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Career Summary

Biography

I completed my PhD at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia in 2000. The focus of this work was to identify parts of the brain that controlled neuroendocrine responses to different forms of stress. This work showed that different categories of stress - psychological or physiological (e.g. infection) - elicit distinct cellular activity "footprints" within the amygdala and sub-populations of catecholamine cells within the brainstem. This finding was because the consensus at the time was that these brain regions responded homogenously to stress irrespective of the 'category' or nature of the stimulus.

At the end of my PhD I was awarded a CJ Martin fellowship from the NHMRC that allowed me to travel to the United States to undertake post-doctoral training at The Scripps Research Institute in California, San Diego. My post-doctoral research at The Scripps Research Institute contributed to the understanding of the neural pathways that control reinstatement of alcohol relapse. In articles published in the journal Biological Psychiatry and Journal of Neuroscience, I showed that the pattern of neural activity elicited by stimuli conditioned to predict the availability of alcohol, a factor linked to increased relapse risk in humans, is similar to the patterns produced by stimuli paired with the availability of other commonly abused drugs such as cocaine or nicotine. Additionally, we demonstrated how existing neuropharmacological treatments for alcoholism such as naltrexone, or newer agents that show promise in the treatment of addiction such as agonists for group II/III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptors, also modulate these patterns. We also showed that mGlu2/3 receptor agonists, which appear to have an anxiolytic profile, are effective in suppressing reinstatement (or relapse) elicited by stress - an important trigger for relapse in humans. At Scripps I also demonstrated that hypothalamic peptide systems, better known for their role in feeding behaviour, may be important neurotransmitters in the brain circuitry that trigger alcohol seeking behaviour.

After returning to Australia in 2006, I established my own laboratory in the Discipline of Anatomy, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, University of Newcastle to investigate the role of these hypothalamic peptides in driving drug-seeking and relapse-like behaviour. I received an NHMRC grant in 2007 to commence this work. My laboratory therefore focuses on the brain pathways that are involved in addiction and stress.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Queensland, 01/03/2001
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Queensland

Research

Research keywords

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Neurosciences

Research expertise

Relapse to drug taking is considered the most significant obstacle to the successful treatment of addiction. Although much progress has been made in identifying individual brain regions that elicit drug-seeking behaviour and subsequently relapse, there are presently very few effectively pharmaceutical or indeed behavioural therapy strategies available to treat this disease. My research interests concern the following key issues:

1.Understanding the neuroanatomical and pharmacological interactions between key components of brain circuitry thought to be responsible for provoking drug relapse.

2.Determining the role of the neuropeptides (orexin/hypocretin and CART) recently found to be powerful modulators of drug-seeking and relapse.

3.Elucidating the cellular and molecular neuroadaptations that promotes long-term relapse vulnerability.

4.Determining the neurobiological basis for why some individuals become addicted and show greater vulnerability to drug relapse than others.

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
110900Neurosciences100

Memberships

Committee/Associations (relevant to research).

  • Member - Australian Neuroscience Society
  • Member - Research Society on Alcoholism
  • Member - Society for Neuroscience

Appointments

CJ Martin Biomedical Fellowships (Overseas)
National Health & Medical Research Council (Australia)
01/11/2006 - 01/12/2008

Invitations

" Invited speaker at the Research Society on Alcoholism Meeting in Vancouver, Canada, 2004
Research Society on Alcholism, United States (Conference Presentation - non published.)
2004

Collaboration

Relapse to drug taking is considered the most significant obstacle to the successful treatment of addiction. Although much progress has been made in identifying individual brain regions that elicit drug-seeking behaviour and subsequently relapse, there are presently very few effectively pharmaceutical or indeed behavioural therapy strategies available to treat this disease. My research interests concern the following key issues:

1. Understanding the neuroanatomical and pharmacological interactions between key components of brain circuitry thought to be responsible for provoking drug relapse.

2. Determining the role of the neuropeptides (orexin/hypocretin and CART) recently found to be powerful modulators of drug-seeking and relapse.

3. Elucidating the cellular and molecular neuroadaptations that promotes long-term relapse vulnerability.

4. Determining the neurobiological basis for why some individuals become addicted and show greater vulnerability to drug relapse than others.

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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.

Click on a category title below to expand the list of citations for that specific category.

