Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns

Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns

Conjoint Associate Professor

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy (Pharmacy and Experimental Pharmacology)

Unlocking the mind's mysteries

Dr Murray Cairns believes tiny molecules in the brain may be the key to understanding the causes of a perplexing neuropsychiatric disorder.

Murray Cairns in front of a screen 

The brain is the most complex of organs, with 100 billion neurons each connected to up to 100,000 other neurons. To understand how irregularity within that intricate network can lead to schizophrenia, Dr Murray Cairns delves deep into the innermost workings of brain cells, studying the effect that tiny molecules called microRNA have on the function of genes.

"One of the main hypotheses around schizophrenia is that during development of the brain there is a problem with the ability of neurons to make connections with each other," Cairns explains. "My focus is on the role of microRNA in brain development, looking in particular at how they regulate gene expression – whether those genes are switched on or off and what controls that activity. The central dogma of molecular biology is that the gene makes RNA and RNA makes protein, but these microRNA can prevent that protein being produced, effectively 'silencing' – or switching off – the gene."

MicroRNA molecules play a key role in regulating genes but were not discovered by scientists until 1993 and have only been intensively studied since the early 2000s. As a postdoctoral scientist, Cairns was part of a commercial biotechnology research team at the forefront of that movement. "It was a high-powered group of researchers with cutting-edge skills in gene delivery and gene suppression technology, so it was a great training ground," recalls Cairns, who completed a PhD in molecular biologyat the University of New South Walesin 1998.

A scientific and personal interest in schizophrenia attracted him in 2005to a Schizophrenia Research Institute (SRI) fellowship at the University of Newcastle. Cairns now leads his own research team, which last year achieved a breakthrough by identifying a number of microRNA on chromosome 14 that are depleted in the blood of schizophrenia sufferers. The discovery has the potential to lead to the development of a blood biomarker for schizophrenia, which could assist in earlier diagnosis of the disorder, as well as better predictions of susceptibility and likely response to treatments. The finding of this genetic signature was published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry. Cairns and his team are now extending their research into the causes of this down-regulation and its impact on gene expression.

As well as ongoing support from the SRI and the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI), Cairns has received substantial grants from the US-based National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), which awarded him $485,000 in 2010 to lead research into the molecular and cellular characterisation of schizophrenia-associated dysfunction in microRNA. Another $573,660 NHMRC grant received this year, administered through the Brain and Mind Research Institute, will allow Cairns and his collaborators to progress to a biological evaluation of microRNA involved in schizophrenia.

While scientists remain confounded by the causes of schizophrenia, a mental illness that affects one per cent of people worldwide, Cairns believes research is drawing closer to unlocking the mysteries of the disorder.

"We know schizophrenia has a large genetic component but researchers have been unable to pin it on any one gene," he states. "Also, it is a disease that doesn't have any obvious neuropathology – it doesn't produce lesions on the brain like Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease – so it is much harder to examine scientifically.

"What does seem obvious is that it is the result of a network dysfunction – a problem in the brain's wiring – and that is what my research is investigating, right down to the very molecular level."

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Murray Cairns in front of a screen

Unlocking the mind's mysteries

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Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
Molecular and cellular biology. High throughput genomics, bioinformatics and systems biology. Biology of non-coding RNA and post transcriptional gene regulation. Expertise in these areas was developed to investigate mechanisms for gene regulation in neurodevelopment and their role in complex neuropsychiatric disorders.

Teaching Expertise
Expertise in teaching biochemistry and molecular genetics.

Qualifications

  • PhD (Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics), University of New South Wales
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of New South Wales

Keywords

  • Bioinformatics
  • Epigenetics
  • Genetics
  • Genomics
  • Neural development
  • Regulation of gene expression
  • Schizophrenia
  • Synaptic plasticity
  • Systems biology
  • microRNA
  • non-coding RNA

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified 30
060499 Genetics not elsewhere classified 30
110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2005 - 1/12/2011 Senior Research Fellow Schizophrenia Research Institute
Developmental Neurobiology

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/1996 - 1/04/2003 Senior Scientist Johnson and Johnson Research
Nucleic Acid Therapeutics and Diagnostics
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Liu B, Liu L, Tsykin A, Goodall GJ, Cairns MJ, Li J, 'Discovering Functional microRNA-mRNA Regulatory Modules in Heterogeneous Data', MicroRNA Cancer Regulation, Springer, Amsterdam 267-290 (2013) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-94-007-5590-1_14
2007 Cairns MJ, 'Combating the Threat of Pandemic Influenza', 126-147 (2007) [B1]
2007 Carroll AP, Wong JP, Cairns MJ, 'Designs and antiviral activity of gene-based drugs', Communicating Current Research and Educational Topics and Trends in Applied Microbiology, Formatex, Badajoz, Spain 902-914 (2007) [B1]
2004 Cairns MJ, Sun L-Q, 'Nucleic acid sequence analysis using DNAzymes', Ribozymes and siRNA protocol, Humana Press, Totowa, New York, USA 291-302 (2004) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 3
2004 Cairns MJ, Sun L-Q, 'Target site selection for the 10-23 DNAzyme', Ribozymes and siRNA protocols, Humana Press, Totowa, New Jersey, USA 267-277 (2004) [B1]
Show 2 more chapters

