Dr Melissa Tadros

Dr Melissa Tadros

Lecturer

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy

The science of sensation

Dr Melissa Tadros’ research is providing new insights into how nerve signals travel from the body to the brain and govern sensory discrimination.

Image of Melissa Tadros

Dr Melissa Tadros is curious about sensory pathways, specifically, what happens when they are disrupted. Crucial to navigating our environment—distinguishing warm from hot, or a tickle from an itch—disrupted sensory pathways can have devastating effects.

“My research seeks to understand how the signals from our environment are passed onto our brain, and how the brain tells our bodies what to do in response to this information.

“The ability to sense a cool summer breeze, an insect crawling on the skin, a full stomach or food that is too hot to eat depends on this carefully organised sensory pathway.

“When it is disrupted, the consequences can be serious. Imagine if the touch of your clothes caused inexplicable pain. Or if you were unable to determine whether a drink was too hot to consume.”

Under the microscope

Melissa uses highly advanced neurological techniques to examine sensory pathways in detail. This allows her to investigate the kinds of signals sent from the body to the brain via the spinal cord, and how damaged cells behave.

Melissa is particularly interested in what happens to these signals during early development or when they’re damaged by infection or stress. To explore this further, she has teamed up with Associate Professor Jay Horvat from the Respiratory Immunology Research Group, located at the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI), and Professor Deborah Hodgson, the University’s Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research and Innovation) and Director of University of Newcastle’s Laboratory of Neuroimmunology. Their collaborative studies aim to better understand the long-term implications of neonatal infections.

“We often don’t think about the long-lasting effects of infections, but when these infections occur early in development, they can have significant impacts on our nerves that last well into adulthood.”

Taking research to the classroom

As an educator, Melissa can offer her students access to the latest research progress and innovation. She is also gifted at explaining complex scientific processes in a way that is palatable for allied health undergraduates—a powerful and valuable trait.

“Being at the forefront of neuroscience research means I have a wide knowledge base upon which to design my teaching resources. This helps me to design meaningful, and hopefully interesting, classes for my students.

“I like seeing students grasp concepts and build their foundations early in their chosen program. It’s critically important to have a foundational knowledge of the human body and all its complexities in order to be able to adequately treat patients in any profession.”

Developing new strategies and treatments

In 2018, Melissa participated in the University’s ThinkWell Early and Mid-Career Women’s Development Program, facilitated through the Faculty of Health and Medicine's Gender Equity Committee. Soon after, she was awarded the University’s covetable Women in Research Fellowship for 2019. The fellowship is helping to launch Melissa into the next phase of her career: expanding her research team and continuing to connect and learn from eminent female professors.

“Understanding neuronal networks is fundamental to working out how the brain communicates with the body, and vice versa. If we don’t know how things work in a “normal” individual, it is impossible to accurately develop strategies and treatments for disease intervention and prevention.

“I aim to spend the next few years of my career building and developing a team of engaged and dedicated scientists who can contribute to answering these overarching questions.”

The science of sensation

Dr Melissa Tadros’ research is providing new insights into how nerve signals travel from the body to the brain and govern sensory discrimination.Dr Melissa Tadros is curious about sensory pathways, specifically, what happens when they are disrupted. Crucial to navigating…

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Career Summary

Biography

The ability to sense a cool summer breeze, an insect crawling on the skin, a full stomach or food that is too hot to eat depends upon a carefully organized sensory pathway from the body to the brain. When this pathway is disrupted, the consequences can be devastating. 

 

Dr Melissa Tadros uses sophisticated neurological techniques to examine this sensory pathway in high resolution, with a main focus on how early life events, including infection, can change the developmental plan for the nerves along this passage. 

 

In parallel with her research, Melissa has a passion for community engagement and the dissemination of knowledge across platforms. She has a wealth of teaching experience, and is known for delivering quality anatomy courses to first year students of allied health programs. Melissa has also been an integral organiser for a number of local and national conferences. 

