Mr Seth Tarrant

Mr Seth Tarrant

Lecturer

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Seth Tarrant is an Orthopaedic Surgeon currently finishing a PhD under Prof Zsolt Balogh and Prof John Attia. He is currently contributing to the University of Newcastle's Masters of Traumatology program after a decade of mentoring and lecturing to medical students from the University of Newcastle and University of New South Wales.

Background

Seth was born and bred in Newcastle. After attend Hamilton South Primary and finishing as Dux of Newcastle Grammar School, he continued his studies at the University of Newcastle completing a Bachelor of Biomedical Science and an Honours year under the supervision of Prof Mike Calford and Prof Chris Levi in stroke neurophysiology. Medical school was completed at the University of Queensland. As a doctor, Seth has been based in the Hunter in addition to working from Sydney to Northern NSW and internationally. He was awarded a Fellowship of Orthopaedic Surgery through the Royal Australian College of Surgeons with 'exceptional performance' in 2018.

Research

Seth has published several peer review articles, presented multiple times internationally and is a reviewer for three surgical publications. He is targeted to complete his PhD in 2020.

Scholarships

New South Wales (NSW) Health PhD Scholarship Program recipient 2017- $60,000

Korean Orthopaedic Association Travelling Fellow October 2018

Awards & Prizes

Exceptional Performance in AOA Orthopaedic Training Program, October 2018  

Australian Orthopaedic Registrar Association Meeting Best Scientific Abstract, November 2018

Singapore Orthopaedic Association Scientific Meeting Runner-up Best Scientific Presentation, November 2018


Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Biomedical Science, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Fragility fractures
  • Inflammation
  • Orthogeriatrics
  • Orthopaedics
  • Trauma

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
060699 Physiology not elsewhere classified 10
110314 Orthopaedics 80
111706 Epidemiology 10

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
MEDI3018 Chronic Diseases and Sub-Specialty Clinical Practice
The University of Newcastle
PBL tutor 1/07/2012 - 30/11/2012
MEDI3017 Chronic Diseases and Sub-Specialty Clinical Practice
The University of Newcastle, Australia
PBL Tutor 2/02/2012 - 30/06/2012
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Tarrant SM, Balogh ZJ, 'Low-energy falls', ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 85 202-203 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/ans.13002
Co-authors Zsolt Balogh
2014 Tarrant SM, Hardy BM, Balogh ZJ, 'Repair of traumatic muscle herniation with acellular porcine collagen matrix', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 84 464-467 (2014) [C1]

Background: Muscle hernias are uncommon clinical conditions with no uniform solution of repair. Biocompatible mesh allows for repair of hernias without the donor site morbidity an... [more]

Background: Muscle hernias are uncommon clinical conditions with no uniform solution of repair. Biocompatible mesh allows for repair of hernias without the donor site morbidity and complications from direct repair under tension. Methods: Over a 6-month period at a Level 1 Trauma centre, four consecutive symptomatic muscle hernias were identified, two in the forearm and two in the lower limb. Three resulted from high-speed motorbike accidents, one from a mining accident. All patients had hernia repair at a minimum of 4 months post accident. A 10×15cm×1.0mm sheet of acellular collagen matrix was fashioned to fit as an underlay of the fascia defect. Patients were clinically followed at the 2-, 6-, 12- and 26-week mark. Final phone contact was made 18 months post-operatively. Results: All patients were pleased with their cosmetic and functional outcomes. All patients returned to work and sport 3 months after reconstruction. Conclusion: Symptomatic hernias as a result of trauma can be safely reconstructed with a biological mesh implant. This approach can prevent complications from previously described methods and return to active lifestyles with good results. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

DOI 10.1111/ans.12200
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Zsolt Balogh
2014 Tarrant SM, Hardy BM, Byth PL, Brown TL, Attia J, Balogh ZJ, 'Preventable mortality in geriatric hip fracture inpatients', Bone and Joint Journal, 69B 1178-1184 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery. There is a high rate of mortality in elderly patients who sustain a fracture of the hip. We aimed to determine ... [more]