Journal article (30 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Zouikr I, James MH, Campbell EJ, Clifton VL, Beagley KW, Dayas CV, Hodgson DM, 'Altered formalin-induced pain and Fos induction in the periaqueductal grey of preadolescent rats following neonatal LPS exposure.', PLoS One, 9 e98382 (2014) [C1]
2014Goldie BJ, Dun MD, Lin M, Smith ND, Verrills NM, Dayas CV, Cairns MJ, 'Activity-associated miRNA are packaged in Map1b-enriched exosomes released from depolarized neurons.', Nucleic Acids Research, 42 9195-9208 (2014) [C1]
2014Yeoh JW, Campbell EJ, James MH, Graham BA, Dayas CV, 'Orexin antagonists for neuropsychiatric disease: progress and potential pitfalls.', Front Neurosci, 8 36 (2014) [C1]
2014James MH, Quinn RK, Ong LK, Levi EM, Charnley JL, Smith DW, et al., 'mTORC1 inhibition in the nucleus accumbens 'protects' against the expression of drug seeking and 'relapse' and is associated with reductions in GluA1 AMPAR and CAMKIIa levels.', Neuropsychopharmacology, 39 1694-1702 (2014) [C1]
2014James MH, Campbell EJ, Walker FR, Smith DW, Richardson HN, Hodgson DM, Dayas CV, 'Exercise reverses the effects of early life stress on orexin cell reactivity in male but not female rats', Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 8 (2014) [C1]
2014Yeoh JW, James MH, Graham BA, Dayas CV, 'Electrophysiological characteristics of paraventricular thalamic (PVT) neurons in response to cocaine and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART)', FRONTIERS IN BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE, 8 (2014)
2013Cahif A, Parkinson GM, Dayas CV, Smith DW, 'Characterisation of mitochondrial DNA deletions by long-PCR in central nervous system regions of young, middle- and old-aged rats.', Current Aging Science, 6 232-238 (2013) [C1]

Co-authors: Douglas Smith

2013Brown AL, Day TA, Dayas CV, Smith DW, 'Purity and Enrichment of Laser-Microdissected Midbrain Dopamine Neurons', BIOMED RESEARCH INTERNATIONAL, (2013) [C1]
2013James MH, Dayas CV, 'What about me ...? The PVT: a role for the paraventricular thalamus (PVT) in drug-seeking behavior', FRONTIERS IN BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE, 7 (2013) [C3]
2012Dayas CV, Smith DW, Dunkley PR, 'An emerging role for the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in 'pathological' protein translation: Relevance to cocaine addiction', Frontiers in Pharmacology, 3 1-12 (2012) [C1]
2012Yeoh JW, James MH, Jobling P, Bains JS, Graham BA, Dayas CV, 'Cocaine potentiates excitatory drive in the perifornical/lateral hypothalamus', Journal of Physiology, 590 3677-3689 (2012) [C1]
2012James MH, Yeoh JW, Graham B, Dayas C, 'Insights for Developing Pharmacological Treatments for Psychostimulant Relapse Targeting Hypothalamic Peptide Systems.', Journal of Addiction Research and Therapy, 01 1-14 (2012)

Co-authors: Brett Graham

2011James MH, Charnley JL, Levi EM, Jones E, Yeoh JW, Smith DW, Dayas CV, 'Orexin-1 receptor signalling within the ventral tegmental area, but not the paraventricular thalamus, is critical to regulating cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking', International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 14 684-690 (2011) [C1]
2011Brown AL, Flynn JR, Smith DW, Dayas CV, 'Down-regulated striatal gene expression for synaptic plasticity-associated proteins in addiction and relapse vulnerable animals', International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 14 1099-1110 (2011) [C1]

Co-authors: Douglas Smith

2011James MH, Charnley JL, Flynn JR, Smith DW, Dayas CV, 'Propensity to 'relapse' following exposure to cocaine cues is associated with the recruitment of specific thalamic and epithalamic nuclei', Neuroscience, 199 235-242 (2011) [C1]

