is most likely to be misclassified?', Family Practice, 32 282-287 (2015) [C1]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background. Meta-analyses indicate 50% of cases of depression are not detected by GPs. It is importan... [more]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background. Meta-analyses indicate 50% of cases of depression are not detected by GPs. It is important to examine patient and GP characteristics associated with misclassification so that systems can be improved to increase accurate detection and optimal management for groups at risk of depression. Objective. To examine patient and GP characteristics associated with GP misclassification of depression for patients classified by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 as depressed. Methods. A cross-sectional study within general practices in two states of Australia. GPs completed a one-page paper and pencil survey indicating whether they thought each patient was clinically depressed. Patients completed a computer tablet survey while waiting for their appointment to provide demographic information and indicate depression status. Chi-square analyses were used to determine whether patient and GP characteristics were associated with a false-negative and false-positive result. The probability of misclassification was modelled using Generalized Estimating Equations to account for clustering of patients. Results. Fifty GPs from 12 practices participated. GPs completed surveys for 1880 patients. Younger patients aged 25-44, and those with a health care card were less likely to have a false-negative assessment. Patients with 0-3 GP visits in the past 12 months, and those with private health insurance were less likely to have a false-positive assessment. GPs who worked five sessions or fewer per week were more likely to make false-positive assessments.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmu087
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Alice Grady, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Serene Yoong, Kerry Inder
2015 Williams CM, Nathan N, Delaney T, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, Preece S, et al., 'CAFÉ: A multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: Protocol of a randomised controlled trial', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C1]

Introduction: A number of jurisdictions internationally have policies requiring schools to implement healthy canteens. However, many schools have not implemented such policies. On... [more]

Introduction: A number of jurisdictions internationally have policies requiring schools to implement healthy canteens. However, many schools have not implemented such policies. One reason for this isthat current support interventions cannot feasibly be delivered to large numbers of schools. A promising solution to support population-wide implementation of healthy canteen practices is audit and feedback. The effectiveness of this strategy has, however, not previously been assessed in school canteens. This study aims to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an audit and feedback intervention, delivered by telephone and email, in increasing the number of school canteens that have menus complying with a government healthy-canteen policy. Methods and analysis: Seventy-two schools, across the Hunter New England Local Health District in New South Wales Australia, will be randomised to receive the multicomponent audit and feedback implementation intervention or usual support. The intervention will consist of between two and four canteen menu audits over 12 months. Each menu audit will be followed by two modes of feedback: a written feedback report and a verbal feedback/support via telephone. Primary outcomes, assessed by dieticians blind to group status and as recommended by the Fresh Tastes @ School policy, are: (1) the proportion of schools with a canteen menu containing foods or beverages restricted for sale, and; (2) the proportion of schools that have a menu which contains more than 50% of foods classified as healthy canteen items. Secondary outcomes are: the proportion of menu items in each category ('red', 'amber' and 'green'), canteen profitability and cost-effectiveness. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval has been obtained by from the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee and the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee. The findings will be disseminated in usual forums, including peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006969
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly
2015 Bryant J, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, Carey M, Walsh J, Bisquera A, 'Is identification of smoking, risky alcohol consumption and overweight and obesity by General Practitioners improving? A comparison over time.', Family practice, 32 664-671 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmv078
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant
2015 Yoong SL, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse R, Jones J, Freund M, et al., 'Childcare service centers' preferences and intentions to use a web-based program to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices:a cross-sectional study', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17 (2015) [C1]

Background: Overweight and obesity is a significant public health problem that impacts a large number of children globally. Supporting childcare centers to deliver healthy eating ... [more]

Background: Overweight and obesity is a significant public health problem that impacts a large number of children globally. Supporting childcare centers to deliver healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices is a recommended strategy for obesity prevention, given that such services provide access to a substantial proportion of children during a key developmental period. Electronic Web-based interventions represent a novel way to support childcare service providers to implement such policies and practices. Objective: This study aimed to assess: (1) childcare centers' current use of technology, (2) factors associated with intention to use electronic Web-based interventions, and (3) Web-based features that managers rated as useful to support staff with implementing healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices. Methods: A computer-Assisted telephone interview (CATI) was conducted with service managers from long day care centers and preschools. The CATI assessed the following: (1) childcare center characteristics, (2) childcare centers' use of electronic devices, (3) intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program-Assessed using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) with ratings between 1 (strongly disagree) and 7 (strongly agree), and (4) features rated as useful to include in a Web-based program. Results: Overall, 214 service centers out of 277 (77.3%) consented to participate. All service centers except 2 reported using computers (212/214, 99.1%), whereas 40.2% (86/214) used portable tablets. A total of 71.9% (151/210) of childcare service managers reported a score of 6 or more for intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, intention to use the program was significantly associated with perceived ease of use (P=.002, odds ratio [OR] 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.2) and perceived usefulness (P<.001, OR 28,95% CI 8.0-95.2). Features reported by service managers as useful or very useful for a Web-based program included decision-support tools to support staff with menu planning (117/129, 90.7%), links to relevant resources (212/212, 100%), updated information on guidelines (208/212, 98.1%), and feedback regarding childcare center performance in relation to other childcare centers (212/212, 100%). Conclusions: Childcare service managers reported high intention to use a Web-based program and identified several useful features to support staff to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Further descriptive and intervention research examining the development and use of such a program to support childcare centers with the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices is warranted.