 

Melissa has a PhD in Neuroscience (University of Newcastle, 2011) and postgraduate qualifications in tertiary education. She brings this wide variety of experiences together to provide mentoring and guidance for younger members of her research team.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences (Hons), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Brainstem
  • Developmental neurobiology
  • Early-life events
  • Intrinsic excitability
  • Motoneurons
  • Motor control
  • Neurophysiology
  • Neuroscience
  • Pain
  • Sensory neurobiology
  • Spinal cord

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110603 Motor Control 20
110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified 50
111699 Medical Physiology not elsewhere classified 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
Research Associate University of Newcastle
Faculty of Health and Medicine
Australia
Casual Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (17 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Karshikoff B, Tadros MA, Mackey S, Zouikr I, 'Neuroimmune modulation of pain across the developmental spectrum', Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 28 85-92 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Today's treatment for chronic pain is inadequate, and novel targets need to be identified. This requires a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in pain sens... [more]

© 2019 Today's treatment for chronic pain is inadequate, and novel targets need to be identified. This requires a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in pain sensitization and chronification. In this review, we discuss how peripheral inflammation, as occurs during an infection, modulates the central pain system. In rodents, neonatal inflammation leads to increased pain sensitivity in adulthood by priming immune components both peripherally and centrally. The excitability of neurons in the spinal cord is also altered by neonatal inflammation and may add to pain sensitization later in life. In adult humans, inflammation modulates pain sensitivity as well, partly by affecting the activity in brain areas that process and regulate pain signals. Low-grade inflammation is common in clinical populations both peripherally and centrally, and priming of the immune system has also been suggested in some pain populations. The nociceptive and immune systems are primed by infections and inflammation. The early life programming of nociceptive responses following exposure to infections or inflammation will define individual differences in adult pain perception. Immune-to-brain mechanisms and neuroimmune pathway need further investigation as they may serve both as predictors and therapeutic targets in chronic pain.

DOI 10.1016/j.cobeha.2019.01.010
2019 Mattei C, Lim R, Drury H, Nasr B, Li Z, Tadros MA, et al., 'Generation of Vestibular Tissue-Like organoids From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Using the Rotary Cell Culture System', FRONTIERS IN CELL AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, 7 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fcell.2019.00025
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Lim
2018 Tadros MA, Graham BA, Callister RJ, 'Moving functional classification of dorsal horn neurons from art to science', JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-LONDON, 596 1543-1544 (2018)
DOI 10.1113/JP275870
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Robert Callister, Brett Graham
2018 Tadros MA, Zouikr I, Hodgson DM, Callister RJ, 'Excitability of rat superficial dorsal horn neurons following a neonatal immune challenge', Frontiers in Neurology, 9 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fneur.2018.00743
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Deborah Hodgson, Robert Callister
2016 Tadros MA, Fuglevand AJ, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Intrinsic excitability differs between murine hypoglossal and spinal motoneurons.', Journal of neurophysiology, 115 2672-2680 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1152/jn.01114.2015
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2015 Tadros MA, Lim R, Hughes DI, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Electrical maturation of spinal neurons in the human fetus: Comparison of ventral and dorsal horn', Journal of Neurophysiology, 114 2661-2671 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 the American Physiological Society. The spinal cord is critical for modifying and relaying sensory information to, and motor commands from, higher centers in the central ne... [more]

© 2015 the American Physiological Society. The spinal cord is critical for modifying and relaying sensory information to, and motor commands from, higher centers in the central nervous system to initiate and maintain contextually relevant locomotor responses. Our understanding of how spinal sensorimotor circuits are established during in utero development is based largely on studies in rodents. In contrast, there is little functional data on the development of sensory and motor systems in humans. Here, we use patch-clamp electrophysiology to examine the development of neuronal excitability in human fetal spinal cords (10¿18 wk gestation; WG). Transverse spinal cord slices (300 µm thick) were prepared, and recordings were made, from visualized neurons in either the ventral (VH) or dorsal horn (DH) at 32°C. Action potentials (APs) could be elicited in VH neurons throughout the period examined, but only after 16 WG in DH neurons. At this age, VH neurons discharged multiple APs, whereas most DH neurons discharged single APs. In addition, at 16¿18 WG, VH neurons also displayed larger AP and after-hyperpolarization amplitudes than DH neurons. Between 10 and 18 WG, the intrinsic properties of VH neurons changed markedly, with input resistance decreasing and AP and after-hyperpolarization amplitudes increasing. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that VH motor circuitry matures more rapidly than the DH circuits that are involved in processing tactile and nociceptive information.

