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Dr Ian Grainge

ARC Future Fellow

School of Environmental and Life Sciences (Biological Sciences)

From Oxford to Newcastle

Dr Ian Grainge

The journey to biology research began for Dr Ian Grainge almost 20 years ago in the United Kingdom.

Two years into an undergraduate degree, Grainge's initial interest in Chemistry had begun to dwindle.  He switched to genetics before obtaining his PhD in biochemistry and he hasn't looked back since.

From there he took his interest in research around the world. This included  working on a natural yeast plasmid in Texas for three years before returning to work for Cancer Research UK, looking at replication proteins and protein structures (x-ray crystallography).

After doing more work on bacteria in Oxford, Grainge's idea was to link together biochemistry (how proteins work in test tubes) to the actual structural information and has carried on with this theme in his current research.

"At the moment we're trying to understand the molecular details of one of the motor proteins and the way it can bind and convert chemical energy into actual movement of DNA" explained Grainge.

"This FtsK protein is a very efficient molecular pump that moves the DNA through the cell and we're trying to understand the molecular details of how this protein machine works. It is found in most bacteria and plays an important role in the cell, co-ordinating the vital process of cell division and chromosome unlinking, which is one way bacteria keep their chromosome intact" he added.

The four year ARC Future Fellowship that Grainge was awarded in 2012 will contribute to this research, which could potentially form the basis for developing a new antibiotic to fight bacteria.

"It's amazing to get the grant both for opportunity for research and the recognition that somebody thinks my work is important. I've got more than enough work to do over the term of the Fellowship and I'll try to get students interested in the work as well to get them helping me on the project", said Grainge.

Mathematicians will also be involved with the project to try to understand the way in which the protein affects the shape of the DNA, known as DNA Topology, and how that affects the outcomes of these reactions.

Grainge's move to Newcastle 2010 was a big step to becoming independent and setting up his own lab, which was a big motivating factor in his decision making. Since his time at the University of Newcastle, he has obtained four grants, including the Fellowship, which is a major achievement.

While the future appears very busy for Grainge, he hopes to take up a few hobbies while based in Newcastle.

"I'd like to try surfing some day. I've just been too scared to try it so far. Apart from that I'm happy to stay at the University of Newcastle. I like it here," he said.

Dr Ian Grainge

From Oxford to Newcastle

Dr Ian Grainge is interested in all aspects of how bacteria pass on their genetic information, from DNA replication to chromosome segregation and accurate

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Career Summary

Biography

I am interested in all aspects of how bacteria pass on their genetic information, from DNA replication to chromosome segregation and accurate cell division. My current research focuses on two main topics. Firstly what happens when the process of DNA replication runs into a blockage and stops- how can the cell recover to restart the vital process of copying its DNA? A large number of homologous recombination proteins have been implicated in the processing of collapsed DNA replication forks and their roles, and the pathways used, will be investigated in living cells. Secondly, is the study of the FtsK protein, which co-ordinates the processes of cell division, chromosome unlinking and chromosome segregation in bacteria. Each of these processes has to be completed in a timely manner to allow the cell to divide to produce offspring with a full genetic content. The DNA translocase protein, FtsK, is a key protein in each of these processes, and could additionally act as a cell division checkpoint. Post-doctoral work: Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (2005-2009) Cancer Research UK (2000-2004) University of Texas at Austin (1997-2000) PhD: University of Oxford, UK (1994-1997)

