Professor Shelly Lane

Professor Shelly Lane

Professor

School of Health Sciences

Senses working overtime

Whether studying the neural mechanisms underlying diagnostic conditions or trialing novel clinical interventions, Professor Shelly Lane has dedicated her research career to understanding and minimising the negative impact of developmental deficits in children.

Joining the University of Newcastle in mid-2015, Shelly brings her long and productive research legacy and administrative experience to the School of Health Sciences. She continues to contribute to an understanding of sensory integration and processing, the development of praxis, and the impact of trauma on development.

Her research focuses on children who are at risk of developmental delays because of autism, attention deficit, premature birth or any number of things that create developmental risk concerns.

Informed by an in-depth knowledge of neuroscience, Shelly's expertise centres around three practical areas in this arena, the first being defining age norms related to the diagnostic criteria for children with dyspraxia.

Her second area of focus is understanding and minimising the negative impact of sensory integration and processing difficulties in children.

And the third is utilising a sensory-based approach to improve outcomes for young children who have experienced early trauma.

BRAIN FOUNDATIONS

Shortly after graduating as an occupational therapist, Shelly became convinced that further study was needed to inform her clinical practice.

Awarded her PhD from the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, she investigated the impact of drug dependence and withdrawal on second messenger systems in the cerebellum using an animal model.

"My PhD work gave me a great foundation in neuroscience, allowing me to read the literature without being afraid of it," Shelly laughs.

A two-year post-doctoral fellowship at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute followed, where she worked with Dr Edward Ornitz to examine the startle reflex in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and autism.

"That work was about sensory processing, and how children with diagnostic conditions like ADHD and autism reacted to sound," Shelly explains.

"There are kids who seem to be over-responsive to sound or touch or movement or other sensations, and those who appear under-responsive. And, it is often context related, which can be confusing. In one environment, home for instance, a child may appear under-responsive to sound and not notice when someone calls his or her name. In another environment, the grocery store perhaps, the same child may cover their ears against the sounds of people talking, flouro lights buzzing, carts rolling…"

"Further research in this area has shown that children with difficulties processing sensation have faulty filtering mechanisms, meaning their response to sensory input results in their inability to predict or anticipate it."

THE WEIGHT OF IMPACTS

The impact of sensory processing difficulties on children cannot be underestimated, and Shelly reports that people describe over-responsivity as "painful".

"If you are over sensitive to touch, it hurts when people touch you," she observes. "Or with loud sounds, some people cover their ears because it hurts. They categorise the level of central activation as pain."

The long term impact of sensory responsiveness differences is unknown. There is some research suggesting over-responsivity may diminish with age, but much more information is needed for us to be certain.

Shelly compares the possible consequences of these impacts to those of dyspraxia, another of her focal points. With dyspraxia messages from the brain to the body may be misinterpreted, causing difficulties in knowing how to move, and in planning movement. Overall behavioural organization can be problematic.

"As a child with dyspraxia, you may have oral motor, gross motor and/or fine motor clumsiness, meaning that speech, play, and school tasks may be problematic" she imparts.

"You have a hard time socially, and you have a hard time in school from an organisational, playground and gym class perspective."

"If it stretches out longer and longer then it impacts on life choices. There are activities you avoid because they require more coordination than you feel you have, and professions that you would not even consider, because you would not be able to manage them."

Following on from UCLA, Shelly held a joint clinical/academic position at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, and as Director of Occupational Therapy at the University's Sparks Center for Developmental and Learning Disorders.

The University of Edmonton in Alberta, Canada was Shelly's next stop. Here she completed locally funded research on the developmental sequelae of preterm birth.

An appointment at State University of New York in Buffalo came next, where Shelly looked at the developmental sequalae from prenatal drug exposure in human babies.

"I worked in a clinic looking after children who had been prenatally exposed to cocktails of drugs," she says.

"We looked at the developmental outcomes of those kids."

LET'S PLAY

While at Buffalo, Shelly also worked with colleagues in examining the use of assistive technology to promote the development of play in young children with delays.

"For children with significant physical disabilities, like Cerebral Palsy or Spina Bifida, therapists tend to make the primary caregiver, mother or father, into the “home” therapist," Shelly conveys.

"From then on, every single moment with the caregiver focuses on sitting, balance and reach and grasp - completely losing sight of play."

"We decided to approach this project from a play perspective."

CHANGING THE FOCUS OF THERAPY

With funding from the US Department of Education, Shelly and her Let's Play! Project team put together a library of toys and assistive technology tools for families to borrow. A suite of resources created for caregivers and therapists is still being accessed today.

"We incorporated therapy into activities that were enjoyable, and used assistive technology to make play easier," Shelly says.

"We received great feedback from caregivers who were able to simply play with, and enjoy being with their child again."

Moving on to Virginia Commonwealth University, Shelly held the position of Chair of Occupational Therapy, and Assistant Dean of Research before concentrating on her research.

Overseeing the set up at the state-of-the-art Sensory Processing and Stress Evaluation (SPASE) Laboratory, she and her team completed several studies on sensory processing disorders.

"We were able to find a million dollar endowment for the lab so it was hard to leave behind," Shelly reveals. During her work at Virginia, Shelly worked on a project utilising a sensory-based approach for preschoolers who had experienced early trauma. Working side-by-side with both a counsellor and a teacher, this team implemented an approach that capitalised on a sensory-based foundation, child and parent counselling, and strengths-based teaching.

THE PRAXIS PUZZLE PIECE

Linked with the SPASE lab, Shelly also worked with colleagues on establishing age norms for the development of ideational and ideomotor praxis in young children.

This work has synergies with Shelly's colleague, Associate Professor Alison Lane. Alison has identified specific sensory subtypes in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). "Alison and I share an interest in sensory processing," Shelly affirms.

"We'll work together to look at early identification and use her sensory subtyping model, but also add that praxis piece in."

Shelly is also collaborating with others at UON. She has joined a team of researchers headed up by Dr Jennifer St. George, studying Father-Child Play, and is working with A/Prof Alison Lane and her team investigating self-regulation strategies in children with autism.

"I'm looking forward to working with some new faces on new perspectives."

Find out more

Shelly Lane

Senses working overtime

Professor Shelly Lane has clinical and research expertise in paediatrics, specifically striving to understand the interplay between physiologic responses and

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Prof Lane has been working to understand the neural mechanisms underlying disorders of sensory integration and processing since the early 2000’s. There has been a surge of interest in developing this understanding as these disorders are being recognized more broadly, and researched by professionals both within and outside of the profession of occupational therapy. Prof Lane and her colleagues have indicated that there are autonomic nervous system (ANS) differences between typical children and children with diagnoses such as autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, along with disorders of sensory integration and processing. Future work will further characterize ANS responses to everyday sensation, and to sensory-based interventions in children, both with and without other diagnoses.

Career summary
Shelly J Lane is a Professor of Occupational Therapy. Her occupational therapy career began as a clinician, working with young children in the public schools in the USA. Having decided she did not fully understand the neural underpinnings of the challenges facing these students, Prof Lane entered a PhD program in Anatomy and Cell Biology, with a focus on neuroscience. Her doctoral work investigated the impact of drug dependence and withdrawal on second messenger systems in the cerebellum. After completing her doctoral work Prof Lane completed a two-year post-doctoral fellowship at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute, working with Dr. Edward Ornitz to examine the startle reflex in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.
On completing her post-doctoral work, Prof Lane held a joint clinical/academic position at the University of Alabama, Birmingham and the Sparks Centre; Prof Lane was the Director of Occupational Therapy at the Sparks Centre.  Moving on from this position, Prof Lane began a robust research career, examining correlates, mechanisms, and interventions for children at high risk for developmental challenges. She engaged in locally funded research on the developmental sequelae of preterm birth at the University of Edmonton, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, the impact of prenatal substance exposure on development in young children at the State University of New York at Buffalo (UB), Buffalo, NY. While at UB Prof Lane also received local funding for examining the use of assistive technology to promote the development of play in young children with delays. This project later became a multi-year, multi-disciplinary, funded study (US Department of Education) focused on the development of a unique model of intervention that included a toy and assistive technology lending library. Although this project ended several years ago, the Let’s Play! materials developed by this multi-disciplinary teach, for caregivers and therapists, continue to be available on the web.
Prof Lane moved to Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) where she served as Department Chair for 9 years and Assistant Dean for Research for 4 years, and conducted research studying neurophysiologic correlates of sensory processing in children with autism and/or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. At VCU she established the Sensory Processing and Stress Evaluation (SPASE) Laboratory where she and her team completed several studies on sensory processing disorders. Linked with this lab, Prof Lane worked with other colleagues on establishing age norms for the development of ideational and ideomotor praxis in young children. Other recent work includes expansion of a program working with pre-schoolers who experienced early trauma to include sensory processing approaches.  
Prof Lane joined the University of Newcastle in July, 2015, and hopes to continue to contribute to an understanding of sensory integration and processing, the development of praxis, and the impact of trauma on development.

