Conjoint Associate Professor Jarad Martin

Conjoint Associate Professor Jarad Martin

Conjoint Associate Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

An integrated approach to cancer treatment

Associate Professor Jarad Martin is a Radiation Oncologist with a dual focus on research and clinical practice.

Radiation oncologists apply radiation therapy to a broad range of conditions and Jarad sub-specialise in anatomic sites such as genito-urinary (prostate, bladders, penis, and urinary), and gastrointestinal (from the oesophagus via the pancreas and liver, and the bowel). While this work is very specialised, Jarad says that there are a range of conditions involved in the treatment which allows for opportunities and challenges for practitioners and researchers.

“When it comes to treating bowel cancer or colorectal cancer we need to work with medical oncologists, colorectal surgeons, radiologists, physios and other professionals to get the right outcomes for the patient,” Jarad says.

Working closely with other specialists to achieve optimal patient outcome, Jarad says that it’s important to consider a whole suite of research approaches, including retrospective reviews, technical sub-studies and behavioural change. “We’ve been working with Laureate Professor Rob Sanson-Fisher’s group to help clinicians integrate research findings into their everyday practice, and we really do try to collaborate as much as we can with the other areas of excellence in this town.”

“We interact with dietitians, physios and other allied health professionals,” Jarad adds. “A lot of these groups have strong community bases, so there are many opportunities to engage with people through speaking at meetings. It’s a great way to interact at the ‘coal-face’ with people.”

A long road to Newcastle

The decision to specialize as a Radiation Oncologist has seen Jarad forge a career in the Hunter after travelling the world studying and specialising. After graduating as a medical practitioner in New Zealand, Jarad spent time in England and then Melbourne training at Australia’s largest cancer hospital.  This gave Jarad insight into the challenges that researchers face when integrating practice.  He then did some advanced training Toronto, Canada, prior to spending nearly six years in Queensland working in a regional setting and in private clinical practice. This range of work settings places Jarad well to have formed numerous networks, and gained valuable perspective on the diversity of issues which arise in different environments.

His move to Newcastle has placed Jarad in an epicentre of cancer research. The Hunter region has a strong network of cancer researchers, with a diverse range of specialists collaborating to achieve a positive outcome for this pernicious disease. As the leading cause of death in Australia, there is a justifiable focus on diagnosis, treatment and options for cure for cancer with researchers drawn to solving one of the world’s greatest health problems.

Jarad is also involved in TROG Cancer Research group, which is based in Newcastle, and working across Australia and New Zealand to improve the way that radiotherapy is delivered to cancer patients. “With the TROG group we have almost 30 years of history and are the epicentre for a lot of research and practice. We’re also integrated with a range of other groups involved in research into different forms of cancer.”

However, Jarad’s quick to point out that while the Hunter is a hub for specialists in the field, collaborating further afield is not only desirable, it’s essential. “It’s a little bit challenging, but because a lot of the networks are dispersed it means that you could end up collaborating with someone from Canada just easily as you would with someone from down the corridor.”

The challenges of juggling clinical work and research isn’t lost on Jarad who acknowledges that a heavy workload just comes with the territory. “It would be just about impossible to be a really relevant clinical researcher unless you’re a relatively busy clinician – because then you’re aware of what the pertinent questions are and what’s really relevant,” Jarad states.

“With research you’ve got to be pretty clear-eyed about why you’re getting into it,” Jarad explains. “It’s a way of keeping your practice connected with an always changing standard of care, as well as offering your patients access to novel approaches.”

A mathematical angle

Jarad’s early interest in maths and physics has stood him in a positive stead for this career. “On a day-to-day basis we’re really creating virtual patients and using super-computers to model the way  photon interact within them and coming up with all sorts of ways to predict toxicity and effectiveness,” he explains. “Unless you have a fairly deep understanding of the mathematics behind the practice you’re potentially going to end up an uninformed end user fairly quickly.”

Radiation therapy is complex because you’re treating a moving target, using something invisible that doesn’t leave a footprint, and that’s why quality assurance has become a really big part of the speciality. Jarad is working with a team led by Professor Peter Greer on a new system called ‘Watchdog’ which aims to verify that the patient is receiving the correct dose during radiation therapy treatment.

“You could describe it as a practical way of doing quality control, but it’s a lot deeper than that in that it tries to confirm that what we predict will happen is actually occurring,” Jarad says. With radiotherapy it’s important to not only identify where a tumour is located, but to look at how it can move, rotate or change shape.

Jarad and his team are also looking at how you can change the amount of radiation given, so that it can make treatment more accessible to patients by giving people larger doses over a shorter time period. Having recently led the Australian arm of a clinical trial with prostate cancer patients, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology where patients were given shorter treatments, using higher doses of radiation. The study showed that the and 4 week version stacked up very well against the previously standard 8 week approach. “It’s a month’s less treatment for exactly the same cure rates,” Jarad affirms.

Challenges of Clinical Oncology

Dealing with patients and their families who are facing deeply emotional issues around their health can be taxing, “When you’re dealing with cancer there’s a lot of information that you’re trying to convey,” Jarad explains. “We’re trying to guide people through a fairly difficult time in their life, and that’s our most important role as clinicians in oncology.”

“It’s important to remember that there’s no right or wrong answer when it comes to treatment options, all you can really do is break up the information into bite-sized chunks and then try to figure out what will lead to the best outcome for all. You need to have an open conversation with the patients and come up with a decision that everyone’s comfortable with.”

Associate Professor Jarad Martin

An integrated approach to cancer treatment

Associate Professor Jarad Martin is a Radiation Oncologist with a dual focus on research and clinical practice.

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Career Summary

Biography

Conjoint Associate Professor Jarad Martin (MB ChB BSc DMed PhD, FRANZCR GAustMS ) is the Director of Research (Department of Radiation Oncology) and Radiation Oncologist at the Calvary Mater Newcastle, and Visiting Medical Officer at Genesis Cancer Care, Lake Macquarie Private Hospital.

With strong research interests in the areas of gastrointestinal and genitourinary oncology, A/Prof Martin has attracted over $6.5 million in competitive grant funding and has over 70 peer-reviewed publications to date. He is also Senior author on the Australasian guidelines for prostate cancer radiotherapy.

A/Prof Martin's professional leadership roles include: Faculty of Radiation Oncology; Chairperson Research Committee, Faculty of Radiation Oncology, Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists; Australia New Zealand Urological and Prostate Cancer Trials Group Scientific Advisory Committee; Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) Clinical Liason Leader; and Deputy Chairperson, Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA) Implementation Science Flagship Committee.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Queensland
  • Doctor of Medicine, University of Queensland

Keywords

  • Bladder Cancer
  • Diagnostics
  • Gastrointestinal Cancer
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Mathematics
  • Oesophageal Cancer
  • Prostate Cancer
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Radiotherapy
  • Rectal Cancer
  • Screening
  • Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy
  • Therapy and Treatment

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111208 Radiation Therapy 50
029903 Medical Physics 50

Professional Experience

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
12/11/2014 -  Visiting Radiation Oncologist

A/Prof Martin is engaged with Australia's largest provider of radiotherapy services with over 25 campuses.

Genesis Cancer Care, Lake Macquarie Private Hospital
Australia
7/05/2012 -  Director of Research (Department of Radiation Oncology), Radiation Oncologist

A/Prof Martin is a clinician who also helps shape research strategy within the field of Radiation Oncology.

Calvary Mater Newcastle
Australia
30/04/2007 - 30/04/2012 Radiation Oncologist Radiation Oncology Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland
Australia
1/07/2006 - 27/04/2007 Locum Radiation Oncologist Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital
Australia
1/07/2005 - 30/06/2006 Fellow in Radiation Oncology

A/Prof Martin did his advanced fellowship training at the Princess Margaret Hospital, one of the world's largest and most respected radiotherapy centres.

