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Associate Professor Chris Dayas

Associate Professor

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy (Anatomy)

Career Summary

Biography

I completed my PhD at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia in 2000. The focus of this work was to identify parts of the brain that controlled neuroendocrine responses to different forms of stress. This work showed that different categories of stress - psychological or physiological (e.g. infection) - elicit distinct cellular activity "footprints" within the amygdala and sub-populations of catecholamine cells within the brainstem. This finding was because the consensus at the time was that these brain regions responded homogenously to stress irrespective of the 'category' or nature of the stimulus. At the end of my PhD I was awarded a CJ Martin fellowship from the NHMRC that allowed me to travel to the United States to undertake post-doctoral training at The Scripps Research Institute in California, San Diego.

My post-doctoral research at The Scripps Research Institute contributed to the understanding of the neural pathways that control reinstatement of alcohol relapse. In articles published in the journal Biological Psychiatry and Journal of Neuroscience, I showed that the pattern of neural activity elicited by stimuli conditioned to predict the availability of alcohol, a factor linked to increased relapse risk in humans, is similar to the patterns produced by stimuli paired with the availability of other commonly abused drugs such as cocaine or nicotine. Additionally, we demonstrated how existing neuropharmacological treatments for alcoholism such as naltrexone, or newer agents that show promise in the treatment of addiction such as agonists for group II/III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptors, also modulate these patterns. We also showed that mGlu2/3 receptor agonists, which appear to have an anxiolytic profile, are effective in suppressing reinstatement (or relapse) elicited by stress - an important trigger for relapse in humans.
At Scripps I also demonstrated that hypothalamic peptide systems, better known for their role in feeding behaviour, may be important neurotransmitters in the brain circuitry that trigger alcohol seeking behaviour.

After returning to Australia, I established my own laboratory in the Discipline of Anatomy, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, University of Newcastle to investigate the role of these hypothalamic peptides in driving drug-seeking and relapse-like behaviour. I received an NHMRC grant in to commence this work. My laboratory therefore focuses on the brain pathways that are involved in addiction and stress.

Research Expertise
Relapse to drug taking is considered the most significant obstacle to the successful treatment of addiction. Although much progress has been made in identifying individual brain regions that elicit drug-seeking behaviour and subsequently relapse, there are presently very few effectively pharmaceutical or indeed behavioural therapy strategies available to treat this disease. My research interests concern the following key issues: 1.Understanding the neuroanatomical and pharmacological interactions between key components of brain circuitry thought to be responsible for provoking drug relapse. 2.Determining the role of the neuropeptides (orexin/hypocretin and CART) recently found to be powerful modulators of drug-seeking and relapse. 3.Elucidating the cellular and molecular neuroadaptations that promotes long-term relapse vulnerability. 4.Determining the neurobiological basis for why some individuals become addicted and show greater vulnerability to drug relapse than others. 

Collaborations
Relapse to drug taking is considered the most significant obstacle to the successful treatment of addiction. Although much progress has been made in identifying individual brain regions that elicit drug-seeking behaviour and subsequently relapse, there are presently very few effectively pharmaceutical or indeed behavioural therapy strategies available to treat this disease. My research interests concern the following key issues: 1. Understanding the neuroanatomical and pharmacological interactions between key components of brain circuitry thought to be responsible for provoking drug relapse. 2. Determining the role of the neuropeptides (orexin/hypocretin and CART) recently found to be powerful modulators of drug-seeking and relapse. 3. Elucidating the cellular and molecular neuroadaptations that promotes long-term relapse vulnerability. 4. Determining the neurobiological basis for why some individuals become addicted and show greater vulnerability to drug relapse than others.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Queensland

Keywords

  • Neurosciences

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/11/2006 - 1/12/2008 CJ Martin Biomedical Fellowships (Overseas)

NHMRC - Early Career Fellowships (Formerly Postdoctoral Training Fellowships)

