Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King

Conjoint Associate Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
Dr Bruce King is a Staff Specialist, Paediatric Endocrinology, at John Hunter Hospital and Conjoint Senior Lecturer at the University School of Medicine and Public Health.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery, University of Queensland

Keywords

  • Biomolecular Chemistry
  • Medicinal Chemistry

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 30
060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified 35
060499 Genetics not elsewhere classified 35
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (31 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Paterson MA, Smart CEM, Lopez PE, Mcelduff P, Attia J, Morbey C, King BR, 'Influence of dietary protein on postprandial blood glucose levels in individuals with Type¿1 diabetes mellitus using intensive insulin therapy', Diabetic Medicine, 33 592-598 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Diabetes UK.Aim: To determine the effects of protein alone (independent of fat and carbohydrate) on postprandial glycaemia in individuals with Type¿1 diabetes mellitus us... [more]

© 2016 Diabetes UK.Aim: To determine the effects of protein alone (independent of fat and carbohydrate) on postprandial glycaemia in individuals with Type¿1 diabetes mellitus using intensive insulin therapy. Methods: Participants with Type¿1 diabetes mellitus aged 7-40¿years consumed six 150¿ml whey isolate protein drinks [0¿g (control), 12.5, 25, 50, 75 and 100] and two 150¿ml glucose drinks (10 and 20¿g) without insulin, in randomized order over 8¿days, 4¿h after the evening meal. Continuous glucose monitoring was used to assess postprandial glycaemia. Results: Data were collected from 27 participants. Protein loads of 12.5 and 50¿g did not result in significant postprandial glycaemic excursions compared with control (water) throughout the 300¿min study period (P¿>¿0.05). Protein loads of 75 and 100¿g resulted in lower glycaemic excursions than control in the 60-120¿min postprandial interval, but higher excursions in the 180-300¿min interval. In comparison with 20¿g glucose, the large protein loads resulted in significantly delayed and sustained glucose excursions, commencing at 180¿min and continuing to 5¿h. Conclusions: Seventy-five grams or more of protein alone significantly increases postprandial glycaemia from 3 to 5¿h in people with Type¿1 diabetes mellitus using intensive insulin therapy. The glycaemic profiles resulting from high protein loads differ significantly from the excursion from glucose in terms of time to peak glucose and duration of the glycaemic excursion. This research supports recommendations for insulin dosing for large amounts of protein.

DOI 10.1111/dme.13011
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Bruce King, John Attia
2016 Wu MK, de Kock L, Conwell LS, Stewart CJ, King BR, Choong CS, et al., 'Functional characterization of multiple DICER1 mutations in an adolescent.', Endocr Relat Cancer, 23 L1-L5 (2016)
DOI 10.1530/ERC-15-0460
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Bruce King
2015 Bell KJ, King BR, Shafat A, Smart CE, 'The relationship between carbohydrate and the mealtime insulin dose in type 1 diabetes', Journal of Diabetes and its Complications, 29 1323-1329 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.A primary focus of the nutritional management of type 1 diabetes has been on matching prandial insulin therapy with carbohydrate amount c... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.A primary focus of the nutritional management of type 1 diabetes has been on matching prandial insulin therapy with carbohydrate amount consumed. Different methods exist to quantify carbohydrate including counting in one gram increments, 10 g portions or 15 g exchanges. Clinicians have assumed that counting in one gram increments is necessary to precisely dose insulin and optimize postprandial control. Carbohydrate estimations in portions or exchanges have been thought of as inadequate because they may result in less precise matching of insulin dose to carbohydrate amount. However, studies examining the impact of errors in carbohydrate quantification on postprandial glycemia challenge this commonly held view. In addition it has been found that a single mealtime bolus of insulin can cover a range of carbohydrate intake without deterioration in postprandial control. Furthermore, limitations exist in the accuracy of the nutrition information panel on a food label. This article reviews the relationship between carbohydrate quantity and insulin dose, highlighting limitations in the evidence for a linear association. These insights have significant implications for patient education and mealtime insulin dose calculations.