University of Toronto
Canada
23/07/2001 - 30/06/2005 Registrar in Radiation Oncology

A/Prof Martin did his clinical training at the Peter Mac - Australia's largest cancer hospital.

Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2009 Fay MF, Martin JM, Porceddu SV, O'Sullivan B, 'Acute and Late Radiation Therapy Effects', When Cancer Crosses Disciplines, World Scientific, London 179-200 (2009)
Co-authors Michael Fay

Journal article (66 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Nguyen DT, O'Brien R, Kim J-H, Huang C-Y, Wilton L, Greer P, et al., 'The first clinical implementation of a real-time six degree of freedom target tracking system during radiation therapy based on Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring (KIM).', Radiother Oncol, 123 37-42 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.radonc.2017.02.013
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Peter Greer
2017 Forshaw K, Hall AE, Boyes AW, Carey ML, Martin J, 'Patients' Experiences of Preparation for Radiation Therapy: A Qualitative Study.', Oncol Nurs Forum, 44 E1-E9 (2017)
DOI 10.1188/17.ONF.E1-E9
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Allison Boyes, Alix Hall
2017 Legge K, Greer PB, Keall PJ, Booth JT, Arumugam S, Moodie T, et al., 'Technical note: TROG 15.01 SPARK trial multi-institutional imaging dose measurement.', J Appl Clin Med Phys, (2017)
DOI 10.1002/acm2.12151
Co-authors Peter Greer, John Oconnor
2017 Keall P, Doan TN, O'Brien R, Booth J, Greer P, Poulsen P, et al., 'Stereotactic prostate adaptive radiotherapy utilising kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring: the TROG 15.01 SPARK trial', BMC CANCER, 17 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3164-1
Co-authors Peter Greer
2017 Martin J, Arm J, Smart J, Palazzi K, Capp A, Ainsworth P, Cowin G, 'Spinal multiparametric MRI and DEXA changes over time in men with prostate cancer treated with androgen deprivation therapy: a potential imaging biomarker of treatment toxicity', EUROPEAN RADIOLOGY, 27 995-1003 (2017)
DOI 10.1007/s00330-016-4434-z
2017 Legge K, Greer PB, O'Connor DJ, Wilton L, Richardson M, Hunter P, et al., 'Real-time in vivo rectal wall dosimetry using MOSkin detectors during linac based stereotactic radiotherapy with rectal displacement', RADIATION ONCOLOGY, 12 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s13014-017-0781-4
Co-authors John Oconnor, Peter Greer
2017 Catton CN, Lukka H, Gu C-S, Martin JM, Supiot S, Chung PWM, et al., 'Randomized Trial of a Hypofractionated Radiation Regimen for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer.', J Clin Oncol, 35 1884-1890 (2017)
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2016.71.7397
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2017 Siva S, Callahan J, Pryor D, Martin J, Lawrentschuk N, Hofman MS, 'Utility of (68) Ga prostate specific membrane antigen - positron emission tomography in diagnosis and response assessment of recurrent renal cell carcinoma.', J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol, 61 372-378 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/1754-9485.12590
2016 Chandra SS, Dowling JA, Greer PB, Martin J, Wratten C, Pichler P, et al., 'Fast automated segmentation of multiple objects via spatially weighted shape learning', Physics in Medicine and Biology, 61 8070-8084 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. Active shape models (ASMs) have proved successful in automatic segmentation by using shape and appearance priors in a num... [more]

© 2016 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. Active shape models (ASMs) have proved successful in automatic segmentation by using shape and appearance priors in a number of areas such as prostate segmentation, where accurate contouring is important in treatment planning for prostate cancer. The ASM approach however, is heavily reliant on a good initialisation for achieving high segmentation quality. This initialisation often requires algorithms with high computational complexity, such as three dimensional (3D) image registration. In this work, we present a fast, self-initialised ASM approach that simultaneously fits multiple objects hierarchically controlled by spatially weighted shape learning. Prominent objects are targeted initially and spatial weights are progressively adjusted so that the next (more difficult, less visible) object is simultaneously initialised using a series of weighted shape models. The scheme was validated and compared to a multi-atlas approach on 3D magnetic resonance (MR) im ages of 38 cancer patients and had the same (mean, median, inter-rater) Dice's similarity coefficients of (0.79, 0.81, 0.85), while having no registration error and a computational time of 12-15 min, nearly an order of magnitude faster than the multi-atlas approach.

DOI 10.1088/0031-9155/61/22/8070
Co-authors Peter Greer
2016 Supiot S, Delaroche G, Latorzeff I, Magne N, Créhange G, Carrie C, et al., 'Profit (Prostate Fractionated Irradiation Trial)¿: résultats d¿une étude internationale randomisée comparant deux schémas d¿irradiation des cancers de prostate de risque intermédiaire.', Prog Urol, 26 793-794 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.purol.2016.07.249
2015 Schmidt C, Martin JM, Khoo E, Plank A, Grigg R, 'Outcomes of nodal metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated in a regional center', HEAD AND NECK-JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES AND SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, 37 1808-1815 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/hed.23843
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2015 Loh J, Baker K, Sridharan S, Greer P, Wratten C, Capp A, et al., 'Infections after fiducial marker implantation for prostate radiotherapy: are we underestimating the risks?', RADIATION ONCOLOGY, 10 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13014-015-0347-2
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Peter Greer
2015 Dowling JA, Sun J, Pichler P, Rivest-Hénault D, Ghose S, Richardson H, et al., 'Automatic substitute computed tomography generation and contouring for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-alone external beam radiation therapy from standard MRI sequences', International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 93 1144-1153 (2015) [C1]

Crown Copyright © 2015 Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Purpose To validate automatic substitute computed tomography CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2-weig... [more]

Crown Copyright © 2015 Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Purpose To validate automatic substitute computed tomography CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance (MR) pelvic scans for MR-Sim prostate treatment planning. Patients and Methods A Siemens Skyra 3T MR imaging (MRI) scanner with laser bridge, flat couch, and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole-pelvis MRI scan (1.6 mm 3-dimensional isotropic T2w SPACE [Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution] sequence) was acquired. Three additional small field of view scans were acquired: T2w, T2*w, and T1w flip angle 80° for gold fiducials. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Manual contouring of the prostate, rectum, bladder, and bones was performed independently on the CT and MR scans. Three experienced observers contoured each organ on MRI, allowing interobserver quantification. To generate a training database, each patient CT scan was coregistered to their whole-pelvis T2w using symmetric rigid registration and structure-guided deformable registration. A new multi-atlas local weighted voting method was used to generate automatic contours and sCT results. Results The mean error in Hounsfield units between the sCT and corresponding patient CT (within the body contour) was 0.6 ± 14.7 (mean ± 1 SD), with a mean absolute error of 40.5 ± 8.2 Hounsfield units. Automatic contouring results were very close to the expert interobserver level (Dice similarity coefficient): prostate 0.80 ± 0.08, bladder 0.86 ± 0.12, rectum 0.84 ± 0.06, bones 0.91 ± 0.03, and body 1.00 ± 0.003. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same dose prescription was found to be 0.3% ± 0.8%. The 3-dimensional ¿ pass rate was 1.00 ± 0.00 (2 mm/2%). Conclusions The MR-Sim setup and automatic sCT generation methods using standard MR sequences generates realistic contours and electron densities for prostate cancer radiation therapy dose planning and digitally reconstructed radiograph generation.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.08.045
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Fred Menk, Peter Greer
2015 Trada Y, Kneebone A, Paneghel A, Pearse M, Sidhom M, Tang C, et al., 'Optimizing radiation therapy quality assurance in clinical trials: A TROG 08.03 RAVES substudy', International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 93 1045-1051 (2015) [C1]