Research Expertise
DNA replication in bacteria: restart of stalled replication forks The chromosome of E. coli is a circular DNA molecule which is replicated bi-directionally from a single origin (OriC). Multiple copies of the tetracycline operator (tetO) have been placed in the chromosome 16kb to one side of the origin of replication. Expression of a fluorescent tetracycline repressor (TetR-YFP) allows direct visualization of this region in a fluorescence microscope. Using this system, the origin can effectively be followed during duplication and on through the cell cycle. It was found that overexpression of tetR led to cell inviability. The viability of the cells could be recovered by addition of the effector molecule, anhydrous tetracycline (AT) which reduces the binding of TetR to tetO. Analysis of replication in cells overexpressing TetR showed that the array formed an effective block to replication forks. 2-D gel analysis shows that replication forks can proceed fewer than 500 bp into the tetO array before stalling occurs. Further it is seen that addition of AT leads to a very rapid restart of these stalled forks. Restart of the forks was examined in recA and recB mutant strains and it was found that restart occurred with very similar kinetics to those seen in a wild-type background. This has led us to propose that a stalled replication fork is stable in E. coli for a period of at least 2 hours and that restart does not require recombination. Current work is focusing on what happens when the replisome, stalled at the tetO array block, is disassembled, with a view to understanding replication fork restart pathways and kinetics in vivo. Using this system replication restart can be followed in various mutant backgrounds by examination of fluorescent repressor operators, and by using 2-D gels, to effectively dissect in vivo restart pathways. FtsK: a fast molecular motor The multifunctional FtsK protein is involved in cell division and DNA segregation in E. coli. The C-terminal portion of this large protein forms a hexameric ring with the ability to translocate DNA at speeds of ~ 5kb/sec. The FtsK protein is loaded on DNA in a specific orientation by interactions with polarized sequences on the chromosome which ensure that the protein will subsequently move towards the dif site located in the terminus of the chromosome. Once there, FtsK also interacts with the site-specific recombinase XerD to promote recombination between two dif sites. Further, as a result of translocation the two recombining dif sites are brought together in a topologically simple manner so that recombination leads to a simplification of topology, and eventually chromosome unlinking. Using a variety of biochemical techniques the mechanism of directed loading upon DNA, DNA translocation and activation of recombination within a specific synapse topology is being investigated. Using covalently linked multimers of the translocase protion of the protein, hexameric rings can be formed within which mutations can be targeted to specific subunits. This allows more defined analysis of the mechanism of loading and translocation than would otherwise be possible.

Teaching Expertise
Present course taught: BIOL2010- Biochemistry CHEM3550 Medicinal Chemistry BIOL3100 Microbiology BIOL2230 Biomolecules Courses lectured at the University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry: Modern Molecular Biology: Methods DNA: Replication and Recombination

Administrative Expertise
Member of Institutional Biosafety Committee Member of Faculty Research and Research Training Committee Convenor of Biological Sciences seminar series.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Oxford - UK
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Cambridge - UK
  • Master of Arts, University of Cambridge - UK

Keywords

  • BIOL2010
  • BIOL2230
  • BIOL3100
  • CHEM3550
  • Cell division
  • Chromosome segregation
  • DNA translocation
  • Microbiology
  • Novel antibiotics
  • Site-specific recombination

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
030499Medicinal and Biomolecular Chemistry not elsewhere classified10
060199Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified70
060599Microbiology not elsewhere classified20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2014 - LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/11/2012 - Fellow ARC
ARC - Discovery - Future Fellowships
University of Newcastle
Australia

Membership

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2012 - Membership - Australian Society for MicrobiologyAustralian Society for Microbiology
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (5 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2012Doherty GP, Mettrick KA, Grainge IR, Lewis PJ, 'Imaging fluorescent protein fusions in live bacteria', Methods in Microbiology, Academic Press, Kidlington, Ox 107-126 (2012) [B1]
Co-authorsPeter Lewis
2007Grainge I, Sherratt D, 'Site specific recombination', Topics in Current Genetics: Molecular Genetics of Recombination, Springer, Berlin, Germany 1423-1433 (2007) [B1]
2005Grainge IRF, Jayaram M, 'Introduction to site-specific recombination', The Dynamic Bacterial Genome, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom 33-82 (2005) [B1]
2005Voziyanov Y, Grainge I, Jayaram M, 'Applications of fungal site-specific recombination as a tool in biotechnology and basic biology', 189-210 (2005) [B1]

Two classes of conservative site-specific recombinases, those belonging to the tyrosine and serine families, have been identified, and several of its members characterized in genetic and biochemical detail. These families are named after the active site amino acid, tyrosine or serine, that is utilized as the nucleophile during the strand breaking step of recombination. The Flp recombinase encoded by the 2 micron plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related recombinases encoded by similar plasmids found in other yeast species belong to the tyrosine family. The Flp protein has provided several insights into the mechanism of target DNA recognition, strand cleavage and strand exchange during the recombination reaction. Here we describe how the Flp system has been used as a tool for tackling basic and applied problems in biology. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI10.1016/S1874-5334(05)80010-3
2002Jayaram M, Grainge IRF, Tribble GD, 'Site-specific DNA recombination mediated by the Flp protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae', Mobile DNA II, ASM Press, Washington, DC/USA 192-218 (2002) [B1]
Show 2 more chapters

Journal article (30 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Guo P, Grainge I, Zhao Z, Vieweger M, 'Two classes of nucleic acid translocation motors: Rotation and revolution without rotation', Cell and Bioscience, 4 (2014) [C1]

Biomotors are extensively involved in biological processes including cell mitosis, bacterial binary fission, DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, Holliday junction resolution, RNA transcription, and viral genome packaging. Traditionally, they were classified into two categories including linear and rotation motors. In 2013, a third class of motor by revolution mechanism without rotation was discovered. In this issue of " Structure and mechanisms of nanomotors in the cells" , four comprehensive reviews are published to address the latest advancements of the structure and motion mechanism of a variety of biomotors in archaea, animal viruses, bacteria, and bacteriophages.