DOI 10.2196/jmir.3639
Citations Scopus - 14
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers, Megan Freund, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong
2014 Paul C, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, Russell G, Makeham M, 'Under the radar: A cross-sectional study of the challenge of identifying at-risk alcohol consumption in the general practice setting', BMC Family Practice, 15 (2014) [C1]

Background: Primary care providers are an important source of information regarding appropriate alcohol consumption. As early presentation to a provider for alcohol-related concer... [more]

Background: Primary care providers are an important source of information regarding appropriate alcohol consumption. As early presentation to a provider for alcohol-related concerns is unlikely, it is important that providers are able to identify at-risk patients in order to provide appropriate advice. This study aimed to report the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of General Practitioner (GP) assessment of alcohol consumption compared to patient self-report, and explore characteristics associated with GP non-detection of at-risk status. Method. GP practices were selected from metropolitan and regional locations in Australia. Eligible patients were adults presenting for general practice care who were able to understand English and provide informed consent. Patients completed a modified AUDIT-C by touchscreen computer as part of an omnibus health survey while waiting for their appointment. GPs completed a checklist for each patient, including whether the patient met current Australian guidelines for at-risk alcohol consumption. Patient self-report and GP assessments were compared for each patient. Results: GPs completed the checklist for 1720 patients, yielding 1565 comparisons regarding alcohol consumption. The sensitivity of GPs' detection of at-risk alcohol consumption was 26.5%, with specificity of 96.1%. Higher patient education was associated with GP non-detection of at-risk status. Conclusions: GP awareness of which patients might benefit from advice regarding at-risk alcohol consumption appears low. Given the complexities associated with establishing whether alcohol consumption is 'at-risk', computer-based approaches to routine screening of patients are worthy of exploration as a method for prompting the provision of advice in primary care. © 2014 Paul et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-15-74
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2014 Yoong SLI, Wolfenden L, Clinton-McHarg T, Waters E, Pettman TL, Steele E, Wiggers J, 'Exploring the pragmatic and explanatory study design on outcomes of systematic reviews of public health interventions: a case study on obesity prevention trials', Journal of public health (Oxford, England), 36 170-176 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdu006
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2014 Dodds P, Wyse R, Jones J, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Williams A, et al., 'Validity of a measure to assess healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in Australian childcare services', BMC Public Health, 14 (2014) [C1]

Childcare services represent a valuable obesity prevention opportunity, providing access to a large portion of children at a vital point in their development. Few rigorously valid... [more]

Childcare services represent a valuable obesity prevention opportunity, providing access to a large portion of children at a vital point in their development. Few rigorously validated measures exist to measure healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in this setting, and no such measures exist that are specific to the childcare setting in Australia. Methods. This was a cross sectional study, comparing two measures (pen and paper survey and observation) of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services. Research assistants attended consenting childcare services (n = 42) across the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia and observed practices for one day. Nominated Supervisors and Room Leaders of the service also completed a pen and paper survey during the day of observation. Kappa statistics and proportion agreement were calculated for a total of 43 items relating to healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Results: Agreement ranged from 38%-100%. Fifty one percent of items showed agreement of greater than or equal to 80%. Items assessing the frequency with which staff joined in active play with children reported the lowest percent agreement, while items assessing availability of beverages such as juice, milk and cordial, as well as the provision of foods such as popcorn, pretzels and sweet biscuits, reported the highest percent agreement. Kappa scores ranged from -0.06 (poor agreement) to 1 (perfect agreement). Of the 43 items assessed, 27 were found to have moderate or greater agreement. Conclusions: The study found that Nominated Supervisors and Room Leaders were able to accurately report on a number of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Items assessing healthy eating practices tended to have higher kappa scores than those assessing physical activity related policies or practices. The tool represents a useful instrument for public health researchers and policy makers working in this setting. © 2014Dodds et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-572
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 23
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2014 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Williams CM, Delaney T, Reilly KL, Freund M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: study protocol.', Implement Sci, 9 147 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0147-3
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 18
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, Kathryn L Reilly, Serene Yoong, Megan Freund
2014 Wolfenden L, Carruthers J, Wyse R, Yoong S, 'Translation of tobacco control programs in schools: Findings from a rapid review of systematic reviews of implementation and dissemination interventions', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 25 136-138 (2014) [C3]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2014. Issue addressed: School-based programs targeting the prevention of tobacco use are a key strategy for reducing the overall tobacco-... [more]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2014. Issue addressed: School-based programs targeting the prevention of tobacco use are a key strategy for reducing the overall tobacco-related mortality and morbidity in the community. While substantial research investment has resulted in the identification of various effective tobacco prevention interventions in schools, this research investment will not result in public health benefits, unless effectively disseminated and implemented. This rapid review aimed to identify effective implementation or dissemination interventions, targeting the adoption of school-based tobacco prevention programs. Methods: A systematic search was conducted to identify published systematic reviews that examined the effectiveness of implementation and dissemination strategies for facilitating the adoption of tobacco policies or programs in schools from 1992 to 2012. Results: The search yielded 1028 results, with one relevant systematic review being identified. The review included two controlled studies examining the implementation and dissemination of tobacco prevention programs and guidelines. The two randomised trials examined the delivery of active face-to-face training to implement a school-based curriculum compared with video-delivered or mail-based training. Improvements in the implementation of the programs were reported for the face-to-face training arm in both trials. Conclusions: Little rigorous evidence exists to guide the implementation and dissemination of tobacco prevention programs in schools. So what?: Few systematic reviews exist to inform the implementation of evidence-based tobacco prevention programs in schools. In the absence of a strong evidence base, health care policymakers and practitioners may need to draw on setting-based frameworks or parallel evidence from other settings to design strategies to facilitate the adoption of tobacco prevention initiatives.