Journal article (80 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Bergon A, Belzeaux R, Comte M, Pelletier F, Hervé M, Gardiner EJ, et al., 'CX3CR1 is dysregulated in blood and brain from schizophrenia patients.', Schizophr Res, (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.schres.2015.08.010
Co-authors Paul Tooney, Ulrich Schall
2015 Quinn RK, Brown AL, Goldie BJ, Levi EM, Dickson PW, Smith DW, et al., 'Distinct miRNA expression in dorsal striatal subregions is associated with risk for addiction in rats.', Transl Psychiatry, 5 e503 (2015)
DOI 10.1038/tp.2014.144
Co-authors Phil Dickson, Christopher Dayas
2015 Bulik-Sullivan BK, Loh P-R, Finucane HK, Ripke S, Yang J, Patterson N, et al., 'LD Score regression distinguishes confounding from polygenicity in genome-wide association studies', Nature Genetics, 47 291-295 (2015)
DOI 10.1038/ng.3211
Co-authors Paul Tooney, Ulrich Schall
2015 Dun MD, Chalkley RJ, Faulkner S, Keene S, Avery-Kiejda K, Scott RJ, et al., 'Proteotranscriptomic Profiling of 231-BR Breast Cancer Cells: Identification of Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Brain Metastasis.', Mol Cell Proteomics, (2015)
DOI 10.1074/mcp.M114.046110
Co-authors Matt Dun, Hubert Hondermarck, Kelly Kiejda
2015 Geaghan M, Cairns MJ, 'MicroRNA and Posttranscriptional Dysregulation in Psychiatry', Biological Psychiatry, 78 231-239 (2015)

Psychiatric syndromes, including schizophrenia, mood disorders, and autism spectrum disorders, are characterized by a complex range of symptoms, including psychosis, depression, m... [more]

Psychiatric syndromes, including schizophrenia, mood disorders, and autism spectrum disorders, are characterized by a complex range of symptoms, including psychosis, depression, mania, and cognitive deficits. Although the mechanisms driving pathophysiology are complex and remain largely unknown, advances in the understanding of gene association and gene networks are providing significant clues to their etiology. In recent years, small noncoding RNA molecules known as microRNA (miRNA) have emerged as potential players in the pathophysiology of mental illness. These small RNAs regulate hundreds of target transcripts by modifying their stability and translation on a broad scale, influencing entire gene networks in the process. There is evidence to suggest that numerous miRNAs are dysregulated in postmortem neuropathology of neuropsychiatric disorders, and there is strong genetic support for association of miRNA genes and their targets with these conditions. This review presents the accumulated evidence linking miRNA dysregulation and dysfunction with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and autism spectrum disorders and the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers or therapeutics for these disorders. We further assess the functional roles of some outstanding miRNAs associated with these conditions and how they may be influencing the development of psychiatric symptoms.

DOI 10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.12.009
2015 Wang X, Gardiner EJ, Cairns MJ, 'Optimal consistency in microRNA expression analysis using reference-gene-based normalization.', Mol Biosyst, 11 1235-1240 (2015)
DOI 10.1039/c4mb00711e
2014 Oldmeadow C, Mossman D, Evans TJ, Holliday EG, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, et al., 'Combined analysis of exon splicing and genome wide polymorphism data predict schizophrenia risk loci.', J Psychiatr Res, 52 44-49 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.01.011
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Attia, Rodney Scott, Liz Holliday, Paul Tooney, Christopher Oldmeadow
2014 Gould IC, Shepherd AM, Laurens KR, Cairns MJ, Carr VJ, Green MJ, 'Multivariate neuroanatomical classification of cognitive subtypes in schizophrenia: A support vector machine learning approach', NeuroImage: Clinical, 6 229-236 (2014) [C1]

Heterogeneity in the structural brain abnormalities associated with schizophrenia has made identification of reliable neuroanatomical markers of the disease difficult. The use of ... [more]

Heterogeneity in the structural brain abnormalities associated with schizophrenia has made identification of reliable neuroanatomical markers of the disease difficult. The use of more homogenous clinical phenotypes may improve the accuracy of predicting psychotic disorder/s on the basis of observable brain disturbances. Here we investigate the utility of cognitive subtypes of schizophrenia-'cognitive deficit' and 'cognitively spared'-in determining whether multivariate patterns of volumetric brain differences can accurately discriminate these clinical subtypes from healthy controls, and from each other. We applied support vector machine classification to grey-and white-matter volume data from 126 schizophrenia patients previously allocated to the cognitive spared subtype, 74 cognitive deficit schizophrenia patients, and 134 healthy controls. Using this method, cognitive subtypes were distinguished from healthy controls with up to 72% accuracy. Cross-validation analyses between subtypes achieved an accuracy of 71%, suggesting that some common neuroanatomical patterns distinguish both subtypes from healthy controls. Notably, cognitive subtypes were best distinguished from one another when the sample was stratified by sex prior to classification analysis: cognitive subtype classification accuracy was relatively low (<60%) without stratification, and increased to 83% for females with sex stratification. Distinct neuroanatomical patterns predicted cognitive subtype status in each sex: sex-specific multivariate patterns did not predict cognitive subtype status in the other sex above chance, and weight map analyses demonstrated negative correlations between the spatial patterns of weights underlying classification for each sex. These results suggest that in typical mixed-sex samples of schizophrenia patients, the volumetric brain differences between cognitive subtypes are relatively minor in contrast to the large common disease-associated changes. Volumetric differences that distinguish between cognitive subtypes on a case-by-case basis appear to occur in a sex-specific manner that is consistent with previous evidence of disrupted relationships between brain structure and cognition in male, but not female, schizophrenia patients. Consideration of sex-specific differences in brain organization is thus likely to assist future attempts to distinguish subgroups of schizophrenia patients on the basis of neuroanatomical features.