National Health & Medical Research Council

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Member - Society for Neuroscience Society for Neuroscience
Australia
Member - Australian Neuroscience Society Australian Neuroscience Society (ANS)
Australia
Member - Research Society on Alcoholism Research Society on Alcoholism
Australia

Invitations

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2004 " Invited speaker at the Research Society on Alcoholism Meeting in Vancouver, Canada, 2004
Organisation: Research Society on Alcholism
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Caillé S, Baker AL, Todd J, Turner A, Dayas CV, 'Smoking and mental health problems', 199-209 (2015) [B1]

© 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel. Patients with mental illness have greater rates of smoking during their lifetime and experience severe social, health and psychological disadvantages,... [more]

© 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel. Patients with mental illness have greater rates of smoking during their lifetime and experience severe social, health and psychological disadvantages, and stigma. This chapter begins by providing a brief update on the neurobiology of nicotine addiction and we present evidence that an imbalance in the brain reward and aversion systems, and specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes expressed in these pathways, may lead to dependence. Then, in a special case review, we highlight recent advances regarding the knowledge on the association between nicotine dependence and schizophrenia. Further understanding these mechanistic links, including nicotine-induced improvements in cognitive deficits, might provide new insights into improving smoking cessation success in people diagnosed with schizophrenia. Additionally, we discuss data indicating that smoking cessation does not worsen mental health symptoms or increase other drug and alcohol use. Indeed, smoking cessation interventions should be available within mental health and substance use treatment settings. Treatments for nicotine addiction include psychological interventions and pharmacological agents such as nicotine replacement therapies (e.g. gums and lozenges) or medications such as the partial agonist varenicline. Importantly, the outcomes for smokers with mental illness are enhanced when these approaches are combined and may need to be administered over the long term.

DOI 10.1159/000369483
Co-authors Juanita Todd, Amanda Baker

Journal article (34 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Quinn RK, Brown AL, Goldie BJ, Levi EM, Dickson PW, Smith DW, et al., 'Distinct miRNA expression in dorsal striatal subregions is associated with risk for addiction in rats', Translational Psychiatry, 5 (2015) [C1]

Recently, we published data using an animal model that allowed us to characterize animals into two groups, addiction vulnerable and addiction resilient, where we identified that a... [more]

Recently, we published data using an animal model that allowed us to characterize animals into two groups, addiction vulnerable and addiction resilient, where we identified that addiction/relapse vulnerability was associated with deficits in synaptic plasticityassociated gene expression in the dorsal striatum (DS). Notable was the strong reduction in expression for activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) considered a master regulator of synaptic plasticity. In the present study, we confirmed that Arc messenger RNA was significantly decreased in the DS, but importantly, we identified that this reduction was restricted to the dorsomedial (DMS) and not dorsolateral striatum (DLS). There is recent evidence of microRNA (miRNA)-associated posttranscriptional suppression of Arc and animal models of addiction have identified a key role for miRNA in the regulation of addiction-relevant genes. In further support of this link, we identified several differentially expressed miRNA with the potential to influence addiction-relevant plasticity genes, including Arc. A key study recently reported that miR-212 expression is protective against compulsive cocaine-seeking. Supporting this hypothesis, we found that miR-212 expression was significantly reduced in the DMS but not DLS of addiction-vulnerable animals. Together, our data provide strong evidence that miRNA promote ongoing plasticity deficits in the DS of addiction-vulnerable animals.

DOI 10.1038/tp.2014.144
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Phil Dickson, Murray Cairns
2015 Campbell EJ, Watters SM, Zouikr I, Hodgson DM, Dayas CV, 'Recruitment of hypothalamic orexin neurons after formalin injections in adult male rats exposed to a neonatal immune challenge', Frontiers in Neuroscience, 9 (2015)

© 2015 Campbell, Watters, Zouikr, Hodgson and Dayas. Exposure to early life physiological stressors, such as infection, is thought to contribute to the onset of psychopathology i... [more]