© 2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery. There is a high rate of mortality in elderly patients who sustain a fracture of the hip. We aimed to determine the rate of preventable mortality and errors during the management of these patients. A 12 month prospective study was performed on patients aged > 65 years who had sustained a fracture of the hip. This was conducted at a Level 1 Trauma Centre with no orthogeriatric service. A multidisciplinary review of the medical records by four specialists was performed to analyse errors of management and elements of preventable mortality. During 2011, there were 437 patients aged > 65 years admitted with a fracture of the hip (85 years (66 to 99)) and 20 died while in hospital (86.3 years (67 to 96)). A total of 152 errors were identified in the 80 individual reviews of the 20 deaths. A total of 99 errors (65%) were thought to have at least a moderate effect on death; 45 reviews considering death (57%) were thought to have potentially been preventable. Agreement between the panel of reviewers on the preventability of death was fair. A larger-scale assessment of preventable mortality in elderly patients who sustain a fracture of the hip is required. Multidisciplinary review panels could be considered as part of the quality assurance process in the management of these patients.

DOI 10.1302/0301-620X.96B9.32814$2.00
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 18
Co-authors John Attia, Zsolt Balogh
2014 Dewar DC, White A, Attia J, Tarrant SM, King KL, Balogh ZJ, 'Comparison of postinjury multiple-organ failure scoring systems: Denver versus sequential organ failure assessment', Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, 77 624-629 (2014) [C1]

Copyright © 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. BACKGROUND: The Denver and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores have been used widely to describe the epidemi... [more]

Copyright © 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. BACKGROUND: The Denver and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores have been used widely to describe the epidemiology of postinjury multiple-organ failure; however, differences in these scores make it difficult to compare incidence, duration, and mortality of multiple-organ failure. The study aim was to compare the performance of the Denver and SOFA scores with respect to the outcomes of mortality, intensive care unit length of stay (ICU LOS), and ventilator days.METHODS: A 60-month prospective epidemiologic study was undertaken at an Australian Level I trauma center. Data were collected on trauma patients that met inclusion criteria (ICU admission, Injury Severity Score [ISS] 9 15, age 9 18 years, head Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score G 3, survival for 948 hours). Demographics, ISS, physiologic parameters, SOFA and Denver scores, and outcome data were prospectively collected. Sensitivity/specificity and receiver operating characteristic curve were calculated for both scores. Analysis was also completed for a Day 3 postinjury SOFA and Denver score.RESULTS: A total of 140 patients met the inclusion criteria (mean [SD] age, 47 [21] years; ISS, 30; male, 69%; mortality rate, 6%; mean [SD] ICU LOS, 9 [7] days; mean [SD] ventilation period, 6 [7] days). There was no difference in the score performance predicting mortality. Day 3 SOFA score of 4 or greater outperformed the Denver score of greater than 3 when predicting ICU LOS and ventilator days (area under the curve, 0.83 vs. 0.69, 0.86 vs. 0.73, respectively). The SOFA score was more sensitive and the Denver score was more specific when predicting mortality, ICU LOS, and ventilator days.CONCLUSION: Both scores had similar performance predicting mortality; however, the Day 3 SOFA score outperforms the Denver score when predicting ICU LOS and ventilator days. Either score could be superior based on whether one is seeking to optimize specificity or sensitivity. It is important to note that these findings are in a non-head-injured population and that there are practical difficulties using the SOFA in head-injured patients.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Diagnostic study, level II.

DOI 10.1097/TA.0000000000000406
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Zsolt Balogh, John Attia
2013 Williams N, Hardy BM, Tarrant S, Enninghorst N, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, Balogh ZJ, 'Changes in hip fracture incidence, mortality and length of stay over the last decade in an Australian major trauma centre.', Archives of Osteoporosis, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11657-013-0150-3
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Zsolt Balogh, John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow
2013 Dewar DC, Tarrant SM, King KL, Balogh ZJ, 'Changes in the epidemiology and prediction of multiple-organ failure after injury', JOURNAL OF TRAUMA AND ACUTE CARE SURGERY, 74 774-779 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/TA.0b013e31827a6e69
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Zsolt Balogh
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Influence of Shock and Systemic Inflammation on Fracture Union PhD (Trauma Sciences), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Mr Seth Tarrant

Position

Lecturer
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email seth.tarrant@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 3000

Office

Building Enter building name
Location Maitland Hospital

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