DOI 10.1016/j.nicl.2014.09.009
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Goldie BJ, Dun MD, Lin M, Smith ND, Verrills NM, Dayas CV, Cairns MJ, 'Activity-associated miRNA are packaged in Map1b-enriched exosomes released from depolarized neurons.', Nucleic Acids Research, 42 9195-9208 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/nar/gku594
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Minjie Lin, Matt Dun, Nikki Verrills, Christopher Dayas
2014 Yu X, Yang L, Cairns MJ, Dass C, Saravolac E, Li X, Sun L-Q, 'Chemosensitization of solid tumors by inhibition of Bcl-xL expression using DNAzyme', Oncotarget, 5 9039-9048 (2014) [C1]

DNAzymes are a novel class of gene suppressors that selectively bind to an RNA substrate by Watson-Crick base pairing and cleave phosphodiester bonds. To explore the potential for... [more]

DNAzymes are a novel class of gene suppressors that selectively bind to an RNA substrate by Watson-Crick base pairing and cleave phosphodiester bonds. To explore the potential for therapeutic use of catalytic DNA molecules, active DNAzymes targeting the bcl-xL gene were generated through a multiplex in vitro selection. The DNAzyme-mediated down-regulation of the bcl-xL expression was demonstrated in various cancer cell lines by Western blots. Treatment of the cells with the active DNAzyme led to increases in percentage of apoptotic cells and cytochrome c release from mitochondria, a hall marker of apoptosis. When combined with chemotherapeutics such as Taxol, the DNAzyme significantly sensitised a panel of cancer cells to apoptosis as measured by cell survival assay. In Taxol-resistant cells, down-regulation of bcl-xL expression by the DNAzyme reversed the chemo-resistant phenotype of the cancer cells. In a xenograft mouse model, the DNAzyme was delivered into the tumors via an ALZET osmotic pump and shown to chemosensitize PC3 tumor when treating with Taxol. The results from the present study demonstrate that bcl-xL DNAzyme treatment facilitates apoptosis in solid tumors and suggest the potential use of bcl-xL DNAzyme in combination with chemotherapeutics for cancer therapy.

Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014 Hollins SL, Zavitsanou K, Walker FR, Cairns MJ, 'Alteration of imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 miRNA cluster expression in the entorhinal cortex induced by maternal immune activation and adolescent cannabinoid exposure.', Transl Psychiatry, 4 e452 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/tp.2014.99
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rohan Walker
2014 Gupta P, Cairns MJ, Saksena NK, 'Regulation of gene expression by microRNA in HCV infection and HCV-mediated hepatocellular carcinoma', Virology Journal, 11 (2014) [C1]

MicroRNA (miRNA) exert a profound effect on Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and on the manifestation of HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). miR-122 in particular, i... [more]

MicroRNA (miRNA) exert a profound effect on Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and on the manifestation of HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). miR-122 in particular, is highly enriched in liver and has been shown to interact with HCV, suggesting this virus has evolved to subvert and manipulate the host gene silencing machinery in order to support its life cycle. It is therefore likely that miR-122 and other miRNAs play an important role in the pathophysiology of HCV infection. The changes in post-transcriptional gene regulation by the miRNAs may play a key role in the manifestation of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding of HCV-host miRNA interactions will ultimately lead to the design of therapeutic modalities against HCV infection and HCV-mediated HCC and may also provide important biomarkers that direct treatment options. Here, we review the current knowledge on the role of miRNA and gene expression on HCV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma, in addition to the possible role of miRNA as future therapeutic targets. © 2014 Gupta et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1743-422X-11-64
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 McCarthy-Jones S, Green MJ, Scott RJ, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, Wu JQ, et al., 'Preliminary evidence of an interaction between the FOXP2 gene and childhood emotional abuse predicting likelihood of auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia', JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH, 50 66-72 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2013.11.012
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Paul Tooney, Rodney Scott
2014 Green MJ, Chia T-Y, Cairns MJ, Wu J, Tooney PA, Scott RJ, Carr VJ, 'Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genotype moderates the effects of childhood trauma on cognition and symptoms in schizophrenia', Journal of Psychiatric Research, 49 43-50 (2014) [C1]

The interaction of genetic and environmental factors may affect the course and development of psychotic disorders. We examined whether the effects of childhood trauma on cognition... [more]

The interaction of genetic and environmental factors may affect the course and development of psychotic disorders. We examined whether the effects of childhood trauma on cognition and symptoms in schizophrenia were moderated by the Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism, a common genetic variant known to affect cognition and prefrontal dopamine levels. Participants were 429 schizophrenia/schizoaffective cases from the Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank (ASRB). Cognitive performance was assessed using the Repeatable Battery for Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT), Letter Number Sequencing (LNS) test, and the Wechsler Test of Adult Reading (WTAR). Hierarchical regression was used to test the main effects and additive interaction effects of genotype and childhood trauma in the domains of physical abuse, emotional abuse, and emotional neglect, on cognition and symptom profiles of clinical cases. Consistent with previous findings, COMT Val homozygotes performed worse on cognitive measures in the absence of childhood adversity. In addition, a significant interaction between COMT genotype and physical abuse was associated with better executive function in Val homozygotes, relative to those of the same genotype with no history of abuse. Finally, the severity of positive symptoms was greater in Met carriers who had experienced physical abuse, and the severity of negative symptoms in Met carriers was greater in the presence of emotional neglect. These results suggest that the possible epigenetic modulation of the expression of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and consequent effects on cognition and symptoms in schizophrenia, with worse outcomes associated with adverse childhood experiences in Met carriers. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2013.10.018
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Paul Tooney
2014 Green MJ, Chia T-Y, Carr VJ, Cairns MJ, Tooney PA, Scott RJ, Wu J, 'Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genotype moderates the effects of childhood trauma on cognition and symptoms in schizophrenia', Journal of Psychiatric Research, 49 43-50 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2013.10.018
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Paul Tooney
2014 Gupta P, Liu B, Wu JQ, Soriano V, Vispo E, Carroll AP, et al., 'Genome-wide mRNA and miRNA analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) reveals different miRNAs regulating HIV/HCV co-infection', Virology, 450-451 336-349 (2014) [C1]

Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is common due to shared transmission routes. The genomic basis of HIV/HCV co-infection and its reg... [more]

Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is common due to shared transmission routes. The genomic basis of HIV/HCV co-infection and its regulation by microRNA (miRNA) is unknown. Therefore, our objective was to investigate genome-wide mRNA expression and its regulation by miRNA in primary PBMCs derived from 27 patients (5 HCV - mono-infected, 5 HIV-mono-infected, 12 HCV/HIV co-infected, and 5 healthy controls). This revealed 27 miRNAs and 476 mRNAs as differentially expressed (DE) in HCV/HIV co-infection when compared to controls (adj p<0.05). Our study shows the first evidence of miRNAs specific for co-infection, several of which are correlated with key gene targets demonstrating functional relationships to pathways in cancer, immune-function, and metabolism. Notable was the up regulation of HCV-specific miR-122 in co-infection (FC>50, p=4.02E-06), which may have clinical/biological implications. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.virol.2013.12.026
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2014 Wang X, Cairns MJ, 'Understanding complex transcriptome dynamics in schizophrenia and other neurological diseases using RNA sequencing', International Review of Neurobiology, 116 127-152 (2014) [C1]

How the human brain develops and adapts with its trillions of functionally integrated synapses remains one of the greatest mysteries of life. With tremendous advances in neuroscie... [more]

How the human brain develops and adapts with its trillions of functionally integrated synapses remains one of the greatest mysteries of life. With tremendous advances in neuroscience, genetics, and molecular biology, we are beginning to appreciate the scope of this complexity and define some of the parameters of the systems that make it possible. These same tools are also leading to advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders. Like the substrate for these problems, the etiology is usually complex-involving an array of genetic and environmental influences. To resolve these influences and derive better interventions, we need to reveal every aspect of this complexity and model their interactions and define the systems and their regulatory structure. This is particularly important at the tissue-specific molecular interface between the underlying genetic and environmental influence defined by the transcriptome. Recent advances in transcriptome analysis facilitated by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) can provide unprecedented insight into the functional genomics of neurological disorders. In this review, we outline the advantages of this approach and highlight some early application of this technology in the investigation of the neuropathology of schizophrenia. Recent progress of RNA-Seq studies in schizophrenia has shown that there is extraordinary transcriptome dynamics with significant levels of alternative splicing. These studies only scratch the surface of this complexity and therefore future studies with greater depth and samples size will be vital to fully explore transcriptional diversity and its underlying influences in schizophrenia and provide the basis for new biomarkers and improved treatments. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-801105-8.00006-0
2014 Walker FR, Beynon SB, Jones KA, Zhao Z, Kongsui R, Cairns M, Nilsson M, 'Dynamic structural remodelling of microglia in health and disease: A review of the models, the signals and the mechanisms', BRAIN BEHAVIOR AND IMMUNITY, 37 1-14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2013.12.010
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Rohan Walker
2014 Barry G, Briggs JA, Vanichkina DP, Poth EM, Beveridge NJ, Ratnu VS, et al., 'The long non-coding RNA Gomafu is acutely regulated in response to neuronal activation and involved in schizophrenia-associated alternative splicing', Molecular Psychiatry, 19 486-494 (2014)
DOI 10.1038/mp.2013.45
Citations Scopus - 20
2014 Barry G, Briggs JA, Vanichkina DP, Poth EM, Beveridge NJ, Ratnu VS, et al., 'The long non-coding RNA Gomafu is acutely regulated in response to neuronal activation and involved in schizophrenia-associated alternative splicing', Molecular Psychiatry, 19 486-494 (2014) [C1]

Schizophrenia (SZ) is a complex disease characterized by impaired neuronal functioning. Although defective alternative splicing has been linked to SZ, the molecular mechanisms res... [more]

Schizophrenia (SZ) is a complex disease characterized by impaired neuronal functioning. Although defective alternative splicing has been linked to SZ, the molecular mechanisms responsible are unknown. Additionally, there is limited understanding of the early transcriptomic responses to neuronal activation. Here, we profile these transcriptomic responses and show that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are dynamically regulated by neuronal activation, including acute downregulation of the lncRNA Gomafu, previously implicated in brain and retinal development. Moreover, we demonstrate that Gomafu binds directly to the splicing factors QKI and SRSF1 (serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1) and dysregulation of Gomafu leads to alternative splicing patterns that resemble those observed in SZ for the archetypal SZ-associated genes DISC1 and ERBB4. Finally, we show that Gomafu is downregulated in post-mortem cortical gray matter from the superior temporal gyrus in SZ. These results functionally link activity-regulated lncRNAs and alternative splicing in neuronal function and suggest that their dysregulation may contribute to neurological disorders. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

DOI 10.1038/mp.2013.45
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 18
2014 Gardiner E, Carroll A, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Antipsychotic drug-associated gene-miRNA interaction in T-lymphocytes', International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 17 929-943 (2014)
DOI 10.1017/S1461145713001752
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2014 Gardiner E, Carroll A, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Antipsychotic drug-associated gene-miRNA interaction in T-lymphocytes', International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 17 929-943 (2014) [C1]

Antipsychotic drugs (APDs) can have a profound effect on the human body that extends well beyond our understanding of their neuropsychopharmacology. Some of these effects manifest... [more]

Antipsychotic drugs (APDs) can have a profound effect on the human body that extends well beyond our understanding of their neuropsychopharmacology. Some of these effects manifest themselves in peripheral blood lymphocytes, and in some cases, particularly in clozapine treatment, result in serious complications. To better understand the molecular biology of APD action in lymphocytes, we investigated the influence of chlorpromazine, haloperidol and clozapine in vitro, by microarray-based gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression analysis. JM-Jurkat T-lymphocytes were cultured in the presence of the APDs or vehicle alone over 2 wk to model the early effects of APDs on expression. Interestingly both haloperidol and clozapine appear to regulate the expression of a large number of genes. Functional analysis of APD-associated differential expression revealed changes in genes related to oxidative stress, metabolic disease and surprisingly also implicated pathways and biological processes associated with neurological disease consistent with current understanding of the activity of APDs. We also identified miRNA-mRNA interaction associated with metabolic pathways and cell death/survival, all which could have relevance to known side effects of APDs. These results indicate that APDs have a significant effect on expression in peripheral tissue that relate to both known mechanisms as well as poorly characterized side effects. © CINP 2014.

