Associate Professor Brett Graham

Associate Professor

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy (Anatomy)

Career Summary

Biography

Brett Graham graduated with his PhD in 2006 and after a short postdoctoral period started his research laboratory, now the Spinal Cord Connections Group, in 2008. The primary theme of his research is spinal sensory coding, a topic he has been focussed on since completing Honours year studying inhibitory synaptic transmission between spinal dorsal horn neurons in 2001.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences (Hons), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Biomedical Science
  • Neurophysiology
  • Neuroscience
  • Pain
  • Spinal cord
  • Synaptic transmission

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified 35
111699 Medical Physiology not elsewhere classified 55
170299 Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified 10

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2008 - 1/12/2011 Fellow NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2001 -  Membership - Australian Neuroscience Society (ANS) Australian Neuroscience Society (ANS)
Australia
1/01/2001 -  Membership - International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) IASP International Association for the Study of Pain
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Graham BA, Callister RJ, 'Pain', The Mouse Nervous System, Academic Press, San Diego 589-606 (2012) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Robert Callister

Journal article (37 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Duchatel RJ, Jobling P, Graham BA, Harms LR, Michie PT, Hodgson DM, Tooney PA, 'Increased white matter neuron density in a rat model of maternal immune activation - Implications for schizophrenia', Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, 65 118-126 (2016)

© 2015. Interstitial neurons are located among white matter tracts of the human and rodent brain. Post-mortem studies have identified increased interstitial white matter neuron (... [more]

© 2015. Interstitial neurons are located among white matter tracts of the human and rodent brain. Post-mortem studies have identified increased interstitial white matter neuron (IWMN) density in the fibre tracts below the cortex in people with schizophrenia. The current study assesses IWMN pathology in a model of maternal immune activation (MIA); a risk factor for schizophrenia. Experimental MIA was produced by an injection of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) into pregnant rats on gestational day (GD) 10 or GD19. A separate control group received saline injections. The density of neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN+) and somatostatin (SST+) IWMNs was determined in the white matter of the corpus callosum in two rostrocaudally adjacent areas in the 12week old offspring of GD10 (n=10) or GD19 polyI:C dams (n=18) compared to controls (n=20). NeuN+ IWMN density trended to be higher in offspring from dams exposed to polyI:C at GD19, but not GD10. A subpopulation of these NeuN+ IWMNs was shown to express SST. PolyI:C treatment of dams induced a significant increase in the density of SST+ IWMNs in the offspring when delivered at both gestational stages with more regionally widespread effects observed at GD19. A positive correlation was observed between NeuN+ and SST+ IWMN density in animals exposed to polyI:C at GD19, but not controls. This is the first study to show that MIA increases IWMN density in adult offspring in a similar manner to that seen in the brain in schizophrenia. This suggests the MIA model will be useful in future studies aimed at probing the relationship between IWMNs and schizophrenia.

DOI 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2015.09.006
Co-authors Lauren Harms, Paul Tooney, Pat Michie, Deborah Hodgson
2016 Farrell KE, Rank MM, Keely S, Brichta AM, Graham BA, Callister RJ, 'In vivo characterization of colorectal and cutaneous inputs to lumbosacral dorsal horn neurons in the mouse spinal cord.', Neuroscience, 316 13-25 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.12.023
Co-authors Simon Keely, Robert Callister, Michelle Rank, Alan Brichta
2015 Kongsui R, Johnson SJ, Graham BA, Nilsson M, Walker FR, 'A combined cumulative threshold spectra and digital reconstruction analysis reveal structural alterations of microglia within the prefrontal cortex following low-dose LPS administration', Neuroscience, 310 629-640 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 IBRO. Sickness behaviors have become the focus of great interest in recent years as they represent a clear case of how peripheral disturbances in immune signaling can disr... [more]

© 2015 IBRO. Sickness behaviors have become the focus of great interest in recent years as they represent a clear case of how peripheral disturbances in immune signaling can disrupt quite complex behaviors. In the current study, we were interested in examining whether we could identify any significant morphological disturbances in microglia associated with these sickness-like behaviors in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. We chose lipopolysaccharide (LPS 100 µg/kg/i.p.), to induce sickness-like behaviors as it is the most well-validated approach to do so in rodents and humans. We were particularly interested in examining changes in microglia within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) as several recent neuroimaging studies have highlighted significant functional changes in this region following peripheral LPS administration. Paraformaldehyde-fixed tissue was collected from animals 24 h post LPS administration and labeled immunohistochemically with an antibody directed to bind to Iba-1, a protein known to be involved in the structural remodeling of microglia. To analyze changes, we have made use of two recently described image analysis procedures. The first is known as cumulative threshold spectra (CTS) analysis. The second involves the unsupervised digital reconstruction of microglia. We undertook these complementary analysis of microglial cells in the both the pre- and infralimbic divisions of the PFC. Our results indicated that microglial soma size was significantly enlarged, while cell processes had contracted slightly following LPS administration. To our knowledge this study is to first to definitely demonstrate substantial microglial disturbances within the PFC following LPS delivered at a dose that was sufficient to induce significant sickness-like behavior.

DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.09.061
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Sarah Johnson
2015 Tadros MA, Farrell KE, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Properties of sodium currents in neonatal and young adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons.', Mol Pain, 11 17 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s12990-015-0014-5
2015 Tadros MA, Farrell KE, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Properties of sodium currents in neonatal and young adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons', Molecular Pain, 11 (2015)

© Tadros et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: Superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons process nociceptive information and their excitability is partly determined by the pro... [more]

© Tadros et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: Superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons process nociceptive information and their excitability is partly determined by the properties of voltage-gated sodium channels. Recently, we showed the excitability and action potential properties of mouse SDH neurons change markedly during early postnatal development. Here we compare sodium currents generated in neonate (P0-5) and young adult (=P21) SDH neurons. Results: Whole cell recordings were obtained from lumbar SDH neurons in transverse spinal cord slices (CsF internal, 32°C). Fast activating and inactivating TTX-sensitive inward currents were evoked by depolarization from a holding potential of 100mV. Poorly clamped currents, based on a deflection in the IV relationship at potentials between 60 and 50mV, were not accepted for analysis. Current density and decay time increased significantly between the first and third weeks of postnatal development, whereas time to peak was similar at both ages. This was accompanied by more subtle changes in activation range and steady state inactivation. Recovery from inactivation was slower and TTX-sensitivity was reduced in young adult neurons. Conclusions: Our study suggests sodium channel expression changes markedly during early postnatal development in mouse SDH neurons. The methods employed in this study can now be applied to future investigations of spinal cord sodium channel plasticity in murine pain models.

DOI 10.1186/s12990-015-0014-5
Co-authors Robert Callister, Alan Brichta
2015 Callister RJ, Graham BA, 'Spicing up the gabapentionoids: Facilitating gabapentin entry in spinal pain circuits', Neuroscience Letters, 584 395-396 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.neulet.2014.08.039
Co-authors Robert Callister
2015 Smith KM, Boyle KA, Madden JF, Dickinson SA, Jobling P, Callister RJ, et al., 'Functional heterogeneity of calretinin-expressing neurons in the mouse superficial dorsal horn: Implications for spinal pain processing', Journal of Physiology, 593 4319-4339 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Physiological Society. Neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (SDH) of the spinal cord play an important role in nociceptive, thermal, itch and light touch sensations.... [more]

© 2015 The Physiological Society. Neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (SDH) of the spinal cord play an important role in nociceptive, thermal, itch and light touch sensations. Excitatory interneurons comprise ~65% of all SDH neurons but surprisingly few studies have investigated their role in spinal sensory processing. Here we use a transgenic mouse to study putative excitatory SDH neurons that express the calcium binding protein calretinin (CR). Our immunocytochemical, morphological and electrophysiological analysis identified two distinct populations of CR-expressing neurons, which we termed 'Typical' and 'Atypical'. Typical CR-expressing neurons comprised ~85% of the population and exhibited characteristic excitatory interneuron properties including delayed firing discharge, large rapid A-type potassium currents, and central, radial or vertical cell morphologies. Atypical neurons exhibited properties consistent with inhibitory interneurons, including tonic firing or initial bursting discharge, Ih currents, and islet cell morphology. Although both Typical and Atypical CR-expressing neurons responded to noxious peripheral stimulation, the excitatory drive onto Typical CR-expressing neurons was much stronger. Furthermore, Atypical CR-expressing cells comprise at least two functionally distinct subpopulations based on their responsiveness to noxious peripheral stimulation and neurochemical profile. Together our data suggest CR expression is not restricted to excitatory neurons in the SDH. Under normal conditions, the contribution of 'Typical' excitatory CR-expressing neurons to overall SDH excitability may be limited by the presence of A-type potassium currents, which limit the effectiveness of their strong excitatory input. Their contribution may, however, be increased in pathological situations where A-type potassium currents are decreased. By contrast, 'Atypical' inhibitory neurons with their excitable phenotype but weak excitatory input may be more easily recruited during increased peripheral stimulation.