DOI10.1186/2045-3701-4-54
CitationsScopus - 1
2013Shimokawa K, Ishihara K, Grainge I, Sherratt DJ, Vazquez M, 'FtsK-dependent XerCD-dif recombination unlinks replication catenanes in a stepwise manner.', Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 110 20906-20911 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1073/pnas.1308450110Author URL
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2013Grainge I, 'Simple topology: FtsK-directed recombination at the dif site', BIOCHEMICAL SOCIETY TRANSACTIONS, 41 595-600 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1042/BST20120299Author URL
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2011Grainge IR, Lesterlin C, Sherratt DJ, 'Activation of XerCD-dif recombination by the FtsK DNA translocase', Nucleic Acids Research, 39 5140-5148 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1093/nar/gkr078
CitationsScopus - 28Web of Science - 26
2010Crozat E, Meglio A, Allemand J-F, Chivers CE, Howarth M, Venien-Bryan C, et al., 'Separating speed and ability to displace roadblocks during DNA translocation by FtsK.', The EMBO Journal, 29 1423-1433 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1038/emboj.2010.29
CitationsScopus - 23Web of Science - 22
2010Sherratt DJ, Arciszewska L, Crozat E, Graham J, Grainge IRF, 'The Escherichia coli DNA translocase FtsK.', Biochemical Society Transactions, 38 395-398 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1042/BST0380395
CitationsScopus - 29Web of Science - 29
2010Grainge IR, 'FtsK - a bacterial cell division checkpoint?', Molecular Microbiology, 78 1055-1057 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2958.2010.07411.x
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2010Crozat E, Grainge IR, 'FtsK DNA translocase: The fast motor that knows where it's going', ChemBioChem, 11 2232-2243 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1002/cbic.201000347
CitationsScopus - 20Web of Science - 20
2008Lowe J, Ellonen A, Allen MD, Atkinson C, Sherratt DJ, Grainge IRF, 'Molecular mechanism of sequence-directed DNA loading and translocation by FtsK', Molecular Cell, 31 498-509 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.molcel.2008.05.027
CitationsScopus - 55Web of Science - 56
2008Atanassova N, Grainge IRF, 'Biochemical Characterization of the Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) Protein of the Crenarchaeote Aeropyrum pernix and Its Interactions with the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) Proteins', Biochemistry, 47 1336-1337 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1021/bi801479s
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 10
2008Grainge IRF, 'Sporulation: SpoIIIE is the key to cell differentiation', Current Biology, 18 871-872 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.cub.2008.07.047
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2007Grainge I, Sherratt DJ, 'Site-specific recombination', Topics in Current Genetics, 17 27-52 (2007)

Site-specific recombination is a reaction in which a pair of genetically defined sites undergoes reciprocal exchange ("crossing-over") via a recombinase-mediated DNA breakage and joining process. Such reactions have a wide range of biological outcomes, from integration and excision of virus genomes into and out of host chromosomes, to acquisition of novel genes and drug resistance, and even facilitating bacterial chromosome segregation. Two distinct families of recombinases exist, designated by their active site residues. In both these families recombination is carried out by a core of four recombinase monomers acting at two synapsed DNA sites. In many cases additional recombinase monomers and/or accessory proteins act at adjacent DNA sites to facilitate synapsis and often play a critical role in determining reaction topology. Here, the mechanism of site-specific recombination reactions is examined for both site-specific recombinase families, as well as for related proteins that mediate variant reactions, such as integrons and the integrases of conjugative transposons. © 2006 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