Crown Copyright © 2015 Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Purpose To explore site- and clinician-level factors associated with protocol violations requiring real-tim... [more]

Crown Copyright © 2015 Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Purpose To explore site- and clinician-level factors associated with protocol violations requiring real-time-review (RTR) resubmission in a multicenter clinical trial to help tailor future quality assurance (QA) protocols. Methods and Materials RAVES (Radiation Therapy-Adjuvant vs Early Salvage) (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 08.03) is a randomized trial comparing adjuvant with early salvage radiation therapy in men with positive surgical margins or pT3 disease after prostatectomy. Quality assurance in RAVES required each clinician and site to submit a credentialing dummy run (DR) and for each patient's radiation therapy plan to undergo external RTR before treatment. Prospectively defined major violations from trial protocol required remedy and resubmission. Site and clinician factors associated with RTR resubmission were examined using hierarchical modeling. Results Data were collected from 171 consecutive patients, treated by 46 clinicians at 32 hospitals. There were 47 RTR resubmissions (27%) due to 65 major violations. The relative rate of resubmission decreased by 29% per year as the study progressed (odds ratio OR. 0.71, P=.02). The majority of resubmissions were due to contouring violations (39 of 65) and dosimetric violations (22 of 65). For each additional patient accrued, significant decreases in RTR resubmission were seen at both clinician level (OR 0.75, P=.02) and site level (OR 0.72, P=.01). The rate of resubmission due to dosimetric violations was only 1.6% after the first 5 patients. Use of IMRT was associated with lower rates of resubmission compared with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (OR 0.38, P=.05). Conclusion Several low- and high-risk factors that may assist with tailoring future clinical trial QA were identified. Because the real-time resubmission rate was largely independent of the credentialing exercise, some form of RTR QA is recommended. The greatest benefit from QA was derived early in trial activation and clinician experience.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.08.029
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Loh J, Baker K, Sridharan S, Greer P, Wratten C, Capp A, et al., 'Infections after fiducial marker implantation for prostate radiotherapy: are we underestimating the risks?', Radiation oncology (London, England), 10 38 (2015)
2015 Jones M, Hruby G, Stanwell P, Gallagher S, Wong K, Arm J, Martin J, 'Multiparametric MRI as an outcome predictor for anal canal cancer managed with chemoradiotherapy.', BMC Cancer, 15 281 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1244-7
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Peter Stanwell
2015 Sun J, Dowling JA, Pichler P, Parker J, Martin J, Stanwell P, et al., 'Investigation on the performance of dedicated radiotherapy positioning devices for MR scanning for prostate planning', Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics, 16 4-13 (2015) [C1]

The purpose of this study was to investigate performance of the couch and coil mounts designed for MR-simulation prostate scanning using data from ten volunteers. Volunteers were ... [more]

The purpose of this study was to investigate performance of the couch and coil mounts designed for MR-simulation prostate scanning using data from ten volunteers. Volunteers were scanned using the standard MR scanning protocol with the MR coil directly strapped on the external body and the volunteer lying on the original scanner table. They also were scanned using a MR-simulation table top and pelvic coil mounts. MR images from both setups were compared in terms of body contour variation and image quality effects within particular organs of interest. Six-field conformal plans were generated on the two images with assigned bulk density for dose calculation. With the MR-simulation devices, the anterior skin deformation was reduced by up to 1.7 cm. The hard tabletop minimizes the posterior body deformation which can be up to 2.3 cm on the standard table, depending on the weight of volunteer. The image signal-to-noise ratio reduced by 14% and 25% on large field of view (FOV) and small FOV images, respectively, after using the coil mount; the prostate volume contoured on two images showed difference of 1.05 ± 0.66 cm3. The external body deformation caused a mean dose reduction of 0.6 ± 0.3 Gy, while the coverage reduced by 22% ± 13% and 27% ± 6% in V98 and V100, respectively. A dedicated MR simulation setup for prostate radiotherapy is essential to ensure the agreement between planning anatomy and treatment anatomy. The image signal was reduced after applying the coil mount, but no significant effect was found on prostate contouring.

DOI 10.1120/jacmp.v16i2.4848
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Peter Greer, Peter Stanwell, Fred Menk
2015 Sun J, Dowling J, Pichler P, Menk F, Rivest-Henault D, Lambert J, et al., 'MRI simulation: End-to-end testing for prostate radiation therapy using geometric pelvic MRI phantoms', Physics in Medicine and Biology, 60 3097-3109 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. To clinically implement MRI simulation or MRI-alone treatment planning requires comprehensive end-to-end testing to ensur... [more]

© 2015 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. To clinically implement MRI simulation or MRI-alone treatment planning requires comprehensive end-to-end testing to ensure an accurate process. The purpose of this study was to design and build a geometric phantom simulating a human male pelvis that is suitable for both CT and MRI scanning and use it to test geometric and dosimetric aspects of MRI simulation including treatment planning and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. A liquid filled pelvic shaped phantom with simulated pelvic organs was scanned in a 3T MRI simulator with dedicated radiotherapy couch-top, laser bridge and pelvic coil mounts. A second phantom with the same external shape but with an internal distortion grid was used to quantify the distortion of the MR image. Both phantoms were also CT scanned as the gold-standard for both geometry and dosimetry. Deformable image registration was used to quantify the MR distortion. Dose comparison was made using a seven-field IMRT plan developed on the CT scan with the fluences copied to the MR image and recalculated using bulk electron densities. Without correction the maximum distortion of the MR compared with the CT scan was 7.5 mm across the pelvis, while this was reduced to 2.6 and 1.7 mm by the vendor's 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. Within the locations of the internal organs of interest, the distortion was < 1.5 and < 1 mm with 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. The dose at the prostate isocentre calculated on CT and MRI images differed by 0.01% (1.1 cGy). Positioning shifts were within 1 mm when setup was performed using MRI generated DRRs compared to setup using CT DRRs. The MRI pelvic phantom allows end-to-end testing of the MRI simulation workflow with comparison to the gold-standard CT based process. MRI simulation was found to be geometrically accurate with organ dimensions, dose distributions and DRR based setup within acceptable limits compared to CT.

DOI 10.1088/0031-9155/60/8/3097
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Peter Greer, Jim Denham, Fred Menk
2015 Wu R, Woodford H, Capp A, Hunter P, Cowin G, Tai KH, et al., 'A prospective study of nomogram-based adaptation of prostate radiotherapy target volumes', Radiation Oncology, 10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Wu et al. Background: A prospective clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of a novel approach to the treatment of patients with high risk prostate cance... [more]