DOI 10.1113/JP270855
Co-authors Phillip Jobling, Robert Callister
2014 Tadros MA, Farrell KE, Schofield PR, Brichta AM, Graham BA, Fuglevand AJ, Callister RJ, 'Intrinsic and synaptic homeostatic plasticity in motoneurons from mice with glycine receptor mutations', Journal of Neurophysiology, 111 1487-1498 (2014) [C1]

Inhibitory synaptic inputs to hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs) are important for modulating excitability in brainstem circuits. Here we ask whether reduced inhibition, as occurs in t... [more]

Inhibitory synaptic inputs to hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs) are important for modulating excitability in brainstem circuits. Here we ask whether reduced inhibition, as occurs in three murine mutants with distinct naturally occurring mutations in the glycine receptor (GlyR), leads to intrinsic and/or synaptic homeostatic plasticity. Whole cell recordings were obtained from HMs in transverse brainstem slices from wild-type (wt), spasmodic (spd), spastic (spa), and oscillator (ot) mice (C57Bl/6, approximately postnatal day 21). Passive and action potential (AP) properties in spd and ot HMs were similar to wt. In contrast, spa HMs had lower input resistances, more depolarized resting membrane potentials, higher rheobase currents, smaller AP amplitudes, and slower afterhyperpolarization current decay times. The excitability of HMs, assessed by "gain" in injected current/firing-frequency plots, was similar in all strains whereas the incidence of rebound spiking was increased in spd. The difference between recruitment and derecruitment current (i.e., ¿I) for AP discharge during ramp current injection was more negative in spa and ot. GABAA miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSC) amplitude was increased in spa and ot but not spd, suggesting diminished glycinergic drive leads to compensatory adjustments in the other major fast inhibitory synaptic transmitter system in these mutants. Overall, our data suggest long-term reduction in glycinergic drive to HMs results in changes in intrinsic and synaptic properties that are consistent with homeostatic plasticity in spa and ot but not in spd. We propose such plasticity is an attempt to stabilize HM output, which succeeds in spa but fails in ot. © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

DOI 10.1152/jn.00728.2013
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Robert Callister, Alan Brichta
2014 Farrell KE, Keely S, Graham BA, Callister R, Callister RJ, 'A Systematic Review of the Evidence for Central Nervous System Plasticity in Animal Models of Inflammatory-mediated Gastrointestinal Pain', INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES, 20 176-195 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/01.MIB.0000437499.52922.b1
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Robin Callister, Robert Callister, Simon Keely
2014 Yeoh JW, Campbell EJ, James MH, Graham BA, Dayas CV, 'Orexin antagonists for neuropsychiatric disease: progress and potential pitfalls.', Front Neurosci, 8 36 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fnins.2014.00036
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Christopher Dayas
2014 Yeoh JW, James MH, Graham BA, Dayas CV, 'Electrophysiological characteristics of paraventricular thalamic (PVT) neurons in response to cocaine and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART)', FRONTIERS IN BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE, 8 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00280
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Christopher Dayas
2014 Harris BM, Hughes DI, Bolton PS, Tadros MA, Callister RJ, Graham BA, 'Contrasting alterations to synaptic and intrinsic properties in upper-cervical superficial dorsal horn neurons following acute neck muscle inflammation', MOLECULAR PAIN, 10 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1744-8069-10-25
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Robert Callister, Philip Bolton
2014 Stuart DG, Schaefer AT, Massion J, Graham BA, Callister RJ, 'Pioneers in CNS inhibition: 1. Ivan M. Sechenov, the first to clearly demonstrate inhibition arising in the brain', Brain Research, 1548 20-48 (2014) [C1]

This article reviews the contributions of Ivan Michailovich Sechenov [1829-1905] to the neurophysiological concept of central inhibition. He first studied this concept in the frog... [more]