DOI 10.1071/HE13089
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2014 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Mackenzie L, Boyes A, 'A cross-sectional study examining Australian general practitioners' identification of overweight and obese patients', Journal of General Internal Medicine, 29 328-334 (2014) [C1]

BACKGROUND: Overweight and obese patients attempt weight loss when advised to do so by their physicians; however, only a small proportion of these patients report receiving such a... [more]

BACKGROUND: Overweight and obese patients attempt weight loss when advised to do so by their physicians; however, only a small proportion of these patients report receiving such advice. One reason may be that physicians do not identify their overweight and obese patients. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the extent that Australian general practitioners (GP) recognise overweight or obesity in their patients, and to explore patient and GP characteristics associated with non-detection of overweight and obesity. METHODS: Consenting adult patients (n = 1,111) reported weight, height, demographics and health conditions using a touchscreen computer. GPs (n = 51) completed hard-copy questionnaires indicating whether their patients were overweight or obese. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for GP detection, using patient self-reported weight and height as the criterion measure for overweight and obesity. For a subsample of patients (n = 107), we did a sensitivity analysis with patient-measured weight and height. We conducted an adjusted, multivariable logistic regression to explore characteristics associated with non-detection, using random effects to adjust for correlation within GPs. RESULTS: Sensitivity for GP assessment was 63 % [95 % CI 57-69 %], specificity 89 % [95 % CI 85-92 %], PPV 87 % [95 % CI 83-90 %] and NPV 69 % [95 % CI 65-72 %]. Sensitivity increased by 3 % and specificity was unchanged in the sensitivity analysis. Men (OR: 1.7 [95 % CI 1.1-2.7]), patients without high blood pressure (OR: 1.8 [95 % CI 1.2-2.8]) and without type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.4 [95 % CI 1.2-8.0]) had higher odds of non-detection. Individuals with obesity (OR: 0.1 [95 % CI 0.07-0.2]) or diploma-level education (OR: 0.3 [95%CI 0.1-0.6]) had lower odds of not being identified. No GP characteristics were associated with non-detection of overweight or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: GPs missed identifying a substantial proportion of overweight and obese patients. Strategies to support GPs in identifying their overweight or obese patients need to be implemented. © 2013 Society of General Internal Medicine.

DOI 10.1007/s11606-013-2637-4
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Allison Boyes, Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey
2014 Carey M, Small H, Yoong SL, Boyes A, Bisquera A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Prevalence of comorbid depression and obesity in general practice: A cross-sectional survey', British Journal of General Practice, 64 (2014) [C1]

Background: General practice is a common setting for the provision of weight-management advice, as well as the treatment of depression. While there is some evidence of a reciproca... [more]

Background: General practice is a common setting for the provision of weight-management advice, as well as the treatment of depression. While there is some evidence of a reciprocal relationship between obesity and depression, there are limited data about the rates of depression among general practice patients who are underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese. Aim: To explore the prevalence of depression among underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese general practice patients. Design and setting: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 12 Australian general practices. Method: Patients aged =18 years and older who were presenting for general practice care were eligible to participate. Consenting patients completed a touchscreen computer survey assessing self-reported weight and height. Depression was assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), with a score of =10 used to indicate possible depression. Results: Data were obtained from 3361 participants. The prevalence of depression was 24% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 11.86 to 39.28) among underweight participants, 11% (95% CI = 8.5 to 14.0) among normal weight participants, 12% (95% CI = 0.9 to 15.2) among overweight participants, and 23% (95% CI = 17.8 to 29.0) among obese participants. The prevalence of depression was higher for women than for men across all weight categories except underweight. Conclusion: Weight and depression demonstrated a U-shaped relationship, with higher prevalence of depression observed among underweight and obese general practice patients. These conditions may act as red flags for opportunistic screening of depression in the general practice setting. ©British Journal of General Practice.

DOI 10.3399/bjgp14X677482
Citations Scopus - 67Web of Science - 64
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong
2014 Yoong SL, Skelton E, Jones J, Wolfenden L, 'Do childcare services provide foods in line with the 2013 Australian Dietary guidelines? A cross-sectional study', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 38 595-596 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12312
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2014 Carey M, Jones KA, Yoong SL, D'Este C, Boyes AW, Paul C, et al., 'Comparison of a single self-assessment item with the PHQ-9 for detecting depression in general practice', Family Practice, 31 (2014) [C1]

Background: Several factors need to be considered when selecting a screening tool for depression including accuracy, level of burden for patients and for staff to administer and f... [more]

