Dr Phil Jobling

Dr Phil Jobling

Senior Lecturer

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy (Human Physiology)

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
My research centres on the structure and function of nerves which control our internal organs. This includes, the sensory neurons which give us information on the state of our internal organs, and the autonomic neurons which modify organ function. We are interested in how autonomic neurons receive information from other parts of the nervous system and how they process this information before sending signals to the final target organ. At present we are focusing on control of the female reproductive tract using a number of animal models. To study these complex nervous pathways we use a combination of electrical recording techniques, to monitor the activity of individual neurons, and anatomical techniques to visualise the shape and chemical content of neurons. The major aim of our research is to build a picture of the types of neurons which are important in pelvic organ function and the nature of the chemical signals which neurons use to communicate with each other. This knowledge will be crucial to the design of therapies aimed at combating the wide range of diseases which involve perturbations of the autonomic and sensory nervous systems. Such maladies include incontinence, sexual dysfunction, and chronic pelvic pain.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Melbourne
  • Master of Science, University of Melbourne
  • Graduate Certificate Practice of Tertiary Teaching, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Autonomic Nervous System
  • Electrophysiology
  • Histology
  • Neuroanatomy
  • Pain and Sensory Dysfunction
  • Physiology

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
060699 Physiology not elsewhere classified 20
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 40
111699 Medical Physiology not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2000 - 1/06/2004 Senior Research Officer (NHMRC) Flinders University
Anatomy and Histology
Australia
1/01/1996 - 1/01/2000 NHMRC Postdoctoral Fellow Flinders University
Anatomy and Histology
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2002 - 31/12/2003 State Representitive - Australian Neuroscience Society Australian Neuroscience Society (ANS)
Australia

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
1996 Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship
Unknown
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Jobling P, 'Visceral motoneurons', The Mouse Nervous System, Academic Press, San Diego 499-514 (2012) [B1]

Journal article (48 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 van Helden DF, Kamiya A, Kelsey S, Laver DR, Jobling P, Mitsui R, Hashitani H, 'Nerve-induced responses of mouse vaginal smooth muscle.', Pflugers Arch, (2017)
DOI 10.1007/s00424-017-1995-x
Co-authors Derek Laver, Dirk Vanhelden
2017 Poppi LA, Tabatabaee H, Drury HR, Jobling P, Callister RJ, Migliaccio AA, et al., 'ACh-induced hyperpolarization and decreased resistance in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells.', J Neurophysiol, jn.00030.2017 (2017)
DOI 10.1152/jn.00030.2017
Co-authors Alan Brichta
2017 Boilly B, Faulkner S, Jobling P, Hondermarck H, 'Nerve Dependence: From Regeneration to Cancer.', Cancer Cell, 31 342-354 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.ccell.2017.02.005
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Hubert Hondermarck
2017 Carreiro JN, Magnani M, Jobling P, van Helden DF, Nalivaiko E, Braga VA, 'Resveratrol restores uterine contractions during hypoxia by blockade of ATP-sensitive potassium channels', Journal of Functional Foods, 33 307-313 (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd This study assessed the¿effects of resveratrol, a polyphenol¿found in grapes and red wine¿on non-pregnant murine uteri under hypoxia. Resveratrol at 1, 3, ... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd This study assessed the¿effects of resveratrol, a polyphenol¿found in grapes and red wine¿on non-pregnant murine uteri under hypoxia. Resveratrol at 1, 3, 10, 30 and 100¿µM promoted uterine relaxation and decreased the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous uterine contractions. Assayed at 3, 10, 30¿µM, resveratrol inhibited the oxytocin-induced cumulative contractions reducing the maximum effect in a dose-dependent manner. In hypoxic uteri, resveratrol at 100¿µM restored the uterine contractions compromised by hypoxia. In addition, under hypoxia, resveratrol prevented the decrease in uterine contractions maintaining > 75% of its contraction capability. The effects of resveratrol on uterine contractions under hypoxia were attenuated by tetraethylammonium (10¿mM) and almost abolished by glibenclamide (10¿µM). Our¿results show regenerative and protective effects of resveratrol in non-pregnant murine uteri under hypoxia and describes for the first time that these effects are mediated by blockade of ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

DOI 10.1016/j.jff.2017.04.001
Co-authors Eugene Nalivaiko, Dirk Vanhelden
2016 Duchatel RJ, Jobling P, Graham BA, Harms LR, Michie PT, Hodgson DM, Tooney PA, 'Increased white matter neuron density in a rat model of maternal immune activation - Implications for schizophrenia', Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, 65 118-126 (2016) [C1]

© 2015. Interstitial neurons are located among white matter tracts of the human and rodent brain. Post-mortem studies have identified increased interstitial white matter neuron (... [more]

© 2015. Interstitial neurons are located among white matter tracts of the human and rodent brain. Post-mortem studies have identified increased interstitial white matter neuron (IWMN) density in the fibre tracts below the cortex in people with schizophrenia. The current study assesses IWMN pathology in a model of maternal immune activation (MIA); a risk factor for schizophrenia. Experimental MIA was produced by an injection of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) into pregnant rats on gestational day (GD) 10 or GD19. A separate control group received saline injections. The density of neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN < sup > + < /sup > ) and somatostatin (SST < sup > + < /sup > ) IWMNs was determined in the white matter of the corpus callosum in two rostrocaudally adjacent areas in the 12week old offspring of GD10 (n=10) or GD19 polyI:C dams (n=18) compared to controls (n=20). NeuN < sup > + < /sup > IWMN density trended to be higher in offspring from dams exposed to polyI:C at GD19, but not GD10. A subpopulation of these NeuN < sup > + < /sup > IWMNs was shown to express SST. PolyI:C treatment of dams induced a significant increase in the density of SST < sup > + < /sup > IWMNs in the offspring when delivered at both gestational stages with more regionally widespread effects observed at GD19. A positive correlation was observed between NeuN < sup > + < /sup > and SST < sup > + < /sup > IWMN density in animals exposed to polyI:C at GD19, but not controls. This is the first study to show that MIA increases IWMN density in adult offspring in a similar manner to that seen in the brain in schizophrenia. This suggests the MIA model will be useful in future studies aimed at probing the relationship between IWMNs and schizophrenia.

DOI 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2015.09.006
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Brett Graham, Lauren Harms, Pat Michie, Deborah Hodgson, Paul Tooney
2016 Smith KM, Boyle KA, Mustapa M, Jobling P, Callister RJ, Hughes DI, Graham BA, 'Distinct forms of synaptic inhibition and neuromodulation regulate calretinin-positive neuron excitability in the spinal cord dorsal horn', Neuroscience, 326 10-21 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 . The dorsal horn (DH) of the spinal cord contains a heterogenous population of neurons that process incoming sensory signals before information ascends to the brain. We h... [more]

© 2016 . The dorsal horn (DH) of the spinal cord contains a heterogenous population of neurons that process incoming sensory signals before information ascends to the brain. We have recently characterized calretinin-expressing (CR+) neurons in the DH and shown that they can be divided into excitatory and inhibitory subpopulations. The excitatory population receives high-frequency excitatory synaptic input and expresses delayed firing action potential discharge, whereas the inhibitory population receives weak excitatory drive and exhibits tonic or initial bursting discharge. Here, we characterize inhibitory synaptic input and neuromodulation in the two CR+ populations, in order to determine how each is regulated. We show that excitatory CR+ neurons receive mixed inhibition from GABAergic and glycinergic sources, whereas inhibitory CR+ neurons receive inhibition, which is dominated by glycine. Noradrenaline and serotonin produced robust outward currents in excitatory CR+ neurons, predicting an inhibitory action on these neurons, but neither neuromodulator produced a response in CR+ inhibitory neurons. In contrast, enkephalin (along with selective mu and delta opioid receptor agonists) produced outward currents in inhibitory CR+ neurons, consistent with an inhibitory action but did not affect the excitatory CR+ population. Our findings show that the pharmacology of inhibitory inputs and neuromodulator actions on CR+ cells, along with their excitatory inputs can define these two subpopulations further, and this could be exploited to modulate discrete aspects of sensory processing selectively in the DH.

DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2016.03.058
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Robert Callister, Brett Graham
2015 Jobling P, 'Sympathy for the ganglion', Journal of Physiology, 593 755-756 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.2014.287771
2015 Smith KM, Boyle KA, Madden JF, Dickinson SA, Jobling P, Callister RJ, et al., 'Functional heterogeneity of calretinin-expressing neurons in the mouse superficial dorsal horn: Implications for spinal pain processing', Journal of Physiology, 593 4319-4339 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Physiological Society. Neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (SDH) of the spinal cord play an important role in nociceptive, thermal, itch and light touch sensations.... [more]

© 2015 The Physiological Society. Neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (SDH) of the spinal cord play an important role in nociceptive, thermal, itch and light touch sensations. Excitatory interneurons comprise ~65% of all SDH neurons but surprisingly few studies have investigated their role in spinal sensory processing. Here we use a transgenic mouse to study putative excitatory SDH neurons that express the calcium binding protein calretinin (CR). Our immunocytochemical, morphological and electrophysiological analysis identified two distinct populations of CR-expressing neurons, which we termed 'Typical' and 'Atypical'. Typical CR-expressing neurons comprised ~85% of the population and exhibited characteristic excitatory interneuron properties including delayed firing discharge, large rapid A-type potassium currents, and central, radial or vertical cell morphologies. Atypical neurons exhibited properties consistent with inhibitory interneurons, including tonic firing or initial bursting discharge, I h currents, and islet cell morphology. Although both Typical and Atypical CR-expressing neurons responded to noxious peripheral stimulation, the excitatory drive onto Typical CR-expressing neurons was much stronger. Furthermore, Atypical CR-expressing cells comprise at least two functionally distinct subpopulations based on their responsiveness to noxious peripheral stimulation and neurochemical profile. Together our data suggest CR expression is not restricted to excitatory neurons in the SDH. Under normal conditions, the contribution of 'Typical' excitatory CR -expressing neurons to overall SDH excitability may be limited by the presence of A-type potassium currents, which limit the effectiveness of their strong excitatory input. Their contribution may, however, be increased in pathological situations where A-type potassium currents are decreased. By contrast, 'Atypical' inhibitory neurons with their excitable phenotype but weak excitatory input may be more easily recruited during increased peripheral stimulation.

DOI 10.1113/JP270855
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Brett Graham, Robert Callister
2015 Jobling P, Pundavela J, Oliveira SMR, Roselli S, Walker MM, Hondermarck H, 'Nerve-Cancer Cell Cross-talk: A Novel Promoter of Tumor Progression', CANCER RESEARCH, 75 1777-1781 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-14-3180
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Hubert Hondermarck, Marjorie Walker
2015 Pundavela J, Roselli S, Faulkner S, Attia J, Scott RJ, Thorne RF, et al., 'Nerve fibers infiltrate the tumor microenvironment and are associated with nerve growth factor production and lymph node invasion in breast cancer', Molecular Oncology, 9 1626-1635 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.molonc.2015.05.001
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rick Thorne, John Attia, Rodney Scott, John Forbes, Hubert Hondermarck, Marjorie Walker
2014 Pundavela J, Demont Y, Jobling P, Lincz LF, Roselli S, Thorne RF, et al., 'ProNGF correlates with Gleason score and is a potential driver of nerve infiltration in prostate cancer', American Journal of Pathology, 184 3156-3162 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Nerve infiltration is essential to prostate cancer progression, but the mecha... [more]

© 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Nerve infiltration is essential to prostate cancer progression, but the mechanism by which nerves are attracted to prostate tumors remains unknown. We report that the precursor of nerve growth factor (proNGF) is overexpressed in prostate cancer and involved in the ability of prostate cancer cells to induce axonogenesis. A series of 120 prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) samples were analyzed by IHC for proNGF. ProNGF was mainly localized in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells, with marked expression in cancer compared with BPH. Importantly, the proNGF level positively correlated with the Gleason score (n = 104, t < inf > B < /inf > = 0.51). A higher level of proNGF was observed in tumors with a Gleason score of =8 compared with a Gleason score of 7 and 6 (P < 0.001). In vitro, proNGF was detected in LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3 prostate cancer cells and BPH-1 cells but not in RWPE-1 immortalized nontumorigenic prostate epithelial cells or primary normal prostate epithelial cells. Co-culture of PC12 neuronal-like cells or 50B11 neurons with PC-3 cells resulted in neurite outgrowth in neuronal cells that was inhibited by blocking antibodies against proNGF, indicating that prostate cancer cells can induce axonogenesis via secretion of proNGF. These data reveal that ProNGF is a biomarker associated with high-risk prostate cancers and a potential driver of infiltration by nerves.

DOI 10.1016/j.ajpath.2014.08.009
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Lisa Lincz, Marjorie Walker, Danielle Bond, Rick Thorne, Hubert Hondermarck
2014 Gravina FS, Van Helden DF, Kerr KP, De Oliveira RB, Jobling P, 'Phasic contractions of the mouse vagina and cervix at different phases of the estrus cycle and during late pregnancy', PLoS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Gravina et al. Conclusions/Significance: Cervical smooth muscle strips taken from mice in estrus, metestrus or late pregnancy were generally spontaneously active. Vaginal ... [more]

© 2014 Gravina et al. Conclusions/Significance: Cervical smooth muscle strips taken from mice in estrus, metestrus or late pregnancy were generally spontaneously active. Vaginal smooth muscle strips were normally quiescent but could be induced to exhibit phasic contractions independent on phase of the estrus cycle or late pregnancy. Spontaneous cervical or TEA-induced vaginal phasic contractions were not mediated by ICs or intracellular Ca2+ stores. Given that vaginal smooth muscle is normally quiescent then it is likely that increases in hormones such as oxytocin, as might occur through sexual stimulation, enhance the effectiveness of such pacemaking until phasic contractile activity emerges. Methodology/Principal Findings: Vaginal and cervical contractions were measured in vitro, as was the distribution of c-Kit and vimentin positive interstitial cells (ICs). Cervical smooth muscle was spontaneously active in estrus and metestrus but quiescent during proestrus and diestrus. Vaginal smooth muscle was normally quiescent but exhibited phasic contractions in the presence of oxytocin or the K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA) chloride. Spontaneous contractions in the cervix and TEA-induced phasic contractions in the vagina persisted in the presence of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a blocker of the SERCA that refills intracellular SR Ca2+ stores, but were inhibited in low Ca2+ solution or in the presence of nifedipine, an inhibitor of L-type Ca2+ channels. ICs were found in small numbers in the mouse cervix but not in the vagina. Background/Aims: The pacemaker mechanisms activating phasic contractions of vaginal and cervical smooth muscle remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate properties of pacemaking in vaginal and cervical tissues by determining whether: 1) functional pacemaking is dependent on the phase of the estrus cycle or pregnancy; 2) pacemaking involves Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA)-dependent intracellular Ca2+ stores; and 3) c-Kit and/or vimentin immunoreactive ICs have a role in pacemaking.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0111307
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Dirk Vanhelden, Karen Kerr
2014 Jobling P, O'Hara K, Hua S, 'Female reproductive tract pain: Targets, challenges, and outcomes', Frontiers in Pharmacology, 5 FEB (2014) [C1]