This article reviews the contributions of Ivan Michailovich Sechenov [1829-1905] to the neurophysiological concept of central inhibition. He first studied this concept in the frog and on himself. Later his trainees extended the study of central inhibition to other mammalian species. Outside his own country, Sechenov is better known for his prescient contributions to physiological psychology. In Russia, however, he is also revered as "the father of Russian physiology," because of his contributions to neurophysiology and other aspects of physiology including blood gases and respiration, the physiology and biomechanics of movement, and general physiology concepts that appeared in his textbooks and later works he helped translate from largely German sources. After graduation from Moscow University Medical School in 1856 he spent 31/2 years in Germany and Austria where he attended lectures and conducted research under the direction of several prominent physiologists and biochemists. In his subsequent academic career he held positions at universities in St. Petersburg (1860-1870; 1876-1888), Odessa (1871-1876) and Moscow (1890-1905). From 1860 onwards he was acclaimed as a physiologist in academic circles. He was also well known in Russian society for his public lectures on physiology and his views on physiological psychology. The latter resulted in him being branded "politically unreliable" by the tsarist bureaucracy from 1863 onwards. Sechenov's first (1862) study on central inhibition remains his most memorable. He delayed the withdrawal of a frog's foot from a weak acid solution by chemical or electrical stimulation of selected parts of the central nervous system. He also noted similar effects on his own hand during co-activation of other sensory inputs by tickling or teeth gnashing. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.brainres.2013.12.006
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Robert Callister
2014 Smith KM, Madden JF, Callister RJ, Hughes DI, Graham BA, 'The search for novel analgesics: re-examining spinal cord circuits with new tools.', Front Pharmacol, 5 22 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fphar.2014.00022
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Robert Callister
2013 Hughes DI, Boyle KA, Kinnon CM, Bilsland C, Quayle JA, Callister RJ, Graham BA, 'HCN4 subunit expression in fast-spiking interneurons of the rat spinal cord and hippocampus', Neuroscience, 237 7-18 (2013) [C1]

Hyperpolarisation-activated (Ih) currents are considered important for dendritic integration, synaptic transmission, setting membrane potential and rhythmic action potential (AP) ... [more]

Hyperpolarisation-activated (Ih) currents are considered important for dendritic integration, synaptic transmission, setting membrane potential and rhythmic action potential (AP) discharge in neurons of the central nervous system. Hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels underlie these currents and are composed of homo- and hetero-tetramers of HCN channel subunits (HCN1-4), which confer distinct biophysical properties on the channel. Despite understanding the structure-function relationships of HCN channels with different subunit stoichiometry, our knowledge of their expression in defined neuronal populations remains limited. Recently, we have shown that HCN subunit expression is a feature of a specific population of dorsal horn interneurons that exhibit high-frequency AP discharge. Here we expand on this observation and use neuroanatomical markers to first identify well-characterised neuronal populations in the lumbar spinal cord and hippocampus and subsequently determine whether HCN4 expression correlates with high-frequency AP discharge in these populations. In the spinal cord, HCN4 is expressed in several putative inhibitory interneuron populations including parvalbumin (PV)-expressing islet cells (84.1%; SD: ±2.87), in addition to all putative Renshaw cells and Ia inhibitory interneurons. Similarly, virtually all PV-expressing cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield (93.5%; ±3.40) and the dentate gyrus (90.9%; ±6.38) also express HCN4. This HCN4 expression profile in inhibitory interneurons mirrors both the prevalence of Ih sub-threshold currents and high-frequency AP discharge. Our findings indicate that HCN4 subunits are expressed in several populations of spinal and hippocampal interneurons, which are known to express both Ih sub-threshold currents and exhibit high-frequency AP discharge. As HCN channel function plays a critical role in pain perception, learning and memory, and sleep as well as the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases, these findings provide important insights into the identity and neurochemical status of cells that could underlie such conditions. © 2013 IBRO.

DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2013.01.028
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Robert Callister
2012 James MH, Yeoh JW, Graham B, Dayas C, 'Insights for Developing Pharmacological Treatments for Psychostimulant Relapse Targeting Hypothalamic Peptide Systems.', Journal of Addiction Research and Therapy, 01 1-14 (2012)
Co-authors Christopher Dayas
2012 Tadros MA, Harris B, Anderson WB, Brichta AM, Graham BA, Callister RJ, 'Are all spinal segments equal: Intrinsic membrane properties of superficial dorsal horn neurons in the developing and mature mouse spinal cord', Journal of Physiology, 590 2409-2425 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2012 Yeoh JW, James MH, Jobling P, Bains JS, Graham BA, Dayas CV, 'Cocaine potentiates excitatory drive in the perifornical/lateral hypothalamus', Journal of Physiology, 590 3677-3689 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Phillip Jobling, Christopher Dayas
2012 Hughes DI, Sikander S, Kinnon CM, Boyle KA, Watanabe M, Callister RJ, Graham BA, 'Morphological, neurochemical and electrophysiological features of parvalbumin-expressing cells: A likely source of axo-axonic inputs in the mouse spinal dorsal horn', Journal of Physiology, 590 3927-3951 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Robert Callister
2011 Graham BA, Tadros MA, Schofield PR, Callister RJ, 'Probing glycine receptor stoichiometry in superficial dorsal horn neurones using the spasmodic mouse', Journal of Physiology, 589 2459-2474 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.2011.206326
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Robert Callister
2011 Flynn JR, Graham BA, Galea MP, Callister RJ, 'The role of propriospinal interneurons in recovery from spinal cord injury', Neuropharmacology, 60 809-822 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2011.01.016
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Robert Callister
2011 Flynn JR, Brichta AM, Galea MP, Callister RJ, Graham BA, 'A horizontal slice preparation for examining the functional connectivity of dorsal column fibres in mouse spinal cord', Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 200 113-120 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2011.06.017
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2010 Callister RJ, Graham BA, 'Early history of glycine receptor biology in mammalian spinal cord circuits', Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience, 3 1-13 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fnmol.2010.00013
Citations Scopus - 10
Co-authors Robert Callister
2010 Jobling P, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Cervix stimulation evokes predominantly subthreshold synaptic responses in mouse thoracolumbar and lumbosacral superficial dorsal horn neurons', Journal of Sexual Medicine, 7 2068-2076 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-6109.2010.01768.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Robert Callister, Alan Brichta, Phillip Jobling
2010 De Oliveira R, Graham BA, Howlett MC, Gravina FS, Oliveira MW, Imtiaz MS, et al., 'Ketamine anesthesia helps preserve neuronal viability', Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 189 230-232 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2010.03.029
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Rebecca Lim, Dirk Vanhelden, Robert Callister
2010 Graham BA, Clausen PD, Bolton PS, 'A descriptive study of the force and displacement profiles of the toggle-recoil spinal manipulative procedure (adjustment) as performed by chiropractors', Manual Therapy, 15 74-79 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2009.07.003
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Philip Clausen, Philip Bolton
2009 Anderson WB, Graham BA, Beveridge NJ, Tooney PA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Different forms of glycine- and GABA(A)-receptor mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission in mouse superficial and deep dorsal horn neurons', Molecular Pain, 5 1-16 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1744-8069-5-65
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Robert Callister, Alan Brichta, Paul Tooney
2009 Tadros MA, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Evidence for a critical period in the development of excitability and potassium currents in mouse lumbar superficial dorsal horn neurons', Journal of Neurophysiology, 101 1800-1812 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1152/jn.90755.2008
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Robert Callister, Alan Brichta
2008 Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Recording temperature affects the excitability of mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons, in vitro', Journal of Neurophysiology, 99 2048-2059 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1152/jn.01176.2007
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2007 Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Moving from an averaged to specific view of spinal cord pain processing circuits', Journal of Neurophysiology, 98 1057-1063 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1152/jn.00581.2007
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 57
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2007 Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Pinch-current injection defines two discharge profiles in mouse superficial dorsal horn neurones, in vitro', Journal of Physiology, 578 787-798 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.2006.123349
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2007 Graham BA, Brichta AM, Schofield PR, Callister RJ, 'Altered potassium channel function in the superficial dorsal horn of the spastic mouse', Journal of Physiology, 584 121-136 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.2007.138198
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2006 Graham BA, Schofield PR, Sah P, Margrie TW, Callister RJ, 'Distinct physiological mechanisms underlie altered glycinergic synaptic transmission in the murine mutants, spastic, spasmodic, and oscillator', Journal of Neuroscience, 26 4880-4890 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3991-05.2006
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Robert Callister
2004 Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'In vivo responses of mouse superficial dorsal horn neurones to both current injection and peripheral cutaneous stimulation', Journal of Physiology, 561.3 749-763 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.2004.072645
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 42
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2004 Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'An in vivo mouse spinal cord preparation for patch-clamp analysis of nociceptive processing', Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 136 221-228 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2004.01.014
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2003 Graham BA, Schofield PR, Sah P, Callister RJ, 'Altered inhibitory synaptic transmission in superficial dorsal horn neurones in spastic and oscillator mice', The Journal of Physiology, 551.3 905-916 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.2003.049064
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Robert Callister
2002 Graham BA, Schofield P, Sah P, Callister RJ, 'GABAAergic and glycinergic synaptic transmission in superficial dorsal horn neurones of wild type, spastic and oscillator mice', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society, 22:94 n/a (2002) [C3]
Co-authors Robert Callister
Show 34 more journal articles