© 2015 Campbell, Watters, Zouikr, Hodgson and Dayas. Exposure to early life physiological stressors, such as infection, is thought to contribute to the onset of psychopathology in adulthood. In animal models, injections of the bacterial immune challenge, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), during the neonatal period has been shown to alter both neuroendocrine function and behavioural pain responses in adulthood. Interestingly, recent evidence suggests a role for the lateral hypothalamic peptide orexin in stress and nociceptive processing. However, whether neonatal LPS exposure affects the reactivity of the orexin system to formalin-induced inflammatory pain in later life remains to be determined. Male Wistar rats (n=13) were exposed to either LPS or saline (0.05mg/kg, i.p) on postnatal days (PND) 3 and 5. On PND 80-97, all rats were exposed to a subcutaneous hindpaw injection of 2.25% formalin. Following behavioural testing, animals were perfused and brains processed for Fos-protein and orexin immunohistochemistry. Rats treated with LPS during the neonatal period exhibited decreased licking behaviours during the interphase of the formalin test, the period typically associated with the active inhibition of pain, and increased grooming responses to formalin in adulthood. Interestingly, these behavioural changes were accompanied by an increase in the percentage of Fos-positive orexin cells in the dorsomedial and perifornical hypothalamus in LPS-exposed animals. Similar increases in Fos-protein were also observed in stress and pain sensitive brain regions that receive orexinergic inputs. These findings highlight a potential role for orexin in the behavioural responses to pain and provide further evidence that early life stress can prime the circuitry responsible for these responses in adulthood.

DOI 10.3389/fnins.2015.00065
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Deborah Hodgson
2015 Parkinson GM, Dayas CV, Smith DW, 'Age-related gene expression changes in substantia nigra dopamine neurons of the rat.', Mech Ageing Dev, 149 41-49 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.mad.2015.06.002
Co-authors Douglas Smith
2014 James MH, Quinn RK, Ong LK, Levi EM, Charnley JL, Smith DW, et al., 'mTORC1 inhibition in the nucleus accumbens 'protects' against the expression of drug seeking and 'relapse' and is associated with reductions in GluA1 AMPAR and CAMKIIa levels.', Neuropsychopharmacology, 39 1694-1702 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/npp.2014.16
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Phil Dickson, Douglas Smith
2014 Goldie BJ, Dun MD, Lin M, Smith ND, Verrills NM, Dayas CV, Cairns MJ, 'Activity-associated miRNA are packaged in Map1b-enriched exosomes released from depolarized neurons.', Nucleic Acids Research, 42 9195-9208 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/nar/gku594
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Minjie Lin, Murray Cairns, Matt Dun, Nikki Verrills
2014 Parkinson GM, Dayas CV, Smith DW, 'Increased mitochondrial DNA deletions in substantia nigra dopamine neurons of the aged rat.', Current aging science, 7 155-160 (2014) [C2]
Co-authors Douglas Smith
2014 Zouikr I, James MH, Campbell EJ, Clifton VL, Beagley KW, Dayas CV, Hodgson DM, 'Altered formalin-induced pain and fos induction in the periaqueductal grey of preadolescent rats following neonatal LPS exposure', PLoS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]

Animal and human studies have demonstrated that early pain experiences can produce alterations in the nociceptive systems later in life including increased sensitivity to mechanic... [more]