DOI 10.1152/jn.00682.2015
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister, Rebecca Lim
2015 Tadros MA, Farrell KE, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Properties of sodium currents in neonatal and young adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons', Molecular Pain, 11 (2015) [C1]

© Tadros et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: Superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons process nociceptive information and their excitability is partly determined by the prop... [more]

© Tadros et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: Superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons process nociceptive information and their excitability is partly determined by the properties of voltage-gated sodium channels. Recently, we showed the excitability and action potential properties of mouse SDH neurons change markedly during early postnatal development. Here we compare sodium currents generated in neonate (P0-5) and young adult (=P21) SDH neurons. Results: Whole cell recordings were obtained from lumbar SDH neurons in transverse spinal cord slices (CsF internal, 32°C). Fast activating and inactivating TTX-sensitive inward currents were evoked by depolarization from a holding potential of 100mV. Poorly clamped currents, based on a deflection in the IV relationship at potentials between 60 and 50mV, were not accepted for analysis. Current density and decay time increased significantly between the first and third weeks of postnatal development, whereas time to peak was similar at both ages. This was accompanied by more subtle changes in activation range and steady state inactivation. Recovery from inactivation was slower and TTX-sensitivity was reduced in young adult neurons. Conclusions: Our study suggests sodium channel expression changes markedly during early postnatal development in mouse SDH neurons. The methods employed in this study can now be applied to future investigations of spinal cord sodium channel plasticity in murine pain models.

DOI 10.1186/s12990-015-0014-5
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Robert Callister, Alan Brichta
2015 Tadros MA, Farrell KE, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Properties of sodium currents in neonatal and young adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons.', Molecular pain, 11 17 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s12990-015-0014-5
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Brett Graham, Robert Callister
2014 Tadros MA, Farrell KE, Schofield PR, Brichta AM, Graham BA, Fuglevand AJ, Callister RJ, 'Intrinsic and synaptic homeostatic plasticity in motoneurons from mice with glycine receptor mutations', Journal of Neurophysiology, 111 1487-1498 (2014) [C1]

Inhibitory synaptic inputs to hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs) are important for modulating excitability in brainstem circuits. Here we ask whether reduced inhibition, as occurs in t... [more]

Inhibitory synaptic inputs to hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs) are important for modulating excitability in brainstem circuits. Here we ask whether reduced inhibition, as occurs in three murine mutants with distinct naturally occurring mutations in the glycine receptor (GlyR), leads to intrinsic and/or synaptic homeostatic plasticity. Whole cell recordings were obtained from HMs in transverse brainstem slices from wild-type (wt), spasmodic (spd), spastic (spa), and oscillator (ot) mice (C57Bl/6, approximately postnatal day 21). Passive and action potential (AP) properties in spd and ot HMs were similar to wt. In contrast, spa HMs had lower input resistances, more depolarized resting membrane potentials, higher rheobase currents, smaller AP amplitudes, and slower afterhyperpolarization current decay times. The excitability of HMs, assessed by "gain" in injected current/firing-frequency plots, was similar in all strains whereas the incidence of rebound spiking was increased in spd. The difference between recruitment and derecruitment current (i.e., ¿I) for AP discharge during ramp current injection was more negative in spa and ot. GABAA miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSC) amplitude was increased in spa and ot but not spd, suggesting diminished glycinergic drive leads to compensatory adjustments in the other major fast inhibitory synaptic transmitter system in these mutants. Overall, our data suggest long-term reduction in glycinergic drive to HMs results in changes in intrinsic and synaptic properties that are consistent with homeostatic plasticity in spa and ot but not in spd. We propose such plasticity is an attempt to stabilize HM output, which succeeds in spa but fails in ot. © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

DOI 10.1152/jn.00728.2013
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Brett Graham, Robert Callister, Alan Brichta
2014 Zouikr I, Tadros MA, Barouei J, Beagley KW, Clifton VL, Callister RJ, Hodgson DM, 'Altered nociceptive, endocrine, and dorsal horn neuron responses in rats following a neonatal immune challenge', PSYCHONEUROENDOCRINOLOGY, 41 1-12 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2013.11.016
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Robert Callister, Deborah Hodgson
2014 Lim R, Drury HR, Tadros MA, Callister RJ, Brichta AM, Camp AJ, 'Preliminary Characterization of Voltage-Activated Whole-Cell Currents in Developing Human Vestibular Hair Cells and Calyx Afferent Terminals', Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, (2014) [C1]