© 2015 Wu et al. Background: A prospective clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of a novel approach to the treatment of patients with high risk prostate cancer (HRPC) through the use of a nomogram to tailor radiotherapy target volumes. Methods: Twenty seven subjects with HRPC were treated with a mildly hypofractionated radiotherapy regimen using image-guided IMRT technique between Jun/2013-Jan/2015. A set of validated prognostic factors were inputted into the Memorial-Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) prostate cancer nomogram to estimate risk of loco-regional spread (LRS). The nomogram risk estimates for extra-capsular extension (ECE), seminal vesicles involvement (SVI), and pelvic lymph nodes involvement (LNI) were used to adapt radiotherapy treatment volumes based on a risk threshold of =15% in all cases. A planning guide was used to delineate target volumes and organs at risk (OAR). Up to three dose levels were administered over 28 fractions; 70Gy for gross disease in the prostate +/- seminal vesicles (2.5Gy/fraction), 61.6Gy for subclinical peri-prostatic disease (2.2Gy/fraction) and 50.4Gy to pelvic nodes (1.8Gy/fraction). Data regarding protocol adherence, nomogram use, radiotherapy dose distribution, and acute toxicity were collected. Results: Nomogram use 100% of patients were treated for ECE, 88.9% for SVI, and 70.4% for LNI. The three areas at risk of LRS were appropriately treated according to the study protocol in 98.8% cases. The MSKCC nomogram estimates for LRS differed significantly between the time of recruitment and analysis. Contouring protocol compliance Compliance with the trial contouring protocol for up to seven target volumes was 93.0% (159/171). Compliance with protocol for small bowel contouring was poor (59.3%). Dose constraints compliance Compliance with dose constraints for target volumes was 97.4% (191/196). Compliance with dose constraints for OAR was 88.2% (285/323). Acute toxicity There were no grade 3 acute toxicities observed. 20/27 (74.1%) and 6/27 (22.2%) patients experienced a grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity respectively. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the feasibility of this novel risk-adapted radiation treatment protocol for HRPC. This study has identified key learning points regarding this approach, including the importance of standardization and updating of risk quantification tools, and the utility of an observer to verify their correct use. Trial registration: ClincialTrials.gov identifier NCT01418040. Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee (HNEHREC) reference number 12/08/15/4.02

DOI 10.1186/s13014-015-0545-y
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Jones M, Hruby G, Solomon M, Rutherford N, Martin J, 'The Role of FDG-PET in the Initial Staging and Response Assessment of Anal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis', ANNALS OF SURGICAL ONCOLOGY, 22 3574-3581 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1245/s10434-015-4391-9
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
2014 Loh J, Jovanovic L, Lehman M, Capp A, Pryor D, Harris M, et al., 'Circulating tumor cell detection in high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer', Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, 140 2157-2162 (2014) [C1]

© 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Results: The median age was 70¿years, median PSA was 14.1, and the median Gleason score was 9. The median 5-year risk of progression o... [more]

© 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Results: The median age was 70¿years, median PSA was 14.1, and the median Gleason score was 9. The median 5-year risk of progression of disease using a validated nomogram was 39¿%. Five out of 36 patients (14¿%, 95¿% CI 5¿30¿%) had CTCs detected in their circulation. Four patients had only 1 CTC per 7.5¿mL of blood detected. One patient had 3 CTCs per 7.5¿mL of blood detected, which included a circulating tumor microemboli. Both on univariate analysis and multivariate analysis, there were no correlations found between CTC positivity and the classic prognostic factors including PSA, Gleason score, T-stage and age. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that patients with high-risk, non-metastatic prostate cancer present infrequently with small number of CTCs in peripheral blood. This finding is consistent with the limited literature available in this setting. Other CTC isolation and detection technologies with improved sensitivity and specificity may enable detection of CTCs with mesenchymal phenotypes, although none as yet have been validated for clinical use. Newer assays are emerging for detection of new putative biomarkers for prostate cancer. Correlation of disease control outcomes with CTC detection will be important. Purpose: The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provides important prognostic information in men with metastatic prostate cancer. We aim to determine the rate of detection of CTCs in patients with high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer using the CellSearch < sup > ® < /sup > method. Method: Samples of peripheral blood (7.5¿mL) were drawn from 36 men with newly diagnosed high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer, prior to any initiation of therapy and analyzed for CTCs using the CellSearch < sup > ® < /sup > method.

DOI 10.1007/s00432-014-1775-3
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 15
2014 Lehman M, Sidhom M, Kneebone AB, Hayden AJ, Martin JM, Christie D, et al., 'FROGG high-risk prostate cancer workshop: Patterns of practice and literature review. Part II post-radical prostatectomy', Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology, 58 392-400 (2014) [C1]

Australian and New Zealand radiation oncologists with an interest in uro-oncology were invited to undertake a pattern of practice survey dealing with issues encountered in the man... [more]

Australian and New Zealand radiation oncologists with an interest in uro-oncology were invited to undertake a pattern of practice survey dealing with issues encountered in the management of high-risk prostate cancer in the post-prostatectomy setting. Responses from pract itioners revealed a lack of consensus regarding the optimal timing of radiation therapy the use of whole pelvic radiation therapy and the use of androgen deprivation therapy. A review of the literature outlining the current body of knowledge and the clinical studies that will inform future practice is presented. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

DOI 10.1111/1754-9485.12139
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Martin J, Nicholson G, Cowin G, Ilente C, Wong W, Kennedy D, 'Rapid determination of vertebral fat fraction over a large range of vertebral bodies', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, 58 155-163 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/1754-9485.12143
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
2014 Loh J, Davis ID, Martin JM, Siva S, 'Extracranial oligometastatic renal cell carcinoma: current management and future directions', FUTURE ONCOLOGY, 10 761-774 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.2217/fon.14.40
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2014 Ratnayake G, Martin J, Plank A, Wong W, 'Incremental changes verses a technological quantum leap: The additional value of intensity-modulated radiotherapy beyond image-guided radiotherapy for prostate irradiation', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, 58 503-510 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1754-9485.12153
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2014 Robson K, Alizart M, Martin J, Nagel R, 'Coeliac Patients Are Undiagnosed at Routine Upper Endoscopy', PLOS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0090552
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2014 Lehman M, Hayden AJ, Martin JM, Christie D, Kneebone AB, Sidhom M, et al., 'FROGG high-risk prostate cancer workshop: Patterns of practice and literature review: Part I: Intact prostate', Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology, 58 257-265 (2014) [C1]

Australian and New Zealand radiation oncologists with an interest in uro-oncology were invited to participate in a pattern-of-practice survey dealing with the management of intact... [more]

Australian and New Zealand radiation oncologists with an interest in uro-oncology were invited to participate in a pattern-of-practice survey dealing with the management of intact high-risk prostate cancer. Responses from 46 practitioners (representing 73% of all potential respondents) revealed that high-dose radiation therapy is the standard of care. However, there is variability i n practice with regard to the methods used to achieve dose escalation, the use of whole-pelvic radiation therapy and the optimal duration of androgen deprivation therapy employed. A review of the literature outlining the current body of knowledge and the planned and ongoing studies in intact high-risk prostate cancer is presented. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