Animal and human studies have demonstrated that early pain experiences can produce alterations in the nociceptive systems later in life including increased sensitivity to mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli. However, less is known about the impact of neonatal immune challenge on future responses to noxious stimuli and the reactivity of neural substrates involved in analgesia. Here we demonstrate that rats exposed to Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.05 mg/kg IP, Salmonella enteritidis) during postnatal day (PND) 3 and 5 displayed enhanced formalin-induced flinching but not licking following formalin injection at PND 22. This LPS-induced hyperalgesia was accompanied by distinct recruitment of supraspinal regions involved in analgesia as indicated by significantly attenuated Fos-protein induction in the rostral dorsal periaqueductal grey (DPAG) as well as rostral and caudal axes of the ventrolateral PAG (VLPAG). Formalin injections were associated with increased Fos-protein labelling in lateral habenula (LHb) as compared to medial habenula (MHb), however the intensity of this labelling did not differ as a result of neonatal immune challenge. These data highlight the importance of neonatal immune priming in programming inflammatory pain sensitivity later in development and highlight the PAG as a possible mediator of this process. © 2014 Zouikr et al.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0098382
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Deborah Hodgson, Vicki Clifton
2014 Yeoh JW, Campbell EJ, James MH, Graham BA, Dayas CV, 'Orexin antagonists for neuropsychiatric disease: progress and potential pitfalls.', Front Neurosci, 8 36 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fnins.2014.00036
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Brett Graham
2014 Yeoh JW, James MH, Graham BA, Dayas CV, 'Electrophysiological characteristics of paraventricular thalamic (PVT) neurons in response to cocaine and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART)', FRONTIERS IN BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE, 8 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00280
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Brett Graham
2014 James MH, Campbell EJ, Walker FR, Smith DW, Richardson HN, Hodgson DM, Dayas CV, 'Exercise reverses the effects of early life stress on orexin cell reactivity in male but not female rats', Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 8 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00244
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Douglas Smith, Deborah Hodgson, Rohan Walker
2013 James MH, Dayas CV, 'What about me ...? The PVT: a role for the paraventricular thalamus (PVT) in drug-seeking behavior', FRONTIERS IN BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE, 7 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.3389/fnbeh.2013.00018
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
2013 Cahif A, Parkinson GM, Dayas CV, Smith DW, 'Characterisation of mitochondrial DNA deletions by long-PCR in central nervous system regions of young, middle- and old-aged rats.', Current Aging Science, 6 232-238 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Douglas Smith
2013 Brown AL, Day TA, Dayas CV, Smith DW, 'Purity and Enrichment of Laser-Microdissected Midbrain Dopamine Neurons', BIOMED RESEARCH INTERNATIONAL, (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1155/2013/747938
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Douglas Smith
2012 James MH, Yeoh JW, Graham B, Dayas C, 'Insights for Developing Pharmacological Treatments for Psychostimulant Relapse Targeting Hypothalamic Peptide Systems.', Journal of Addiction Research and Therapy, 01 1-14 (2012)
Co-authors Brett Graham
2012 Yeoh JW, James MH, Jobling P, Bains JS, Graham BA, Dayas CV, 'Cocaine potentiates excitatory drive in the perifornical/lateral hypothalamus', Journal of Physiology, 590 3677-3689 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Phillip Jobling, Brett Graham
2012 Dayas CV, Smith DW, Dunkley PR, 'An emerging role for the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in 'pathological' protein translation: Relevance to cocaine addiction', Frontiers in Pharmacology, 3 1-12 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Douglas Smith
2011 James MH, Charnley JL, Flynn JR, Smith DW, Dayas CV, 'Propensity to 'relapse' following exposure to cocaine cues is associated with the recruitment of specific thalamic and epithalamic nuclei', Neuroscience, 199 235-242 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Douglas Smith
2011 James MH, Charnley JL, Levi EM, Jones E, Yeoh JW, Smith DW, Dayas CV, 'Orexin-1 receptor signalling within the ventral tegmental area, but not the paraventricular thalamus, is critical to regulating cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking', International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 14 684-690 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/s1461145711000423
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 43
Co-authors Douglas Smith
2011 Brown AL, Flynn JR, Smith DW, Dayas CV, 'Down-regulated striatal gene expression for synaptic plasticity-associated proteins in addiction and relapse vulnerable animals', International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 14 1099-1110 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Douglas Smith
2010 James MH, Charnley JL, Jones E, Levi E, Yeoh JW, Flynn JR, et al., 'Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) signaling within the paraventricular thalamus modulates cocaine-seeking behaviour', Plos One, 5 e12980 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0012980
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Douglas Smith
2009 Martin-Fardon R, Baptista MAS, Dayas CV, Weiss F, 'Dissociation of the effects of MTEP [3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl] piperidine] on conditioned reinstatement and reinforcement: Comparison between cocaine and a conventional reinforcer', Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 329 1084-1090 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1124/jpet.109.151357
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 52
2008 Dayas C, McGranahan T, Martin-Fardon F, Weiss F, 'Stimuli Linked to Ethanol Availability Activate Hypothalamic CART and Orexin Neurons in a Reinstatement Model of Relapse', Biological Psychiatry, 63 152-157 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.biopsych.2007.02.002
Citations Scopus - 98Web of Science - 97
2007 Dayas C, Liu X, Simms J, Weiss F, 'Distinct Patterns of Neural Activation Associated with Ethanol Seeking: Effects of Naltrexone', Biological Psychiatry, 61 979-989 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.biopsych.2006.07.034
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 62
2006 Xhao Y, Dayas C, Aujla H, Baptista MA, Martin-Fardon R, Weiss F, 'Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors attenuates both stress and cue-induced ethanol-seeking and modulates c-fos expression in the hippocampus and amygdala', The Journal of Neuroscience, 26 9967-9974 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2384-06.2006
Citations Scopus - 93Web of Science - 90
2005 Breese GR, Chu K, Dayas C, Funk D, Knapp DJ, Koob GF, et al., 'Stress enhancement of craving during sobriety: A risk for relapse', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 29 185-195 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/01.ALC.0000153544.83656.3C
Citations Scopus - 131Web of Science - 113
2004 Dayas C, Buller KM, Day TA, 'Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons regulate medullary catecholamine cell responses to restraint stress', Journal of Comparative Neurology, 478 22-34 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cne.20259
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 30
2004 Dayas C, Martin-Fardon R, Thorsell A, Weiss F, 'Chronic footshock, but not a physiological stressor, suppresses the alcohol deprivation effect in dependent rats', Alcohol and Alcoholism, 39 190-196 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/alcalc/agh046
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
2003 Buller KM, Dayas C, Day TA, 'Descending pathways from the paraventricular nucleus contribute to the recruitment of brainstem nuclei following a systemic immune challenge', Neuroscience, 118 189-203 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0306-4522(02)00808-4
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 34
2002 Dayas C, Day TA, 'Opposing Roles For Medial And Central Amygdala In The Initiation Of Noradrenergic Cell Responses To A Psychological Stressor.', European Journal of Neuroscience, 15 1712-1718 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 57Web of Science - 45
2001 Buller K, Xu YY, Dayas C, Day T, 'Dorsal and ventral medullary catecholamine cell groups contribute differentially to systemic interleukin-1 beta-induced hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis responses', NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY, 73 129-138 (2001)
DOI 10.1159/000054629
Citations Web of Science - 64
2001 Dayas CV, Buller KM, Day TA, 'Medullary neurones regulate hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor cell responses to an emotional stressor', NEUROSCIENCE, 105 707-719 (2001)
DOI 10.1016/S0306-4522(01)00213-5
Citations Scopus - 73Web of Science - 62
2001 Dayas CV, Buller KM, Crane JW, Xu Y, Day TA, 'Stressor categorization: Acute physical and psychological stressors elicit distinctive recruitment patterns in the amygdala and in medullary noradrenergic cell groups', European Journal of Neuroscience, 14 1143-1152 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 285Web of Science - 260
2000 Dayas CV, Xu Y, Buller KM, Day TA, 'Effects of chronic oestrogen replacement on stress-induced activation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis control pathways', JOURNAL OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY, 12 784-794 (2000)
DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2826.2000.00527.x
Citations Scopus - 76Web of Science - 64
1999 Dayas CV, Buller KM, Day TA, 'Neuroendocrine responses to an emotional stressor: Evidence for involvement of the medial but not the central amygdala', European Journal of Neuroscience, 11 2312-2322 (1999) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 225Web of Science - 205
Show 31 more journal articles