DOI 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2015.08.014
Co-authors Bruce King
2015 Paterson M, Bell KJ, O Connell SM, Smart CE, Shafat A, King B, 'The Role of Dietary Protein and Fat in Glycaemic Control in Type 1 Diabetes: Implications for Intensive Diabetes Management', Current Diabetes Reports, 15 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, The Author(s).A primary focus of the management of type 1 diabetes has been on matching prandial insulin therapy with carbohydrate amount consumed. However, even with the... [more]

© 2015, The Author(s).A primary focus of the management of type 1 diabetes has been on matching prandial insulin therapy with carbohydrate amount consumed. However, even with the introduction of more flexible intensive insulin regimes, people with type 1 diabetes still struggle to achieve optimal glycaemic control. More recently, dietary fat and protein have been recognised as having a significant impact on postprandial blood glucose levels. Fat and protein independently increase the postprandial glucose excursions and together their effect is additive. This article reviews how the fat and protein in a meal impact the postprandial glycaemic response and discusses practical approaches to managing this in clinical practice. These insights have significant implications for patient education, mealtime insulin dose calculations and dosing strategies.

DOI 10.1007/s11892-015-0630-5
Co-authors Bruce King
2015 Bell KJ, Smart CE, Steil GM, Brand-Miller JC, King B, Wolpert HA, 'Impact of Fat, Protein, and Glycemic Index on Postprandial Glucose Control in Type 1 Diabetes: Implications for Intensive Diabetes Management in the Continuous Glucose Monitoring Era', DIABETES CARE, 38 1008-1015 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.2337/dc15-0100
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Bruce King
2015 Goodwin GC, Medioli AM, Carrasco DS, King BR, Fu Y, 'A fundamental control limitation for linear positive systems with application to Type 1 diabetes treatment', Automatica, 55 73-77 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.automatica.2015.02.041
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Bruce King, Graham Goodwin
2015 Anderson D, Phelan H, Jones K, Smart C, Oldmeadow C, King B, Crock P, 'Evaluation of a novel continuous glucose monitoring guided system for adjustment of insulin dosing - PumpTune: A randomized controlled trial', Pediatric Diabetes, (2015)

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.Objective: Retrospective continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) can guide insulin pump adjustments, however, interpr... [more]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.Objective: Retrospective continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) can guide insulin pump adjustments, however, interpretation of data and recommending new pump settings is complex and subjective. We aimed to compare the safety and glycaemic profiles of children after their diabetologist or a novel algorithm (PumpTune) adjusted their insulin pump settings. Research design and methods: In a randomized cross-over trial of 22 patients aged 6-14yr with type 1 diabetes with mean Hba1c 7.4% (57mmol/mol) using CSII, CGM was used over two periods each of 6.5d to assess percentage time glucose remained within, above and below 3.9-10.0mmol/L. Before the start of one period pump settings were adjusted by the patient's diabetologist, and before the other insulin pump settings were adjusted by PumpTune. Results: A total of 63.4% of the sensor glucose levels were within target range with PumpTune settings and 57.4% were within range with the clinician settings (p=0.016). The time spent above target range with PumpTune was 26.9% and with clinician settings was 33.5% (p=0.021). The time spent below target range with PumpTune was 9.7% and with clinician settings was 9.2% (p=0.77). The mean number of times when a sensor glucose level <2.75mmol/L was recorded with PumpTune settings was 2.9 compared with 3.7 with clinician settings (p=0.39). There were no serious adverse outcomes and no difference in parent-assessed satisfaction. Conclusions: Automated insulin pump adjustment with PumpTune is feasible and warrants testing in a larger more varied population over a longer time. In this well-controlled group of children, PumpTune achieved a more favorable glucose profile.