DOI 10.1111/1754-9485.12142
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2013 Izard MA, Morris LM, Wan W-Y, Martin J, 'Long-term outcome for prostate cancer using pseudo pulse-dosed rate brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, and hormones', BRACHYTHERAPY, 12 608-614 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.brachy.2013.04.004
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2013 Martin J, Frantzis J, Chung P, Langah I, Crain M, Cornes D, et al., 'Prostate radiotherapy clinical trial quality assurance: How real should real time review be? (A TROG-OCOG Intergroup Project)', RADIOTHERAPY AND ONCOLOGY, 107 333-338 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.radonc.2013.05.015
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2013 Supiot S, Crehange G, Latorzeff I, Pommier P, Paumier A, Rio E, et al., 'Hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer', CANCER RADIOTHERAPIE, 17 349-354 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.canrad.2013.05.005
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2013 Healy B, Frantzis J, Murry R, Martin J, Plank A, Middleton M, et al., 'Results from a multicenter prostate IMRT dosimetry intercomparison for an OCOG-TROG clinical trial', MEDICAL PHYSICS, 40 (2013)
DOI 10.1118/1.4808151
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2013 Grimison P, Houghton B, Chatfield M, Toner GC, Davis ID, Martin J, et al., 'Patterns of management and surveillance imaging amongst medical oncologists in Australia for stage i testicular cancer', BJU International, 112 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/bju.12221
Citations Scopus - 8
2013 Trada Y, Plank A, Martin J, 'Defining a doseresponse relationship for prostate external beam radiotherapy', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, 57 237-246 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1754-9485.12008
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2012 Lin C, Tripcony L, Keller J, Poulsen M, Martin J, Jackson J, Dickie G, 'PERINEURAL INFILTRATION OF CUTANEOUS SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA AND BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITHOUT CLINICAL FEATURES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 82 334-340 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2010.09.040
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 23
2012 Khoo ELH, Schick K, Plank AW, Poulsen M, Wong WWG, Middleton M, Martin JM, 'PROSTATE CONTOURING VARIATION: CAN IT BE FIXED?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 82 1923-1929 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2011.02.050
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 25
2012 Gillett J, Ientile C, Hiscock J, Plank A, Martin JM, 'Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Radiotherapy: What Are Patients Using?', JOURNAL OF ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE, 18 1014-1020 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1089/acm.2011.0334
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 16
2012 Hansen CJ, Kenny L, Lakhani SR, Ung O, Keller J, Tripcony L, et al., 'Tubular breast carcinoma: An argument against treatment de-escalation', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, 56 116-122 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1754-9485.2011.02330.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2011 Martin JM, Brett R, Blyth J, Morrison S, Bryant D, Plank A, et al., 'Dosimetric effect of external beam planning preceding combined high-dose-rate brachytherapy of the prostate', BRACHYTHERAPY, 10 474-478 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.brachy.2010.10.003
Co-authors Michael Fay
2011 Martin JM, Supiot S, Berthold DR, 'Pharmacotherapeutic Management of Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Current Status', DRUGS, 71 1019-1041 (2011) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
2011 Healy B, Frantzis J, Murry R, Martin J, Middleton M, Catton C, Kron T, 'Development of a dosimetry inter-comparison for IMRT as part of site credentialing for a TROG multi-centre clinical trial for prostate cancer', AUSTRALASIAN PHYSICAL & ENGINEERING SCIENCES IN MEDICINE, 34 195-202 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s13246-011-0063-7
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2011 Middleton M, Frantzis J, Healy B, Jones M, Murry R, Kron T, et al., 'SUCCESSFUL IMPLEMENTATION OF IMAGE-GUIDED RADIATION THERAPY QUALITY ASSURANCE IN THE TRANS TASMAN RADIATION ONCOLOGY GROUP 08.01 PROFIT STUDY', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 81 1576-1581 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2010.09.017
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 11
2010 Hayden AJ, Martin JM, Kneebone AB, Lehman M, Wiltshire KL, Skala M, et al., 'Australian & New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group: 2010 consensus guidelines for definitive external beam radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, 54 513-525 (2010) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1754-9485.2010.02214.x
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
2010 Martin JM, Frantzis J, Eade T, Chung P, 'Clinician's guide to prostate IMRT plan assessment and optimisation', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, 54 569-575 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1754-9485.2010.02217.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
2010 Poulsen M, Middleton M, McQuitty S, Ramsay J, Gogna K, Martin J, et al., 'Comparison of a Commonwealth-initiated regional radiation oncology facility in Toowoomba with a Queensland Health facility', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, 54 368-374 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1754-9485.2010.02166.x
Co-authors Jen Martin
2010 Devereux B, Frantzis J, Sisson T, Jones M, Martin J, Middleton M, 'A comparison of kV and MV imaging in head and neck image guided radiotherapy', Radiography, 16 8-13 (2010)

Purpose: To compare and assess kV and MV imaging modalities and their role in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for head and neck cancer patients. Method: Twelve patients receiving... [more]

Purpose: To compare and assess kV and MV imaging modalities and their role in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for head and neck cancer patients. Method: Twelve patients receiving radical radiotherapy to the head and neck were analysed in this study. Six patients undertook MV daily online intervention and a further six patients undertook kV daily online intervention. Pre-intervention field placement data were collected from three separate observers' image match analysis for each patient. The radiotherapy collective involved in the daily online image match analysis formed the fourth observer in the study. The primary end point was to establish the difference in inter- and intra-observer variance between kV and MV imaging modalities. Results: The range of the standard deviations of systematic set-up error for MV imaging calculated was 1.47-2.33 mm (MV) and 1.61-1.64 mm (kV) for the right-left (RL), 2.10-2.17 mm (MV) and 1.53-1.84 mm (kV) for the cranio-caudal (CC) and 1.43-1.63 mm (MV) and 1.02-1.11 mm (kV) for the anterior-posterior (AP). The mean inter-observer variance was 0.21 mm (MV) and 0.41 mm (kV) for the RL, 0.53 mm (MV) and 0.55 mm (kV) for the CC and 0.23 mm (MV) and 0.16 mm (kV) for the AP direction. Intra-observer mean variance was in the order of 0.60 mm (MV) and 0.16 mm (kV) for the RL, 1.41 mm (MV) and 0.05 mm (kV) for the CC and 1.41 mm (MV) and 0.08 mm (kV) for the AP. Discussion: The data in this study suggest both inter- and intra-observer consistency across kV and MV imaging modalities were comparable. However, it is felt that the improved clarity and quality of kV imaging allows all observers to analyse images in a consistent manner, identifying and acting on potential field placement moves. Conclusion: The introduction of kV imaging has maintained the high levels of inter- and intra-observer consistency achieved with MV imaging. This in turn further enables positive verification outcomes and supports the implementation of potential reductions in action thresholds. The increased quality, clarity and field of view offered by kV imaging have established it as the method of choice for head and neck IGRT at Radiation Oncology Queensland. © 2009 The College of Radiographers.

DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2009.08.002
Citations Scopus - 6
2010 Martin JM, Gorayski P, Zwahlen D, Fay M, Keller J, Millar J, 'IS RADIOTHERAPY A GOOD ADJUVANT STRATEGY FOR MEN WITH A HISTORY OF CRYPTORCHISM AND STAGE I SEMINOMA?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 76 65-70 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.01.027
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Michael Fay
2009 Martin JM, Bayley A, Bristow R, Chung P, Gospodarowicz M, Menard C, et al., 'Image guided dose escalated prostate radiotherapy: still room to improve', RADIATION ONCOLOGY, 4 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1748-717X-4-50
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 39
2009 Martin JM, Bayley A, Bristow R, Chung P, Gospodarowicz M, Menard C, et al., 'Image guided dose escalated prostate radiotherapy: still room to improve (vol 4, pg 50, 2009)', RADIATION ONCOLOGY, 4 (2009) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1748-717X-4-65
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 2
2009 Middleton M, Bradford C, Frantzis J, Ambler A, Sisson T, Montgomerie D, Martin J, 'Paperless and paper-based processes in the modern radiotherapy department', Radiography, 15 300-305 (2009)

Purpose: To assess the implications on workflow and efficiency in a paperless environment versus a traditional paper-based environment. This paper summarises the comparison of spe... [more]

Purpose: To assess the implications on workflow and efficiency in a paperless environment versus a traditional paper-based environment. This paper summarises the comparison of specific workflow practices conducted in a paperless and paper-based approach, comparing time taken, potential advantages and disadvantages of each approach, and the cost-effectiveness of a paperless approach. Methods and materials: A time study was undertaken on three specific workflow areas for 5¿patients with breast and prostate cancer respectively, and comparison made between paperless and paper-based methodology. The workflow areas analysed were electronic treatment record (ETR) versus treatment sheet preparation, digital history check process versus paper-based and digital image and trend analysis versus paper-based. The cost-effectiveness of a paperless approach was then analysed. Additionally a staff questionnaire was undertaken, assessing Information Technology (IT) skills of staff and comfort levels pertaining to a paperless environment. Results: There was on average a 50% reduction in workload when comparing an ETR versus a paper-based treatment sheet, a 50% reduction in workload by utilising a paperless history check process and a 70% reduction in workload with a paperless image and trend analysis process. There was also significant cost savings by introducing a paperless workflow. The survey showed a higher level of comfort with information technology in the paperless environment, and less frustration with aspects of working in the paper-based centre. Conclusion: The digital radiotherapy department offers highly significant improvements in efficiency. These potentially translate into major financial savings and increased job satisfaction. Crown Copyright © 2009.

DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2009.02.002
Citations Scopus - 4
2009 Jackson J, Dickie G, Poulsen M, Martin J, 'EXISTENCE OF MRI-NEGATIVE CLINICAL (LARGE NERVE) PERINEURAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA SPREAD Reply', HEAD AND NECK-JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES AND SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, 31 1532-1533 (2009) [C3]
2008 Middleton M, See A, Rolfo A, Medwell S, Joon ML, Joon DL, et al., 'Intraprostatic fiducials for image guidance: Workflow implications in a single linac department', Radiography, 14 312-317 (2008) [C1]

Purpose: To assess the accuracy and implications on workflow of an online correction electronic portal imaging (EPI) protocol utilising bony anatomy in the online environment and ... [more]

Purpose: To assess the accuracy and implications on workflow of an online correction electronic portal imaging (EPI) protocol utilising bony anatomy in the online environment and an assessment of three implanted gold seed fiducial markers in the offline environment. This paper summarises an initial trial to establish the range of systematic and random errors present in patient set-up for both bony anatomy and fiducial markers, and to calculate optimal clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins. The impact of the introduction of such a technique was also assessed in terms of impact on workflow and resource management in a single machine unit (SMU). Methods and materials: Pre treatment electronic portal images (EPIs) were acquired and bony anatomy was matched with CT derived digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Intervention in field placement was made if field placement fell outside the range of 4 mm on any of the orthogonal axes. In the offline environment the position of the implanted gold seed fiducials was aligned with that of the DRRs. An analysis of set-up error, total error and internal organ motion was then undertaken, with full statistical analysis of systematic and random errors. Results: Eleven patients completed treatment as specified, with 1006 EPIs available for analysis. Treatment times were in the order of 10.4 min. Set-up errors were in the order of 2.7 mm right-left, 2.4 mm sup-inf and 1.6 mm ant-pst. These were reduced to 1.2 mm, 0.7 mm and 0.9 mm respectively utilising an online correction protocol. However there was minimal impact on total error and internal organ motion. Using the data obtained in both the online and offline environments optimal CTV-PTV margins were calculated for correcting to bone, correcting to gold seed fiducials and also the possibility of EPI malfunction. Conclusions: Daily targeting of the prostate is both technically feasible and can be carried out in an efficient and accurate manner. An online correction protocol using gold seeds as the matching mechanism provides the ability to significantly reduce treatment margins for most prostate patients, and importantly does not impact on a busy clinical workflow. © 2007 The College of Radiographers.

DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2007.11.002
Citations Scopus - 6
2008 Zwahlen DR, Martin JM, Millar JL, Schneider U, 'Effect of radiotherapy volume and dose on secondary cancer risk in stage I testicular seminoma', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 70 853-858 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.10.007
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 32
2007 Fogarty GB, Cassumbhoy R, Martin JM, Fay M, Ainslie J, 'Technique for axillary radiotherapy using computer-assisted planning for high-risk skin cancer', AUSTRALASIAN RADIOLOGY, 51 267-275 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1673.2007.01729.x
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Michael Fay
2007 Martin JM, Rosewall T, Bayley A, Bristow R, Chung P, Crook J, et al., 'Phase II trial of hypofractionated image-guided intensitymodulated radiotherapy for localized prostate adenocarcinoma', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 69 1084-1089 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.04.049
Citations Scopus - 110Web of Science - 93
2007 Martin JM, Panzarella T, Zwahlen DR, Chung P, Warde P, 'Evidence-based guidelines for following stage 1 seminoma', CANCER, 109 2248-2256 (2007)
DOI 10.1002/cncr.22674
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 54
2006 Martin J, Chung P, Warde P, 'Treatment options, prognostic factors and selection of treatment in stage I seminoma', ONKOLOGIE, 29 592-598 (2006)
DOI 10.1159/000096608
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
2006 Oldenburg J, Martin JM, Fossa SD, 'Late relapses of germ cell malignancies: Incidence, management, and prognosis', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 24 5503-5511 (2006)
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2006.08.1836
Citations Scopus - 85Web of Science - 76
2006 Martin J, Bristow R, Warde P, 'Low and intermediate risk prostate cancer-- role of hormonal therapy with external beam radiation therapy.', The Canadian journal of urology., 13 Suppl 2 63-67 (2006)

Risk categorization based on pre-treatment PSA, clinical stage and Gleason score is now widely used in the management of patients with localized prostate cancer. In patients with ... [more]

Risk categorization based on pre-treatment PSA, clinical stage and Gleason score is now widely used in the management of patients with localized prostate cancer. In patients with low-risk disease (cT1-T2a, PSA < 10 ng/ml and Gleason score < 6) there is no role for the routine use of adjunctive hormonal therapy. In intermediate-risk patients (T1-T2, PSA < 20 ng/ml and Gleason < or= 7) there is some evidence to suggest improved outcomes with neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy when low-dose external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is used. However, with appropriate modern dose EBRT there is little data to support the use of routine adjunctive hormonal therapy and this should be done only in the context of a clinical trial.

Citations Scopus - 1
2006 Martin J, Rodrigues G, Malone S, Morton G, Campbell H, Crook J, 'Changing management of localized prostate cancer: a comparison survey of Ontario radiation oncologists.', The Canadian journal of urology., 13 Suppl 2 26-33 (2006)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Annual genitourinary radiation oncology meetings aim to assist in the dissemination of knowledge that may affect current practice. We aim to measure change... [more]

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Annual genitourinary radiation oncology meetings aim to assist in the dissemination of knowledge that may affect current practice. We aim to measure changes in practice approaches that have occurred while these meetings have been conducted. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A previously published survey from 2002 was sent to all genitourinary radiation oncologists in Ontario. Six prostate cancer patient scenarios were used: three definitive (low risk, intermediate risk, high risk), and three post-operative (extracapsular extension, margin positive, slowly rising PSA). There were 21 responders from seven cancer centers. RESULTS: Using biological equivalent dose (BED), there is significant dose escalation in 2005, particularly for intermediate risk patients (mean BED 73.0 Gy2 in 2002 versus 76.1 Gy2 in 2005, p=0.0003). There has been a corresponding move away from the use of neoadjuvant hormones in these patients (2002: 62% versus 2005: 24%, p=0.0097). More accurate prostate localization using fiducials is more common, leading to less use of rectal barium and urethrograms in the simulation process. In the definitive settings there is more utilization of rigid immobilization and more complex treatment delivery including intensity modulated radiotherapy. There is also greater use of multileaf collimation, electronic portal imaging and dose volume histograms in 2005 compared with 2002. CONCLUSIONS: There have been significant changes in the way that prostate cancer is managed with radiotherapy in Ontario between 2002 and 2005. Dose escalation and more complex treatment planning is widely evident.

2006 Martin J, Ngan SYK, Leong T, 'Primary anal adenocarcinoma: A caution for conservative treatment', Journal of Radiotherapy in Practice, 5 233-236 (2006)

There is evidence that a conservative approach with chemoradiotherapy can achieve long-term local control in patients with anal adenocarcinoma. Identification of suitable patients... [more]

There is evidence that a conservative approach with chemoradiotherapy can achieve long-term local control in patients with anal adenocarcinoma. Identification of suitable patients for this approach remains a problem. We describe a patient with a clinically staged T2N0 tumour, who achieved a complete clinical response on magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography after chemoradiotherapy, but was noted to have residual disease with evidence of lymph node metastasis on pathological examination in the abdominoperineal resection specimen. A complete clinical response does not necessarily equate to pathological response. © 2006 Cambridge University Press.