Conference (11 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 James MH, Charnley JL, Levi EM, Dunkley PR, Smith DW, Dickson PW, Dayas CV, 'A role for the mTOR pathway in the development of addiction', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Phil Dickson, Peter Dunkley, Douglas Smith
2012 Brown AL, Flynn JR, Dayas CV, Smith DW, 'Altered gene expression in cell signalling pathways of midbrain dopamine neurons from addiction and relapse vulnerable animals', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Douglas Smith
2012 Dayas CV, Quinn RK, Goldie BJ, Brown AM, Levi EM, Smith DW, Cairns MJ, 'Association of miRNAs with addiction-relevant synaptic plasticity genes', Abstract Book. Biological Psychiatry Australia Scientific Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Murray Cairns, Douglas Smith
2012 Campbell EJ, James MH, Sominsky Bar L, Hodgson DM, Dayas CV, 'Adult stress unmasks altered orexin cell functioning in maternally separated rats: Implications for the development of psychopathologies', Abstract Book. Biological Psychiatry Australia Scientific Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Hodgson
2010 Dayas CV, 'BRAIN MECHANISMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE DEVELOPMENT OF PSYCHOSTIMULANT ADDICTION', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2010) [E3]
2008 Dayas CV, 'The neurobiology of drug relapse: A role for hypothalamic 'feeding' peptides in drug relapse?', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
2007 Dayas CV, McGranahan TM, Martin-Fardon R, Weiss F, 'Hypothalamic feeding-related peptides are recruited in a reinstatement model of ethanol relapse (Poster)', 7th IBRO 2007 World Congress of Neuroscience Program (2007) [E3]
2007 Weiss F, Dayas CV, 'Alcohol cue exposure produces distinct patterns of neural activation implications for alcohol craving and relapse', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH (2007)
2005 Zhao Y, Dayas CV, Weiss F, 'Effects of the metabotropic Glutamate 2/3 agonist LY379268 on reinstatement of ethanol-seeking induced by alcohol-associated environmental stimuli and foot-shock stress', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH (2005)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2005 Dayas CV, Zhao Y, Weiss F, ''Anti-relapse' effects of the metabotropic glutamate 2/3 agonist LY379268 am associated with increased c-fos expression in the central amygdala', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH (2005)
1999 Day TA, Buller KM, Xu Y, Dayas CV, Crane JW, 'Separation of neural pathways mediating HPA axis responses to emotional and physical stressors', CONTROL MECHANISMS OF STRESS AND EMOTION: NEUROENDOCRINE-BASED STUDIES (1999)
Citations Web of Science - 2
Show 8 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 26
Total funding $1,635,961