Pain from the female reproductive tract (FRT) is a significant clinical problem for which there are few effective therapies. The complex neuroanatomy of pelvic organs not only mak... [more]

Pain from the female reproductive tract (FRT) is a significant clinical problem for which there are few effective therapies. The complex neuroanatomy of pelvic organs not only makes diagnosis of pelvic pain disorders difficult but represents a challenge to development of targeted therapies. A number of potential therapeutic targets have been identified on sensory neurons supplying the FRT but our knowledge on the basic neurophysiology of these neurons is limited compared with other viscera. Until this is addressed we can only guess if the new experimental therapies proposed for somatic, gastrointestinal, or bladder pain will translate to the FRT. Once suitable therapeutic targets become clear, the next challenge is drug delivery. The FRT represents a promising system for topical drug delivery that could be tailored to act locally or systemically depending on formulation. Development of these therapies and their delivery systems will need to be done in concert with more robust in vivo and in vitro models of FRT pain. © 2014 Jobling, O'Hara and Hua.

DOI 10.3389/fphar.2014.00017
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Susan Hua
2013 Bobrovskaya L, Beard D, Bondarenko E, Beig MI, Jobling P, Walker FR, et al., 'Does exposure to chronic stress influence blood pressure in rats?', AUTONOMIC NEUROSCIENCE-BASIC & CLINICAL, 177 217-223 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.autneu.2013.05.001
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Eugene Nalivaiko, Rohan Walker
2012 Yeoh JW, James MH, Jobling P, Bains JS, Graham BA, Dayas CV, 'Cocaine potentiates excitatory drive in the perifornical/lateral hypothalamus', Journal of Physiology, 590 3677-3689 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Christopher Dayas, Brett Graham
2011 Jobling P, 'Autonomic control of the urogenital tract', Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical, 165 113-126 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.autneu.2010.07.004
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 11
2011 Gravina FS, Jobling P, Kerr KP, De Oliveira R, Parkington HC, Van Helden DF, 'Oxytocin depolarizes mitochondria in isolated myometrial cells', Experimental Physiology, 96 949-956 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1113/expphysiol.2011.058388
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Karen Kerr, Dirk Vanhelden
2010 Jobling P, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Cervix stimulation evokes predominantly subthreshold synaptic responses in mouse thoracolumbar and lumbosacral superficial dorsal horn neurons', Journal of Sexual Medicine, 7 2068-2076 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-6109.2010.01768.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Brett Graham, Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2010 Gravina FS, Parkington HC, Kerr KP, De Oliveira R, Jobling P, Coleman HA, et al., 'Role of mitochondria in contraction and pacemaking in the mouse uterus', British Journal of Pharmacology, 161 1375-1390 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00949.x
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Karen Kerr, Dirk Vanhelden
2009 Jobling P, 'W-conotoxin GVIA sensitive calcium channels on preganglionic nerve terminals in mouse pelvic and celiac ganglia', Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical, 146 56-61 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.autneu.2008.11.014
Citations Scopus - 1
2008 Jobling P, Lim R, 'Anatomical and physiological properties of pelvic ganglion neurons in female mice', Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic & Clinical, 140 30-39 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.autneu.2008.03.001
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Rebecca Lim
2005 Morris JL, Gibbins IL, Jobling P, 'Post-stimulus potentiation of transmission in pelvic ganglia enhances sympathetic dilatation of guinea-pig uterine artery in vitro', Journal of Physiology, 566 189-203 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.2005.083493
Citations Scopus - 14
2005 Morris JL, Konig P, Shimizu T, Jobling P, Gibbins IL, 'Most peptide-containing sensory neurons lack proteins for exocytotic release and vesicular transport of glutamate', Journal of Comparative Neurology, 483 1-16 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cne.20399
Citations Scopus - 51
2004 Ozols D, Morris JL, Lewis RJ, Gibbins IL, Jobling P, 'Differential involvement of N-type calcium channels in transmitter release from vasoconstrictor and vasodilator neurons.', British Journal of Pharmacology, 141 961-970 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/sj.bjp.0705712
Citations Scopus - 7
2004 Jobling P, Gibbins IL, Lewis RJ, Morris JL, 'Differential expression of calcium channels in sympathetic and parasympathetic preganglionic inputs to neurons in paracervical ganglia of guinea-pigs.', Neuroscience, 127 455-466 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2004.05.005
Citations Scopus - 16
2003 Jobling P, Gibbins IL, Morris JL, 'Functional organization of vasodilator neurons in pelvic ganglia of female guinea pigs: comparison with uterine motor neurons.', Journal of Comparative Neurology, 459 223-241 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cne.10584
Citations Scopus - 19
2003 Anderson RL, Jobling P, Matthew SE, Gibbins IL, 'Development of convergent synaptic inputs to subpopulations of autonomic neurons', Journal of Comparative Neurology, 447 218-233 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cne.10222
Citations Scopus - 6
2003 Gibbins IL, Teo EH, Jobling P, Morris JL, 'Synaptic density, convergence and dendritic complexity of prevertebral sympathetic neurons. Journal of Comparative Neurology', Journal of Comparative Neurology, 455 285-298 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cne.10404
Citations Scopus - 27
2003 Gibbins IL, Jobling P, Teo EH, Matthew SE, Morris JL, 'Heterogenous expression of SNAP-25 and synaptic vesicle proteins by central and peripheral inputs to sympathetic neurons.', Journal of Comparative Neurology, 459 25-43 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cne.10527
Citations Scopus - 20
2003 Morris JL, Jobling P, Shimizu T, Gibbins IL, 'Interleukin-1 receptor immunoreactivity in sympathetic vascular and non vascular neurons in the guinea-pig coeliac ganglion', Neuroscience Letters, 333 54-58 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0304-3940(02)00959-X
Citations Scopus - 1
2002 Morris JL, Jobling P, Gibbins IL, 'Botulinum neurotoxin A attenuates release of norepinepherine but not neuropeptide Y from vasoconstrictor neurons', American Journal of Physiology. 283: H2627-2635., 2627-2635 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 46
2001 Jobling P, Messenger JP, Gibbins IL, 'Differential expression of functionally identified and immunohistochemically identified NK1 receptors on sympathetic neurons.', Journal of Neurophysiology 85: 1888-1898., 1888-1898 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 22
2001 Anderson RL, Jobling P, Gibbins IL, 'Development of electrophysiological and morphological diversity in autonomic neurons.', Journal of Neurophysiology 86: 1237-1251., 1237-1251 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 28
2001 Morris JL, Jobling P, Gibbins IL, 'Differential inhibition by botulinum neurotoxin A of cotransmitters released from autonomic vasodilator neurons', American Journal of Physiology. 281: H2124-2132., 2124-2132 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 96
2000 Jobling P, Gibbins IL, 'Erratum: Electrophysiological and morphological diversity of mouse sympathetic neurons (Journal of Neurophysiology (November 1999) 82 (2747- 2764))', Journal of Neurophysiology, 83 (2000)
2000 Jobling P, Gibbins IL, 'Erratum: Electrophysiological and morphological diversity of mouse sympathetic neurons (Journal of Neurophysiology (Nov. 1999) 82 (2747-2764))', Journal of Neurophysiology, 83 (2000)
2000 Gibbins IL, Jobling P, Messenger JP, Teo EH, Morris JL, 'Neuronal morphology and the synaptic organisation of sympathetic ganglia', Journal of the Autonomic Nervous System, 81 104-109 (2000)