Co-authors: Douglas Smith

2010James MH, Charnley JL, Jones E, Levi E, Yeoh JW, Flynn JR, et al., 'Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) signaling within the paraventricular thalamus modulates cocaine-seeking behaviour', Plos One, 5 e12980 (2010) [C1]
2009Martin-Fardon R, Baptista MAS, Dayas CV, Weiss F, 'Dissociation of the effects of MTEP [3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl] piperidine] on conditioned reinstatement and reinforcement: Comparison between cocaine and a conventional reinforcer', Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 329 1084-1090 (2009) [C1]
2008Dayas C, McGranahan T, Martin-Fardon F, Weiss F, 'Stimuli Linked to Ethanol Availability Activate Hypothalamic CART and Orexin Neurons in a Reinstatement Model of Relapse', Biological Psychiatry, 63 152-157 (2008) [C1]
2007Dayas C, Liu X, Simms J, Weiss F, 'Distinct Patterns of Neural Activation Associated with Ethanol Seeking: Effects of Naltrexone', Biological Psychiatry, 61 979-989 (2007) [C1]
2006Xhao Y, Dayas C, Aujla H, Baptista MA, Martin-Fardon R, Weiss F, 'Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors attenuates both stress and cue-induced ethanol-seeking and modulates c-fos expression in the hippocampus and amygdala', The Journal of Neuroscience, 26 9967-9974 (2006) [C1]
2005Breese GR, Chu K, Dayas C, Funk D, Knapp DJ, Koob GF, et al., 'Stress enhancement of craving during sobriety: A risk for relapse', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 29 185-195 (2005) [C1]
2004Dayas C, Buller KM, Day TA, 'Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons regulate medullary catecholamine cell responses to restraint stress', Journal of Comparative Neurology, 478 22-34 (2004) [C1]
2004Dayas C, Martin-Fardon R, Thorsell A, Weiss F, 'Chronic footshock, but not a physiological stressor, suppresses the alcohol deprivation effect in dependent rats', Alcohol and Alcoholism, 39 190-196 (2004) [C1]
2003Buller KM, Dayas C, Day TA, 'Descending pathways from the paraventricular nucleus contribute to the recruitment of brainstem nuclei following a systemic immune challenge', Neuroscience, 118 189-203 (2003) [C1]
2002Dayas C, Day TA, 'Opposing Roles For Medial And Central Amygdala In The Initiation Of Noradrenergic Cell Responses To A Psychological Stressor.', European Journal of Neuroscience, 15 1712-1718 (2002) [C1]

Co-authors: Trevor Day

2001Dayas CV, Buller KM, Crane JW, Xu Y, Day TA, 'Stressor categorization: Acute physical and psychological stressors elicit distinctive recruitment patterns in the amygdala and in medullary noradrenergic cell groups', European Journal of Neuroscience, 14 1143-1152 (2001) [C1]
2001Buller K, Xu YY, Dayas C, Day T, 'Dorsal and ventral medullary catecholamine cell groups contribute differentially to systemic interleukin-1 beta-induced hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis responses', NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY, 73 129-138 (2001)
2001Dayas CV, Buller KM, Day TA, 'Medullary neurones regulate hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor cell responses to an emotional stressor', NEUROSCIENCE, 105 707-719 (2001)
2000Dayas CV, Xu Y, Buller KM, Day TA, 'Effects of chronic oestrogen replacement on stress-induced activation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis control pathways', JOURNAL OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY, 12 784-794 (2000)
1999Dayas CV, Buller KM, Day TA, 'Neuroendocrine responses to an emotional stressor: Evidence for involvement of the medial but not the central amygdala', European Journal of Neuroscience, 11 2312-2322 (1999) [C1]
Show 27 more

Conference (11 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2012Dayas CV, Quinn RK, Goldie BJ, Brown AM, Levi EM, Smith DW, Cairns MJ, 'Association of miRNAs with addiction-relevant synaptic plasticity genes', Abstract Book. Biological Psychiatry Australia Scientific Meeting, Parkville, Vic (2012) [E3]
2012James MH, Charnley JL, Levi EM, Dunkley PR, Smith DW, Dickson PW, Dayas CV, 'A role for the mTOR pathway in the development of addiction', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting, Gold Coast, Queensland (2012) [E3]
2012Brown AL, Flynn JR, Dayas CV, Smith DW, 'Altered gene expression in cell signalling pathways of midbrain dopamine neurons from addiction and relapse vulnerable animals', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012, Melbourne, Vic (2012) [E3]

Co-authors: Douglas Smith

2012Campbell EJ, James MH, Sominsky Bar L, Hodgson DM, Dayas CV, 'Adult stress unmasks altered orexin cell functioning in maternally separated rats: Implications for the development of psychopathologies', Abstract Book. Biological Psychiatry Australia Scientific Meeting, Parkville, Vic (2012) [E3]