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $491,473

Mechanisms underlying efferent feedback in the vestibular system$491,473

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Alan Brichta, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Doctor Rebecca Lim, Professor Robert Callister, Dr Chris Holt, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Professor Richard Rabbitt
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1500239
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20154 grants / $294,400

Glencore-HMRI: Laser Applied Stimulation and Uncaging System$250,000

The LASU system is a dedicated microscope and electrophysiological rig for optogenetics.

Funding body: HMRI

Funding body HMRI
Project Team
Scheme HMRI
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON N

How does stress increase vulnerability to food and drug addiction$20,000

Funding body: Coopers Brewery Foundation Inc Trust

Funding body Coopers Brewery Foundation Inc Trust
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501068
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Neuroimaging extension study for Cannabis Dependent Patients in an RCT of Cannabinoid Replacement Therapy (Sativex®)$14,400

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop, Doctor Amanda Brown, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Associate Professor Peter Stanwell, Associate Professor Nicholas Lintzeris, Professor Iain McGregor, Dr David Allsop, Dr Nghi Phung
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500923
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

The involvement of the lateral hypothalamic orexin system in motivational behaviours$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Ms Erin Campbell, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Professor Deborah Hodgson
Scheme Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401379
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20141 grants / $25,000

Modulation of emotion by gut signals to the brain$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401518
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20136 grants / $90,596

Identifying novel pharmacological targets for drug relapse$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300473
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Identifying novel pharmacological targets for drug relapse$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas
Scheme Near Miss
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300827
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Addictive drugs rewire the hypothalamus to drive relapse through brain 'reward' circuits$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300474
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Addictive drugs rewire the hypothalamus to drive relapse through brain 'reward' circuits$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas
Scheme Near Miss
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300828
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

