Miss Jacklyn Jackson

Miss Jacklyn Jackson

Research student

Career Summary

Biography

Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD) and full-time PhD candidate (Nutrition and Dietetics) at the University of Newcastle.

The focus of Jacklyn's PhD is to investigate the role of dietary nitrate and nitrite on cardiovascular disease risk factors and outcomes. More specifically, Jacklyn aims to understand whether a higher habitual intake of dietary nitrate and nitrite leads to improved cardiovascular disease related outcomes in humans.

This will be primarily achieved through epidemiological investigation of two Australian cohorts, and one cohort from the United States of America. At the end of 2016, Jacklyn spent 12 weeks at the Harvard School of Public Health working on the Nurses' Health Study data, a project which was carried out in collaboration with pre-eminent Nutritional Epidemiologists, Professor Walter Willett and Professor Eric Rimm. 

Jacklyn is keen to develop her skills, experiences and expertise within the field of Nutrition and Medical reserach.

In particular, Jacklyn is extremely interested in understanding how dietary and lifestyle factors can improve the health of the community, and has a key interest in the practical applications of Public Health Nutrition. Jacklyn is also passionate about the effective and responsible communication of Nutrition Research to the public. So far, Jacklyn has spoken as a representative for the Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA) and was awarded 2nd place, and People's Choice in the 2017 University of Newcastle's 3 Minute Thesis competition. 


Keywords

  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health
  • Dietary Nitrates
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Systematic Review

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/08/2017 -  Casual Academic Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
1/03/2016 - 31/05/2016 Casual Marker Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
1/10/2015 -  Casual Research Assistant The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2017 UON Three Minute Thesis Finals 2017, 2nd Place
The University of Newcastle
2017 People's Choice Best Poster, School of Health Sciences' Research Day
The University of Newcastle - The School of Health Sciences
2017 UON Three Minute Thesis 2017 Finals, People's Choice
The University of Newcastle
2017 HDR Best Publication
Newcastle University Postgraduate Students' Association (NUPSA)
2017 Nutrition Society Australia Travel Grant
Nutrition Society Australia
2016 Runner Up Best Poster, School of Health Sciences' Research Day
The University of Newcastle - The School of Health Sciences
2015 Nutrition Society Australia Travel Grant
Nutrition Society Australia

Scholarship

Year Award
2017 Greaves Family Postgraduate Top Up Scholarship in Medical Research
Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
2015 University of Newcastle Research Scholarship Central
The University of Newcastle

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
NUDI2110 Community Nutrition Practice
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Tutor 1/08/2017 - 30/10/2017
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Patterson A, Hure A, Burrows T, Jackson J, Collins C, 'Diet quality and 10-year healthcare costs by BMI categories in the mid-age cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 31 463-472 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The British Dietetic Association Ltd. Background: Better diets, as evaluated by diet quality indices, are associated with lower rates of morbidity and mortality. Although g... [more]

© 2018 The British Dietetic Association Ltd. Background: Better diets, as evaluated by diet quality indices, are associated with lower rates of morbidity and mortality. Although governments and researchers alike recognise the burden that obesity incurs for increased healthcare spending, there is insufficient evidence for the role of diet quality on healthcare costs. Methods: Diet quality was assessed by the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS) for 6328 women aged 50¿55 years from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. The ARFS was ranked by quintile, and 10-year cumulative data on healthcare costs from Medicare (Australia's Universal healthcare cover) were reported by body mass index category, using generalised linear modelling. Results: Healthy weight women with the highest diet quality were found to make significantly fewer Medicare claims (P = 0.012) compared to those with the lowest diet quality. In healthy weight and overweight women, the number of healthcare claims and charges was inversely associated with consuming a greater variety of vegetables. For every 1 point increase in the ARFS vegetable component score, healthy weight women made 1.9 fewer healthcare claims and were charged $139 less, whereas overweight women made 2.3 fewer claims and were charged $176 less for healthcare over 10 years. Conclusions: The results of the present study support the need to prioritise an improved diet quality with the aim of reducing healthcare claims and overall costs in a population-based sample of Australian females. As the burden of overweight and obesity on the healthcare system increases, strategies to improve diet quality may be of particular importance; however, more research is required to further establish this relationship.