Co-authors: Deborah Hodgson

2010Dayas CV, 'BRAIN MECHANISMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE DEVELOPMENT OF PSYCHOSTIMULANT ADDICTION', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2010) [E3]
2008Dayas CV, 'The neurobiology of drug relapse: A role for hypothalamic 'feeding' peptides in drug relapse?', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
2007Dayas CV, McGranahan TM, Martin-Fardon R, Weiss F, 'Hypothalamic feeding-related peptides are recruited in a reinstatement model of ethanol relapse (Poster)', 7th IBRO 2007 World Congress of Neuroscience Program, Melbourne (2007) [E3]
2007Weiss F, Dayas CV, 'Alcohol cue exposure produces distinct patterns of neural activation implications for alcohol craving and relapse', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, Chicago, IL (2007)
2005Dayas CV, Zhao Y, Weiss F, ''Anti-relapse' effects of the metabotropic glutamate 2/3 agonist LY379268 am associated with increased c-fos expression in the central amygdala', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, Santa Barbara, CA (2005)
2005Zhao Y, Dayas CV, Weiss F, 'Effects of the metabotropic Glutamate 2/3 agonist LY379268 on reinstatement of ethanol-seeking induced by alcohol-associated environmental stimuli and foot-shock stress', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, Santa Barbara, CA (2005)
1999Day TA, Buller KM, Xu Y, Dayas CV, Crane JW, 'Separation of neural pathways mediating HPA axis responses to emotional and physical stressors', CONTROL MECHANISMS OF STRESS AND EMOTION: NEUROENDOCRINE-BASED STUDIES, KITAKYUSHU, JAPAN (1999)
Show 8 more
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants20
Total funding$825,088

- Indicates that the researcher may be seeking students for this project.

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.

2013 (6 grants)

Ultra-Low Temperature Cryogenic Freezer$24,596
Funding Body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Identifying novel pharmacological targets for drug relapse$20,000
Funding Body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Project Team
Doctor Chris Dayas
SchemeRole
Near MissChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$20,00020132013
GNo:G1300827

Identifying novel pharmacological targets for drug relapse$20,000
Funding Body: University of Newcastle

Project Team
Doctor Chris Dayas
SchemeRole
Near Miss GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$20,00020132013
GNo:G1300473

Addictive drugs rewire the hypothalamus to drive relapse through brain 'reward' circuits$10,000
Funding Body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Project Team
Doctor Chris Dayas
SchemeRole
Near MissChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$10,00020132013
GNo:G1300828

Addictive drugs rewire the hypothalamus to drive relapse through brain 'reward' circuits$10,000
Funding Body: University of Newcastle

Project Team
Doctor Chris Dayas
SchemeRole
Near Miss GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$10,00020132013
GNo:G1300474

PhD Student Pulse Travel Award 'Dopamine 2013'$6,000
Funding Body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Project Team
Doctor Chris Dayas
SchemeRole
Research GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$6,00020132013
GNo:G1300521

2012 (4 grants)

Characterizing psychostimulant-induced synaptic plasticity in the hypothalamus$20,000
Funding Body: University of Newcastle

Project Team
Doctor Chris Dayas, Doctor Brett Graham
SchemeRole
Near Miss GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$20,00020122012
GNo:G1200677

Roles of post-transcriptional gene silencing in the functional regulation of neuronal gene expression and plasticity in schizophrenia$19,500
Funding Body: Schizophrenia Research Institute

Project Team
Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Ms Belinda Goldie, Doctor Chris Dayas
SchemeRole
Postgraduate Research ScholarshipInvestigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$19,50020122014
GNo:G1200761

Understanding the behavioural and neuroendocrine mechanisms of invasiveness in an avian system: do Indian mynahs display a dopaminergic-dependent invasion syndrome?$12,211
Funding Body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Project Team
Doctor Andrea Griffin, Doctor Chris Dayas, Doctor David Guez
SchemeRole
Strategic Small GrantInvestigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$12,21120122012
GNo:G1401098

Addiction Research and Therapy, Embassy Suites Las Vegas, 20 - 22 August 2012$1,500
Funding Body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Project Team
Doctor Chris Dayas
SchemeRole
Travel GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$1,50020122012
GNo:G1200602

2011 (2 grants)

Brain Mechanisms Conferring Psychostimulant Addiction$25,000
Funding Body: University of Newcastle

Project Team
Doctor Chris Dayas, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley, Doctor Doug Smith
SchemeRole
Near Miss GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$25,00020112011
GNo:G1001052