Conference (32 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Farrell K, Rank M, Keely S, Graham B, Callister R, 'In vivo electrophysiological characterisation of mouse lumbosacral dorsal horn neurons receiving visceral inputs', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015)
Co-authors Simon Keely
2015 Gunnersen J, Lovric M, Teng K, Daykin H, Wright C, Barwood J, et al., 'SEZ6 binds the analgesic target alpha 2 delta and contributes to neuropathic pain plasticity', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015)
2015 Smith K, Dickinson S, Jobling P, Callister R, Graham B, 'Peripheral nerve injury alters the excitability of calretinin positive dorsal horn neurons', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015)
Co-authors Phillip Jobling
2015 Dickinson S, Smith K, Bigland M, Smith D, Jobling P, Graham B, 'Morphological analysis of microglial and astrocyte populations in the superficial dorsal horn of spinal cord in aged mice', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015)
Co-authors Phillip Jobling
2015 Duchatel R, Jobling P, Graham B, Harms L, Michie P, Hodgson D, Tooney P, 'Modelling white matter neuron pathology in schizophrenia using maternal immune activation', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015)
Co-authors Paul Tooney, Phillip Jobling, Lauren Harms, Deborah Hodgson
2015 Gradwell M, Callister R, Hughes D, Graham B, 'Optogenetic dissection of a parvalbumin interneuron microcircuits within the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015)
2015 Graham B, Smith K, Madden J, Dickinson S, Bigland M, Jobling P, Smith D, 'Characteristics of dorsal horn neuron excitability and synaptic input in aged mice', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015)
Co-authors Phillip Jobling
2014 Farrell KE, Graham BA, Keely S, Callister RJ, 'Understanding the mechanisms underlying chronic pain in IBD: A new method for studying visceral inputs from the gastrointestinal tract', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Simon Keely, Robert Callister
2014 Wellings TP, Graham BA, Camp AJ, Callister RJ, Brichta AM, Lim R, 'Calcium binding proteins subdivide medial vestibular nucleus neurons', Journal of Vestibular Research: Equilibrium and Orientation: an international journal of experimental and clinical vestibular science (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.3233/VES-140517
Co-authors Robert Callister, Alan Brichta, Rebecca Lim
2013 Wellings TP, Callister RJ, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Lim R, 'Sensing balance: the role of central vestibular nuclei', University of Western Sydney Medical School (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Lim, Robert Callister, Alan Brichta
2012 Flynn JR, Callister RJ, Graham BA, 'Electrophysiological properties of identified long descending propriospinal neurons in mice', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robert Callister
2012 Tadros MA, Lim R, Graham BA, Hughes DI, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Excitability of human ventral horn neurons during early foetal development', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robert Callister, Alan Brichta, Rebecca Lim
2012 Jobling P, Madden JF, Graham BA, 'Whole cell patch clamp recordings from muscle spindle afferent neurons in intact dorsal root ganglia isolated from mouse', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Phillip Jobling
2012 Tadros MA, Jack R, Lim R, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Hughes DI, Callister RJ, 'Sensorimotor processing in the spinal cord of the developing human fetus', Society for Neuroscience (2012)
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister, Rebecca Lim
2012 Farrell KE, Keely S, Graham BA, Minahan KL, Madden JF, Callister RJ, 'Spinal cord signalling in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease', Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Simon Keely, Robert Callister
2011 Tadros MA, Lim R, Graham BA, Hughes DI, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Excitability of human ventral horn neurons during early foetal development', Poster Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Lim, Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2011 Jobling P, Smith K, Madden J, Hickey LR, Graham BA, 'Characterisation of pain behaviour, spinal neurochemistry and glial populations in a mouse antigen-induced arthritis model', Posters. Australian Neuroscience Society 31st Annual Meeting (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Phillip Jobling
2011 Graham BA, Sah P, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, Hughes DI, 'Neuroanatomical and neurochemical features of parvalbumin-expressing neurons in the mouse spinal dorsal horn', Posters. Australian Neuroscience Society 31st Annual Meeting (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2010 Callister RJ, Walsh MA, Harris BM, Anderson WB, Brichta AM, Graham BA, 'Segmental and developmental differences in the excitability of mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons', 13th World Congress on Pain: Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2010 Walsh MA, Farrell KE, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Sodium current properties differ in neonate and adult superficial dorsal horn neurons', 13th World Congress on Pain: Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2010 Harris BM, Graham BA, Bolton PS, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Influence of acute neck muscle inflammation on the excitability of superficial dorsal horn neurons', 13th World Congress on Pain: Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Bolton, Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2010 Hughes DI, Sah P, Callister RJ, Graham BA, 'Neuroanatomical and electrophysiological features of parvalbumin-expressing neurons in the rodent spinal dorsal horn', 13th World Congress on Pain: Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Robert Callister
2010 Graham BA, Hughes DI, Lim R, Sah P, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Characterization of calretinin expressing interneurons in the superficial dorsal horn of the mouse spinal cord', 13th World Congress on Pain: Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Robert Callister, Alan Brichta, Rebecca Lim
2009 Graham BA, Schofield PR, Callister RJ, 'Glycine receptor mediated synaptic transmission in the superficial dorsal horn of Spasmodic mice', ANS 2009 Abstracts: Posters (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Robert Callister
2009 Tadros MA, Anderson WB, Graham BA, Callister RJ, 'Responses to current injection differ between mouse cervical, thoracic and lumbar superficial dorsal horn neurons', ANS 2009 Abstracts: Posters (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Robert Callister
2008 Jobling P, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'In vivo patch clamp recording of synaptic events evoked in superficial dorsal horn neurons after stimulation of the female reproductive tract in the mouse', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Phillip Jobling, Robert Callister, Alan Brichta
2008 Callister RJ, Brichta AM, Graham BA, 'Beyond the dorsal horn: The use of animal models to discover new sites for pain therapy', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Robert Callister, Alan Brichta
2006 Anderson WB, Graham BA, Jobling P, Lim R, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Glycine receptor diversity in the dorsal horn of the mouse spinal cord', Society for Neuroscience (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Phillip Jobling, Alan Brichta, Rebecca Lim, Robert Callister
2006 Jobling P, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'In vivo patch-clamp recording of subthreshold synaptic events evoked in dorsal horn neurons after stimulation of the female reproductive tract in the mouse', Society for Neuroscience (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Robert Callister, Phillip Jobling, Alan Brichta
2006 Walsh MA, Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Postnatal development of electrophysiological properties in mouse supeficial dorsal horn neurones', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2005 Graham BA, Brichta AM, Callister RJ, 'Effect of Temperature on the Discharge Properties of Mouse Superficial Dorsal Horn Neurons', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
2005 Callister RJ, Graham BA, Brichta AM, 'In Vivo Responses of Mouse Spinal Neurones to Electrical and Functionally-Relevant Stimulation', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society Conference (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Alan Brichta, Robert Callister
Show 29 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 28
Total funding $3,564,508