DOI 10.1017/S1460396906000331
2005 Martin J, Bowden P, Stephens R, Andrews J, Bishop M, 'Managing waiting time for radiotherapy: A single machine unit experience', Australasian Radiology, 49 480-484 (2005)

Waiting time (WT) for radiotherapy (RT) is a significant clinical problem. This paper examines various strategies for managing WT for patients treated with radical and palliative ... [more]

Waiting time (WT) for radiotherapy (RT) is a significant clinical problem. This paper examines various strategies for managing WT for patients treated with radical and palliative intent in the new setting of a rural single machine unit in Australia. Cohorts of patients undergoing both radical and palliative RT in Bendigo had their WT prospectively recorded. Matched cohorts from the hub centre (Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne) treated with palliative intent were also collated. Strategies implemented included a devoted priority meeting, palliative points system, and reallocation of appointment times. The audit was to continue until best practice guidelines were bettered. Three cohorts of patients were compared. There is a significant trend for increasing numbers of patients treated per month since the centre opened (P < 0.0001). The ratio of palliative to radical intent patients remained stable between 46 and 52%. Mean WT for palliative RT reduced from 25 days in the first cohort to 7 days in the final cohort (P < 0.0005). Waiting time for palliative RT was initially longer at Bendigo than the hub centre (P < 0.0005), but by the final cohort there was a non-significant difference favouring the Bendigo cohort (P = 0.26). Waiting time for radical treatment also improved throughout the three cohorts in Bendigo (P < 0.0005). A number of new strategies have successfully resulted in the abolition of lengthy WT for RT in Bendigo despite the increasing demand for the RT service. © 2005 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1673.2005.01502.x
Citations Scopus - 2
2005 Martin JM, Joon DL, Ng N, Grace M, Van Gelderen D, Lawlor M, et al., 'Towards individualised radiotherapy for Stage I seminoma', RADIOTHERAPY AND ONCOLOGY, 76 251-256 (2005)
DOI 10.1016/j.radonc.2005.08.005
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
2004 Porceddu S, Martin J, Shanker G, Weih L, Russell C, Rischin D, et al., 'Paranasal sinus tumors: Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute experience', HEAD AND NECK-JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES AND SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, 26 322-330 (2004)
DOI 10.1002/hed.10388
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 39
2004 Martin JM, Ryan G, Duchesne G, 'Clinical prioritisation for curative radiotherapy: A local waiting llist initiative', Clinical Oncology, 16 299-306 (2004)

Aims: Waiting time for radiotherapy is a major problem in radiation oncology practice. The aim of this paper is to present the experience of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in t... [more]

Aims: Waiting time for radiotherapy is a major problem in radiation oncology practice. The aim of this paper is to present the experience of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in trialling a number of strategies to reduce patient waiting times. Materials and methods: All patients starting megavoltage radiotherapy with curative intent in three separate 1-week blocks had their waiting times recorded. The cohorts were each 8 weeks apart and were before (September), during (November) and after (January) the introduction of a priority points system. Results: Median waiting time was 35 days in September, 42 days in November and 31 days in January. The number of extremely long waits ( > 90 days) decreased to 1 by January. Significantly more patients were pre-booked for treatment in January (27/51) compared with September (17/65; P=0.003) and November (12/65; P < 0.001). Pre-booked patients had shorter waiting times compared with patients who was not pre-booked (P < 0.0001). Difficulties at one particular treating location contributed to the longer median waiting times in November. Although there had no significant difference in waiting time in non-breast unit patients between the three cohorts, there was a decrease in waiting times in breast unit patients, especially between November and January (P=0.0008). There was no significant increase in delay to starting treatment in other treating units, resulting in more equitable access across all units. Conclusions: A combination of encouraging pre-booking and the introduction of a priority points system has led to a decrease in waiting times, especially among breast unit patients. © 2004 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.clon.2003.12.008
Citations Scopus - 11
2004 Rischin D, Porceddu S, Peters L, Martin J, Corry J, Weih L, 'Promising results with chemoradiation in patients with sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma', Head and Neck, 26 435-441 (2004)

Background. Sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma (SNUC) is an uncommon malignancy associated with poor prognosis. The optimal treatment approach for SNUC has not been established ... [more]

Background. Sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma (SNUC) is an uncommon malignancy associated with poor prognosis. The optimal treatment approach for SNUC has not been established was performed. Methods. A retrospective review of all patients with SNUC seen at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre over a 12-year period. Results. Ten patients with SNUC were identified, with nine having locally advanced disease (T4). Seven were treated with three cycles of platinum and 5-fluorouracil followed by radiation with two cycles of concurrent platinum. In these seven patients, the 2-year progress on-free survival was 43% (95% CI, 11% to 82%) and the 2-year overall survival was 64% (95% CI, 23% to 91%). One patient with a T1N0 nasal cavity tumor treated with radiation alone has not had a relapse. Two patients who were treated with initial surgical resection, prior to referral to our institution, received postoperative radiation, but they subsequently had relapses and died. Conclusion. Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation is a promising treatment strategy for SNUC. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/hed.10396
Citations Scopus - 68
2004 Martin JM, Porceddu S, Weih L, Corry J, Peters LJ, 'Outcomes in sinonasal mucosal melanoma', ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 74 838-842 (2004)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-1433.2004.03185.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Show 63 more journal articles

Conference (11 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Rutledge A, Mehan N, Ahmed G, Ainsworth P, Chong P, Doyle T, et al., 'Reducing unnecessary staging investigations in newly diagnosed prostate cancer: does surgeon education lead to improved implementation of clinical guidelines?', BJU INTERNATIONAL (2017)
2016 Nguyen D, Kim J, O'Brien R, Huang C, Booth J, Greer P, et al., 'TH-AB-202-12: The First Clinical Implementation of a Real-Time Six Degree of Freedom Tracking System During Radiation Therapy.', Med Phys (2016)
DOI 10.1118/1.4958076
Co-authors Peter Greer
2016 Legge K, Nguyen D, Ng J, Wilton L, Booth J, Keall P, et al., 'SU-G-JeP4-10: Measurement of Prostate Motion Trajectories During Prostate SBRT Boost Treatments with a Rectafix.', Med Phys (2016)
DOI 10.1118/1.4957120
Co-authors John Oconnor, Peter Greer
2016 Legge K, Cutajar D, Wilfert A, Martin J, Rozenfeld A, O'Connor DJ, Greer P, 'SU-F-T-328: Real-Time in Vivo Dosimetry of Prostate SBRT Boost Treatments Using MOSkin Detectors.', Med Phys (2016)
DOI 10.1118/1.4956513
Co-authors Peter Greer, John Oconnor
2016 Mian M, Kumar M, Wills V, Johnson C, Skov A, Wright T, et al., 'TRANSLATION OF THE CROSS TRI-MODALITY PROTOCOL FOR ESOPHAGEAL CANCER TO THE GENERAL POPULATION: A COMPLIANCE AUDIT', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
2011 Trada Y, Plank A, Martin JM, 'Establishing a Dose Response Relationship for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer With External Beam Radiotherapy: a Meta-analysis', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER (2011) [E3]
2009 Jackson JE, Dickie GJ, Wiltshire KL, Keller J, Tripcony L, Poulsen MG, et al., 'RADIOTHERAPY FOR PERINEURAL INVASION IN CUTANEOUS HEAD AND NECK CARCINOMAS: TOWARD A RISK-ADAPTED TREATMENT APPROACH', HEAD AND NECK-JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES AND SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK (2009) [E1]
DOI 10.1002/hed.20991
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 29
2008 Lin CY, Dickie G, Wiltshire K, Evans J, Poulsen M, Martin J, 'Perineural invasion in skin cancers of the head and neck: Outcomes and pattern of relapse of 280 patients treated with radiotherapy', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS (2008)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.06.502
2008 Gorayski P, Zwahlen D, Fay M, Millar J, Cattley T, Keller J, Martin JM, 'Should men with stage one testicular seminoma and a history of cryptorchism be offered adjuvant radiotherapy?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS (2008) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.06.1149
Co-authors Michael Fay
2006 Martin JM, Bayley A, Bristow R, Chung P, Crook J, Gospodarowicz M, et al., 'A prospective study of hypofractionated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS (2006)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.07.091
Citations Web of Science - 7
2006 Martin JM, Panzarella T, Zwahlen DR, Chung PW, Warde P, 'Stage one seminoma: Evidence based guidelines for follow up.', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2006)
Citations Web of Science - 1
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Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Martin JM, Imaging and Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: Advances in Biomarkers and Treatment, University of Queensland (2016)
DOI 10.14264/uql.2017.47
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 26
Total funding $11,840,541