Background: Several factors need to be considered when selecting a screening tool for depression including accuracy, level of burden for patients and for staff to administer and follow-up. Objective: This study aimed to explore the utility of a single self-assessment item in identifying possible cases of depression in primary care by examining sensitivity and specificity with the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) at different thresholds. Design: Cross-sectional survey presented on a touchscreen computer. Participants. Adult patients attending 12 urban general practices in Australia completed a health status questionnaire (n = 1004). Main measures. Depression was assessed by the PHQ-9 and a single self-assessment item. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for the single item using a PHQ-9 score of 10 or more as the criterion value. Key results. A total of 1004 participants (61% female, 48% aged 55 years or older) completed both the PHQ-9 and a single self-assessment item. When using a threshold of mild depression or greater, the single item had adequate specificity (76%, 95% CI: 71-80%), with 76 out of every 100 people defined as non-depressed by the PHQ-9 also identified as not depressed by the single item. Sensitivity was high (91%, 95% CI: 84-95%), with the single item identifying 91 out of every 100 true cases (as defined by the PHQ-9). Conclusions: The single self-assessment item has high sensitivity and moderate specificity to identify possible cases of depression when used at a threshold of mild depression or greater. © The Author 2014.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmu018
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Kerry Inder, Allison Boyes, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Paul CL, Yoong SL, 'Agreement between HADS classifications and single-item screening questions for anxiety and depression: a cross-sectional survey of cancer patients.', Ann Oncol, 25 889-895 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdu023
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Lisa Mackenzie, Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste
2014 Carey M, Jones K, Meadows G, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Inder K, et al., 'Accuracy of general practitioner unassisted detection of depression.', Aust N Z J Psychiatry, 48 571-578 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0004867413520047
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Kerry Inder, Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste
2014 Jones J, Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Finch M, Yoong SL, Dodds P, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services.', BMJ Open, 4 e005312 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005312
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Patrick Mcelduff, Luke Wolfenden, Megan Freund, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2013 Yoong SL, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Grady A, 'A systematic review of behavioural weight-loss interventions involving primary-care physicians in overweight and obese primary-care patients (1999-2011).', Public Health Nutrition, 16 2083-2099 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1368980012004375
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Alice Grady, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, 'Recruitment in general practice', Australian Family Physician, 42 9 (2013) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Yoong SLI, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, 'Recruitment in general practice', Australian family physician, 42 9 (2013)
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey
2013 Paul CL, Carey M, Yoong SL, D'Este C, Makeham M, Henskens F, 'Access to chronic disease care in general practice: The acceptability of implementing systematic waiting-room screening using computer-based patient-reported risk status', British Journal of General Practice, 63 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3399/bjgp13X671605
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Chris Paul, Frans Henskens, Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste, Serene Yoong
2013 Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Williams A, Dodds P, Gillham K, Wyse R, 'A randomised controlled trial of an active telephone-based recruitment strategy to increase childcare-service staff attendance at a physical activity and nutrition training workshop', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 24 224-226 (2013) [C1]

Issue addressed: Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a ke... [more]

Issue addressed: Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a key component of multi-strategy interventions to improve implementation of effective physical activity and nutrition promoting practices for obesity prevention in childcare services. This randomised controlled trial aimed to examine whether an active telephone-based strategy to invite childcare-service staff to attend a training workshop was effective in increasing the proportion of services with staff attending training, compared with a passive strategy. Methods: Services were randomised to an active telephone-based or a passive-recruitment strategy. Those in the active arm received an email invitation and one to three follow-up phone calls, whereas services in the passive arm were informed of the availability of training only via newsletters. The proportion of services with staff attending the training workshop was compared between the two arms. Results: One hundred and twenty-eight services were included in this study. A significantly larger proportion (52%) of services in the active arm compared with those in the passive-strategy arm (3.1%) attended training (d.f.=1, ¿2=34.3; P<0.001). Conclusions: An active, telephone-based recruitment strategy significantly increased the proportion of childcare services with staff attending training. Further strategies to improve staff attendance at training need to be identified and implemented. So what? Active-recruitment strategies including follow-up telephone calls should be utilised to invite staff to participate in training, in order to maximise the use of training as an implementation strategy for obesity prevention in childcare services. © 2013 Australian Health Promotion Association.

DOI 10.1071/HE13055
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2013 Yoong SL, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, 'Prevalence and correlates of overweight and obesity in adult Australian general practice patients', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 37 586-586 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12117
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Yoong SL, Carey ML, D'Este C, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Agreement between self-reported and measured weight and height collected in general practice patients: a prospective study', BMC MEDICAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-13-38
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 51
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Carey M, Bryant J, Yoong SL, Russell G, Barker D, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Prostate specific antigen testing in family practice: a cross sectional survey of self-reported rates of and reasons for testing participation and risk disclosure', BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 14 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-14-186
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Serene Yoong, Daniel Barker
2013 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'A cross-sectional study assessing Australian general practice patients' intention, reasons and preferences for assistance with losing weight', BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 14 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-14-187
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Macrae FA, Yoong SL, 'Community approaches to increasing colorectal screening uptake: A review of the methodological quality and strength of current evidence', Cancer Forum, 36 27-35 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Macrae FA, Yoong SL, 'COMMUNITY APPROACHES TO INCREASING COLORECTAL SCREENING UPTAKE: A REVIEW OF THE METHODOLOGICAL QUALITY AND STRENGTH OF CURRENT EVIDENCE', CANCER FORUM, 36 25-33 (2012)
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2012 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'A cross-sectional study assessing the self-reported weight loss strategies used by adult Australian general practice patients', BMC Family Practice, 13 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-13-48
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste
2012 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Russell G, Mazza D, Makeham M, et al., 'Touch screen computer health assessment in Australian general practice patients: A cross-sectional study protocol', BMJ Open, 2 1-7 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Kerry Inder
2011 Carey ML, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Paul CL, Inder KJ, Makeham M, 'Efforts to close the evidence-practice gap in the management of cardiovascular risk factors in general practice: Strategic or haphazard?', International Journal of Person Centered Medicine, 1 660-667 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.5750/ijpcm.v1i4.140
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Kerry Inder
Delaney T, Mclaughlin M, Hall A, Yoong SL, Brown A, O'Brien K, et al., 'Associations between digital health intervention engagement and dietary intake: A Systematic Review (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.26698
Co-authors Alix Hall, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Jenna Hollis, Julia Dray, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc
Sutherland R, Brown A, Nathan N, Yoong S, Janssen L, Chooi A, et al., 'Effectiveness of a multi-component m-health-based intervention to decrease the consumption of discretionary foods packed in school lunchboxes: the SWAP IT effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 1 trial. (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.25256
Co-authors Andrew Searles, John Wiggers, Kathryn L Reilly, Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan
Grady A, Barnes C, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Yoong SL, 'Barriers and Enablers to Adoption of Digital Health Interventions to Support the Implementation of Dietary Guidelines in Early Childhood Education and Care: Cross-Sectional Study (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.22036
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Serene Yoong
Sutherland R, Brown A, Nathan N, Yoong S, Janssen L, Chooi A, et al., 'Effectiveness of a multi-component m-health-based intervention to decrease the consumption of discretionary foods packed in school lunchboxes: the SWAP IT effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 1 trial. (Preprint)', Journal of Medical Internet Research,
DOI 10.2196/25256
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Kathryn L Reilly, John Wiggers, Andrew Searles, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong
Show 176 more journal articles