DOI 10.1111/pedi.12332
Co-authors Bruce King, Christopher Oldmeadow
2014 Lopez PE, King BR, Goss PW, Chockalingam G, 'Bubble formation occurs in insulin pumps in response to changes in ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure but not as a result of vibration.', BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care, 2 e000036 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjdrc-2014-000036
Co-authors Bruce King
2014 Lopez P, Smart C, Morbey C, McElduff P, Paterson M, King BR, 'Extended insulin boluses cannot control postprandial glycemia as well as a standard bolus in children and adults using insulin pump therapy.', BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care, 2 1-6 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjdrc-2014-000050
Co-authors Bruce King
2013 Smart CEM, Evans M, O'Connell SM, McElduff P, Lopez PE, Jones TW, et al., 'Both Dietary Protein and Fat Increase Postprandial Glucose Excursions in Children With Type 1 Diabetes, and the Effect Is Additive', DIABETES CARE, 36 3897-3902 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.2337/dc13-1195
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Bruce King
2012 Smart CE, King BR, McElduff P, Collins CE, 'In children using intensive insulin therapy, a 20-g variation in carbohydrate amount significantly impacts on postprandial glycaemia', Diabetic Medicine, 29 E21-E24 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Clare Collins, Bruce King
2012 Bandara DMWS, King BR, Howard NJ, Verge CF, Jack MM, Govind N, et al., 'A diabetes awareness campaign prevents diabetic ketoacidosis in children at their initial presentation with type 1 diabetes', Pediatric Diabetes, 13 647-651 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Bruce King
2011 King BR, Goss PW, Paterson MA, Crock PA, Anderson DG, 'Hitting the dartboard from 40,000 feet: A better chance with your eyes open!', Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, 13 1075-1076 (2011) [C3]
Co-authors Bruce King
2011 King BR, Goss PW, Paterson MA, Crock PA, Anderson DG, 'Changes in altitude cause unintended insulin delivery from insulin pumps', Diabetes Care, 34 1932-1933 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.2337/dc11-0139
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Bruce King
2010 Smart CE, Ross K, Edge JA, King BR, McElduff P, Collins CE, 'Can children with Type 1 diabetes and their caregivers estimate the carbohydrate content of meals and snacks?', Diabetic Medicine, 27 348-353 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2010.02945.x
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Clare Collins, Bruce King
2009 Smart CE, Ross K, Edge JA, Collins CE, Colyvas KJ, King BR, 'Children and adolescents on intensive insulin therapy maintain postprandial glycaemic control without precise carbohydrate counting', Diabetic Medicine, 26 279-285 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2009.02669.x
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Bruce King, Clare Collins, Kim Colyvas
2008 Ryan RL, King BR, Anderson DG, Attia JR, Collins CE, Smart CE, 'Influence of and optimal insulin therapy for a low-glycemic index meal in children with type 1 diabetes receiving intensive insulin therapy', Diabetes Care, 31 1485-1490 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.2337/dc08-0331
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Clare Collins, John Attia, Bruce King
2007 King BR, Nicholson RC, 'Advances in understanding corticotrophin-releasing hormone gene expression', Frontiers in Bioscience, 12 581-590 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.2741/2084
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Bruce King
2006 Shipman KL, Robinson PJ, King BR, Smith R, Nicholson RC, 'Identification of a family of DNA-binding proteins with homology to RNA splicing factors', Biochemistry and Cell Biology-Biochimie Et Biologie Cellulaire, 84 9-19 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1139/o05-139
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Roger Smith, Bruce King
2004 Ni X, Hou Y, King BR, Tang X, Read MA, Smith R, Nicholson RC, 'Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Down-Regulation of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Gene Expression Is Dependant on a Cyclic Adenosine 3', 5'-Monophosphate Syncytiotrophoblast Cells', The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 89 2312-2318 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1210/jc.2003-030948
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Bruce King, Roger Smith
2004 Smith CJ, Crock PA, King BR, Meldrum CJ, Scott R, 'Phenotype-Genotype Correlations in a Series of Wolfram Syndrome Families', Diabetes Care, 27 2003-2009 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.2337/diacare.27.8.2003
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 39
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Bruce King
2004 Nicholson RC, King BR, Smith R, 'Complex Regulatory Interactions Control CRH Gene Expression', Frontiers in Bioscience, 9 32-39 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.2741/1204
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Bruce King, Roger Smith
2002 Ni X, Nicholson RC, King B, Chan EC, Read M, Smith R, 'Estrogen Represses whereas the Estrogen-Antagonist ICI 182780 Stimulates Placental CRH Gene Expression', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 87(8) 3774-3778 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Bruce King, Roger Smith
2002 King B, Smith R, Nicholson RC, 'Novel glucocorticoid and cAMP interactions on the CRH gene promoter', Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, 194 19-28 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 54
Co-authors Roger Smith, Bruce King
2001 King BR, Smith R, Nicholson RC, 'The regulation of human corticotrophin-releasing hormone gene expression in the placenta (vol 22, pg 795, 2001)', PEPTIDES, 22 1939-+ (2001)
DOI 10.1016/S0196-9781(01)00485-5
Co-authors Roger Smith, Bruce King
2001 King BR, Smith R, Nicholson RC, 'The regulation of human corticotrophin-releasing hormone gene expression in the placenta.', Peptides, 22 1941-1947 (2001)

Corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a 41 amino acid neuropeptide that is expressed in the hypothalamus and the human placenta. Placental CRH production has been linked to th... [more]

Corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a 41 amino acid neuropeptide that is expressed in the hypothalamus and the human placenta. Placental CRH production has been linked to the determination of gestational length in the human. Although encoded by a single copy gene, CRH expression in the placenta is regulated differently to the hypothalamus. Glucocorticoids stimulate CRH promoter activity in the placenta but inhibit it's activity in the hypothalamus, via mechanisms involving different regions of the CRH promoter. We discuss how various stimuli alter CRH promoter activity and why these responses are unique to the placenta.

DOI 10.1016/S0196-9781(01)00486-7
Citations Scopus - 9
Co-authors Roger Smith, Bruce King
2001 King BR, Smith R, Nicholson RC, 'The regulation of human corticotrophin-releasing hormone gene expression in the placenta', Peptides, 22 795-801 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Roger Smith, Bruce King
2001 Nicholson RC, King BR, 'Regulation of CRH gene expression in the placenta', ENDOCRINOLOGY OF PARTURITION: BASIC SCIENCE AND CLINICAL APPLICATION, 27 246-257 (2001)
Citations Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Bruce King
2001 King BR, Nicholson RC, Smith R, 'Placental Corticotrophin-releasing Hormone, Local Effects and Fetomaternal Endocrinology', Stress: the international journal on the biology of stress, 4 219-233 (2001) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors Roger Smith, Bruce King
2000 Cheng Y, Nicholson RC, King BR, Chan EC, Fitter JT, Smith R, 'Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Gene Expresssion in Primary Placental Cells is Modulated by Cyclic Adenosine 3',5'-Monophosphate', The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 85 1239-1244 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Bruce King, Roger Smith, John Fitter
2000 Cheng Y, Nicholson RC, King BR, Chan EC, Fitter JT, Smith R, 'Glucocorticoid stimulation of Corticiotrophin-releasing hormone gene expression requires a Cyclic Adenosine 3',5'-Monophosphate regulatory element in human primary Placental Cytotrophoblast Cells', The journal of Clinical Endocrinology And Metabolism, 85 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 66Web of Science - 60
Co-authors Bruce King, Roger Smith, John Fitter
Show 28 more journal articles

Conference (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Goodwin GC, Carrasco DS, Medioli AM, King BR, Stephen C, 'Nonlinear insulin to carbohydrate rule for treatment of type 1 diabetes', IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline) (2015) [E1]

This paper develops a nonlinear insulin to carbohydrate rule for use by type 1-diabetes patients. The goal is to refine the commonly used Insulin to Carbohydrate Ratio (ICR) formu... [more]