In this article, we provide a short review of the structure and synaptic organisation of the final motor neurons in the sympathetic ganglia of mammals. Combinations of pathway tra... [more]

In this article, we provide a short review of the structure and synaptic organisation of the final motor neurons in the sympathetic ganglia of mammals. Combinations of pathway tracing, multiple-labelling immunofluorescence and intracellular dye injection have shown that neurons in different functional pathways differ not only in their patterns of neuropeptide expression, but also in the size of their cell bodies and dendritic fields. Thus, vasoconstrictor neurons consistently are smaller than any other major functional class of neurons. Serial section ultrastructural analysis of dye filled neurons, together with electron microscopic and confocal microscopic analysis of immunolabelled synaptic inputs to sympathetic final motor neurons indicate that synapses are rare and randomly distributed over the surface of the neurons. The total number of synapses is simply proportional to the total surface area of the neurons. Many terminal boutons of peptide-containing preganglionic neurons do not make conventional synapses with target neurons. Furthermore, there is a spatial mismatch in the distribution of peptide-containing terminals and neurons expressing receptors for the corresponding peptides. Together, these results suggest that there are likely to be significant differences in the ways that the final sympathetic motor neurons in distinct functional pathways integrate their synaptic inputs. In at least some pathways, heterosynaptic actions of neuropeptides probably contribute to subtle modulation of ganglionic transmission. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

DOI 10.1016/S0165-1838(00)00132-6
Citations Scopus - 30
1999 Jobling P, Gibbins IL, 'Electrophysiological and morphological diversity of mouse sympathetic neurons', Journal of Neurophysiology, 82 2747-2764 (1999)

We have used multiple-labeling immunohistochemistry, intracellular dye- filling, and intracellular microelectrode recordings to characterize the morphological and electrical prope... [more]

We have used multiple-labeling immunohistochemistry, intracellular dye- filling, and intracellular microelectrode recordings to characterize the morphological and electrical properties of sympathetic neurons in the superior cervical, thoracic, and celiac ganglia of mice. Neurochemical and morphological characteristics of neurons varied between ganglia. Thoracic sympathetic ganglia contained three main populations of neurons based on differential patterns of expression of immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). In the celiac ganglion, nearly all neurons contained immunoreactivity to both tyrosine hydroxylase and NPY. Both the overall size of the dendritic tree and the number of primary dendrites were greater in neurons from the thoracic and celiac ganglia compared with those from the superior cervical ganglion. The electrophysiological properties of sympathetic neurons depended more on their ganglion of origin rather than their probable targets. All neurons in the superior cervical ganglion had phasic firing properties and large afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs). In addition, 34% of these neurons displayed an afterdepolarization preceding the AHP. Superior cervical ganglion neurons had prominent I(M), I(A), and I(H) currents and a linear currentvoltage relationship between -60 and -110 mV. Neurons from the thoracic ganglia had significantly smaller action potentials, AHPs, and apparent cell capacitance compared with superior cervical ganglion neurons, and only 18% showed an afterdepolarization. All neurons in superior cervical ganglia and most neurons in celiac ganglia received at least one strong preganglionic input. Nearly one-half the neurons in the celiac ganglion had tonic firing properties, and another 15% had firing properties intermediate between those of tonic and phasic neurons. Most celiac neurons showed significant inward rectification below -90 mV. They also expressed I(A), but with slower inactivation kinetics than that of superior cervical or thoracic neurons. Both phasic and tonic celiac ganglion neurons received synaptic inputs via the celiac nerves in addition to strong inputs via the splanchnic nerves. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that the properties of the action potential, the AHP, and the apparent cell capacitance together were sufficient to correctly classify 80% of neurons according to their ganglion of origin. These results indicate that there is considerable heterogeneity in the morphological, neurochemical, and electrical properties of sympathetic neurons in mice. Although the morphological and neurochemical characteristics of the neurons are likely to be related to their peripheral projections, the expression of particular electrophysiological traits seems to be more closely related to the ganglia within which the neurons occur.

Citations Scopus - 58
1999 Gibbins IL, Matthew SE, Jobling P, 'Pathway-specific expression of PKC and PKA in sympathetic neurons', NeuroReport, 10 975-979 (1999)

We used multiple-labelling immunofluorescence, intracellular dye injection, electrophysiological recording and confocal microscopy to examine the expression of immunoreactivity to... [more]

We used multiple-labelling immunofluorescence, intracellular dye injection, electrophysiological recording and confocal microscopy to examine the expression of immunoreactivity to protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) in sympathetic ganglia of guinea-pigs. PKCa and PKC¿ were widespread in vasoconstrictor and pilomotor neurons. High levels of PKA RIIa and RIIß were restricted to neurons that lacked significant expression of PKC, including somatostatin-containing neurons projecting to the gut, and non-noradrenergic vasodilator neurons. In coeliac ganglia, most neurons with PKC contained neuropeptide Y and displayed phasic patterns of action potential firing, often with a long after-hyperpolarization. Tonically firing neurons lacked both neuropeptide Y and PKC. These results show remarkably pathway-specific expression of protein kinases in functionally identified populations of sympathetic neurons.

Citations Scopus - 11
1997 Brookes SJH, Meedeniya ACB, Jobling P, Costa M, 'Orally projecting interneurones in the guinea-pig small intestine', Journal of Physiology, 505 473-491 (1997)

1. Orally projecting, cholinergic interneurones are important in mediating ascending excitatory reflexes in the small intestine. We have shown that there is just one major class o... [more]

1. Orally projecting, cholinergic interneurones are important in mediating ascending excitatory reflexes in the small intestine. We have shown that there is just one major class of orally projecting interneurone, which we have characterized using retrograde labelling in organ culture, combined with immunohistochemistry, intracellular recording and dye filling. 2. Orally projecting interneurones, previously shown to be immunoreactive for choline acetyltransferase, tachykinins, enkephalin, calretinin and neurofilament protein triplet, have axons up to 14 mm long and are the only class of cells with orally directed axons more than 8.5 mm long. 3. They are all small Dogiel type I neurones with short dendrites, usually lamellar in form, and a single axon which sometimes bifurcates. Their axons give rise to short varicose collaterals in myenteric ganglia more than 3 mm oral to their cell bodies. 4. Orally projecting interneurones receive prominent fast excitatory post synaptic potentials (fast EPSPs). A major source of fast EPSPs is other ascending interneurones located further aborally. They also receive fast EPSPs from circumferential pathways. 5. In the stretched preparations used in this study orally projecting interneurones were highly excitable, firing repeatedly to depolarizing current pulses and had negligible long after-hyperpolarizations following their action potentials. They did not receive measurable noncholinergic slow excitatory synaptic inputs. 6. Ascending interneurones had a characteristic inflection in their membrane responses to depolarizing current pulses and their first action potential was typically delayed by approximately 30 ms. Under single electrode voltage clamp, ascending interneurones had a transient outward current when depolarized above -70 mV from more hyperpolarized holding potentials. Ascending interneurones also consistently showed marked inward rectification under both current clamp and voltage clamp conditions. 7. This class of cells has consistent morphological, neurochemical and electrophysiological characteristics and are important in mediating orally directed enteric reflexes.