Qualifications
•    Bachelor of Allied Health, Occupational Therapy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
•    PhD, Department Anatomy and Cell Biology (emphasis: neuroscience), University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Texas
  • Bachelor of Science, Ohio State University - USA

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • children
  • developmental dyspraxia
  • developmental trauma disorder
  • electrodermal response
  • heart rate variability
  • neurodevelopmental disability
  • paediatric occupational therapy
  • sensory integration and processing
  • sensory processing disorders

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance 50
110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy) 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/08/2009 - 30/06/2015 Professor

Research, teaching and service position. Served as Assistant Dean for Research for the School of Allied Health for 5 years, conducted research on the development of praxis in children and the neurophysiology of sensory modulation disorders. Engaged in a community engagement project with the Circle Preschool, working to integrate sensory strategies into a program for preschoolers who had experienced trauma, abuse, and neglect. Mentored PhD and OTD students, serving as major professor for several projects.

Virginia Commonwealth University
Occupational Therapy
United States
1/08/1996 - 30/07/2009 Professor and Chair

Leadership and management of the Department of Occupational Therapy; teaching Neuroscience Applications to Occupational Therapy, Grant Writing and Project Management, and aspects of pediatrics and medical conditions courses. Engaged in research examining neurophysiological aspects of sensory modulation deficits.

Virginia Commonwealth University
Occupational Therapy
United States
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Lane SJ, Bundy AC, Kids Can Be Kids: A Childhood Occupations Approach, F.A. Davis, Philadelphia, PA, 704 (2011)
2002 Bundy AC, Lane SJ, Murray EA, Sensory Integration: Theory and Practice, FA Davis, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 528 (2002)
1999 Porr SM, Rainville EB, Pediatric Therapy: A Systems Approach, FA Davis, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 607 (1999)
1997 Angelo J, Lane SJ, Assistive Technology for the Rehabilitation Therapist, FA Davis, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 294 (1997)
Show 1 more book

Chapter (37 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Lane SJ, Reynolds S, 'Sensory modulation', Interventions in autism: Exploring the spectrum of autism, 2nd ed, Hamill Institute on Disabilities, Austin, TX 57-88 (2014)
2013 Lane SJ, Roley SS, Champagne T, 'Sensory integration and processing: Theory and applications to occupational performance', Willard and Spackman's Occupational Therapy: Twelfth Edition 816-868 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 5
2012 Lane SJ, 'Is it contagious? medical conditions and occupational therapy', Kids can be Kids: a Childhood Occupations Approach, F. A. Davis, Philadelphia, PA 417-436 (2012) [B1]
2012 Lane SJ, 'Occupation and participation at the heart of pediatric occupational therapy', Kids can be Kids: a Childhood Occupations Approach, F. A. Davis, Philadelphia, PA 3-9 (2012) [B1]
2012 Lane SJ, Anzalone M, 'Feels awful and doesn't sound very good, either: sensory processing disorders', Kids can be Kids: a Childhood Occupations Approach, F. A. Davis, Philadelphia, PA 437-459 (2012) [B1]
2012 Lane SJ, Chapparo C, 'Learning and intellectual disabilities', Kids can be Kids: a Childhood Occupations Approach, F. A. Davis, Philadelphia, PA 525-548 (2012) [B1]
2012 Lane SJ, Sample PL, Bundy AC, 'Transition planning: what do you want to be when you grow up?', Kids can be Kids: a Childhood Occupations Approach, F. A. Davis, Philadelphia, PA 102-124 (2012) [B1]
2011 Lane SJ, 'Occupation and participation at the heart of pediatric occupational therapy', Kids Can Be Kids, FA Davis, Philadelphia, PA 3-9 (2011)
2011 Sample PL, Bundy A, Lane SJ, 'Transition planning. What do you want to be when you grow up?', Kids Can Be Kids, F A Davis Company, Philadelphia, PA 102-124 (2011)
2011 Lane SJ, Chapparo C, 'Learning disabilities and intellectual disabilities. Why is this so hard for me?', Kids Can Be Kids, F.A. Davis Company, Philadelphia, PA 525-548 (2011)
2011 Anzalone M, Lane SJ, 'Feels Awful and Doesn¿t Sound Very Good, Either: Sensory Processing Disorders', Kids Can Be Kids, F.A. Davis Company, Philadelphia, PA 437-459 (2011)
2011 Lane SJ, 'Disorders of Eating and Feeding, and Disorders Following Prenatal Substance Exposure. Why Won¿t My Baby Eat?', Kids Can Be Kids, FA Davis Company, Philadelphia, PA 102-124 (2011)
2011 Schaaf RC, Schoen SA, Roley SS, Lane SJ, Koomar J, May-Benson TA, 'A frame of reference for sensory integration', Frames of Reference for Pediatric Occupational Therapy: Third Edition 99-186 (2011)
Citations Scopus - 1
2008 Lane SJ, 'Sensory integration', Developmental Disabilities in Infancy and Childhood, 3rd ed, Paul H Brookes Publishing Company, Baltimore, MD 673-690 (2008)
2008 Lane SJ, Mistrett S, 'Facilitating play in early intervention', Play in Occupational Therapy for Children 413-425 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/B978-032302954-4.10017-0
Citations Scopus - 1
2005 Miller LJ, Lane SJ, Cermak S, Anzalone M, Osten E, 'Regulatory-sensory processing disorders', ICDL Diagnostic Manual for Infancy and Early Childhood, ICDL, Baltimore, MD 73-112 (2005)
2005 Lane SJ, Mistrett S, Ruffino AG, 'Growing and learning through technology: birth to five', Handbook of Special Education Technology, Research and Practice, Knowledge by Design, Whitefish Bay, WI 273-307 (2005) [B1]
2005 Lane SJ, Lou JQ, 'Personal performance capabilities and their impact on occupational performance', Occupational Therapy: Performance, Participation and Well-Being, Slack, Thorofare, NJ 268-297 (2005) [B2]
2005 Lane SJ, 'Sensory Integration', Developmental Disabilities in Infancy and Childhood, Brookes Publishing, Baltimore, MD (2005)
2005 Lane SJ, Miller LJ, Cermak S, Anzalone M, Osten E, 'Regulatory-sensory processing disorders', ICDL Diagnostic Manual for Infancy and Early Childhood, ICDL, Baltimore, MD (2005)
2004 Lane SJ, 'Personal performance capabilities and their impact on occupational performance', Occupational Therapy: Performance, Participation, and Well-Being, Slack Inc, Thorofare, NJ 268-297 (2004)
2002 Lane SJ, 'Sensorimotor development', A practical guide to infant and preschool assessment in special education, Pearson/Merrill, San Antonio, TX 1-20 (2002)
2002 Lane SJ, 'Structure and function of the sensory systems', Sensory Integration: Theory and Practice, F. A. Davis, Philadelphia, PA 35-70 (2002)
2002 Lane SJ, 'Sensory modulation', Sensory Integration: Theory and Practice, F. A. Davis, Philadelphia, PA 101-123 (2002)
2001 Lane SJ, Hueber RA, 'Neuropyschological understanding of autistic spectrum', Autistic Spectrum: a Sensorimotor Approach to Assessment and Treatment, ., . 61-100 (2001)
1999 Lane SJ, Lowman DK, 'Children with feeding and nutritional problems', Pediatric Therapy: a Systems Approach, F. A. Davis, Philadelphia, PA 313-378 (1999) [B1]
1997 Lane SJ, 'Can and should technology be used as a tool for early intervention?', Assistive Technology for Rehabilitation Therapists, F.A. Davis, Philadelphia, PA (1997) [B1]
1997 Lane SJ, 'Motor development: the second year', Handbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Wiley, New York 136-143 (1997)
1997 Lane SJ, 'Motor development: birth - one year', Handbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Wiley, New York (1997)
1997 Lane SJ, 'Nature: environmental influences on central nervous system functions', Neuroscience: Update on Essentials, AOTA, Rockville, MD (1997)
1995 Lane SJ, Mistrett SG, 'Using assistive technology for play and learning: children, ages birth to ten', Assistive Technology for Persons with Disabilities: the Role of Occupational Therapy, AOTA, Bethesda, MD 129-144 (1995) [B1]
1995 Lane SJ, 'Motivation', The Practice of the Future: Putting Occupation Back into Therapy, AOTA, Baltimore, MD 23-26 (1995)
1995 Lane SJ, 'Use it or lose it!', The Practice of the Future: Putting Occupation Back into Therapy, AOTA, Bethesda, MD 19-21 (1995)
1995 Lane SJ, 'There's no place like home', The Practice of the Future: Putting Occupation Back into Therapy, AOTA, Bethesda, MD 20-22 (1995)
1994 Lane SJ, 'Sensorimotor development', A Practical Guide to Infant and Preschool Assessment in Early Childhood Special Education, Allyn & Bacon, Boston, MA 293-310 (1994)
1991 Lane SJ, Royeen CB, 'Tactile dysfunction and related sensory modulation disorders', Sensory Integration: Theory and Practice, F. A. Davis, Philadelphia, PA 108-136 (1991)
1991 Lane SJ, 'Motor planning', Neuroscience Foundations of Human Performance, AOTA, Bethesda, MD (1991)
Show 34 more chapters