IMPLEN NanoPhotometer pearl$10,000
Funding Body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Project Team
Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Associate Professor Alan Brichta, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Emeritus Professor Patricia Michie, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Ulli Schall, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Doctor Frederick Walker, Doctor Rick Thorne, Doctor Chris Dayas, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Doctor Janet Holt, Doctor Severine Roselli, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Associate Professor Liz Milward, Doctor Charles De Bock, Doctor Julie Merriman-Jones, Doctor Jing Qin Wu, Doctor Bing Liu, Mr Dan Johnstone, Ms Belinda Goldie, Ms Natalie Beveridge
SchemeRole
Equipment GrantInvestigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$10,00020112011
GNo:G1100030

2010 (2 grants)

ABI 7500 Real Time PCR System $34,000
Funding Body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Characterising the synaptic physiology of orexin neurons in response to cocaine: Implications for drug relapse$21,303
Funding Body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Project Team
Doctor Chris Dayas, Doctor Brett Graham
SchemeRole
Research GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$21,30320102010
GNo:G0900151

2008 (1 grants)

Brain pathways underlying vulnerability to drug relapse$398,978
Funding Body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Project Team
Doctor Chris Dayas
SchemeRole
Project GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$398,97820082010
GNo:G0187592

2007 (4 grants)

3D Imaging Software/Work station$20,000
Funding Body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Project Team
Professor David Pow, Doctor Chris Dayas, Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Derek Laver
SchemeRole
Equipment GrantInvestigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$20,00020072007
GNo:G0188026

Characterisation of the brain mechanisms linking vulnerability to stress and vulnerability to drug addiction$20,000
Funding Body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Project Team
Professor Trevor Day, Doctor Chris Dayas, Doctor Doug Smith
SchemeRole
Project GrantInvestigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$20,00020072007
GNo:G0187255

Characterisation of the Brain Mechanisms linking vulnerability to stress and vulnerability to drug addiction$10,000
Funding Body: University of Newcastle

Project Team
Doctor Chris Dayas
SchemeRole
Early Career Researcher GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$10,00020072007
GNo:G0187312

Molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning drug relapse$7,500
Funding Body: University of Newcastle

Project Team
Doctor Chris Dayas
SchemeRole
New Staff GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$7,50020072007
GNo:G0187726

2006 (1 grants)

Neural links between drug addiction and stress$134,500
Funding Body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Project Team
Doctor Chris Dayas, Professor Trevor Day
SchemeRole
Training (Postdoctoral) Fellowships - C.J. Martin Biomedical Fellowships (Overseas)Chief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$134,50020062008
GNo:G0187071
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Research Supervision

Number of current supervisions7
Total current UoN PhD EFTSL2.8

For supervisions undertaken at an institution other that the University of Newcastle, the institution name is listed below the program name.

Current Supervision

CommencedProposed
Completion
ProgramSupervisor TypeResearch Title
20142018PhD (Anatomy)Principal SupervisorThe Role of Group III Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in Psychostimulant Addiction
20142018PhD (Psychology - Science)Co-SupervisorEvidence Accumulation Models of Rodent Behaviour
20132017PhD (Anatomy)Principal SupervisorCharacterizing Changes in the Orexin System in Models of Neuropsychiatric Disease
20122016PhD (Anatomy)Principal SupervisorRole of miRNA in Addiction Vulnerability
20112015PhD (Medical Biochemistry)Co-SupervisorRoles of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing in the Functional Regulation of Neuronal Gene Expression and Plasticity
20112015PhD (Medical Biochemistry)Co-SupervisorAgeing of the Somatic Motor Nervous System: A Role for Mitochondrial and Nuclear Genome Changes
20102014PhD (Anatomy)Principal SupervisorUnderstanding Drug-Induced Changes to the Lateral Hypothalamic Orexin Circuitry

Past Supervision

YearProgramSupervisor TypeResearch Title
2014PhD (Anatomy)Principal SupervisorThe Role of Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) and Orexin in Drug-Seeking and Addiction-Related Behaviours
2012PhD (Anatomy)Co-SupervisorMolecular Correlates of Dopamine Signalling in Addiction Vulnerability
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Dr Christopher (Chris) Dayas

Work Phone(02) 4921 5618
Fax(02) 4921 7904
Email
PositionsSenior Lecturer
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine
The University of Newcastle, Australia
Casual Lecturer
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine
The University of Newcastle, Australia
Focus AreaAnatomy
Office
MS306C/D,
Medical Sciences,
Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan NSW 2308
Australia
URL:www.newcastle.edu.au/profile/christopher-dayas