DOI 10.1111/j.1469-7793.1997.473bb.x
Citations Scopus - 61
1996 Jobling P, Horn JP, 'In vitro relation between preganglionic sympathetic stimulation and activity of cutaneous glands in the bullfrog', Journal of Physiology, 494 287-296 (1996)

1. Activation of cutaneous glands was studied by measuring changes in transepithelial potential (TEP) after pre- and postganglionic sympathetic stimulation in the bullfrog, Rana c... [more]

1. Activation of cutaneous glands was studied by measuring changes in transepithelial potential (TEP) after pre- and postganglionic sympathetic stimulation in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana. 2. In normal Ringer solution, TEP was 20-90 mV with the basolateral (inside) surface positive. Single shocks to the preganglionic B pathway decreased TEP by up to 3 mV. Cutaneous depolarizations had a latency of 1.2 s, a rise time of 2.5 s, and decayed with an exponential time constant of 15 s. Similar depolarizations were evoked by postganglionic stimulation. 3. Cutaneous depolarizations summed during repetitive stimulation at > 0.05 Hz. For trains of three stimuli, peak amplitude increased with frequency and saturated at 2 Hz. In some preparations, longer trains evoked polyphasic changes in TEP. Preganglionically evoked cutaneous responses were abolished by (+)-tubocurarine. Postganglionically evoked cutaneous depolarizations were antagonized by phentolamine, but not propranolol. 4. Repetitive preganglionic stimulation of the C pathway ( > 100 at 20 Hz) evoked little change in TEP and did not modulate depolarizations evoked through the B pathway. In nicotine, peptidergic cotransmission was enhanced in the ganglia, and repetitive C pathway stimulation evoked cutaneous depolarizations whose time course mirrored that of the postganglionic peptidergic after-discharge. The after-discharge and associated cutaneous depolarization were blocked by a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist. 5. The results show cutaneous glands are selectively innervated by B neurones and respond to low levels of neural activity. Asynchronous postganglionic firing mediated by peptidergic cotransmission can provide a basis for heterosynaptic interactions between the B and C pathways.

Citations Scopus - 16
1995 Brock JA, McLachlan EM, Jobling P, Lewis RJ, 'Electrical activity in rat tail artery during asynchronous activation of postganglionic nerve terminals by ciguatoxin-1', British Journal of Pharmacology, 116 2213-2220 (1995)

The effects of ciguatoxin-1 (CTX-1) on the membrane potential of smooth muscle cells have been examined in rat proximal tail arteries isolated in vitro. CTX-1 (= 10 pM) increased ... [more]

The effects of ciguatoxin-1 (CTX-1) on the membrane potential of smooth muscle cells have been examined in rat proximal tail arteries isolated in vitro. CTX-1 (= 10 pM) increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory junction potentials (s.ej.ps). At 100¿400 pM, there was also a marked and maintained depolarization (19.7 ± 1.4 mV, n=14, at 400 pM). In 20¿400 pM CTX-1, perivascular stimuli evoked excitatory junction potentials (s.e.j.ps) which were prolonged in time course relative to control. Although threshold and latency of the e.j.p. were not affected by CTX-1 (=400 pM), propagated impulses were blocked at = 100 pM. The spontaneous activity and the depolarization produced by CTX-1 were reduced in the presence of Ca 2+ (0.1 mM)/Mg 2+ (25 mM), ¿-conotoxin (0.1 µm) or Cd 2+ (50¿100 µm) All effects of CTX-1 were abolished by tetrodotoxin (0.3 µm). Raised Ca 2+ (6 mM) reduced the depolarization and spontaneous activity produced by CTX-1. In 400 pM CTX-1, the membrane repolarized (17 ± 3.2 mV, n=4) following the addition of phentolamine (1 µm). S.e.j.ps and e.j.ps were selectively abolished by suramin (1 mM), and the membrane repolarized by 1.3±1.6 mV (n=4). We conclude that CTX-1 releases noradrenaline and ATP by initiating asynchronous discharge of postganglionic perivascular axons. In 100¿400 pM CTX-1, the smooth muscle was depolarized to levels resembling those recorded in this artery during ongoing vasoconstrictor discharge in vivo. 1995 British Pharmacological Society

DOI 10.1111/j.1476-5381.1995.tb15056.x
Citations Scopus - 19
1994 Shen W, Jobling P, Horn JP, 'The sensitivity of nicotinic synapses in bullfrog sympathetic ganglia to a-bungarotoxin and neuronal-bungarotoxin', British Journal of Pharmacology, 113 898-902 (1994)

The sensitivity of nicotinic synapses to a-bungarotoxin (a-Bgt) and neuronal-bungarotoxin (n-Bgt) was measured in the B and C cell systems of bullfrog paravertebral sympathetic ga... [more]

The sensitivity of nicotinic synapses to a-bungarotoxin (a-Bgt) and neuronal-bungarotoxin (n-Bgt) was measured in the B and C cell systems of bullfrog paravertebral sympathetic ganglia 9 and 10 by recording extracellular compound postganglionic action potentials from the rami communicantes. High concentrations (10 µm) of a-Bgt applied for up to 8 h had no effect upon synaptic transmission in either the B or C cell system. Ganglia pretreated with collagenase were also insensitive to a-Bgt. In control experiments on isolated sartorius muscle preparations, nerve-evoked twitches were fully blocked by 30-100nM a-Bgt. Nicotinic transmission in the B and C cell systems was reversibly blocked by 30¿300 nm n-Bgt. Block appeared within 25¿45 min of exposure to toxin and reversed fully with a half-time of 40-80min. This was indistinguishable from washout times after block by 100 µm (+)-tubocurarine. The results demonstrate close parallels between the bungarotoxin sensitivity of neuronal nicotinic receptors mediating ganglionic transmission in functional subclasses of bullfrog sympathetic neurones and the bungarotoxin sensitivity which has been reported for autonomic neurones in avian and mammalian preparations. 1994 British Pharmacological Society

DOI 10.1111/j.1476-5381.1994.tb17077.x
Citations Scopus - 2
1994 Jobling P, 'Electrophysiological events during neuroeffector transmission in the spleen of guinea-pigs and rats.', The Journal of Physiology, 476 153-165 (1994)

Intracellular recordings were made from smooth muscle cells of arterioles and the capsule of the spleen of guinea-pig and rat, and the responses to periarterial or subcapsular ner... [more]