Journal article (60 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Reynolds S, Burgess ME, Hymowitz N, Snyder DJ, Lane SJ, 'Fungiform Papilla Number and Olfactory Threshold Assessment in Males With and Without Barth Syndrome', Chemosensory Perception, 1-9 (2017)

© 2017 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC Introduction: Barth syndrome is a rare X-linked genetic disorder caused by a mutation or deletion of the tafazzin gene. Approximately ... [more]

© 2017 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC Introduction: Barth syndrome is a rare X-linked genetic disorder caused by a mutation or deletion of the tafazzin gene. Approximately 50¿70% of affected males have family-reported feeding issues that affect eating habits and/or restrict dietary intake. Research to date suggests that these feeding problems may be related to differences in responsivity to taste and smell stimuli. The purpose of this study was to use indices of chemosensory function to study differences in food-related sensation and anatomy in males with and without Barth syndrome. Methodology: A cross-sectional two-group comparison design was used. Participants included 34 males with Barth syndrome between 5 and 34 years of age and 34 age-matched controls. Measures included the number of fungiform papillae on the anterior dorsal surface of the tongue and scores on the Sniffin¿ Sticks olfactory threshold test. Results: Fungiform papilla counts did not differ significantly between males with and without Barth syndrome, suggesting that altered oral anatomy does not contribute to reported taste and feeding problems in this population. Olfactory thresholds significantly differed between groups; the Barth syndrome sample had a lower threshold for odor detection, indicating greater olfactory sensitivity. These objective measures match self-report data from the Barth syndrome population indicating that they perceive themselves as having a heighted sense of smell compared to others. Conclusions: This study supports previous behavioral research indicating that olfactory sensitivity is heightened in the Barth syndrome population. Although differences in oral anatomy did not occur, previous research suggests that specific oral sensory cues (e.g., bitterness, texture) may be especially salient in Barth syndrome. Implications: Since this is the first study to identify differences in odor threshold in the Barth syndrome population, findings should be corroborated with future research. These efforts should include odor, taste, and tactile cues at both threshold and suprathreshold concentrations. Results suggest, however, that interventions to address feeding and dietary needs of the Barth syndrome population should consider how food-related stimuli can be modified in order to facilitate appetite and reduce food refusal.

DOI 10.1007/s12078-017-9228-4
2017 Philpott-Robinson K, Lane SJ, Korostenski L, Lane AE, 'The impact of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit on sensory and developmental outcomes in infants born preterm: A scoping review', British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 80 459-469 (2017)

© 2017, © The Author(s) 2017. Introduction: Preterm infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit are at higher risk of poor neurodevelopmental and sensory outcomes. Ther... [more]

© 2017, © The Author(s) 2017. Introduction: Preterm infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit are at higher risk of poor neurodevelopmental and sensory outcomes. There is interest in establishing whether elements of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit sensory environment may influence the sensory and overall development of these infants. Method: The purpose of this scoping review was to provide a comprehensive overview of relevant research regarding the sensory elements of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and their short- and long-term influence on preterm infants. This scoping review is underpinned by the six-stage framework by Arksey and O¿Malley. Results: There are few studies that have directly examined the influence of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit environment upon the sensory and developmental outcomes of infants born preterm, in infancy. The findings of the studies included in this review suggest that the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit sensory environment may alter developmental trajectories of preterm infants. However, low-quality evidence exists in this field, with much of the literature being preliminary. Conclusion: Further experimental studies are required that combine multiple methods of assessment to more rigorously understand the sensory characteristics of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and their relationship with developmental outcomes across early childhood.

DOI 10.1177/0308022617709761
Co-authors Alison Lane
2017 Ryan K, Lane SJ, Powers D, 'A multidisciplinary model for treating complex Trauma in early Childhood', International Journal of Play Therapy, 26 111-123 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Association for Play Therapy. Current neurodevelopmental research suggests that chronic and highly stressful environments and experiences, occurring during early developme... [more]

© 2017 Association for Play Therapy. Current neurodevelopmental research suggests that chronic and highly stressful environments and experiences, occurring during early development, have a strong negative impact on the neural architecture and overall brain development in young children. Evidence based practice suggests interventions which provide safe, relational, playful, regulatory directed, and repetitive sensory/motor qualities, geared to the developmental age of the child, will best meet child and family needs. Optimally meeting the needs of these children and their caregivers with a neurobiologically based approach requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Here we describe our multidisciplinary practice model and present the case of a "graduate" of our program. Our model is based on Perry's neurosequential model of therapeutics approach to clinical reasoning, and emphasizes the healing power of safe relationships and the use of regulatory activities designed to activate specific brain regions. We also incorporate trauma informed play therapy to support relationship building and self-regulation, strengths-based and trauma informed early childhood education, occupational therapy emphasizing sensory integration for self-regulation, and caregiver therapy. We suggest that this multidisciplinary, multifaceted model of intervention for preschoolers with serious emotional disorders related to the developmental trauma is healing to both the child and caregiver and assists the child to reenter the educational system with more adaptive selfregulation tools and social emotional tools.

DOI 10.1037/pla0000044
2017 Beaudry-Bellefeuille I, Lane SJ, 'Examining sensory overresponsiveness in preschool children with retentive fecal incontinence', American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 71 (2017)

The development of bowel control is an important activity of daily living in early childhood, and challenges in this area can limit participation in key occupations. Retentive fec... [more]

The development of bowel control is an important activity of daily living in early childhood, and challenges in this area can limit participation in key occupations. Retentive fecal incontinence (RFI) is a common disorder in children. Up to 50% of children do not respond adequately to initial medical intervention, and behaviors around toileting, some related to sensory overresponsivity (SOR), may be partly responsible. Therefore, this study investigated the relationship between RFI and SOR and also examined the discriminative validity of the Toileting Habit Profile Questionnaire (THPQ). Per parent report, children with RFI (n 5 16) showed significantly more behaviors related to SOR compared with typically developing children (n 5 27). In addition, results indicated that the THPQ effectively discriminates between children with RFI and typically developing children. Results are discussed regarding RFI and SOR, the impact of RFI on childhood occupational engagement, and the role of occupational therapy with this population.