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20173 grants / $832,697

Improving patient safety in radiation therapy with the Watchdog real-time treatment delivery verification system$602,815

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Peter Greer, Professor Rick Middleton, Conjoint Associate Professor Jarad Martin, Dr Jeremy Booth, Dr Boyd McCurdy, Dr Dale Lovelock, Dr Andrew Kneebone
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1600453
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

HMRI MRSP Cancer Research Program$190,008

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland, Professor Xu Dong Zhang, Laureate Professor Rodney Scott, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Conjoint Associate Professor Jarad Martin, Doctor Steve Smith, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Conjoint Professor Peter Greer, Conjoint Associate Professor Anthony Proietto, Doctor Fiona Day, Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett
Scheme NSW MRSP Infrastructure Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700603
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Sub-Project - Hunter Cancer Research Alliance; HCRA$39,874

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Associate Professor Erica James, Doctor Craig Gedye, Conjoint Associate Professor Jarad Martin, Doctor Nick Zdenkowski, Miss Aoife McGarvey, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Doctor Ben Britton, Mrs Merridie Rees, Associate Professor Mitch Duncan, Miss Fiona Stacey
Scheme Translational Cancer Research Centre Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo GS170010
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20163 grants / $3,941,667

Improving and maintaining holistic cancer survivor outcomes: A system-based program$2,234,525

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

A prospective multicentre study of the impact of Ga-68 PSMA-PET/CT imaging in the management of prostate cancer (proPSMA study)$1,272,142

Funding body: Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia

Funding body Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

A multistage multi centre international randomised trial of Conventional care Or Radioablation (stereotactic body radiotherapy) for Extra-cranial oligometastatic disease in lung, breast and prostate cancer (CORE).$435,000

Funding body: Cancer Australia

Funding body Cancer Australia
Scheme Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

20151 grants / $20,000

Neurotrophic growth factors as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in prostate cancer$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
Scheme Biomarkers and Targeted Therapies Flagship Program: Pilot Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20145 grants / $5,445,346

SPARK: Stereotactic Prostate Adaptive Radiotherapy utilising Kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring$581,000

Funding body: Cancer Australia

Funding body Cancer Australia
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Prostate Cancer: A new protein for improving diagnosis, prognosis and treatment$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Multiparametric MRI for Response Assessment of Anal Canal Squamous Cell Carcinoma$20,000

Funding body: Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists

Funding body Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists
Scheme Project grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

A prospective study of MRI based prostate treatment planning$19,000

Funding body: Calvary Mater Newcastle

Funding body Calvary Mater Newcastle
Scheme Jane Reid Harle Memorial Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20131 grants / $105,771

Advanced Radiation Oncology Clinical Trials: A Remotely Accessible Solution for Treatment Plan Review$105,771

Funding body: Cancer Instititue NSW

Funding body Cancer Instititue NSW
Scheme Research Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

20124 grants / $540,000

Enhancing Coordination of Complex Collaborative Clinical Trials in NSW: A TROG Initiative$300,000

Funding body: Cancer Instititue NSW

Funding body Cancer Instititue NSW
Scheme Cooperative Clinical Trials
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

Safety and Quality IMRT Treatment Delivery Accuracy$200,000

Funding body: American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology

Funding body American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Multiparametric MRI for Response Assessment of Anal Canal Squamous Cell Carcinoma$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Translational Cancer Research Unit

Funding body Hunter Translational Cancer Research Unit
Scheme Seed Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Real Time Verification of Dynamic Radiotherapy$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Translational Cancer Research Unit

Funding body Hunter Translational Cancer Research Unit
Scheme Seed Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20112 grants / $158,800

Exploring Androgen Deprivation Therapy derived osteopaenia through MRI quantification of marrow, fat and bone composition$80,000

Funding body: Abbott Australasia Pty Ltd

Funding body Abbott Australasia Pty Ltd
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone agonists and the metabolic syndrome – Pathophysiology and mitigation in a rat model$78,800

Funding body: Abbott Australasia Pty Ltd

Funding body Abbott Australasia Pty Ltd
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20091 grants / $176,260

Monitoring tumour Movement during Radiotherapy by 4D Ultrasound Imaging$176,260

Funding body: Cancer Australia

Funding body Cancer Australia
Project Team

Christian Langton, QUT

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20082 grants / $451,000

Phase III trial 'PROFIT: Prostate Fractionated Irradiation'$435,500

Funding body: Cancer Australia

Funding body Cancer Australia
Scheme Infrastructure support for clinical trials program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

PROFIT$15,500

Funding body: Queensland Clinical Oncology Group

Funding body Queensland Clinical Oncology Group
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20073 grants / $140,000

Phase III trial 'PROFIT: Prostate Fractionated Irradiation'$100,000

Funding body: Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia

Funding body Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Phase III trial 'PROFIT: Prostate Fractionated Irradiation'$20,000

Funding body: Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group

Funding body Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group
Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

FLT-PET for patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma managed with chemoradiotherapy (CRT)$20,000

Funding body: Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital

Funding body Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital
Scheme Project Grant & New Investigator Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20041 grants / $29,000

Phase II trial of whole abdominal radiotherapy for platinum resistant recurrent ovarian carcinoma$29,000

Funding body: Merck Medical School Grant

Funding body Merck Medical School Grant
Scheme Merck Medical School Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current3

Total current UON EFTSL

Masters0.1
PhD0.45

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 Masters Development of an MRI Only Imaging Protocol for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Patients With Complex Pelvic Cancers. M Philosophy (Med RadiationSc), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Hypofractionated Prostate Treatments: Dose, Motion Monitoring and Credentialling PhD (Physics), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Anal Cancer and Multiparametric MRI PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
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Research Opportunities

Radiotherapy and Cancer: Integration of Biology and Technology

Radiation Oncology is a rapidly changing field with a vital role to play in the management of the modern cancer patient. With the golden age of basic sciences and availability of new imaging and treatment approaches, there are huge opportunities to explore. Our centre is willing to discuss research interests of prospective students and to help tailor a higher research degree to their talents and clinical need.

PHD

Priority Research Centre for Cancer Research, Innovation and Translation

30/10/2016 - 31/12/2020

Contact

Doctor Mary-Claire Hanlon


mary-claire.hanlon@newcastle.edu.au

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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 71
Canada 21
United Kingdom 8
France 4
Denmark 3
More...
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Conjoint Associate Professor Jarad Martin

Position

Conjoint Associate Professor
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

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