Intracellular recordings were made from smooth muscle cells of arterioles and the capsule of the spleen of guinea-pig and rat, and the responses to periarterial or subcapsular nerve stimulation were recorded. The innervation of the spleen was studied using fluorescence and immunohistochemical techniques. Catecholamine-containing axons were associated with smooth muscle of the splenic capsule, trabeculae, arterioles and amongst cells of the periarteriolar lymphoid sheath. Axons immunoreactive for neuropeptide Y (NPY) and tyrosine hydroxylase were distributed in an identical manner to catecholamine-containing axons, whereas axons immunoreactive for substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide were present at a very low density in spleens from both species. In segments of arterioles, single transmural stimuli evoked excitatory junction potentials (EJPs) of 1-10 mV amplitude. EJPs facilitated during short trains of stimuli (1-10 Hz) and summated at 10 Hz, often initiating a muscle action potential. EJPs persisted in the presence of prazosin (1 microM) and idazoxan (1 microM), but were abolished by the P2x-purinoceptor antagonist suramin (1 mM). Spontaneous depolarizations were observed in smooth muscle cells of arterioles and capsule. Some events in arterioles were observed in the presence of suramin and so may originate postjunctionally independently of transmitter release. As single transmural stimuli failed to evoke a depolarization in capsular smooth muscle, spontaneous depolarizations in this tissue probably also arise postjunctionally. Short trains of high frequency stimuli (10-35 Hz) evoked biphasic depolarizations of capsular smooth muscle cells. The initial component peaked 2.5 s following the onset of stimulation; the second component peaked 15 s following the onset and decayed exponentially with a time constant of 15 s. By fitting a product of exponentials to the second component, it was possible to define the initial component, which decayed with a time constant of around 1.5 s. Neurally evoked depolarizations of capsular smooth muscle were abolished by 1 microM TTX. Blockade of alpha 1-adrenoceptors with prazosin reduced the initial component of the depolarization, whereas alpha 2-adrenoceptor blockade with idazoxan virtually abolished the second component. In some cells a small, faster depolarization persisted after alpha-adrenoceptor blockade. The slow alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated depolarization was identical to that recorded in the rat tail artery and in the guinea-pig mesenteric vein. The data indicate that sympathetic neuroeffector transmission from noradrenergic axons containing NPY to splenic arterial and capsular smooth muscle occur by different mechanisms. © 1994 The Physiological Society

DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.1994.sp020119
Citations Scopus - 10
1993 Jobling P, McLachlan EM, Sah P, 'Calcium induced calcium release is involved in the afterhyperpolarization in one class of guinea pig sympathetic neurone', Journal of the Autonomic Nervous System, 42 251-257 (1993)

The mechanisms underlying two potassium conductances which are activated by Ca 2+ influx during the action potential in ympathetic prevertebral neurones of guinea pigs have been ... [more]

The mechanisms underlying two potassium conductances which are activated by Ca 2+ influx during the action potential in ympathetic prevertebral neurones of guinea pigs have been investigated pharmacologically. One Ca-activated K + conductance, which is present in all mammalian sympathetic postganglionic neurones, is maximal after the action potential and decays exponentially with a time constant of about 130 ms; this conductance was inhibited by apamin (50-100 nM) consistent with the involvement of SK channels. A second Ca-activated K + conductance with much slower kinetics is present in a large subpopulation of coeliac neurones. This conductance was resistant to apamin but markedly inhibited by application of ryanodine (5-20 µM). suggesting that Ca 2+ influx during the action potential triggers release of Ca 2+ from intracellular stores which in turn activates a different class of K + channel. Noradrenaline (100 µM) depressed the second K + conductance selectively. © 1993.

DOI 10.1016/0165-1838(93)90370-A
Citations Scopus - 46
1992 Jobling P, McLachlan EM, 'An electrophysiological study of responses evoked in isolated segments of rat tail artery during growth and maturation.', The Journal of Physiology, 454 83-105 (1992)

1. Intracellular recordings from the smooth muscle of isolated segments of the main caudal artery of rats at various ages between 45 and 150 days postnatal were made in order to r... [more]

1. Intracellular recordings from the smooth muscle of isolated segments of the main caudal artery of rats at various ages between 45 and 150 days postnatal were made in order to relate the spontaneous depolarizations and responses to perivascular stimulation at different levels along the artery to the differences in vessel structure and innervation density during growth of the animals. 2. In the outermost smooth muscle cells close to the neuromuscular junctions, spontaneous depolarizations with fast time courses (spontaneous excitatory junction potentials or SEJPs) were recorded. In cells lying deeper in the media, spontaneous depolarizations had a wide range of time courses and amplitudes, but only a few of those could be attributed to electrotonic attenuation of SEJPs. 3. In arterial segments taken from animals of all ages, stimuli which evoked maximal amplitude excitatory junction potentials (EJPs) 1-2 mm caudal to a suction electrode also evoked neurogenic alpha-depolarizations (NADs) with time to peak of 15 s and duration nearly 1 min. Both responses decreased progressively in amplitude along the length of the artery. NADs were blocked by phentolamine (10(-6) M) or idazoxan (10(-7) M) which were without effects on EJPs. 4. During short trains of stimuli (5 at 1 or 10 Hz), EJPs facilitated but to a lesser extent with distance along the tail. Such trains evoked NADs of greater amplitude than those following a single stimulus; these were often preceded by contractions of the artery which were restricted to the region close to the stimulating electrode. 5. Increasing stimulus voltage led to progressive prolongation of the decay phase of the EJP. After the addition of tetrodotoxin (10(-7) M), or in the presence of reduced Ca2+ and raised Mg2+ concentration, slow depolarizing potentials (SDPs) (with time to peak of 150-300 ms and decay lasting > 2 s) were recorded which were graded in amplitude with stimulus voltage. SDPs were attenuated by increasing Ca2+ concentration to 5 mM. These responses often added to the EJP at supramaximal stimulus voltages. 6. The mean amplitudes of the EJP and NAD declined significantly with age, the former to a greater degree than the latter. These changes may be explained by changes in the electrical properties of the media related to hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells as the animals grew, and emphasize the need to allow for such growth effects in studies of young rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) © 1992 The Physiological Society

DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.1992.sp019255
Citations Scopus - 24
1992 Jobling P, McLachlan EM, Jänig W, Anderson CR, 'Electrophysiological responses in the rat tail artery during reinnervation following lesions of the sympathetic supply.', The Journal of Physiology, 454 107-128 (1992)

1. Responses to perivascular stimuli have been recorded with intracellular microelectrodes from the smooth muscle of isolated segments of the main caudal artery of rats at various... [more]

1. Responses to perivascular stimuli have been recorded with intracellular microelectrodes from the smooth muscle of isolated segments of the main caudal artery of rats at various times between 7 and 128 days after all four collector nerve trunks had been lesioned near the base of the tail at 21 days of age. 2. In proximal segments ( < 40 mm distal to the lesions), excitatory junction potentials (EJPs) and neurogenic alpha-depolarizations (NADs) evoked by stimuli presented via a proximally located suction electrode were similar to those in the same segments of unoperated control animals of the same age. Supramaximal EJPs in these segments decreased in amplitude with age. 3. Stimuli just supramaximal for EJPs in innervated preparations failed to evoke responses in segments farther than 30-40 mm distal to the lesions at any time after the nerves had been cut and 1 cm excised. Higher voltages evoked slow depolarizing potentials (SDPs) which were of longer time course than EJPs. Similar responses occurred in segments over 60 mm distal to the lesions at 20-50 days after the nerves had been frozen, and in all segments sampled over 100 mm distal to nerve lesions. 4. Spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs) were recorded at all depths of the media in denervated segments. These occurred at frequencies similar to those of spontaneous events (including attenuated spontaneous EJPs) in innervated segments. 5. The earliest signs of reinnervation (24-42 days after freeze lesions) consisted of very small amplitude EJPs of normal time course which facilitated markedly during a short train of stimuli (5-10 Hz); these were followed by NADs which were large relative to the amplitudes of the EJPs. Less commonly, small focal EJPs of brief time course (resembling spontaneous EJPs in superficial cells of innervated arteries) were evoked in very restricted regions of the vessel wall. 6. At later times (57-128 days postoperative), six of eight segments located 40-70 mm distal to freeze lesions showed EJPs of nearly control amplitude, but NADs that were larger than in equivalent segments from control animals. In the remaining two cases, reinnervation at this level was similar to that seen at the earliest postoperative times. High stimulus voltages prolonged the decay of EJPs in both control and reinnervated arteries. 7. Sensitivity to exogenous noradrenaline, assessed in terms of membrane depolarization, was increased in both denervated and reinnervated segments. 8. Catecholamine fluorescence disappeared from the arteries at a distance greater than 30-40 mm distal to the site of the nerve lesions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) © 1992 The Physiological Society

DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.1992.sp019256
Citations Scopus - 27
1989 Hirst GDS, Jobling P, 'The distribution of ¿-adrenoceptors and P2 purinoceptors in mesenteric arteries and veins of the guinea-pig', British Journal of Pharmacology, 96 993-999 (1989)

1. Membrane potential changes and contractions were recorded from mesenteric arteries and veins of the guinea-pig, during perivascular nerve stimulation or application of noradren... [more]

1. Membrane potential changes and contractions were recorded from mesenteric arteries and veins of the guinea-pig, during perivascular nerve stimulation or application of noradrenaline or adenosine triphosphate (ATP). 2. After a-adrenoceptor blockade, noradrenaline activated low affinity adrenoceptors (¿-adrenoceptors) causing depolarization and arterial contraction only in the presence of an inhibitor of catecholamine uptake. 3. Noradrenaline did not cause depolarization or contraction of the vein after a-adrenoceptor blockade even after catecholamine uptake was blocked. 4. Adenosine triphosphate caused depolarization and contraction of both arteries and veins. These responses were abolished by a-,ß-,methylene adenosine triphosphate (Me-ATP). 5. Me-ATP abolished rapid excitatory junction potentials (e.j.ps) caused by perivascular nerve stimulation of arteries but had no effect on arterial responses mediated by ¿-adrenoceptors. 6. In veins, perivascular nerve stimulation evoked slow e.j.ps which persisted in the presence of Me-ATP but were abolished after blockade of a-adrenoceptors. 7. The observations indicate that P 2 purinoceptors are present on both mesenteric artery and vein whilst ¿-adrenoceptors are localized near the neuromuscular junction of the artery. However ¿-adrenoceptors do not appear to be directly involved in the generation of arterial e.j.ps.

Citations Scopus - 23
Show 45 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2003 Gibbins IL, Jobling P, Morris JL, 'Functional organisation of peripheral vasomtor pathways', Acta Physilogica Scandinavica (2003) [D1]
Citations Scopus - 24

Conference (23 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Faulkner S, Jobling P, Rowe C, Oldmeadow C, Roselli S, Thorne R, et al., 'CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF PRONGF RECEPTORS IN THYROID CANCER', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Rick Thorne, Hubert Hondermarck, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Attia, Marjorie Walker
2016 Oliveira SMR, Roselli S, Hondermarck H, Jobling P, 'OVARIAN TUMORS PRESENT AUTONOMIC AND SENSORY INNERVATION', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Hubert Hondermarck
2015 Smith K, Dickinson S, Jobling P, Callister R, Graham B, 'Peripheral nerve injury alters the excitability of calretinin positive dorsal horn neurons', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Robert Callister, Brett Graham
2015 Tadros M, Lim R, Hughes D, Jobling P, Brichta A, Callister R, 'Electrical maturation of sensorimotor processing in the human foetus', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Rebecca Lim, Robert Callister
2015 Dickinson S, Smith K, Bigland M, Smith D, Jobling P, Graham B, 'Morphological analysis of microglial and astrocyte populations in the superficial dorsal horn of spinal cord in aged mice', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Douglas Smith, Brett Graham
2015 Oliveira S, Roselli S, Hondermarck H, Jobling P, 'Nerve fibers infiltrate ovarian cancer and may be related to tumor aggressiveness', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Hubert Hondermarck
2015 Duchatel R, Jobling P, Graham B, Harms L, Michie P, Hodgson D, Tooney P, 'Modelling white matter neuron pathology in schizophrenia using maternal immune activation', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Hodgson, Paul Tooney, Brett Graham, Lauren Harms, Pat Michie
2015 Graham B, Smith K, Madden J, Dickinson S, Bigland M, Jobling P, Smith D, 'Characteristics of dorsal horn neuron excitability and synaptic input in aged mice', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Brett Graham
2014 Oliveira SMR, Roselli S, Hondermarck H, Jobling P, 'PERIPHERAL NERVES ARE ASSOCIATED WITH SOME OVARIAN TUMOURS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Hubert Hondermarck
2012 Jobling P, Madden JF, Graham BA, 'Whole cell patch clamp recordings from muscle spindle afferent neurons in intact dorsal root ganglia isolated from mouse', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Brett Graham
2011 Jobling P, Smith K, Madden J, Hickey LR, Graham BA, 'Characterisation of pain behaviour, spinal neurochemistry and glial populations in a mouse antigen-induced arthritis model', Posters. Australian Neuroscience Society 31st Annual Meeting (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Brett Graham
2010 Gravina FS, Van Helden DF, De Oliveira R, Kerr KP, Jobling P, 'Relaxant effects of methanandamide unmasked by indomethacin in the mouse uterus', Australasian Society of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology (ASCEPT) Annual Scientific Meeting, Melbourne, 2010 (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Dirk Vanhelden, Karen Kerr
2010 Nalivaiko E, Beard D, Bondarenko E, Beig MI, Jobling P, Walker FR, et al., 'CHRONIC FOOTSHOCK STRESS CAUSES ENDURING CHANGES IN CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS, WITHOUT PROVOKING HYPERTENSION IN RATS', FASEB JOURNAL (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Eugene Nalivaiko
2009 Gravina FS, Jobling P, Kerr KP, De Oliveira R, Van Helden DF, 'Identification of cannabinoid receptor 1 and the effect of methanandamide on uterine contractions of the mouse uterus', 1st National Symposium on Advances in Urogenital and Gut Research (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Dirk Vanhelden, Karen Kerr
2009 Kerr KP, Jobling P, Gravina FS, Van Helden DF, 'Contractility of the lower uterus and upper vagina in the mouse', 43rd ASCEPT Annual Scientific Meeting: Proceedings (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Karen Kerr, Dirk Vanhelden
2009 Murali SS, Jobling P, 'Effects of neurokinin and cannabinoid receptor activation on the excitability of neurons in pelvic ganglia of female mice', ANS 2009 Abstracts: Posters (2009) [E3]
2008 Anderson WB, Graham BA, Jobling P, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Inhibitory synaptic transmission and cannabinoid effects differ in mouse superficial and deep dorsal horn neurons', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Robert Callister
2008 Jobling P, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'In vivo patch clamp recording of synaptic events evoked in superficial dorsal horn neurons after stimulation of the female reproductive tract in the mouse', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Brett Graham, Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2006 Anderson WB, Graham BA, Jobling P, Lim R, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Glycine receptor diversity in the dorsal horn of the mouse spinal cord', Society for Neuroscience (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Lim, Robert Callister, Alan Brichta, Brett Graham
2006 Jobling P, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'In vivo patch-clamp recording of subthreshold synaptic events evoked in dorsal horn neurons after stimulation of the female reproductive tract in the mouse', Society for Neuroscience (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Robert Callister, Brett Graham, Alan Brichta
2006 Jobling P, 'Synaptic transmission and electrical properties of neurons in pelvic ganglia of female mice', Society for Neuroscience (2006) [E3]
2005 Morris JL, Gibbins IL, Jobling P, 'Sympathetic vasodilation of uterine arteries is amplified by non-cholinergic transmission in pelvic ganglia', FASEB JOURNAL (2005)
2005 Morris JL, Grillett S, Vilimas P, Jobling P, Gibbins IL, 'Peptide release from sensory neurons in primary bronchus is resistant to blockade by botulinum neurotoxin A', FASEB JOURNAL (2005)
Show 20 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 19
Total funding $1,763,337