Conference (45 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Ooi JY, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Wrigley J, Lecathelinais C, Reilly K, et al., 'Prevalence of current school-level nutrition policies and practices of secondary schools in NSW, Australia', HEALTH PROMOTION JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA (2020)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.357
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2019 Reilly K, Nathan N, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Scale up of a multi-strategic intervention to increase implementation of a mandatory school healthy food service policy: The 'healthy food@school' program', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE (2019)
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers
2019 Grady A, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Rissel C, Finch M, Flood V, et al., '2019 Hunter Cancer Research Symposium Program', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2019)
DOI 10.1111/ajco.13251
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Alice Grady
2019 Barnes C, Grady A, Vaughn AE, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, 'A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Improve Child Dietary Intake within Childcare Centres', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2019)
Co-authors Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan
2019 Lum M, Grady A, Jones J, Falkiner M, Finch M, Herrmann V, et al., 'Implementation of Recommended Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in the Family Day Care Setting', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2019)
Co-authors Alice Grady, Serene Yoong
2018 Ben Charif A, Zomahoun HTV, LeBlanc A, Langlois L, Wolfenden L, Yoong SL, et al., 'Effective strategies for scaling up evidence-based practices in primary care: a systematic review', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE (2018)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2018 Nathan N, Yoong SL, Reilly K, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Increasing Australian schools' implementation of a mandatory state-wide school healthy food policy: results of three randomised-controlled trials', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE (2018)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly
2018 Kamper S, Williams A, Lee H, O'Brien K, Wiggers J, Yoong SL, et al., 'CAUSAL MECHANISMS OF A HEALTH BEHAVIOUR INTERVENTION FOR PATIENTS WITH MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2018)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2018 Williams A, Kamper S, Wiggers J, O'Brien K, Lee H, Wolfenden L, et al., 'DO MUSCULOSKELETAL CONDITIONS INCREASE THE RISK OF CHRONIC DISEASE: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND METAANALYSIS OF COHORT STUDIES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2018)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2018 Wyse R, Just D, Gabrielyan G, Swigert J, Delaney T, Ooi J, et al., 'CAN RE-POSITIONING ONLINE MENU ITEMS INCREASE FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SALES FROM AUSTRALIAN PRIMARY SCHOOL CANTEENS? A CLUSTER RANDOMISED TRIAL', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2018)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2018 Nathan N, Elton B, Babic M, McCarthy N, Sutherland R, Presseau J, et al., 'A systematic review of barriers and facilitators to the implementation of physical activity policies in schools', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & HEALTH (2018)
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2018 Delaney T, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Rissel C, Wyse R, 'A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of a Consumer Behavior Intervention to Improve Healthy Food Purchases From Online Canteens', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2018 Brown A, Sutherland R, Nathan N, Lecathelinais C, Reynolds R, Janssen L, et al., 'Assessing the Effectiveness, Feasibility and Acceptability of an m-Health Intervention to Improve the NutritionalQuality of Primary School Aged Children's Lunchboxes', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland
2018 Pond N, Finch M, Yoong S, Jones J, Sutherland R, Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, 'Using the Behavior Change Wheel to Inform an App-Based Intervention to Increase Parents' Packing of Healthy Lunchbox Foods for Children Attending Center-Based Childcare', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong
2017 Yoong S, Grady A, Wiggers J, Flood V, Rissel C, Wolfenden L, 'A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Online Menu Planning Intervention to Improve Childcare Service Adherence to Dietary Guidelines', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2017 Seward K, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Wiggers J, Wyse R, Jones J, Yoong S, 'An Intervention to Improve Nutrition Guideline Compliance in Childcare Services', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse
2017 Grady A, Seward K, Finch M, Stacey F, Jones J, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, 'Theory-Informed Assessment of Barriers and Enablers to Implementation of Dietary Guidelines in Childcare Centers', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2017 Ben Charif A, Zomahoun HTV, LeBlanc A, Langlois L, Wolfenden L, Yoong SL, et al., 'Effective strategies for scaling up evidence-based practices in primary care: a systematic review', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE (2017)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Nathan N, Yoong SL, Reilly K, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Increasing Australian schools' implementation of a mandatory state-wide school healthy food policy: results of three randomised-controlled trials', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE (2017)
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers, Kathryn L Reilly, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland
2016 Finch M, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTIONS IN CENTRE BASED CHILDCARE: META-ANALYSIS OF OUTCOME EFFECTS BY INTERVENTION CHARACTERISTICS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2016 Small T, Kingsland M, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Sherker S, et al., 'THE FEASIBILITY AND ACCEPTABILITY OF A WEB-BASED INTERVENTION TO SUSTAIN RESPONSIBLE ALCOHOL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN COMMUNITY SPORTING CLUBS: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Finch M, Nathan N, Yoong S, Sutherland R, Seward K, Reilly K, et al., 'SUPPORTING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF STATE NUTRITION GUIDELINES AND POLICIES IN SCHOOLS AND CHILDCARE: APPLICATION OF THE THEORETICAL DOMAINS FRAMEWORK', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly, Rachel Sutherland
2016 Yoong S, Nathan N, Finch M, Sutherland R, Seward K, Reilly K, et al., 'IMPLEMENTING STATE NUTRITION GUIDELINES AND POLICIES IN SCHOOLS AND CENTRE BASED CHILDCARE: BARRIERS AND ENABLERS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Kathryn L Reilly