DOI10.1007/4735_2006_0202
2007Grainge I, Bregu M, Vazquez M, Sivanathan V, Ip SCY, Sherratt DJ, 'Unlinking chromosome catenanes in vivo by site-specific recombination', EMBO JOURNAL, 26 4228-4238 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1038/sj.emboj.7601849Author URL
CitationsScopus - 48Web of Science - 50
2006Grainge I, Gaudier M, Schuwirth BS, Westcott SL, Sandall J, Atanassova N, Wigley DB, 'Biochemical analysis of a DNA replication origin in the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix', JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, 363 355-369 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1016/jmb.2006.07.076Author URL
CitationsScopus - 28Web of Science - 28
2006Possoz C, Filipe SR, Grainge I, Sherratt DJ, 'Tracking of controlled Escherichia coli replication fork stalling and restart at repressor-bound DNA in vivo', EMBO JOURNAL, 25 2596-2604 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1038/sj.emboj.7601155Author URL
CitationsScopus - 58Web of Science - 61
2004Singleton MR, Morales R, Grainge I, Cook N, Isupov MN, Wigley DB, 'Conformational changes induced by nucleotide binding in Cdc6/ORC from Aeropyrum pernix', JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, 343 547-557 (2004) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.jmb.2004.08.044Author URL
CitationsScopus - 54Web of Science - 54
2003Grainge I, Scaife S, Wigley DB, 'Biochemical analysis of components of the pre-replication complex of Archaeoglobus fulgidus', NUCLEIC ACIDS RESEARCH, 31 4888-4898 (2003) [C1]
DOI10.1093/nar/gkg662Author URL
CitationsScopus - 48Web of Science - 50
2002Sau AK, Tribble GD, Grainge I, Frohlich RF, Knudsen BR, Jayaram M, 'Biochemical and kinetic analysis of the RNase active sites of the integrase/tyrosine family site-specific recombinases. (vol 276, pg 46612, 2001)', JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, 277 6758-6758 (2002)
Author URL
2002Sau AK, DeVue Tribble G, Grainge I, Frøhlich RF, Knudsen BR, Jayaram M, 'Erratum: Biochemical and kinetic analysis of the RNase active sites of the integrase/tyrosine family site-specific recombinases (Journal of Biological Chemistry (2001) 276 (46612-46623))', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 277 6758-6758 (2002)
2002Grainge I, Pathania S, Vologodskii A, Harshey RM, Jayaram M, 'Symmetric DNA sites are functionally asymmetric within Flp and Cre site-specific DNA recombination synapses', JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, 320 515-527 (2002) [C1]
DOI10.1016/S0022-2836(02)00517-XAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 16Web of Science - 19
2001Frohlich RF, Hansen SG, Lisby M, Grainge I, Westergaard O, Jayaram M, Knudsen BR, 'Inhibition of Flp recombinase by the topoisomerase I-targeting drugs, camptothecin and NSC-314622', JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, 276 6993-6997 (2001) [C1]
DOI10.1074/jbc.C000901200Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2001San AK, Tribble GD, Grainge I, Frohlich RF, Knudsen BR, Jayaram M, 'Biochemical and kinetic analysis of the RNase active sites of the integrase/tyrosine family site-specific DNA recombinases', JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, 276 46612-46623 (2001)
Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2001Sau AK, Tribble GD, Grainge IRF, Frohlich RF, Knudsen BR, Jayaram M, 'Biochemical and kinetic analysis of the RNase active sites of the integrase/tyrosine family site-specific recombinases', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 276 4661-4662 (2001) [C1]
2001Grainge I, Lee J, Xu CJ, Jayaram M, 'DNA recombination and RNA cleavage activities of the Flp protein: Roles of two histidine residues in the orientation and activation of the nucleophile for strand cleavage', JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, 314 717-733 (2001) [C1]
DOI10.1006/jmbi.2001.5194Author URL
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2000Grainge I, Buck D, Jayaram M, 'Geometry of site alignment during int family recombination: Antiparallel synapsis by the Flp recombinase', JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, 298 749-764 (2000) [C1]
DOI10.1006/jmbi.2000.3769Author URL
CitationsScopus - 40Web of Science - 45
1999Grainge I, Sherratt DJ, 'Xer site-specific recombination - DNA strand rejoining by recombinase XerC', JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, 274 6763-6769 (1999) [C1]
DOI10.1074/jbc.274.10.6763Author URL
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 5
1999Lee J, Jayaram M, Grainge I, 'Wild-type Flp recombinase cleaves DNA in trans', EMBO JOURNAL, 18 784-791 (1999) [C1]
DOI10.1093/emboj/18.3.784Author URL
CitationsScopus - 30Web of Science - 28
1998Xu CJ, Grainge I, Lee J, Harshey RM, Jayaram M, 'Unveiling two distinct ribonuclease activities and a topoisomerase activity in a site-specific DNA recombinase', MOLECULAR CELL, 1 729-739 (1998) [C1]
DOI10.1016/S1097-2765(00)80072-6Author URL
CitationsScopus - 26Web of Science - 26
1997Arciszewska L, Grainge IRF, Sherratt DJ, 'Action of site-specific recombinases XerC and XerD on tethered Holliday junctions', The EMBO Journal, 16 3731-3743 (1997) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 39Web of Science - 37
1995Arciszewska L, Grainge IRF, Sherratt DJ, 'EFFECTS OF HOLLIDAY JUNCTION POSITION ON XER-MEDIATED RECOMBINATION IN-VITRO', The EMBO Journal, 14 2651-2660 (1995) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 27Web of Science - 27
Show 27 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
1999Grainge I, Jayaram M, 'The integrase family of recombinases: organization and function of the active site', MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY (1999) [D1]
DOI10.1046/j.1365-2958.1999.01493.xAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 94Web of Science - 94
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants13
Total funding$2,321,884