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20172 grants / $267,471

Targeting Nerves as a New Therapeutic Strategy in Pancreatic Cancer$200,000

Funding body: Maitland Cancer Appeal Committee

Funding body Maitland Cancer Appeal Committee
Project Team Professor Hubert Hondermarck, Doctor Phil Jobling, Professor Marjorie Walker
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1700836
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

Using New Light-Based Approaches to Study Chronic Pain$67,471

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Brett Graham, Doctor Phil Jobling, Ms Kelly Smith
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700526
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20161 grants / $48,677

A novel biomarker and innovative therapeutic strategy for oesophageal cancer$48,677

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Professor Hubert Hondermarck, Professor Marjorie Walker, Doctor Vanessa Wills, Doctor Phil Jobling, Professor John Attia, Professor Robert Rush
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1601109
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20152 grants / $37,000

Electrophysiology rig for the study of schizophrenia-related changes in white matter neurons after maternal infection$22,000

Funding body: Rebecca L Cooper Medical Research Foundation Ltd

Funding body Rebecca L Cooper Medical Research Foundation Ltd
Project Team Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Professor Deborah Hodgson, Emeritus Professor Patricia Michie, Doctor Lauren Harms
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1400999
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Nerves and Neurotrophins as New Therapeutic Targets in Cervical Cancer$15,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Hubert Hondermarck, Doctor Phil Jobling, Professor Marjorie Walker, Ms Janine Lombard, Doctor Jay Pundavela
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501579
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20143 grants / $32,327

Neurophysiological investigation of neurons in the white matter – affects of maternal infection and relevance to Schizophrenia.$15,000

Funding body: Schizophrenia Research Institute

Funding body Schizophrenia Research Institute
Project Team Mr Ryan Duchatel, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1301321
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Vascular adaptation of the newborn: Hydrogen sulphide as a fundamental signalling molecule and novel target for therapy$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Conjoint Professor Ian Wright, Doctor Phil Jobling, Professor Dirk Van Helden
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301409
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Neurobiological Investigation of Interstitial White Matter Neurons in a Maternal Infection Activation Model of Schizophrenia$7,327

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Ian Scott Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1301103
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20131 grants / $35,000

20121 grants / $477,504

Development of peripheral sensory pathways in humans$477,504

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Robert Callister, Professor Alan Brichta, Dr David Hughes, Doctor Phil Jobling
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100102
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20111 grants / $20,000

How do the immune and nervous systems interact in arthritis?$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000987
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20101 grants / $34,000

ABI 7500 Real Time PCR System $34,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Rick Thorne, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Professor Murray Cairns, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Associate Professor Doug Smith, Professor Gordon Burns, Emeritus Professor Leonie Ashman, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Doctor Charles De Bock, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Doctor Martin Horan, Doctor Rebecca Lim, Doctor Severine Roselli, Doctor Larisa Bobrovskaya, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Professor Philip Bolton, Professor Alan Brichta, Professor Robert Callister, Professor Trevor Day, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Professor Manohar Garg, Doctor Phil Jobling, Professor Derek Laver, Associate Professor Eugene Nalivaiko, Emeritus Professor John Rostas
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000055
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20092 grants / $44,644

Neurometer CPT/C$28,435

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Philip Bolton, Professor Robert Callister, Professor Alan Brichta, Professor Robin Callister, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Doctor Phil Jobling
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189845
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Leica VT1200S - Fully automated vibrating blade microtome$16,209

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Robert Callister, Professor Alan Brichta, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Jon Hirst, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Professor Philip Bolton, Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Doctor Angela McPherson, Doctor Rebecca Lim, Doctor Ramatis De Oliveira, Mr Matthew Walsh
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189842
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20081 grants / $24,069

Recovery of the balance system following injury$24,069

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Alan Brichta, Professor Robert Callister, Professor Philip Bolton, Doctor Phil Jobling, Doctor Rebecca Lim
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188471
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20071 grants / $20,000

3D Imaging Software/Work station$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Pow, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Doctor Phil Jobling, Professor Derek Laver
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0188026
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20061 grants / $16,000

How does the nervous system process painful information from the uterus$16,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Phil Jobling
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186103
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20041 grants / $14,000

Studying the connections between nerve cells which control reproductive tissue$14,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Phil Jobling
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0185001
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20001 grants / $692,645

Neurotransmission in functionally distinct vasodilator pathways$692,645

Funding body: National Health & Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health & Medical Research Council
Project Team

JL Morris

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed4
Current11

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD2.6

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Neuro-Cancer Crosstalk in Pancreatic Cancer PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Vascular Pathologies Associated With Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD) PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Neurotrophic growth factors and their receptors as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human cancers PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Nerve Infiltration and its Impact in Breast and Prostate Cancer PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD A Novel Biomarker and Innovative Therapeutic Strategy for Oesophageal Cancer PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Nerve Dependence in Human Cancers PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Novel Strategies to Treat Reproductive Tract Infection and Subsequent Infertility PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Effects of maternal immune activation on adult brain neurobiology PhD (Experimental Pharmacol), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD The Nerve-Cancer Connection in Ovarian Cancer PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD The Role of Calretinin Positive Interneurons in Spinal Sensory Coding PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2008 Honours Modulation of neuronal excitability in neurons which control pelvic organs. Pharmacology, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD In Vivo Investigations into the Effects of Pathological Conditions Including Diabetes on Lymphatic Function and Wound Healing PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD Contractile Properties of the Female Reproductive Tract PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2005 Honours A study of the location and Characteristics of Neurons with Input from Deep Neck Structures Biol Sc Not Elsewhere Classifd, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2003 Honours Mechanisms of Neuropeptide Release from Sensory Neurons Health Not Elswhere Classified, Flinders University Co-Supervisor
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News

Hubert Hondermarck

Study strikes a nerve with the spread of cancer

March 27, 2017

A group led by University of Newcastle biochemistry researcher Hubert Hondermarck has found parallels between tissue regeneration, nerve growth and tumour development, confirming for the first time that the nervous system is strongly implicated in the onset and spread of cancer.

Dr Phil Jobling

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Human Physiology

Contact Details

Email phillip.jobling@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5126
Fax (02) 4921 7406
Link UoN Blogs

Office

Room MS406
Building Medical Sciences
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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