2016 Finch M, Seward K, Yoong S, Wyse B, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'APPLICATION OF THEORETICAL DOMAINS FRAMEWORK TO INFORM AN INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE IMPLEMENTATION OF FOOD SERVICE NUTRITION GUIDELINES BY CENTRE BASED CHILDCARE SERVICES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2016 Nathan N, Yoong S, Reilly K, Delaney T, Janssen L, Sutherland R, et al., 'THEORY-INFORMED INTERVENTIONS TO INCREASE IMPLEMENTATION OF A MANDATORY HEALTHY FOOD POLICY IN SCHOOLS. APPLICATION OF THE THEORETICAL DOMAINS FRAMEWORK.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Kathryn L Reilly, Nicole Nathan
2016 Yoong S, Fielding A, Finch M, Seward K, Gillham K, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'IMPLEMENTING STATE NUTRITION GUIDELINES AND POLICIES IN CHILDCARE: BARRIERS AND ENABLERS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2016 Jones J, Wyse R, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, Wiggers J, Marshall J, et al., 'AN INTERVENTION TO FACILITATE THE IMPLEMENTATION OF OBESITY PREVENTION POLICIES AND PRACTICES IN CHILDCARE SERVICES: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Megan Freund, Luke Wolfenden, Jenna Hollis, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Patrick Mcelduff, John Wiggers
2016 Wyse R, Yoong SL, Dodds P, Campbell L, Delaney T, Nathan N, et al., 'THE POTENTIAL OF ONLINE CANTEENS TO DELIVER PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION INTERVENTIONS TO SCHOOL COMMUNITIES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers, Kathryn L Reilly, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Wyse
2016 Williams A, Wiggers J, O'Brien K, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Campbell E, et al., 'A TELEPHONE-BASED LIFESTYLE BEHAVIOURAL INTERVENTION FOR OVERWEIGHT OR OBESE PATIENTS WITH LOW BACK PAIN.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2016 O'Brien K, Wiggers I, Williams A, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Campbell E, et al., 'A WEIGHT MANAGEMENT AND HEALTHY LIFESTYLE PROGRAM FOR OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE PATIENTS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2016 Hodder RK, Freund N, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Nepal S, Dray J, et al., 'ARE UNIVERSAL SCHOOL-BASED PROTECTIVE FACTOR INTERVENTIONS EFFECTIVE IN REDUCING ADOLESCENT SUBSTANCE USE? RESULTS FROM A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden, Julia Dray
2016 Nathan N, Yoong S, Williams C, Reilly K, Delaney T, Sutherland R, et al., 'INCREASING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A STATE-WIDE HEALTHY CANTEEN POLICY: RESULTS OF THREE RANDOMISED-CONTROLLED TRIALS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Small T, Kingsland M, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Sherker S, et al., 'Feasibility of a web-based intervention for sustaining alcohol management practices in sports clubs', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2016 Small T, Kingsland M, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Sherker S, et al., 'Feasibility of a web-based intervention for sustaining alcohol management practices in sports clubs', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Tzelepis F, Kingsland M, Fielding A, Skelton E, 'Reliable and valid measures for evaluating public health research implementation', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER, Sydney, NSW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Alison A Fielding, Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis, Luke Wolfenden, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Serene Yoong
2015 Wolfenden L, Jones J, Wyse R, Finch M, Yoong S, Dodds P, et al., 'Improving implementation of evidence-based obesity prevention policies and practices in childcare services: Findings from a series of RCTs conducted by the Hunter New England Population Health Research Group', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER, Sydney, NSW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Megan Freund
2015 Wolfenden L, Nathan NR, Yoong S, Rose B, Aikman V, Williams C, et al., 'Improving implementation of NSW healthy canteen policy: Findings from a series of RCTs conducted by the Hunter New England Population Health Research Group', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER, Sydney, NSW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan
2014 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SL, Lecathelinais C, Bell AC, et al., 'Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Australian Primary Schools 2006-2013: How Far Have We Really Come?', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & HEALTH, Toronto, CANADA (2014)
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2014 Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Nathan N, Lecathelinais C, Dodds P, et al., 'ASSESSING CHANGES IN THE ADOPTION OF OBESITY PREVENTION PRACTICES IN AUSTRALIAN CHILDCARE SERVICES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, Brainerd, MN (2014)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2014 Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Wiggers J, 'THE FEASIBILITY OF USING ELECTRONIC INTERVENTIONS TO SUPPORT CHILDCARE SERVICES' IMPLEMENTATION OF OBESITY PREVENTION PROGRAMS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, Brainerd, MN (2014)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2014 Wolfenden L, Finch M, Yoong SL, Nathan N, Waever N, Jones J, et al., 'FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE IMPLEMENTATION OF OBESITY PREVENTION PRACTICES IN AUSTRALIAN CHILDCARE SERVICES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, Brainerd, MN (2014)
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland
2014 Wiggers JH, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SZ, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'OBESITY PREVENTION POLICIES AND PRACTICES IN AUST RALIAN PRIMARY SCHOOLS 2006-2013: HOW FAR HAVE WE COME?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Mackenzie L, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Yoong SL, 'RADIATION ONCOLOGY OUTPATIENTS' CONCERN ABOUT, PREFERENCES FOR, AND PERCEIVED BARRIERS TO DISCUSSING ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste, Lisa Mackenzie, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Bryant J, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, Carey M, Walsh J, Bisquera A, 'IS IDENTIFICATION OF SMOKING, RISKY ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION AND OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY BY GENERAL PRACTITIONERS IMPROVING? A COMPARISON OF DETECTION RATES IN AUSTRALIA BETWEEN 1982 AND 2011', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey, Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Paul CL, Inder KJ, et al., 'A cross-sectional study of the prevalence of multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in overweight or obese general practice patients', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Abstracts from the ICBM 2012 Meeting, Budapest, Hungary (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Kerry Inder, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste
Show 42 more conferences