DOI 10.1017/S1461145713001752
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2014 Liu B, Li J, Cairns MJ, 'Identifying miRNAs, targets and functions', Briefings in Bioinformatics, 15 1-19 (2014) [C1]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous non-coding RNAs that function as the universal specificity factors in post-transcriptional gene silencing. Discovering miRNAs, identifying ... [more]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous non-coding RNAs that function as the universal specificity factors in post-transcriptional gene silencing. Discovering miRNAs, identifying their targets and further inferring miRNA functions have been a critical strategy for understanding normal biological processes of miRNAs and their roles in the development of disease. In this review, we focus on computationalmethods of inferringmiRNA functions, including miRNA functional annotation and inferring miRNA regulatory modules, by integrating heterogeneous data sources.We also briefly introduce the research in miRNA discovery and miRNA-target identification with an emphasis on the challenges to computational biology. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press.

DOI 10.1093/bib/bbs075
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
2014 Hollins SL, Goldie BJ, Carroll AP, Mason EA, Walker FR, Eyles DW, Cairns MJ, 'Ontogeny of small RNA in the regulation of mammalian brain development', BMC GENOMICS, 15 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2164-15-777
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rohan Walker
2014 Goldie BJ, Barnett MM, Cairns MJ, 'BDNF and the maturation of posttranscriptional regulatory networks in human SH-SY5Y neuroblast differentiation', Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, 8 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fncel.2014.00325
2014 Geaghan M, Cairns MJ, 'MicroRNA and Posttranscriptional Dysregulation in Psychiatry', Biological Psychiatry, (2014)

Psychiatric syndromes, including schizophrenia, mood disorders, and autism spectrum disorders, are characterized by a complex range of symptoms, including psychosis, depression, m... [more]

Psychiatric syndromes, including schizophrenia, mood disorders, and autism spectrum disorders, are characterized by a complex range of symptoms, including psychosis, depression, mania, and cognitive deficits. Although the mechanisms driving pathophysiology are complex and remain largely unknown, advances in the understanding of gene association and gene networks are providing significant clues to their etiology. In recent years, small noncoding RNA molecules known as microRNA (miRNA) have emerged as potential players in the pathophysiology of mental illness. These small RNAs regulate hundreds of target transcripts by modifying their stability and translation on a broad scale, influencing entire gene networks in the process. There is evidence to suggest that numerous miRNAs are dysregulated in postmortem neuropathology of neuropsychiatric disorders, and there is strong genetic support for association of miRNA genes and their targets with these conditions. This review presents the accumulated evidence linking miRNA dysregulation and dysfunction with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and autism spectrum disorders and the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers or therapeutics for these disorders. We further assess the functional roles of some outstanding miRNAs associated with these conditions and how they may be influencing the development of psychiatric symptoms.

DOI 10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.12.009
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Wang X, Cairns MJ, 'SeqGSEA: A Bioconductor package for gene set enrichment analysis of RNA-Seq data integrating differential expression and splicing', Bioinformatics, 30 1777-1779 (2014) [C3]

SeqGSEA is an open-source Bioconductor package for the functional integration of differential expression and splicing analysis in RNA-Seq data. SeqGSEA implements an analysis pipe... [more]

SeqGSEA is an open-source Bioconductor package for the functional integration of differential expression and splicing analysis in RNA-Seq data. SeqGSEA implements an analysis pipeline, which first computes differential splicing and differential expression scores, followed by integrating them into a per-gene score that quantifies each gene's association with a phenotype of interest, and finally executes gene set enrichment analysis in a cutoff-free manner to achieve biological insights. SeqGSEA accounts for biological variability and determines the statistical significance of gene pathways and networks using subject permutation, and thus requires at least five samples per group. Real applications show that SeqGSEA detects more biologically meaningful gene sets without biases toward long or highly expressed genes. SeqGSEA can be set up to run in parallel to reduce the analysis time. © 2014 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1093/bioinformatics/btu090
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2013 Cairns MJ, Kocerha J, 'Advances in non-coding RNA profiling for neurological diseases', Frontiers in Genetics, 4 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.3389/fgene.2013.00005
2013 Carroll AP, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Design and interpretation of microRNA-reporter gene activity', Analytical Biochemistry, 437 164-171 (2013) [C1]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that act as sequence specificity guides to direct post-transcriptional gene silencing. In doing so, miRNAs regulate many criti... [more]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that act as sequence specificity guides to direct post-transcriptional gene silencing. In doing so, miRNAs regulate many critical developmental processes, including cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis, as well as more specialized biological functions such as dendritic spine development and synaptogenesis. Interactions between miRNAs and their miRNA recognition elements occur via partial complementarity, rendering tremendous redundancy in targeting such that miRNAs are predicted to regulate 60% of the genome, with each miRNA estimated to regulate more than 200 genes. Because these predictions are prone to false positives and false negatives, there is an ever present need to provide material support to these assertions to firmly establish the biological function of specific miRNAs in both normal and pathophysiological contexts. Using schizophrenia-associated miR-181b as an example, we present detailed guidelines and novel insights for the rapid establishment of a streamlined miRNA-reporter gene assay and explore various design concepts for miRNA-reporter gene applications, including bidirectional miRNA modulation. In exemplifying this approach, we report seven novel miR-181b target sites for five schizophrenia candidate genes (DISC1, BDNF, ENKUR, GRIA1, and GRIK1) and dissect a number of vital concepts regarding future developments for miRNA-reporter gene assays and the interpretation of their results. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.ab.2013.02.022
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2013 Liu B, Liu L, Tsykin A, Goodall GJ, Cairns MJ, Li J, 'Discovering functional microRNAmRNA regulatory modules in heterogeneous data', Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 774 267-290 (2013)

microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that cause mRNA degradation and translation inhibition. They are pivotal regulators of development and cellular homeostasis through th... [more]

microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that cause mRNA degradation and translation inhibition. They are pivotal regulators of development and cellular homeostasis through their control of diverse processes. Recently, great efforts have been made to elucidate many targets that are affected by miRNAs, but the functions of most miRNAs and their precise regulatory mechanisms remain elusive. With more and more matched expression profiles of miRNAs and mRNAs having been made available, it is of great interest to utilize both expression profiles and sequence information to discover the functional regulatory networks of miRNAs and their target mRNAs for potential biological processes that they may participate in. In this chapter, we first brie fly review the computational methods for discovering miRNA targets and miRNA-mRNA regulatory modules, and then focus on a method of identifying functional miRNA-mRNA regulatory modules by integrating multiple data sets from different sources. © Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013.

DOI 10.1007/978-94-7-5590-1_14
2013 Gardiner EJ, Cairns MJ, Liu B, Beveridge NJ, Carr V, Kelly B, et al., 'Gene expression analysis reveals schizophrenia-associated dysregulation of immune pathways in peripheral blood mononuclear cells', JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH, 47 425-437 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2012.11.007
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Paul Tooney, Brian Kelly
2013 Santarelli DM, Liu B, Duncan CE, Beveridge NJ, Tooney PA, Schofield PR, Cairns MJ, 'Gene-microRNA interactions associated with antipsychotic mechanisms and the metabolic side effects of olanzapine', PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY, 227 67-78 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00213-012-2939-y
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2013 Wong J, Duncan CE, Beveridge NJ, Webster MJ, Cairns MJ, Weickert CS, 'Expression of NPAS3 in the Human Cortex and Evidence of Its Posttranscriptional Regulation by miR-17 During Development, With Implications for Schizophrenia', SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN, 39 396-406 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/schbul/sbr177
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 12
2013 Fillman SG, Cloonan N, Catts VS, Miller LC, Wong J, McCrossin T, et al., 'Increased inflammatory markers identified in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of individuals with schizophrenia', MOLECULAR PSYCHIATRY, 18 206-214 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/mp.2012.110
Citations Scopus - 66Web of Science - 65
2013 Green MJ, Cairns MJ, Wu J, Dragovic M, Jablensky A, Tooney PA, et al., 'Genome-wide supported variant MIR137 and severe negative symptoms predict membership of an impaired cognitive subtype of schizophrenia', MOLECULAR PSYCHIATRY, 18 774-780 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/mp.2012.84
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Paul Tooney
2013 Wang X, Cairns MJ, 'Gene set enrichment analysis of RNA-Seq data: integrating differential expression and splicing', BMC BIOINFORMATICS, 14 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2105-14-S5-S16
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2013 Carroll AP, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Context-specific microRNA function in developmental complexity', Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, 5 73-84 (2013) [C1]

Since their discovery, microRNAs (miRNA) have been implicated in a vast array of biological processes in animals, from fundamental developmental functions including cellular proli... [more]

Since their discovery, microRNAs (miRNA) have been implicated in a vast array of biological processes in animals, from fundamental developmental functions including cellular proliferation and differentiation, to more complex and specialized roles such as long-term potentiation and synapse-specific modifications in neurons. This review recounts the history behind this paradigm shift, which has seen small non-coding RNA molecules coming to the forefront of molecular biology, and introduces their role in establishing developmental complexity in animals. The fundamental mechanisms of miRNA biogenesis and function are then considered, leading into a discussion of recent discoveries transforming our understanding of how these molecules regulate gene network behaviour throughout developmental and pathophysiological processes. The emerging complexity of this mechanism is also examined with respect to the influence of cellular context on miRNA function. This discussion highlights the absolute imperative for experimental designs to appreciate the significance of context-specific factors when determining what genes are regulated by a particular miRNA. Moreover, by establishing the timing, location, and mechanism of these regulatory events, we may ultimately understand the true biological function of a specific miRNA in a given cellular environment. © The Author (2013).