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20141 grants / $10,000

DNA Replication fork stability, collapse and processing in living Escherichia coli cells$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Ian Grainge
SchemeNear Miss Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1301382
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20134 grants / $76,144

DVC(R) Research Support for Future Fellow (FT12)$60,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Ian Grainge
SchemeSpecial Project Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1201101
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Development of new genetic tools for protein knockouts in pathogenic bacteria$13,129

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project TeamDoctor Ian Grainge
SchemeStrategic Small Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1401062
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Faculty PVC Conference Assistance Grant 2013$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project TeamDoctor Ian Grainge
SchemePVC Conference Assistance Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1401158
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Characterisation of the interaction between the essential bacterial transcription factor NusA and RNA Polymerase$1,015

Funding body: Australian Synchrotron

Funding bodyAustralian Synchrotron
Project TeamDoctor Ian Grainge
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1301024
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

20123 grants / $1,030,757

Characterization of a powerful molecular motor, the FtsK DNA translocase$709,318

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Ian Grainge
SchemeFuture Fellowships
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1101070
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Targeting nucleic acid synthesis and cell division in gram-negative bacterial pathogens$311,439

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Nicholas Dixon, Associate Professor Elizabeth Harry, Professor Peter Lewis, Associate Professor Aaron Oakley, Doctor Ian Grainge
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1101133
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Ultrasonic Homogenizer System and -80 ºC Freezers for chemical and biological sample storage$10,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Adam McCluskey, Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Professor Peter Lewis, Ms Belinda Nixon, Doctor Shaun Roman, Doctor Jennette Sakoff, Doctor Ian Grainge
SchemeEquipment Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1100986
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

20114 grants / $1,199,983

Molecular characterization of the role of FtsK in chromosome unlinking and segregation.$455,022

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Ian Grainge
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1000271
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Chemical Biology$444,961

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Adam McCluskey, Doctor Warwick Belcher, Doctor Ian Grainge, Professor Christopher Grof, Professor Peter Lewis, Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Doctor Shaun Roman, Conjoint Professor Ray Rose, Doctor Jennette Sakoff, Doctor Nikki Verrills
SchemePriority Research Centre
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100052
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

DNA Replication fork processing and recovery in living Escherichia coli cells$285,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Ian Grainge
SchemeDiscovery Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1000148
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Eppendorf mastercycler pro with thermomixer comfort and 5430R centrifuge$15,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Eileen McLaughlin, Professor Peter Lewis, Professor Adam McCluskey, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Associate Professor Brett Nixon, Doctor Shaun Roman, Doctor Jennette Sakoff, Doctor Ian Grainge, Doctor Janet Holt, Doctor Xiao Yang
SchemeEquipment Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100028
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

20101 grants / $5,000

Chromosome stability in pathogenic bacteria$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Ian Grainge
SchemeNew Staff Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000625
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY
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Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015The Role of Helicases in Replication Fork Processing and Restart Following Stalling in E.coli
Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
2015Elucidating the Function of the Novel Transcription Factor AtfA and its Relevance to Virulence and Persistence in the y Proteobacteria
Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor
2014Frequency of Chromosome Dimers Resulting From Replication Fork Processing Following Blockage or Collapse
Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
2013Understanding Chromosome Dimer Resolution Systems of a Pathogenic Bacteria at a Molecular Level
Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
2012Development of Genetic Tools for the Quantitative Assessment of Gene Depletion in Pathogenic Bacteria
Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
2012Bacterial Transcription Factors NusB, NusE ATFA and p as Targets for Antibiotic Research
Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014Increased Understanding of the Molecular Interactions Involved in Bacterial Transcription and Recombination
Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor
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Dr Ian Grainge

Position

ARC Future Fellow
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Focus area

Biological Sciences

Contact Details

Emailian.grainge@newcastle.edu.au
Phone4921 7238
Fax4921 5472

Office

RoomBG09
BuildingBiological Sciences
LocationCallaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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