Report (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Yoong SL, Tursan d Espaignet E, Wiggers J, St Claire S, Mellin-Olsen J, Grady A, et al., 'WHO tobacco knowledge summaries: tobacco and postsurgical outcomes', World Health Organization (2020)
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Yoong S, Tzelepis F, Wiggers J, Oldmeadow C, Kheng Chai L, Paul C, et al., 'Systematic Review: Prevalence of smoking-proxy electronic inhaling systems (SEIS) use and its association with tobacco initiation in youth', World Health Organisation, 41 (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Flora Tzelepis, Christopher Oldmeadow, Chris Paul, Serene Yoong
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 24
Total funding $7,328,311

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20211 grants / $3,600

Publication for International Journal of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity (IJBNPA)$3,600

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Serene Yoong, Mrs Nicole Pearson
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2100242
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

20203 grants / $240,236

Harnessing digital innovation in High School Canteens to reduce cardiovascular dietary risk factors$150,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Doctor Rebecca Wyse, Doctor Serene Yoong, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Rachel Sutherland
Scheme Vanguard Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1900819
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON Y

Methods and metrics for moving from best practice prevention to implementation and scale up (ISU) $55,000

Funding body: The Sax Institute

Funding body The Sax Institute
Project Team Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Serene Yoong, Doctor Alice Grady
Scheme Australian Prevention Partnership Centre
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G2000481
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Systematic Review on electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) and electronic non-nicotine delivery systems (ENNDS)$35,236

Funding body: World Health Organisation

Funding body World Health Organisation
Project Team Doctor Serene Yoong, Doctor Serene Yoong, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Dr Edouard Tursan d'Espaignet
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G2000813
Type Of Funding C3231 - International Govt - Own Purpose
Category 3231
UON Y

20191 grants / $941,275

A randomised trial of a multi-component implementation intervention to support childcare services with scheduling opportunities for outdoor free play consistent with sector guidelines$941,275

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Serene Yoong, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Chris Rissel, Professor Anthony Okely, Dr Jannah Jones, Professor Patti-Jean Naylor
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2024
GNo G1800986
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20188 grants / $3,306,145

NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Implementation for Community Chronic Disease Prevention.$2,564,665

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Adrian Bauman, Professor Chris Rissel, Professor Andrew Wilson, Doctor Serene Yoong, Professor Julian Elliott, Elliott, Julian, Professor Chris Doran, Mr Hopin Lee, Lee, Hopin, Professor Jeremy Grimshaw, Doctor Rebecca Hodder, Doctor Nicole Nathan
Scheme Centres of Research Excellence (CRE) - Centres of Population Health Research Excellence
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2024
GNo G1701553
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A technology based solution to support parents to improve their child’s diet ‘Swap What’s Packed in the lunchbox: ‘SWAP-It’$499,500

Funding body: nib Foundation

Funding body nib Foundation
Project Team Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Nicole Nathan, Doctor Serene Yoong, Professor John Wiggers
Scheme Multi-Year Partnerships
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1700907
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Addressing the health risk behaviours of the education workforce: A program to enhance the wellbeing of primary school teachers$124,700

Funding body: Teachers Health Foundation

Funding body Teachers Health Foundation
Project Team Doctor Nicole Nathan, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Serene Yoong, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Rebecca Hodder, Doctor Kathryn Reilly, Doctor Elaine Toomey
Scheme Research Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1800853
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Enhancing Teacher's Health$70,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Nicole Nathan, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Serene Yoong, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Rebecca Hodder, Doctor Kathryn Reilly, Doctor Elaine Toomey
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800924
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