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $491,473

Mechanisms underlying efferent feedback in the vestibular system$491,473

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Alan Brichta, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Doctor Rebecca Lim, Professor Robert Callister, Dr Chris Holt, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Professor Richard Rabbitt
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1500239
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20151 grants / $22,000

Electrophysiology rig for the study of schizophrenia-related changes in white matter neurons after maternal infection$22,000

Funding body: Rebecca L Cooper Medical Research Foundation Ltd

Funding body Rebecca L Cooper Medical Research Foundation Ltd
Project Team Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Professor Deborah Hodgson, Emeritus Professor Patricia Michie, Doctor Lauren Harms
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1400999
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20144 grants / $1,016,022

Spinal processing of sensory signals from the gut$536,226

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Robert Callister, Doctor Simon Keely, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Professor Alan Brichta, Dr David Hughes
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1300361
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Microglia as primary drivers of stress-induced changes in neuronal connectivity$460,037

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Frederick Walker, Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1300330
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Neurophysiological investigation of neurons in the white matter – affects of maternal infection and relevance to Schizophrenia.$15,000

Funding body: Schizophrenia Research Institute

Funding body Schizophrenia Research Institute
Project Team Mr Ryan Duchatel, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1301321
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Neurobiological Investigation of Interstitial White Matter Neurons in a Maternal Infection Activation Model of Schizophrenia$4,759

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Ian Scott Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1301103
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20131 grants / $466,044

The role of presynaptic inhibition in neuropathic pain$466,044

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Brett Graham, Professor Robert Callister, Dr David Hughes, Professor George Augustine
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1200088
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20122 grants / $22,000

Characterizing psychostimulant-induced synaptic plasticity in the hypothalamus$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200677
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

14th World Congress on Pain (International Association for the Study of Pain), Milan Italy, 26-31 August 2012$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200544
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20111 grants / $20,000

How do the immune and nervous systems interact in arthritis?$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000987
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20107 grants / $1,088,803