DOI 10.5014/ajot.2017.022707
2016 Beaudry-Bellefeuille I, Lane SJ, Ramos-Polo E, 'The Toileting Habit Profile Questionnaire: Screening for sensory-based toileting difficulties in young children with constipation and retentive fecal incontinence', Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, and Early Intervention, 9 163-175 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis. This study examined the face and preliminary content validity of the Toileting Habit Profile Questionnaire, a tool designed to screen for sensory-based... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis. This study examined the face and preliminary content validity of the Toileting Habit Profile Questionnaire, a tool designed to screen for sensory-based defecation difficulties in children. A panel of experts reviewed a pilot version of the questionnaire and responded to probe questions. Two reviewers conducted direct content analysis of responses; 100% agreement was reached. Experts demonstrated a high degree of agreement and their input was useful in establishing this tool for initial research and clinical use. The Toileting Habit Profile Questionnaire appears to capture behaviors that are consistent with problematic toileting behaviors, particularly as they relate to sensory overreactivity.

DOI 10.1080/19411243.2016.1141081
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Benevides TW, Carretta HJ, Lane SJ, 'Unmet Need for Therapy Among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Results from the 2005-2006 and 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs', MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH JOURNAL, 20 878-888 (2016)
DOI 10.1007/s10995-015-1876-x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Thomas S, Bundy AC, Black D, Lane SJ, 'Toward Early Identification of Sensory Over-Responsivity (SOR): A Construct for Predicting Difficulties With Sleep and Feeding in Infants', OTJR-OCCUPATION PARTICIPATION AND HEALTH, 35 178-186 (2015)
DOI 10.1177/1539449215579855
2015 Benevides TW, Lane SJ, 'A Review of Cardiac Autonomic Measures: Considerations for Examination of Physiological Response in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder', JOURNAL OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, 45 560-575 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10803-013-1971-z
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2015 Reynolds S, Lane SJ, Mullen B, 'Effects of Deep Pressure Stimulation on Physiological Arousal', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, 69 (2015)
DOI 10.5014/ajot.2015.015560
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2015 Beaudry-Bellefeuille I, Lane SJ, 'Cultural adaptation for Spain of the Spanish version of the Short Sensory Profile using cognitive interviews', Austin Journal of Autism & Related Disabilities, 1 1004 (2015)
2015 Lane S, Mailloux Z, Reynolds S, Roley SS, 'Patterns of sensory integration dysfunction in specific populations: Evidence-based identification', OT Practice, 20 CE-1-CE-8 (2015)

© 2015, American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. All rights reserved. Evidence-based occupational therapy practice is informed during the evaluation by using assessments t... [more]

© 2015, American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. All rights reserved. Evidence-based occupational therapy practice is informed during the evaluation by using assessments that characterize clients¿ strengths, abilities, and participation challenges; guide recommendations for intervention; and allow identification of meaningful and desired outcomes. Patterns of sensory integration (SI) function and dysfunction, originally identified by Ayres (Ayres, 1979/2005; Mailloux et al., 2011; Parham & Mailloux, 2015), through numerous factor and cluster analyses of test scores in a variety of populations, have been further characterized over time. Originating with theoretical links between SI functions and occupational performance, Ayres conducted studies that showed data-based patterns that were consistent, even as specific evaluation tools evolved and developed. Research on these identified patterns of function and dysfunction informed further theory development and elucidated our understanding of the various constructs that serve to support the validity of SI theory and practice. In this article, we review the identified patterns of SI function and dysfunction based on historic and current analyses; examine the links between certain patterns of SI dysfunction in various diagnostic and clinical groups, including children with conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, and hearing loss addressed through cochlear implants; and review the way in which theoretical models informed by this theory and research allow further examination through research and in practice.

2015 Schaaf RC, Schoen SA, May-Benson TA, Parham LD, Lane SJ, Roley SS, Mailloux Z, 'State of the science: A roadmap for research in sensory integration', American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69 (2015) [C1]

This article builds on the work of Case-Smith and colleagues and proposes a roadmap to guide future research in occupational therapy. To foster best practice in the application of... [more]

This article builds on the work of Case-Smith and colleagues and proposes a roadmap to guide future research in occupational therapy. To foster best practice in the application of principles and practices of sensory integration (SI), the pillars of practice, advocacy, and education are identified as elements that provide the foundation for research. Each pillar ensures that SI research is conducted in a rigorous and relevant manner. To this end, achievements to date are discussed, with proposed goals presented for each pillar. Finally, the roadmap builds on the pillars and outlines implications for occupational therapy with the overarching theme that a wide array of scientists, educators, therapists, and service recipients will be needed to ensure that those who may benefit most have access to intervention that is evidence based, theory driven, and provided within the highest standards of service delivery.

DOI 10.5014/ajot.2015.019539
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Schaaf RC, Burke JP, Cohn E, May-Benson TA, Schoen SA, Roley SS, et al., 'State of measurement in occupational therapy using sensory integration.', Am J Occup Ther, 68 e149-e153 (2014)
DOI 10.5014/ajot.2014.012526
Citations Scopus - 3
2014 Ivey CK, Lane SJ, May-Benson TA, 'Interrater Reliability and Developmental Norms in Preschoolers for the Motor Planning Maze Assessment (MPMA)', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, 68 539-545 (2014)
DOI 10.5014/ajot.2014.012468
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2014 Lane SJ, Ivey CK, May-Benson TA, 'Test of Ideational Praxis (TIP): Preliminary Findings and Interrater and Test-Retest Reliability With Preschoolers', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, 68 555-561 (2014)
DOI 10.5014/ajot.2014.012542
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2012 Lane SJ, Reynolds S, Dumenci L, 'Sensory Overresponsivity and Anxiety in Typically Developing Children and Children With Autism and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Cause or Coexistence?', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, 66 595-603 (2012)
DOI 10.5014/ajot.2012.004523
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24
2012 Reynolds S, Lane SJ, Thacker L, 'Sensory Processing, Physiological Stress, and Sleep Behaviors in Children With and Without Autism Spectrum Disorders', OTJR-OCCUPATION PARTICIPATION AND HEALTH, 32 246-257 (2012)
DOI 10.3928/15394492-20110513-02
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 11
2011 Reynolds S, Bendixen RM, Lawrence T, Lane SJ, 'A Pilot Study Examining Activity Participation, Sensory Responsiveness, and Competence in Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder', JOURNAL OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, 41 1496-1506 (2011)
DOI 10.1007/s10803-010-1173-x
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 36
2010 Lane SJ, Schaaf RC, 'Examining the Neuroscience Evidence for Sensory-Driven Neuroplasticity: Implications for Sensory-Based Occupational Therapy for Children and Adolescents', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, 64 375-390 (2010)
DOI 10.5014/ajot.2010.09069
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 13
2010 Reynolds S, Lane SJ, 'Grant writing for occupational therapy practitioners', OT Practice, 15 7-12 (2010)

While the national economy remains uncertain, the field of occupational therapy continues to expand, creating a wealth of opportunities for innovative and exciting clinical progra... [more]

While the national economy remains uncertain, the field of occupational therapy continues to expand, creating a wealth of opportunities for innovative and exciting clinical programs. Occupational therapy practitioners must seek new ways to make their ideas for improved client services a reality. Grant writing is one way of obtaining funding for the types of projects and programs that can lead the profession in reaching its Centennial Vision. Occupational therapy practitioners can enhance their own grant writing abilities by working with mentors, attending workshops, and enrolling in continuing education courses.