Pilot cluster randomised controlled trial assessing the potential impact of an online intervention to improve child dietary intake in childcare$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Alice Grady, Doctor Serene Yoong, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Nicole Nathan, Miss Courtney Barnes
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1801365
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

The impact of social media promotion on screening for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs)$15,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Doctor Serene Yoong, Professor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Research Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800879
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

Childcare based interventions to improve children's fruit and vegetable consumption$5,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Doctor Serene Yoong
Scheme Collaboration and Exchange Awards
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701308
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

DVC(RI) Research Support for DECRA (DE17)$2,280

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Serene Yoong
Scheme DECRA Support
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1800933
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20173 grants / $346,238

Theory-based implementation of nutrition guidelines into childcare settings$183,738

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Serene Yoong
Scheme Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1600359
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Implementation of the feedAustralia information technology (IT) program$137,500

Funding body: Healthy Australia Ltd

Funding body Healthy Australia Ltd
Project Team Doctor Alice Grady, Doctor Serene Yoong, Dr Luke Wolfenden, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Meghan Finch
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701513
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

A randomised controlled trial to assess the impact of a uniform intervention on girl’s physical activity at school$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Nicole Nathan, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Serene Yoong, Professor John Wiggers
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701511
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

20165 grants / $1,658,039

A randomised controlled trial of a web-based, organisational systems change intervention to increase childcare service adherence to dietary guidelines$1,078,776

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Dr Vicki Flood, Professor Chris Rissel, Doctor Serene Yoong
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1500172
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Scheduling frequent opportunities for outdoor play: a simple approach to increase physical activity in childcare$355,956

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Serene Yoong
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1400149
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The effectiveness of strategies to scale the implementation of community chronic disease prevention interventions$118,004

Funding body: The Sax Institute

Funding body The Sax Institute
Project Team Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Serene Yoong, Associate Professor Christopher Williams, Doctor Melanie Kingsland, Professor John Wiggers, Mr Andrew Milat, Professor Chris Rissel, Ms Karen Gillham, Ms Kathryn Chapman, Professor Adrian Bauman
Scheme Australian Prevention Partnership Centre
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600445
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Research to gather baseline data regarding operations and provision of healthy food and drinks of licensed school canteens$78,030

Funding body: Health Administration Corporation

Funding body Health Administration Corporation
Project Team Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Rebecca Wyse, Ms Tessa Delaney, Doctor Serene Yoong, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Ms Nicole Nathan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600903
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

Scheduling frequent opportunities for outdoor play - a simple approach to increasing physical activity in childcare$27,273

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Serene Yoong, Ms Lubna Abdul Razak
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600481
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

20151 grants / $150,000

A randomised controlled trial of a childcare-based web intervention to improve children's fruit and vegetable consumption in care.$150,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Doctor Serene Yoong
Scheme Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1400586
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20121 grants / $662,778

Creating childcare environments supportive of child obesity prevention: The effectiveness of an intensive population based dissemination intervention$662,778

Funding body: ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)

Funding body ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)
Project Team

Luke Wolfenden

Scheme Preventive Health Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

1 grants / $20,000

HMRI Award for Early Career Research$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Serene Yoong
Scheme Research Excellence Award
Role Lead
Funding Start
Funding Finish
GNo G1801493
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed5
Current8

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 PhD Identifying and Exploring The Evidence and Practice Gaps of Obesity Prevention Interventions in The Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) Setting in Australia and Internationally PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Consultant Supervisor
2020 PhD A Randomised Trial of an Intervention to Sustain Primary Schools’ Implementation of a State-Wide Physical Activity Policy PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD Improving Healthy Eating and Physical Activity in Children Attending Early Childhood Education and Care Services PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Food Culture of Australian Adolescents – What We Know and Where We Need to Go. PhD (Medicine), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD An m-health nutrition intervention targeting parent packing of lunchboxes to improve the dietary intake of children attending childcare services PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Improving the Dietary Intake of Children in Centre-Based Child Care Services in NSW, Australia PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Acceptability, Feasibility and Potential Effectiveness of a Secondary School Nutrition Intervention PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD The efficacy of an online public health nutrition intervention on improving healthy food purchases from primary school canteens PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Scheduling Frequent Opportunities for Outdoor Free-Play – a Simple Approach to Increasing Physical Activity in Childcare PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD Improving the Implementation of Menu Dietary Guidelines in Childcare Services PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Improving Population Wide Implementation of a Healthy Food Policy in Primary Schools PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Creating Childcare Environments Supportive of Child Obesity Prevention PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Increasing the Implementation of Vegetable and Fruit Breaks in Australian Primary Schools PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

Future research leaders receive funding boost

October 22, 2019

The inaugural Research Advantage NEWstar program will support 13 aspiring University of Newcastle mid-career researchers to further develop their research leadership skills.

Significant funding boost to aid global health issues

March 14, 2019

Hunter researchers have been successful in securing more than $2.8million to work toward solutions for some of the nation’s most pressing health challenges.

Researchers recognised for their scientific contributions

August 17, 2018

Dr Andrew Gardner and Dr Serene Yoong have been announced as winners of the prestigious 2018 NSW Young Tall Poppy Science Awards.

Weighty Problem

November 1, 2013

Research has found GPs are falling short in detecting obesity, which may lead to poor weight management support.

Dr Serene Yoong

Position

Conjoint Senior Lecturer
School of Medicine and Public Health
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email sze.yoong@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 02 4924 6385
Link Twitter

Office

Room Booth Building Wallsend
Building Booth Building, Hunter New England Population Health, Wallsend
Location Wallsend

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