Spinal mechanism underlying arthritic joint pain$416,500

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G0190192
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Laser microdissection microscopy system for cell and development biology$350,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Professor Brett Nixon, Doctor Shaun Roman, Professor Alan Brichta, Doctor Rick Thorne, Doctor Doug Smith, Associate Professor David McCurdy, Emeritus Professor Ray Rose, Professor Christopher Grof, Emeritus Professor Leonie Ashman, Professor Gordon Burns, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Professor Roger Smith, Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Professor Trevor Day, Professor Robert Callister
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190369
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

ABI 7500 Real Time PCR System $34,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Characterising the synaptic physiology of orexin neurons in response to cocaine: Implications for drug relapse$21,303

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900151
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

13th World Congress on Pain, Montreal, Canada, 29 August - 2 September 2010$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000533
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20094 grants / $64,644

Neurometer CPT/C$28,435

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Philip Bolton, Professor Robert Callister, Professor Alan Brichta, Professor Robin Callister, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Doctor Phil Jobling
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189845
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Leica VT1200S - Fully automated vibrating blade microtome$16,209

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Robert Callister, Professor Alan Brichta, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Jon Hirst, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Professor Philip Bolton, Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Doctor Angela McPherson, Doctor Rebecca Lim, Doctor Ramatis De Oliveira, Mr Matthew Walsh
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189842
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Spinal mechanisms of chronic pain in arthritis$15,000

Funding body: Arthritis Australia

Funding body Arthritis Australia
Project Team Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Grant-In-Aid
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189342
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

New Staff Grant 2009$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189912
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20082 grants / $299,000

Mechanisms underlying vestibular cortical representation$279,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Early Career Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0188073
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Leica VT2100S Vibrating Microtome$20,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Alan Brichta, Professor Robert Callister, Professor Dirk Van Helden, Professor Philip Bolton, Doctor Rebecca Lim, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Dr Marcus Howlett, Doctor Angela McPherson, Doctor Mohammad Imtiaz, Doctor Ramatis De Oliveira, Mr Wayne Anderson, Mr Matthew Walsh
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188540
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20074 grants / $66,182

High speed/sensitivity CCD camera$30,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Dirk Van Helden, Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Professor Gordon Burns, Doctor Rick Thorne, Dr Marcus Howlett, Doctor Mohammad Imtiaz, Professor Alan Brichta, Professor Robert Callister, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Associate Professor Derek Laver, Associate Professor Liz Milward, Doctor John Holdsworth
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0188196
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Identifying new spinal cord targets for pain management.$14,252

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Brett Graham, Professor Robert Callister
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187234
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Identifying new spinal cord targets for pain management$14,252

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Project Team
Scheme HMRI Brain and Mental Health Research Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Developing a rodent model to study neck pain$7,678

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Robert Callister, Professor Philip Bolton, Professor Alan Brichta, Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187879
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20051 grants / $8,340

Attend the Society for Neurosciences 35th Annual Meeting in Washington DC USA 12 to 16 November 2005 & visit labs of Prof Maria Fitzgerald & Dr Troy Margrie University College London UK$8,340

Funding body: NSW Ministry for Science and Medical Research

Funding body NSW Ministry for Science and Medical Research
Project Team Associate Professor Brett Graham
Scheme Spinal Cord Injury & Other Neurological Conditions Travel Scholarships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185447
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current6

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD2.43

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Spinal Cord Glial Changes in Pain
PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Optogenetic Dissection of Hypothalamic Brain Circuitry and its Implications for Conditions of Motivated Behaviour
PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD The Role of Parvalbumin Positive Interneurons in Spinal Sensory Coding
PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Investigation of White Matter Neurons in the Maternal Immune Activation Model of Schizophrenia
PhD(Experimental Pharmacology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD The Role of Calretinin Positive Interneurons in Spinal Sensory Coding
PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2011 PhD Spinal Cord Signalling in a Mouse Model of IBD
PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Electrophysiological Investigation of Spinal Cord Injury and Characterisation of Propriospinal Neurons
PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Drug-induced Changes to the Lateral Hypothalamic Circuits and Downstream Projection Targets
PhD (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 Masters The Effect of Neck Muscle Inflammation on Neuronal Excitability in the Dorsal Horn of the Spinal Cord
M Philosophy (Anatomy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Associate Professor Brett Graham

Position

Associate Professor
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Anatomy

Contact Details

Email brett.graham@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5397
Fax (02) 4921 7906
Link UoN Blogs

Office

Room MS411
Building Medical Sciences
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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