DOI 10.1093/jmcb/mjt004
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2013 Carroll AP, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Design and interpretation of microRNA-reporter gene activity.', Analytical biochemistry, 437 164-171 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ab.2013.02.022
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2013 Scarr E, Craig JM, Cairns MJ, Seo MS, Galati JC, Beveridge NJ, et al., 'Decreased cortical muscarinic M1 receptors in schizophrenia are associated with changes in gene promoter methylation, mRNA and gene targeting microRNA', TRANSLATIONAL PSYCHIATRY, 3 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/tp.2013.3
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 15
2012 Tynan R, Weidenhofer JC, Hinwood M, Cairns MJ, Day TA, Walker FR, 'A comparative examination of the anti-inflammatory effects of SSRI and SNRI antidepressants on LPS stimulated microglia', Brain Behavior and Immunity, 26 469-479 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 57Web of Science - 53
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Madeleine Hinwood, Judith Weidenhofer
2012 Goldie BJ, Cairns MJ, 'Post-transcriptional trafficking and regulation of neuronal gene expression', Molecular Neurobiology, 45 99-108 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 37
2012 Beveridge NJ, Cairns MJ, 'MicroRNA dysregulation in schizophrenia', Neurobiology of Disease, 46 263-271 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 52Web of Science - 45
2012 Gardiner EJ, Beveridge NJ, Wu JQ, Carr VJ, Scott R, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Imprinted DLK1-DIO3 region of 14q32 defines a schizophrenia-associated miRNA signature in peripheral blood mononuclear cells', Molecular Psychiatry, 17 827-840 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 53
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Paul Tooney
2012 Carroll AP, Tran N, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Alternative mRNA fates identified in microRNA-associated transcriptome analysis', BMC Genomics, 13 1-19 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2012 Zhou L, Pupo GM, Gupta P, Liu B, Tran SL, Rahme R, et al., 'A parallel genome-wide mRNA and microRNA profiling of the frontal cortex of HIV patients with and without HIV-associated dementia shows the role of axon guidance and downstream pathways in HIV-mediated neurodegeneration', BMC Genomics, 13 677 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
2012 Kim K-T, Carroll AP, Mashkani B, Cairns MJ, Small D, Scott R, 'MicroRNA-16 Is down-regulated in mutated FLT3 expressing murine myeloid FDC-P1 cells and interacts with Pim-1', PLOS One, 7 e44546 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rodney Scott
2012 Wu JQ, Wang X, Beveridge NJ, Tooney PA, Scott R, Carr VJ, Cairns MJ, 'Transcriptome sequencing revealed significant alteration of cortical promoter usage and splicing in schizophrenia', PLoS One, 7 e36351 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Paul Tooney
2011 Santarelli DMF, Beveridge NJ, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Upregulation of dicer and MicroRNA expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex Brodmann area 46 in schizophrenia', Biological Psychiatry, 69 180-187 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.09.030
Citations Scopus - 89Web of Science - 84
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2010 Saravolac EG, Wong JP, Cairns MJ, 'Recent patents in antiviral siRNAs', Recent Patents on Anti-Infective Drug Discovery, 5 44-57 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.2174/157489110790112590
Citations Scopus - 4
2010 Cox MB, Cairns MJ, Gandhi KS, Carroll AP, Moscovis CC, Stewart GJ, et al., 'MicroRNAs miR-17 and miR-20a inhibit T cell activation genes and are under-expressed in MS whole blood', Plos One, 5 e12132 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0012132
Citations Scopus - 92Web of Science - 77
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Pablo Moscato
2010 Carland M, Grannas MJ, Cairns MJ, Roknic V, Denny WA, McFadyen WD, Murray V, 'Substituted 9-aminoacridine-4-carboxamides tethered to platinum(II)diamine complexes: Chemistry, cytotoxicity and DNA sequence selectivity', Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry, 104 815-819 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jinorgbio.2010.03.011
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2010 Wong JP, Christopher ME, Salazar AM, Sun L-Q, Viswanathan S, Wang M, et al., 'Broad-spectrum and virus-specific nucleic acid-based antivirals against influenza', Frontiers in Bioscience, 1 791-800 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9
2010 Beveridge NJ, Gardiner EJ, Carroll AP, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Schizophrenia is associated with an increase in cortical microRNA biogenesis', Molecular Psychiatry, 15 1176-1189 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/mp.2009.84
Citations Scopus - 152Web of Science - 124
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2009 Cairns MJ, Thomas T, Beltran CE, Tillett D, 'Primer fabrication using polymerase mediated oligonucleotide synthesis', BMC Genomics, 10 1-10 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2164-10-344
Citations Scopus - 1
2009 Lai A, Cairns MJ, Tran N, Zhang H-P, Cullen L, Arndt GM, 'RNA modulators of complex phenotypes in mammalian cells', PLoS ONE, 4 e4758 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0004758
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2009 Zhang X, Cairns MJ, Rose B, O'Brien C, Shannon K, Clark J, et al., 'Alterations in miRNA processing and expression in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary gland', International Journal of Cancer, 124 2855-2863 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/ijc.24298
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 44
2009 Cairns MJ, Carland M, David Mcfadyen W, Denny WA, Murray V, 'The DNA sequence selectivity of maltolato-containing cisplatin analogues in purified plasmid DNA and in intact human cells', Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry, 103 1151-1155 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jinorgbio.2009.06.001
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2009 Beveridge NJ, Tooney PA, Carroll AP, Tran N, Cairns MJ, 'Down-regulation of miR-17 family expression in response to retinoic acid induced neuronal differentiation', Cellular Signalling, 21 1837-1845 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cellsig.2009.07.019
Citations Scopus - 57Web of Science - 53
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2008 Cairns MJ, 'Small interfering RNAs and their therapeutic applications in mitigation of virus replication and pathological effects in the respiratory tract', Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Allergy Agents in Medicinal Chemistry, 7 116-121 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.2174/187152308784533177
Citations Scopus - 1
2008 Beveridge NJ, Tooney PA, Carroll AP, Gardiner EJ, Bowden NA, Scott R, et al., 'Dysregulation of miRNA 181b in the temporal cortex in schizophrenia', Human Molecular Genetics, 17 1156-1168 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/hmg/ddn005
Citations Scopus - 173Web of Science - 165
Co-authors Nikola Bowden, Rodney Scott, Paul Tooney
2007 Wong JP, Christopher ME, Cairns M, Sun L, Dale RMK, Salazar AM, 'Current Status on Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Antiviral Drugs Against Influenza Virus Infection 126-147 (2007)
DOI 10.1002/9780470179727.ch5
2007 Bhindi R, Fahmy RG, Lowe HC, Chesterman CN, Dass CR, Cairns MJ, et al., 'Brothers in arms: DNA enzymes, short interfering RNA, and the emerging wave of small-molecule nucleic acid-based gene-silencing strategies', American Journal of Pathology, 171 1079-1088 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.2353/ajpath.2007.070120
Citations Scopus - 83Web of Science - 79
2004 Cairns MJ, Turner R, Sun L-Q, 'Homogeneous real-time detection and quantification of nucleic acid amplification using restriction enzyme digestion', Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 318 684-690 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bbrc.2004.04.077
2003 Tran N, Cairns MJ, Dawes IW, Arndt GM, 'Expressing functional siRNAs in mammalian cells using convergent transcription', BMC Biotechnology, 3 0-0 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6750-3-21
2003 Cairns MJ, King A, Sun L-Q, 'Optimisation of the 10±23 DNAzyme±substrate pairing interactions enhanced RNA cleavage activity at purine±cytosine target sites', Nucleic Acids Research, 31 2883-2889 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/nar/gkg378
Citations Scopus - 57
2003 Kim Y, Cairns MJ, Marouga R, Sun L-Q, 'E6AP gene suppression and characterization with in vitro selected hammerhead ribozymes', Cancer Gene Therapy, 10 707-716 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/sj.cgt.7700623
Citations Scopus - 18
2002 Cairns MJ, Saravolac EG, Sun LQ, 'Catalytic DNA: A novel tool for gene suppression', Current Drug Targets, 3 269-279 (2002)