We present preliminary functional data from human vestibular hair cells and primary afferent calyx terminals during fetal development. Whole-cell recordings were obtained from hai... [more]

We present preliminary functional data from human vestibular hair cells and primary afferent calyx terminals during fetal development. Whole-cell recordings were obtained from hair cells or calyx terminals in semi-intact cristae prepared from human fetuses aged between 11 and 18 weeks gestation (WG). During early fetal development (11-14 WG), hair cells expressed whole-cell conductances that were qualitatively similar but quantitatively smaller than those observed previously in mature rodent type II hair cells. As development progressed (15-18 WG), peak outward conductances increased in putative type II hair cells but did not reach amplitudes observed in adult human hair cells. Type I hair cells express a specific low-voltage activating conductance, G. A similar current was first observed at 15 WG but remained relatively small, even at 18 WG. The presence of a "collapsing" tail current indicates a maturing type I hair cell phenotype and suggests the presence of a surrounding calyx afferent terminal. We were also able to record from calyx afferent terminals in 15-18 WG cristae. In voltage clamp, these terminals exhibited fast inactivating inward as well as slower outward conductances, and in current clamp, discharged a single action potential during depolarizing steps. Together, these data suggest the major functional characteristics of type I and type II hair cells and calyx terminals are present by 18 WG. Our study also describes a new preparation for the functional investigation of key events that occur during maturation of human vestibular organs. © 2014 The Author(s).

DOI 10.1007/s10162-014-0471-y
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Robert Callister, Rebecca Lim, Alan Brichta
2014 Harris BM, Hughes DI, Bolton PS, Tadros MA, Callister RJ, Graham BA, 'Contrasting alterations to synaptic and intrinsic properties in upper-cervical superficial dorsal horn neurons following acute neck muscle inflammation', MOLECULAR PAIN, 10 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1744-8069-10-25
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Brett Graham, Robert Callister, Philip Bolton
2013 Zouikr I, Tadros MA, Clifton VL, Beagley KW, Hodgson DM, 'Low Formalin Concentrations Induce Fine-Tuned Responses That Are Sex and Age-Dependent: A Developmental Study', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0053384
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Deborah Hodgson
2012 Tadros MA, Harris B, Anderson WB, Brichta AM, Graham BA, Callister RJ, 'Are all spinal segments equal: Intrinsic membrane properties of superficial dorsal horn neurons in the developing and mature mouse spinal cord', Journal of Physiology, 590 2409-2425 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Robert Callister, Alan Brichta, Brett Graham
2011 Graham BA, Tadros MA, Schofield PR, Callister RJ, 'Probing glycine receptor stoichiometry in superficial dorsal horn neurones using the spasmodic mouse', Journal of Physiology, 589 2459-2474 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.2011.206326
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Robert Callister, Brett Graham
2011 Pringle KG, Tadros MA, Callister RJ, Lumbers ER, 'The expression and localization of the human placental prorenin/renin-angiotensin system throughout pregnancy: Roles in trophoblast invasion and angiogenesis?', Placenta, 32 956-962 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 57Web of Science - 52
Co-authors Robert Callister, Kirsty Pringle, E Lumbers
2009 Tadros MA, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Evidence for a critical period in the development of excitability and potassium currents in mouse lumbar superficial dorsal horn neurons', Journal of Neurophysiology, 101 1800-1812 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1152/jn.90755.2008
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Brett Graham, Robert Callister
Show 14 more journal articles