2010 Reynolds S, Lane SJ, Gennings C, 'The Moderating Role of Sensory Overresponsivity in HPA Activity A Pilot Study With Children Diagnosed With ADHD', JOURNAL OF ATTENTION DISORDERS, 13 468-478 (2010)
DOI 10.1177/1087054708329906
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 20
2010 Reynolds S, Lane SJ, Richards L, 'Using animal models of enriched environments to inform research on sensory integration intervention for the rehabilitation of neurodevelopmental disorders', JOURNAL OF NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, 2 120-132 (2010)
DOI 10.1007/s11689-010-9053-4
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
2010 Copolillo A, Shepherd J, Anzalone M, Lane SJ, 'Taking on the challenge of the centennial vision: Transforming the passion for occupational therapy into a passion for leadership', Occupational Therapy in Health Care, 24 7-22 (2010)

The Centennial Vision makes it clear that the profession of occupational therapy is facing challenges that require members to move beyond clinical excellence toward larger health ... [more]

The Centennial Vision makes it clear that the profession of occupational therapy is facing challenges that require members to move beyond clinical excellence toward larger health care initiatives (American Occupational Therapy Association, 2007). Accomplishing this goal requires the development of professionals with leadership skills. The focus of the doctorate in occupational therapy at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) hits this mark. In this paper, we describe the development process of a postprofessional occupational therapy doctorate focused on building leaders. To exemplify putting the Centennial Vision in action through education, we describe courses and content, and offer examples of the capstone leadership project and data describing students' experiences with becoming leaders. © 2010 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

DOI 10.3109/07380570903304209
2010 Lane SJ, Lynn JZ, Reynolds S, 'Sensory modulation a neuroscience and behavioral overview', OT Practice, 15 (2010)

Understanding sensory processing and sensory processing disorders such as sensory modulation disorder (SMD) is crucial for occupational therapy practitioners. SMD is increasingly ... [more]

Understanding sensory processing and sensory processing disorders such as sensory modulation disorder (SMD) is crucial for occupational therapy practitioners. SMD is increasingly identified by families, teachers, special educators, and professionals in other health related fields as an issue for children with a variety of conditions. In a recent issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy (AJOT), guest editors Schaaf and Davies (2010) enthusiastically asserted a "perfect storm" has arrived, and we must seize this opportunity to emerge as the leaders in the evolution of the theory of sensory integration and the treatment of people who experience participation limitations related to problems in processing and integrating sensory information. Our terminology must be clear, our role must be clearly delineated, our expertise must be defined, and our interventions must be evidence based (p. 363). It is with this declaration that we define, examine, and anticipate future research on the topic of sensory modulation from both a physiological and behavioral perspective. Here we define and organize the term SMD, including patterns of the clinical presentation of disorders that fall under it. Neuroscience foundations relative to modulation and modulation dysfunction are considered, and tentative links between neuroscience and behavior are presented. Finally, we look at concepts of intervention for disorders of sensory modulation.

Citations Scopus - 3
2010 Lane SJ, Reynolds S, Thacker L, 'Sensory over-responsivity and ADHD: Differentiating using electrodermal responses, cortisol, and anxiety', Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, (2010)

Deficits in sensory modulation have been linked clinically with impaired attention, arousal, and impulsivity for years, but a clear understanding of the relationship between senso... [more]

Deficits in sensory modulation have been linked clinically with impaired attention, arousal, and impulsivity for years, but a clear understanding of the relationship between sensory modulation disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has proven elusive. Our preliminary work suggested that patterns of salivary cortisol and electrodermal responsivity to sensation may be linked to different groups of children with ADHD; those with and without sensory overresponsivity (SOR). Additionally, SOR has been linked to anxiety, and anxiety has been linked to ADHD. A clearer understanding of the relationship between anxiety, SOR, and ADHD may support a better understanding of ADHD diagnostic subtypes. We examined neuroendocrine, electrodermal and behavioral characteristics and sought to predict group membership among 6-to 12-year-old children with ADHD and SOR (ADHDs), ADHD and no SOR (ADHDt), and typicals (TYP). Behavioral questionnaires were completed to document SOR and anxiety. Lab testing used a Sensory Challenge Protocol (SCP) with concurrent electrodermal measurement and the collection of cortisol prior to and following the SCP. Results substantiated links between SOR and anxiety, in both TYP and ADHD children. Results suggests that ADHD should be considered in conjunction with anxiety and sensory responsivity; both may be related to bottom-up processing differences, and deficits in prefrontal cortex/hippocampal synaptic gating. © 2010 Lane, Reynolds and Thacker.

DOI 10.3389/fnint.2010.00008
Citations Scopus - 32
2010 Schaaf RC, Benevides T, Blanche EI, Brett-Green BA, Burke JP, Cohn ES, et al., 'Parasympathetic functions in children with sensory processing disorder', Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, (2010)

The overall goal of this study was to determine if parasympathetic nervous system (PsNS) activity is a significant biomarker of sensory processing difficulties in children. Severa... [more]

The overall goal of this study was to determine if parasympathetic nervous system (PsNS) activity is a significant biomarker of sensory processing difficulties in children. Several studies have demonstrated that PsNS activity is an important regulator of reactivity in children, and thus, it is of interest to study whether PsNS activity is related to sensory reactivity in children who have a type of condition associated with sensory processing disorders termed sensory modulation dysfunction (SMD). If so, this will have important implications for understanding the mechanisms underlying sensory processing problems of children and for developing intervention strategies to address them. The primary aims of this project were: (1) to evaluate PsNS activity in children with SMD compared to typically developing (TYP) children, and (2) to determine if PsNS activity is a significant predictor of sensory behaviors and adaptive functions among children with SMD. We examine PsNS activity during the Sensory Challenge Protocol; which includes baseline, the administration of eight sequential stimuli in five sensory domains, recovery, and also evaluate response to a prolonged auditory stimulus. As a secondary aim we examined whether subgroups of children with specific physiological and behavioral sensory reactivity profiles can be identified. Results indicate that as a total group the children with severe SMD demonstrated a trend for low baseline PsNS activity, compared to TYP children, suggesting this may be a biomarker for SMD. In addition, children with SMD as a total group demonstrated significantly poorer adaptive behavior in the communication and daily living subdomains and in the overall Adaptive Behavior Composite of the Vineland than TYP children. Using latent class analysis, the subjects were grouped by severity and the severe SMD group had significantly lower PsNS activity at baseline, tones and prolonged auditory. These results provide preliminary evidence that children who demonstrate severe SMD may have physiological activity that is different from children without SMD, and that these physiological and behavioral manifestations of SMD may affect a child's ability to engage in everyday social, communication, and daily living skills. © 2010 Schaaf, Benevides, Blanche, Brett-Green, Burke, Cohn, Koomar, Lane, Miller, May-Benson, Parham, Reynolds and Schoen.

DOI 10.3389/fnint.2010.00004
Citations Scopus - 20
2009 Reynolds S, Lane SJ, 'Sensory Overresponsivity and Anxiety in Children With ADHD', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, 63 433-440 (2009)
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 39
2008 Reynolds S, Lane SJ, 'Diagnostic validity of sensory over-responsivity: A review of the literature and case reports', JOURNAL OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, 38 516-529 (2008)
DOI 10.1007/s10803-007-0418-9
Citations Scopus - 78Web of Science - 65
2008 Reynolds S, Shepherd J, Lane SJ, 'Sensory modulation disorders in a minority head start population: Preliminary prevalence and characterization', Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, and Early Intervention, 1 186-198 (2008)

This study examined the prevalence of sensory modulation disorders (SMD) in a population of minority children enrolled in an urban Head Start program. Parents of 105 children atte... [more]

This study examined the prevalence of sensory modulation disorders (SMD) in a population of minority children enrolled in an urban Head Start program. Parents of 105 children attending Head Start were surveyed using the Short Sensory Profile. Results indicated that 17% to 35% of children could be classified as having SMD, with 43% of children exhibiting extreme under-responsive/sensory-seeking behaviors. Rates of SMD in these children were approximately three times higher than those reported in other populations of young children. Potential reasons for these higher prevalence rates are discussed along with the role of occupational therapists in Head Start settings. © 2008 by The Haworth Press.