This paper develops a nonlinear insulin to carbohydrate rule for use by type 1-diabetes patients. The goal is to refine the commonly used Insulin to Carbohydrate Ratio (ICR) formula. The latter is a strictly linear rule relating carbohydrates consumed to insulin infusion. The new relationship presented in this paper is nonlinear and depends on the availability of a nonlinear dynamic model describing a patient's blood glucose response to food and insulin. Such a model can be obtained by use of nonlinear system identification tools applied to patient test data. The suggested procedure is of similar complexity to the existing standard ICR rule. Hence it has the potential to be of clinical importance especially in developing countries where sophisticated solutions such as an artificial pancreas are unlikely to be used due to excessive cost. Simulations are presented which show that there exists a significant difference between the suggested insulin provided by the rule developed here and that given by the standard ICR rule.

DOI 10.1016/j.ifacol.2015.09.183
Co-authors Bruce King, Graham Goodwin
2014 Carrasco DS, Fu Y, Goodwin GC, King BR, Medioli AM, 'Performance limitations arising in closed loop control of blood glucose in type 1 diabetes', IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline) (2014) [E1]

© IFAC.This paper presents a preliminary study of performance limitations that arise in the closed-loop control of blood glucose, using an autonomous artificial pancreas. It is s... [more]

© IFAC.This paper presents a preliminary study of performance limitations that arise in the closed-loop control of blood glucose, using an autonomous artificial pancreas. It is shown that a major source of limitations is due to model uncertainty, specifically due to the combined effect of the insulin infusion system (IIS), the continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and the human glucose regulatory system. It is argued that the uncertainty associated with each of these elements compromises the achievable closed-loop bandwidth, and, in the presence of disturbances, e.g. meal intake and exercise, the closed-loop response will necessarily be poor. A proposition to overcome this problem is given based on feedforward action.

Co-authors Graham Goodwin, Bruce King
2013 O'Connell SM, Smart CE, Evans M, McElduff P, Lopez PE, Jones TW, et al., 'Both Protein and Fat Increase Postprandial Glucose Excursions in Children with Type 1 Diabetes and the Effect is Additive', IRISH JOURNAL OF MEDICAL SCIENCE (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Bruce King
2013 Lopez P, King BR, Chockalingham G, Goss P, 'CHANGES IN TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE BUT NOT VIBRATION CAUSE BUBBLE FORMATION IN INSULIN PUMP CARTRIDGES AND TUBING', DIABETES TECHNOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Bruce King
2009 Smart CE, Ross K, Edge J, Collins CE, King BR, 'Can children with Type 1 diabetes and their caregivers count carbohydrate accurately?', APEG Annual Scientific Meeting 2009. Abstracts (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Bruce King, Clare Collins
2008 Smart CE, Ross K, King BR, Edge JA, 'Can children with Type 1 diabetes and their carers count carbohydrate accurately?', 68th Scientific Session of the American Diabetes Association: Abstracts (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Bruce King
2006 King BR, Smith R, Nicholson RC, 'cAMP regulates CRH gene expression through a multi-element response unit', Endocrine Journal-Continuation of Endocrinologia Japonica (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Roger Smith, Bruce King
2005 King BR, Edwards (Ext) M, Smith R, Scheffer I, 'Doublecortin gene defects. Are they a cause of pseudopseudohypoparathyrodisim?', Hormone Research (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Bruce King, Roger Smith
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 20
Total funding $1,268,212

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20165 grants / $325,051

Minimising Hypoglycaemia and Glycaemic Excursions induced by Food in Young People with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus$215,660

Funding body: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

Funding body Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
Project Team Doctor Carmel Smart, Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King, Dr Elizabeth Davis
Scheme Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600565
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

In children and young people with type 1 diabetes and newly diagnosed coeliac disease, does commencement of a gluten-free diet improve daily glycaemic variability?$50,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Carmel Smart, Dr Prudence Lopez, Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1601083
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Establishment of an insulin dosing schedule for high fat, high protein meals in individuals with type 1 diabetes using insulin pump therapy$25,000