PhD Student Pulse Travel Award 'Dopamine 2013'$6,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300521
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20124 grants / $53,211

Characterizing psychostimulant-induced synaptic plasticity in the hypothalamus$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200677
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Roles of post-transcriptional gene silencing in the functional regulation of neuronal gene expression and plasticity in schizophrenia$19,500

Funding body: Schizophrenia Research Institute

Funding body Schizophrenia Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Ms Belinda Goldie, Associate Professor Chris Dayas
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1200761
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Understanding the behavioural and neuroendocrine mechanisms of invasiveness in an avian system: do Indian mynahs display a dopaminergic-dependent invasion syndrome?$12,211

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project Team Doctor Andrea Griffin, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Doctor David Guez
Scheme Strategic Small Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1401098
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Addiction Research and Therapy, Embassy Suites Las Vegas, 20 - 22 August 2012$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200602
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20112 grants / $35,000

Brain Mechanisms Conferring Psychostimulant Addiction$25,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley, Doctor Doug Smith
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1001052
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

IMPLEN NanoPhotometer pearl$10,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Professor Alan Brichta, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Emeritus Professor Patricia Michie, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Ulli Schall, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Doctor Frederick Walker, Doctor Rick Thorne, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Doctor Janet Bristow, Doctor Severine Roselli, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Associate Professor Liz Milward, Doctor Charles De Bock, Doctor Julie Merriman-Jones, Doctor Jing Qin Wu, Doctor Bing Liu, Dr DAN Johnstone, Ms BELINDA Goldie, Doctor Natalie Beveridge
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100030
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20102 grants / $55,303

ABI 7500 Real Time PCR System $34,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Characterising the synaptic physiology of orexin neurons in response to cocaine: Implications for drug relapse$21,303

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900151
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

20081 grants / $398,978

Brain pathways underlying vulnerability to drug relapse$398,978

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0187592
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20074 grants / $57,500

Characterisation of the brain mechanisms linking vulnerability to stress and vulnerability to drug addiction$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Trevor Day, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Doctor Doug Smith
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187255
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

3D Imaging Software/Work station$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Pow, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Derek Laver
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0188026
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Characterisation of the Brain Mechanisms linking vulnerability to stress and vulnerability to drug addiction$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187312
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning drug relapse$7,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187726
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20061 grants / $134,500

Neural links between drug addiction and stress$134,500

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Professor Trevor Day
Scheme Training (Postdoctoral) Fellowships - C.J. Martin Biomedical Fellowships (Overseas)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0187071
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed4
Current6

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD2.7

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Modulation of Emotion by Gut Signals to the Brain
PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Evidence Accumulation Models of Rodent Behaviour
PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Optogenetic Dissection of Hypothalamic Brain Circuitry and its Implications for Conditions of Motivated Behaviour
PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Characterizing Changes in the Orexin System in Models of Neuropsychiatric Disease
PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD Role of miRNA in Addiction Vulnerability
PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2011 PhD Ageing of the Somatic Motor Nervous System: A Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genome Perspective
PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Drug-induced Changes to the Lateral Hypothalamic Circuits and Downstream Projection Targets
PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Roles of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing in the Functional Regulation of Neuronal Gene Expression and Plasticity
PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD The Role of Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) and Orexin in Drug-Seeking and Addiction-Related Behaviours
PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD Molecular Correlates of Dopamine Signalling in Addiction Vulnerability
PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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News

microscope

Microscope to shed light on mental health

April 30, 2015

A laser-equipped microscope that gives brain researchers unparalleled insight into mental illness has just been installed at the University of Newcastle.

Associate Professor Chris Dayas

Position

Associate Professor
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Anatomy

Contact Details

Email christopher.dayas@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5618
Fax (02) 4921 7904
Link UoN Blogs

Office

Room MS306C/D
Building Medical Sciences
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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