DOI 10.1080/19411240802589031
2007 Miller LJ, Anzalone ME, Lane SJ, Cermak SA, Osten ET, 'Concept evolution in sensory integration: A proposed nosology for diagnosis', American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 61 135-142 (2007)
Citations Scopus - 215
2007 Miller LJ, Anzalone ME, Osten E, Lane SJ, Cermak S, 'Concept evolution in sensory integration: A proposed taxonomy', American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 61 135-140 (2007)
2003 Isabelle S, Bessey SF, Dragas KL, Blease P, Shepherd JT, Lane SJ, 'Assistive Technology for Children with Disabilities', Occupational Therapy In Health Care, 16 29-51 (2003)
DOI 10.1080/J003v16n04_03
2002 Isabelle S, Bessey SF, Dragas KL, Blease P, Shepherd JT, Lane SJ, 'Assistive technology for children with disabilities', Occupational Therapy in Health Care, 16 29-51 (2002)

Through The Rehabilitation Act, the Technology Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (The Tech Act), the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and... [more]

Through The Rehabilitation Act, the Technology Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (The Tech Act), the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, the federal government broadened the states' roles in increasing awareness and accessibility of assistive technology (AT) devices and services to children with disabilities. As a member of the AT team, the occupational therapy practitioner plays an integral role in selecting the most appropriate device, and working with parents and other professionals to integrate the device into a child's daily routines. This literature review presents a summary of available information on AT materials and strategies that assist infants, toddlers, and school-aged children with disabilities. We begin with a brief look at legislation affecting the provision of AT. Issues concerning the use of Electronic Aides of Daily Living (EADL), and strategies for successful manipulation are presented; followed by a discussion of play and leisure, mobility, and communication devices. Finally, we conclude with a discussion concerning the importance of measuring the effectiveness of AT devices and services. © 2002 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1300/J003v16n04_03
Citations Scopus - 21
2002 Lane SJ, Mistrett S, 'Let's Play!: Assistive Technology Interventions for Play', Young Exceptional Children, 5 19-27 (2002) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/109625060200500203
Citations Scopus - 1
2000 White JC, Smith MM, Lowman DK, Reidy TG, Murphy SM, Lane SJ, 'Parent Support of Feeding in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Perspectives of Parents and Occupational Therapists', Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 19 111-126 (2000) [C1]

To examine the perceptions of parent education and support of feeding in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), a survey was conducted with occupational therapists (OTs) and par... [more]

To examine the perceptions of parent education and support of feeding in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), a survey was conducted with occupational therapists (OTs) and parents of infants in the NICU. Data were collected from 32 OTs and 11 parents. The results showed that OTs used a variety of teaching methods to convey information about feeding to parents, that parents felt ¿very confident¿ and OTs felt ¿confident¿ in the parents' understanding of the material, and that different types of equipment and follow-up services were offered to parents following their child'S discharge from the NICU. © 2000, Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1080/J006v19n03_09
Citations Scopus - 3
2000 Goetz AL, Gavin W, Lane SJ, 'Measuring parent/professional interaction in early intervention: Validity and reliability', OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY JOURNAL OF RESEARCH, 20 222-240 (2000)
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
1998 Lane SJ, 'Clinical interpretation of "maternal endocrine activation during pregnancy alters neurobehavioral state in primate infants"', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, 52 99-101 (1998)
1997 Sperle PA, Ottenbacher KJ, Braun SL, Lane SJ, Nochajski S, 'Equivalence reliability of the Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM(R)) administration methods', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, 51 35-41 (1997)
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 31
1997 Tomchek SD, Lane SJ, Ottenbacher K, 'Pre-academic skill development in children who were full-term low-birthweight infants: Pilot data', OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY JOURNAL OF RESEARCH, 17 219-236 (1997)
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
1996 Lane SJ, Mistrett SG, 'Play and assistive technology issues for infants and young children with disabilities: A preliminary examination', Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 11 96-104 (1996) [C1]

Play forms an important foundation for the development of skills in all children. Unfortunately, for infants and children with disabilities, real play may be absent or diminished,... [more]

Play forms an important foundation for the development of skills in all children. Unfortunately, for infants and children with disabilities, real play may be absent or diminished, replaced by therapies and/or special instruction. Infants and young children with disabilities experience barriers to play that are created by the nature of their disability. Parents of these children may feel they do not have time to play, given the demands of intervention and education. Alternatively, they may not know how to facilitate play with a child with a disability. Assistive technology has the potential to open up play options to children with disabilities and their parents, if our "definition" of assistive technology is broadened. This article examiness "low-tech" assistive technology options addressing positioning, communication, learning, mobility, and self-care barriers. A discussion of the combination of low-tech assistive technology with high-tech assistive technology is presented with a case example. Finally, policy issues that interfere with the ability to include low- and high-tech assistive technology in early intervention are addressed, and recommendations for overcoming these barriers are considered.

DOI 10.1177/108835769601100205
Citations Scopus - 21
1996 Ottenbacher KJ, Taylor ET, Msall ME, Braun S, Lane SJ, Granger CV, et al., 'The stability and equivalence reliability of the functional independence measure for children (WeeFIM)(R)', DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE AND CHILD NEUROLOGY, 38 907-916 (1996)
Citations Scopus - 94Web of Science - 84
1996 Bayer DJ, Bleichfeld B, Lane SJ, Volker MA, Alif B, Floss B, 'The relationship between the Movement Assessment of Infants and the Fagan Test of Infant Intelligence in infants with prenatal cocaine exposure', Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 16 145-153 (1996)

In the present study both the Fagan Test of Infant Intelligence (FTII) and the Motor Assessment of Infants (MAI) were administered to 36 full term infants previously exposed to co... [more]

In the present study both the Fagan Test of Infant Intelligence (FTII) and the Motor Assessment of Infants (MAI) were administered to 36 full term infants previously exposed to cocaine in utero. The infants were participating in a program at the PACT (Parents And Children Together) clinic operated by Children's Hospital of Buffalo, New York. The FTII was administered at 69 weeks post-conceptional age and the MAI was administered 8 months from birth. It was hypothesized that significant relationships existed between the mean novelty preference scores on the FTII at 69 weeks and the risk scores on the subsections of the 8-month MAI. Moderate, but statistically significant, negative correlations were found between the FTII and both the automatic reactions and the primitive reflexes subsections of the MAI. The implications of these results are discussed in the context of a homeostatic model of functioning, under which the infants are viewed as having difficulties with internal regulation and motor control, leading to higher risk scores on the MAI and to lower novelty preference scores on the FTII.

Citations Scopus - 1
1996 Lane SJ, 'Cocaine:: An Overview of Use, Actions, and Effects', Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 16 15-33 (1996)

The dramatic rise in cocaine use in the 1980s has prompted increased concern on the part of clinicians for both the user and, if the user is a woman of child-bearing age, for the ... [more]

The dramatic rise in cocaine use in the 1980s has prompted increased concern on the part of clinicians for both the user and, if the user is a woman of child-bearing age, for the developing fetus. The impact of prenatal cocaine exposure on the newborn has been repeatedly documented, 1-6 and plans for intervention are beginning to be developed for these newborns and their caregivers which may be of some help in getting through initial crises. 7 The long-term impact is presently poorly articulated. Although anecdotal reports of developmental concerns in prenatally exposed children at preschool and school age are available, and expectations for developmental deviations exist, research reports are not available to support these contentions. Understanding the actions of cocaine, and the implications of cocaine use, may assist parents and professionals in being realistic in both predictions and expectations. This article provides a summary of these issues. © 1996, Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1080/J006v16n01_03
Citations Scopus - 2
1994 Tomchek SD, Lane SJ, 'Full-term low birth weight infants: Etiology and developmental implications', Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 13 43-65 (1994)

The major purpose of this article is to review literature relating to the risk factors for low birth weight (LBW), and the subsequent impact LBW will have on the child. Since chil... [more]

The major purpose of this article is to review literature relating to the risk factors for low birth weight (LBW), and the subsequent impact LBW will have on the child. Since children with dificits related to LBW may be referred to occupational and physical therapist, this overview should assist them in knowing what to expect from this population. In addition, suggestions for assessment of the child of LBW throughout infancy and early childhood is presented along with a brief discussion of appropriate program planning recommendations. In reviewing the literature on this subject, an attempt has been made to include literature which differentiates between LBW alone, and LBW complicated by prematurity. In some instances this was not feasible, but the information warranted inclusion. In these cases the possible confound of prematurity on the developmental impact of LBW has been noted. © 1993 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.