Funding body: Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group

Funding body Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601243
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Splitting the Insulin Combination Bolus$18,391

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1601082
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Australian Artificial Pancreas Program$16,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King
Scheme Research Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600611
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20152 grants / $160,000

Evaluation of an Australian artificial pancreas algorithm for announced and unannounced meals$150,000

Funding body: Diabetes Australia

Funding body Diabetes Australia
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King, Emeritus Laureate Professor Graham Goodwin, Doctor Carmel Smart, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Ms Megan Paterson-Dick
Scheme Millennium Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1401382
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Dietary proteins contribution to the insulin dose required to maintain post-prandial euglycaemia$10,000

Funding body: Diabetes Australia

Funding body Diabetes Australia
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King, Dr Elizabeth Davis
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501253
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20144 grants / $171,419

The prediction and prevention of hypoglycaemia using insulin suspension in a randomised controlled trial$63,118

Funding body: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

Funding body Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King, Associate Professor Timothy Jones, Dr Elizabeth Davis, Dr Jan Fairchild, Professor Fergus Cameron, Professor Geoffrey Ambler
Scheme Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1400994
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

A comparison of three insulin dosage algorithms for meals of variable macronutrient composition on postprandial glucose levels in children with type 1 diabetes$55,264

Funding body: Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group

Funding body Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group
Project Team Doctor Carmel Smart, Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301296
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

What is the optimal percentage of rapid and extended bolus insulin in a combination insulin bolus?$48,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Miss Prudence Lopez, Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King, Doctor Carmel Smart
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400137
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

JDRF Travel Grant Award - American Diabetes Association in June in San Francisco$5,037

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Ms Megan Paterson-Dick, Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King, Doctor Carmel Smart, Miss Prudence Lopez
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401497
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20132 grants / $72,795

AdDIT Study$62,795

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1300204
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

What is the impact of meals of varying fat and protein content on postprandial blood glucose level in children and young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus$10,000

Funding body: Novo Nordisk Foundation

Funding body Novo Nordisk Foundation
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King, Dr Prudence Lopez, Mrs Carmel Smart
Scheme Regional Diabetes Support Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300522
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20123 grants / $313,942

The development of an algorithm for meals using a closed-loop insulin pump - Fellowship$159,999

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1200431
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

The Gastronomic Lunch of the Year Fellowship$100,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King, Dr Prudence Lopez, Doctor Carmel Smart, Dr Clare Morbey
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1201044
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

A double blind cross over trial in young insulin pump users comparing their glucose control when their insulin pump settings have been set from continuous glucose sensing data interpreted by a new com$53,943

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Doctor Donald Anderson, Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King, Conjoint Associate Professor Patricia Crock, Ms Helen Phelan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1101172
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20111 grants / $19,500

How do high protein and/or high fat meals affect postprandial glycaemic control in children and adolescents using intensive insulin therapy?$19,500

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Mrs Carmel Smart, Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1001010
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20081 grants / $20,000

In children with type 1Diabetes on intensive insulin therapy, can improving carbohydrate knowledge and targeted nutrition education strategies improve diabetes management?$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0188484
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20061 grants / $15,000

Identification of proteins that interact with the multifunctional protein, CREAP$15,000

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Rick Nicholson, Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186557
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20001 grants / $170,505

Characterisation of Pituitary Target Autoantigens.$170,505

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Patricia Crock, Professor Rodney Scott, Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0178451
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current4

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.4

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Optimising glycaemic control in children with type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease.
PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Optimising Insulin Therapy For High Fat, High Protein Meal in People With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Impact of Dietary Protein on Postprandial Blood Glucose Levels in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD Development of an Insulin Delivery Algorithm for Management of Meals for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Children
PhD (Paediatrics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2012 PhD Optimising Nutrition Interventions to Improve Postprandial Glycaemia for Children and Adolescents Using Intensive Insulin Therapy
PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce King

Position

Conjoint Associate Professor
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email b.king@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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