DOI 10.1111/jhn.12556
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Alexis Hure, Clare Collins, Amanda Patterson
2018 Jackson JK, Patterson AJ, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Oldmeadow C, McEvoy MA, 'The role of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in cardiovascular disease risk factors: a systematic review and meta-analysis of human evidence.', Nutrition reviews, 76 348-371 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/nutrit/nuy005
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Mark Mcevoy, Christopher Oldmeadow, Lesley Wicks
2018 Jackson JK, Patterson AJ, Macdonald-Wicks LK, Bondonno CP, Blekkenhorst LC, Ward NC, et al., 'Dietary nitrate and diet quality: An examination of changing dietary intakes within a representative sample of Australian women', Nutrients, 10 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu10081005
Co-authors Julie Byles, Mark Mcevoy, Lesley Wicks, Amanda Patterson
2017 Jackson J, Patterson AJ, MacDonald-Wicks L, McEvoy M, 'The role of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in CVD.', Nutrition research reviews, 30 247-264 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/s0954422417000105
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Mark Mcevoy, Lesley Wicks
2016 Jackson J, Williams R, McEvoy M, MacDonald-Wicks L, Patterson A, 'Is higher consumption of animal flesh foods associated with better iron status among adults in developed countries? A systematic review', Nutrients, 8 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Iron deficiency (ID) is the most prevalent nutrient deficiency within the developed world. This is of concern as ID has b... [more]

© 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Iron deficiency (ID) is the most prevalent nutrient deficiency within the developed world. This is of concern as ID has been shown to affect immunity, thermoregulation, work performance and cognition. Animal flesh foods provide the richest and most bioavailable source of dietary (haem) iron, however, it is unclear whether low animal flesh diets contribute to ID. This systematic review aimed to investigate whether a higher consumption of animal flesh foods is associated with better iron status in adults. CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE and MEDLINE were searched for published studies that included adults (¥18 years) from developed countries and measured flesh intakes in relation to iron status indices. Eight experimental and 41 observational studies met the inclusion criteria. Generally, studies varied in population and study designs and results were conflicting. Of the seven high quality studies, five showed a positive association between animal flesh intake (85¿300 g/day) and iron status. However, the optimum quantity or frequency of flesh intake required to maintain or achieve a healthy iron status remains unclear. Results show a promising relationship between animal flesh intake and iron status, however, additional longitudinal and experimental studies are required to confirm this relationship and determine optimal intakes to reduce ID development.

DOI 10.3390/nu8020089
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Mark Mcevoy, Lesley Wicks
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Conference (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Jackson J, Patterson A, McDonald-Wicks L, McEvoy M, Bondonno C, Blekkenhorst L, et al., 'Dietary Nitrate Intakes within a Representative Sample of Australian Women', ICC Sydney (2018)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Amanda Patterson
2018 Patterson AJ, Collins C, Jackson J, Hure A, Burrows T, 'Diet Quality and 10 years of healthcare costs by BMI categories: Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Sydney, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Alexis Hure, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2017 Jackson J, MacDonald-Wicks L, Patterson A, McEvoy M, 'What is the role of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in cardiovascular disease: A Systematic Review of Human Evidence', What is the role of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in cardiovascular disease: A Systematic Review of Human Evidence, The Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA (2017)
Co-authors Lesley Wicks, Amanda Patterson
2017 Jackson J, Zong G, MacDonald-Wicks L, Patterson A, Willett W, Rimm E, et al., 'Dietary nitrate consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women from the Nurses' Health Study', Adelaide (2017)
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Lesley Wicks
2015 Jackson J, Williams R, Patterson A, 'Is a higher consumption of animal flesh foods associated with a higher iron status in adults from developed countries: A systematic review', Is animal flesh consumption associated with better iron status among adults in developed countries: a systematic review, Wellington, New Zealand (2015)
Co-authors Amanda Patterson
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Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Jackson J, Patterson A, 'I've been diagnosed with iron deficiency, now what?', : The Conversation (2018)
Co-authors Amanda Patterson
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $30,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20172 grants / $30,000

The role of dietary nitrate and nitrite in cardiovascular disease prevention $20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Project Team

Associate Professor Mark McEvoy, Doctor Lesley MacDonald-Wicks, Doctor Amanda Patterson, Miss Jacklyn Jackson, Professor Walter Willett, Professor Jonathan Hodgson

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

The role of dietary inorganic nitrate and nitrite in cardiovascular disease prevention$10,000

Funding body: Greaves PhD top-up scholarships

Funding body Greaves PhD top-up scholarships
Project Team

Jacklyn Jackson, Dr Lesley MacDonald-Wicks, Dr Amanda Patterson, Associate Professor Mark McEvoy

Scheme Greaves Family Postgraduate Top Up Scholarship in Medical Reserach
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON N
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Miss Jacklyn Jackson

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