DOI 10.1080/J006v13n03_05
Citations Scopus - 4
1994 LANE SJ, ATTANASIO CS, HUSELID RF, 'PREDICTION OF PRESCHOOL SENSORY AND MOTOR-PERFORMANCE BY 18-MONTH NEUROLOGIC SCORES AMONG CHILDREN BORN PREMATURELY', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, 48 391-396 (1994)
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
1994 GEBHARD AR, OTTENBACHER KJ, LANE SJ, 'INTERRATER RELIABILITY OF THE PEABODY DEVELOPMENTAL MOTOR SCALES - FINE MOTOR SCALE', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, 48 976-981 (1994)
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 5
1994 BENSON AM, LANE SJ, 'INTERRATER RELIABILITY OF THE TEST OF SENSORY FUNCTIONS IN INFANTS AS USED WITH INFANTS EXPOSED TO COCAINE IN-UTERO', OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY JOURNAL OF RESEARCH, 14 170-177 (1994)
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
1993 Benson AM, Lane SJ, 'The developmental impact of lowlevel lead exposure', Infants and Young Children, 6 41-51 (1993)

Scientific knowledge has expanded concerning the adverse effects of low-level lead exposure. In spite of this expansion, many professionals working with infants and children are u... [more]

Scientific knowledge has expanded concerning the adverse effects of low-level lead exposure. In spite of this expansion, many professionals working with infants and children are unaware of the prevalence of this problem and the developmental consequences associated with it. This article reviews the etiology and impact of low-level lead exposure based on current research. Particular attention is given to developmental issues in the prenatal, infancy, and preschool years. A family-focused intervention model is suggested to deal with this complex issue. © 1993 Aspen Publishers, Inc.

Citations Scopus - 2
1993 Lane SJ, Benson A, 'The developmental effects of low level lead exposure', Infants and Young Children: an interdisciplinary journal of special care practices, 6 41-51 (1993) [C1]
1993 ORNITZ EM, LANE SJ, SUGIYAMA T, DETRAVERSAY J, 'STARTLE MODULATION STUDIES IN AUTISM', JOURNAL OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, 23 619-637 (1993)
DOI 10.1007/BF01046105
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 42
1991 LANE SJ, ORNITZ EM, GUTHRIE D, 'MODULATORY INFLUENCE OF CONTINUOUS TONE, TONE OFFSET, AND TONE ONSET ON THE HUMAN ACOUSTIC STARTLE RESPONSE', PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, 28 579-587 (1991)
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-8986.1991.tb01997.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
1990 ORNITZ EM, GUTHRIE D, LANE SJ, SUGIYAMA T, 'MATURATION OF STARTLE FACILITATION BY SUSTAINED PRESTIMULATION', PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, 27 298-308 (1990)
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-8986.1990.tb00385.x
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
1989 DOHERTY PC, LANE SJ, PFEIL KA, MORGAN WW, BARTKE A, SMITH MS, 'EXTRA-HYPOTHALAMIC DOPAMINE IS NOT INVOLVED IN THE EFFECTS OF HYPERPROLACTINEMIA ON MALE COPULATORY-BEHAVIOR', PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR, 45 1101-1105 (1989) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0031-9384(89)90094-2
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
1988 Lane SJ, Cloud HH, 'Feeding problems and intervention: an interdisciplinary approach', Topics in Clinical Nutrition, 3 23-32 (1988) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4
1986 Ornitz EM, Guthrie D, Kaplan AR, Lane SJ, Norman RJ, 'Maturation of Startle Modulation', Psychophysiology, 23 624-634 (1986)

This study of the maturation of prestimulation-induced modulation of startle in 3 to 8 year old children and adults demonstrated significant effects of age on both startle magnitu... [more]

This study of the maturation of prestimulation-induced modulation of startle in 3 to 8 year old children and adults demonstrated significant effects of age on both startle magnitude and onset latency. Startle was evoked by 104dB(SPL) 50-ms bursts of white noise, and the amplitude and onset latency of the blink reflex were measured after integration of the obicularis oculi EMG. Prestimulation with 75dB 1000 Hz tones resulted in severe inhibition of both amplitude and latency in adults when 20-ms tones preceded the startling stimuli by 120 ms or 250 ms. Following sustained prestimulation for 2000 ms, the adults showed modest nonsignificant response facilitation. Eight-year-old children showed mature inhibitory and facilitatory startle amplitude modulation, but significantly less inhibition and more facilitation of onset latency compared to adults. Preschool children showed significantly less amplitude and latency inhibition and more facilitation than 8-year-olds and adults. In response to prestimulation 120 ms before startling stimuli, the preschool children actually showed latency facilitation. Modulation of startle by prestimulation is mediated by brainstem neuronal networks. These findings suggest that brainstem mechanisms which mediate startle response modulation undergo development during early childhood and do not mature until about 8 years of age. Copyright © 1986, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

DOI 10.1111/j.1469-8986.1986.tb00681.x
Citations Scopus - 81
1985 LANE SJ, MORGAN WW, 'DEMONSTRATION OF NEUROCHEMICAL TOLERANCE FOLLOWING CHRONIC BARBITAL TREATMENT', NEUROBEHAVIORAL TOXICOLOGY AND TERATOLOGY, 7 195-197 (1985)
1985 Lane SJ, Morgan WW, 'The development of tolerance to chronic barbital treatment in the cerebellar cyclic guanosine monophosphate system and its response to subsequent barbital abstinence', Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 234 569-575 (1985) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 6
1984 LANE SJ, MORGAN WW, 'THE EFFECTS OF CHRONIC ORAL-ADMINISTRATION OF BARBITAL ON CEREBELLAR CYCLIC-GMP', NEUROPHARMACOLOGY, 23 779-783 (1984) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0028-3908(84)90111-4
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 9
1983 REITER RJ, RICHARDSON BA, MATTHEWS SA, LANE SJ, FERGUSON BN, 'RHYTHMS IN IMMUNOREACTIVE MELATONIN IN THE RETINA AND HARDERIAN-GLAND OF RATS - PERSISTENCE AFTER PINEALECTOMY', LIFE SCIENCES, 32 1229-1236 (1983) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0024-3205(83)90192-3
Citations Scopus - 138Web of Science - 149
1976 Lane SJ, McMahon PS, Shanahan PM, 'The occupational therapist and terminal illness: learning to cope with death', American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 30 297-299 (1976) [C1]
Show 57 more journal articles