Conference (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Tadros M, Lim R, Hughes D, Jobling P, Brichta A, Callister R, 'Electrical maturation of sensorimotor processing in the human foetus', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, Cairns, AUSTRALIA (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Phillip Jobling, Alan Brichta, Robert Callister, Rebecca Lim
2014 Lim R, Drury HR, Camp AJ, Tadros MA, Callister RJ, Brichta AM, 'Anatomical and physiological characterisation of human vestibular hair cells', Journal of Vestibular Research: Equilibrium and Orientation: an international journal of experimental and clinical vestibular science, Buenos Aires, Argentina (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Lim, Robert Callister, Alan Brichta
2013 Tadros MA, Fuglevand AJ, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Electrophysiological properties of cranial and spinal motor neurons in mice', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2012 Zouikr I, Tadros MA, Callister RJ, Nakamura T, Beagley K, Clifton V, Hodgson DM, 'Neonatal lipopolysaccharide exposure alters nociception', Abstracts of the 21st Annual Meeting of the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society, Kona, Hawaii (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Hodgson, Robert Callister
2012 Tadros MA, Lim R, Graham BA, Hughes DI, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Excitability of human ventral horn neurons during early foetal development', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting, Gold Coast, Queensland (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Lim, Brett Graham, Robert Callister, Alan Brichta
2012 Zouikr I, Tadros MA, Callister RJ, Nakamura T, Beagley K, Hodgson DM, 'Long-term impact of neonatal exposure to a bacterial mimetic on nociception', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting, Gold Coast, Queensland (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Hodgson, Robert Callister
2012 Lim R, Camp AJ, Tadros MA, Drury HR, Callister RJ, Brichta AM, 'Whole cell conductances of developing human hair cells', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting, Gold Coast, Queensland (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robert Callister, Alan Brichta, Rebecca Lim
2012 Lim R, Camp AJ, Drury HR, Tadros MA, Callister RJ, Brichta AM, 'Characterisation of developing human hair cells', Association for Research in Otolaryngology, San Diego, California (2012)
Co-authors Robert Callister, Rebecca Lim, Alan Brichta
2012 Tadros MA, Jack R, Lim R, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Hughes DI, Callister RJ, 'Sensorimotor processing in the spinal cord of the developing human fetus', Society for Neuroscience, New Orleans, USA (2012)
Co-authors Brett Graham, Robert Callister, Rebecca Lim, Alan Brichta
2012 Lim R, Camp AJ, Tadros MA, Drury HR, Callister RJ, Brichta AM, 'Whole cell conductances of developing human hair cells. Mon 047', 32nd Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society, Gold Coast, Queensland (2012)
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister, Rebecca Lim
2011 Tadros MA, Lim R, Graham BA, Hughes DI, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Excitability of human ventral horn neurons during early foetal development', Poster Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting, Auckland, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Rebecca Lim, Robert Callister, Brett Graham
2009 Tadros MA, Anderson WB, Graham BA, Callister RJ, 'Responses to current injection differ between mouse cervical, thoracic and lumbar superficial dorsal horn neurons', ANS 2009 Abstracts: Posters, Canberra, ACT (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Robert Callister, Brett Graham
Show 9 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 7
Total funding $82,873

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20191 grants / $29,642

2018 Women in Research Fellowship$29,642

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Melissa Tadros
Scheme Women in Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1801232
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20182 grants / $9,081

Immune infiltration of the Gut-Brain-Axis following neonatal inflammation$6,990

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle
Scheme Faculty Strategic Seed Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Faculty of Health and Medicine Publication Support $2,091

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Scheme Faculty Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20152 grants / $39,650

Development of a laboratory model to study adult motoneurons$36,650

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Melissa Tadros, Professor Robert Callister
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501432
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

Modelling sensory neuron development in the human$3,000

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant University of Newcastle
Scheme UON Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20142 grants / $4,500

Society for Neuroscience Chapter Award$3,000

Funding body: Society for Neuroscience

Funding body Society for Neuroscience
Scheme Chapter Travel Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Society for Neuroscience, Washington DC USA, 15 - 19 November 2014$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Melissa Tadros
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400718
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Examining Changes in the Neural Control of Respiration Following Early Life Inflammation PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD The Impact of Perinatal Immune Challenge and Adolescent Stress on Gastrointesinal Inflammation and Integrity and the Relationship with Anxiety PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

Female researchers sponsored in academic journey

November 22, 2018

Seven promising University of Newcastle researchers are helping to pave the way for their female peers, as recipients of a Women in Research (WIR) Fellowship designed to support the development of their academic careers.

Dr Melissa Tadros

Positions

Lecturer
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Research Associate
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Lecturer
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email melissa.tadros@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5609

Office

Room MSB 3.12
Building Medical Sciences Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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