Conference (29 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Lane SJ, Odom M, 'Effect of engagement in sensory-based tasks on autonomic nervous system activity and attention' (2015)
2015 Lane SJ, Mailloux Z, Reynolds S, Smith R, 'Current evidence-based identification patterns of sensory integrative dysfunction in specific populations' (2015)
2015 Lane SJ, Ivey CK, Pearce E, 'The Living Laboratory® Model: building university and museum collaborations for research' (2015)
2015 Lane SJ, Riley B, 'Engaging caregivers during childhood occupations' (2015)
2015 Lane SJ, Beneviedes T, Ivey C, Carreta H, 'Access to therapy services for children with Autism spectrum disorder' (2015)
2014 Lane SJ, Odom M, Owe A, Wilson L, 'Effects of engagement in sensory-based tasks on autonomic nervous system activity and attention' (2014)
2014 Lane SJ, Riley B, 'Engaging caregivers during childhood occupations' (2014)
2014 Lane SJ, Cook RA, Lombard A, Alers V, Monvoisin M, 'Research in sensory integration and praxis: from theory to practice' (2014)
2014 Lane SJ, Ivey C, May-Benson T, 'Examination of test-retest reliability for the motor planning maze assessment' (2014)
2014 Lane SJ, 'Sensory modulation disorder (SMD), coping, and occupational performance' (2014)
2014 Lane SJ, Ivey C, May-Benson T, 'Developmental trends in early ideational praxis and motor planning' (2014)
2014 Lane SJ, 'The effect of sensory based therapeutic activities on arousal and attention' (2014) [E3]
2014 Lane SJ, Harris D, Belyea E, Herbert M, Smith B, Armstead K, 'Differential diagnosis and diagnostic validation of sensory modulation disorder (SMD)' (2014)
2013 Lane SJ, Reynolds S, Belyea E, Williamson M, Smith B, McNamara L, Thompson A, 'Perspectives on the impact on arousal of sensory-based therapeutic activities' (2013)
2013 Lane SJ, Ivey C, Quigley E, Smith B, Woolard K, 'The motor planning maze assessment: trends and test-retest stability' (2013)
2013 Lane SJ, Ivey C, May-Benson T, Armstead K, Baeza N, Dayton R, et al., 'Developmental trends in early ideational praxis and motor planning' (2013)
2011 Lane SJ, Reynolds S, 'The relationship between sensory processing, physiological stress and sleep quality in children with autism' (2011)
2011 Lane SJ, Reynolds S, 'Anxiety, arousal and sensory processing in children with Autism spectrum disorder' (2011)
2010 Lane SJ, 'Sensory process and stress responses: linking physiology and behaviour' (2010)
2010 Lane SJ, 'Bubblewrap: the Sydney playground project' (2010)
2010 Lane SJ, Reynolds S, 'Physiologic and behavioral correlates of sensory over-responsiveness in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism' (2010)
2009 Lane SJ, 'Neuroscience foundations of vestibular, proprioceptive and tactile sensory strategies' (2009)
Citations Scopus - 2
2009 Lane SJ, 'Switches and electronic toys: sensory properties and preferences' (2009)
2009 Lane SJ, 'Developing fundable projects: grant winning for OT practitioners' (2009)
2008 Lane SJ, 'Grant writing 101: how to get funding for your fabulous ideas' (2008)
2008 Lane SJ, 'Fidelity to sensory integration treatment: training' (2008)
2008 Lane SJ, 'Discriminating discrimination' (2008)
2008 Schoen SA, Miller LJ, Brett-Green B, Reynolds S, Lane SJ, 'Arousal and reactivity in children with sensory processing disorder and autism specturm disorder', PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY (2008)
Citations Web of Science - 2
2007 Wheeler SD, Lane SJ, McMahon BT, 'Community participation and life satisfaction following intensive, community-based rehabilitation using a life skills training approach', OTJR-OCCUPATION PARTICIPATION AND HEALTH (2007)
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Show 26 more conferences
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 16
Total funding $1,043,965

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $5,944

2016 International Visitor from University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill USA$5,944

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Shelly Lane, Associate Professor Alison Lane, Professor Grace Baranek
Scheme International Research Visiting Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1501022
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20152 grants / $60,217

Effects of deep pressure on arousal and performance in persons with Autism$45,217

Funding body: American Occupational Therapy Association

Funding body American Occupational Therapy Association
Project Team

Stacey Reynolds

Scheme Award
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

A systematic investigation into sensory and motor based feeding issues in boys with Barth Syndrome$15,000

Funding body: Barth Foundation

Funding body Barth Foundation
Project Team

Stacey Reynolds

Scheme Award
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20141 grants / $20,000

Expanding trauma-informed interventiion for pre-schoolers: an inter-disciplinary approach$20,000

Funding body: Virginia Commonwealth University

Funding body Virginia Commonwealth University
Scheme Community Engagement grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20131 grants / $40,004

Examining the impact of sensory-based therapeutic tasks on arousal, attention and performance in children$40,004

Funding body: Virginia Commonwealth University

Funding body Virginia Commonwealth University
Scheme President's Research Incentive Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20111 grants / $43,200

Differential diagnosis of sensory over-responsiveness$43,200

Funding body: Wallace Foundation

Funding body Wallace Foundation
Scheme Research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20051 grants / $2,500

Quantifying electrodermal respsonses in children$2,500

Funding body: Virginia Commonwealth University

Funding body Virginia Commonwealth University
Scheme Faculty development grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20011 grants / $400,000

Effectiveness of assistive technology in promoting playfulness in young children$400,000

Funding body: United States Department of Education

Funding body United States Department of Education
Scheme Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Service grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

19961 grants / $60,000

Key early intervention personnel$60,000

Funding body: NYS Office of Advocate for Persons with disabilities

Funding body NYS Office of Advocate for Persons with disabilities
Scheme Discovery project
Role Lead
Funding Start 1996
Funding Finish 1996
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

19952 grants / $148,000

Let's Play! project: model demonstration project for young children with disabilities$140,000

Funding body: United States Department of Education

Funding body United States Department of Education
Scheme Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Service grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 2000
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Let's Play! Basic Technology for Infants and Young Children with Disabilities$8,000

Funding body: State University of New York

Funding body State University of New York
Scheme Research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1995
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

19941 grants / $20,000

Technology in early intervention$20,000

Funding body: State University of New York

Funding body State University of New York
Scheme Multidisciplinary Projects research foundatiion grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1994
Funding Finish 1995
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

19931 grants / $2,500

Early interventionists and family centred care$2,500

Funding body: Conversions in the Disciplines Program

Funding body Conversions in the Disciplines Program
Scheme Research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1993
Funding Finish 1994
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

19911 grants / $5,000

Development in cocaine exposed children$5,000

Funding body: American Occupational Therapy Association

Funding body American Occupational Therapy Association
Scheme Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 1991
Funding Finish 1992
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

19901 grants / $1,600

Sensory and motor development in four year olds born prematurely$1,600

Funding body: University of Alberta

Funding body University of Alberta
Scheme Small Facilities Endowment fund
Role Lead
Funding Start 1990
Funding Finish 1991
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

19891 grants / $235,000

Pre-service training in occupational therapy$235,000

Funding body: United States Department of Education

Funding body United States Department of Education
Project Team

Kenneth Ottenbacher

Scheme Project grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1989
Funding Finish 1993
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed8
Current4

Total current UON EFTSL

Masters0.2
PhD0.7

Highlighted Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Examining the defecation habits of young children from a sensory perspective PhD (Occupational Therapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 Masters The Relationship Between Sensory Features and Developmental in Premature Infants M Philosophy (Occupat Therapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 Masters Characteristics and Moderators of Sensory Modulation in Infants, in the First Year of Life. M Philosophy (Occupat Therapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Preliminary Investigation of Sensory Features in Pre-Term Infants in the First Year of Life. Occupational Therapy, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Adaptive Functioning in Adults with FASD Occupational Therapy, Virginia Commonwealth University Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Use of a therapy dog to promote play in children with disabilities Occupational Therapy, Virginia Commonwealth University Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Growing Up in Ireland: Factors Impacting Sleep Patterns of Preterm Infants. Occupational Therapy, Virginia Commonwealth University Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Access to therapy for children with autism: A population-based analysis Occupational Therapy, Virginia Commonwealth University Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Coping and sensory modulation disorder: Effects on childhood participation. Occupational Therapy, Virginia Commonwealth University Principal Supervisor
2010 PhD Developmental outcome following international adoption Occupational Therapy, Virginia Commonwealth University Principal Supervisor
2006 PhD Stress and sensory processing Occupational Therapy, Virginia Commonwealth University Principal Supervisor
2004 PhD The effectivenss of a community based life skills training program for Traumatic Brain Injury Occupational Therapy, Virginia Commonwealth University Principal Supervisor
Edit

Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
United States 60
Australia 9
Canada 2
Japan 2
Mexico 2
More...
Edit

Professor Shelly Lane

Position

Professor
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email shelly.lane@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4913 8101

Office

Room HE03
Building Hunter Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
Edit