RNA, as an intermediate in the production of every gene encoded protein and the genetic material of many pathogenic viruses, presents an attractive target for both biological and ... [more]

RNA, as an intermediate in the production of every gene encoded protein and the genetic material of many pathogenic viruses, presents an attractive target for both biological and therapeutic manipulation. Despite its extensive involvement in living systems, its chemical diversity based on four units is relatively low compared with protein. This provides the opportunity for a generic approach to targeting with specificity based on primary structure rather than complex higher order structures. This form of recognition occurs naturally in complementary nucleic acids, due to an ability to bind their single stranded target through Watson-Crick interactions. The most established nucleic acid based approach to gene suppression at the RNA level is through antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). These compounds form heteroduplex with target RNA which are thought to either block its function or mediate its destruction by activation of RNase H. Alternatively, RNA can be targeted by catalytic RNA such as the hammerhead ribozyme. Ribozymes have the advantage of being equipped with their own RNA cleavage apparatus and are therefore independent of host nuclear protein activity. At present, the utility of ribozyme oligonucleotides is restricted by the relative difficulty synthesising active molecules with sufficient resistance to nuclease degradation. Recently the power of in vitro selection has been used to evolve catalytic DNA sequences with RNA cleavage specificity and activity rivalling the very best ribozymes, while maintaining the more robust chemistry of an ODN. These deoxyribozymes or DNAzymes have tremendous potential as gene suppression agents for both target validation and therapeutic applications. A number of studies evaluating the biological activity of these compounds have shown promising results. However, as with other oligonucleotide based strategies, future exploitation of this approach may depend on accessory technology to assist with the accessibility of a target which is folded by its own secondary structure and hidden within the intracellular compartment.

DOI 10.2174/1389450023347722
Citations Scopus - 37
2000 Sun L-Q, Cairns MJ, Saravolac EG, Baker A, Gerlach WL, 'Catalytic nucleic acids: From lab to applications', Pharmacological Reviews, 52 325-347 (2000)

Since the discovery of self-cleavage and ligation activity of the group I intron, the expansion of research interest in catalytic nucleic acids has provided a valuable nonprotein ... [more]

Since the discovery of self-cleavage and ligation activity of the group I intron, the expansion of research interest in catalytic nucleic acids has provided a valuable nonprotein resource for manipulating biomolecules. Although a multitude of reactions can be enhanced by this class of catalyst, including trans-splicing activity of the group I intron (which could be applied to gene correction), RNA-cleaving RNA enzymes or 'ribozymes' hold center stage because of their tremendous potential for mediating gene inactivation. This application has been driven predominantly by the 'hammerhead' and 'hairpin' ribozymes as they induce specific RNA cleavage from a very small catalytic domain, allowing delivery either as a transgene expression product or directly as a synthetic oligonucleotide. Although advances in the development of RNA modifications have improved the biological half-life of synthetic ribozymes, their use is restricted by the mechanistic dependence on conserved 2'OH-moieties. Recently a new class of catalytic nucleic acid made entirely of DNA has emerged through in vitro selection. DNA enzymes or deoxyribozyme with extraordinary RNA cleavage activity has already demonstrated their capacity for gene suppression both in vitro and in vivo. These new molecules, although rivaling the activity and stability of synthetic ribozymes, are limited equally by inefficient delivery to the intracellular target RNA. The challenge of in vivo delivery is being addressed with the assessment of a variety of approaches in animal models with the aim of bringing these compounds closer to the clinic.

Citations Scopus - 116
2000 Cairns MJ, Hopkins TM, Witherington C, Sun L-Q, 'The influence of arm length asymmetry and base substitution on the activity of the 10-23 DNA enzyme', Antisense and Nucleic Acid Drug Development, 10 323-332 (2000)

A small oligodeoxyribonucleotide derived from in vitro selection has been shown to be capable of efficient sequence-specific cleavage of RNA at purine-pyrimidine junctions. As the... [more]

A small oligodeoxyribonucleotide derived from in vitro selection has been shown to be capable of efficient sequence-specific cleavage of RNA at purine-pyrimidine junctions. As the reaction readily takes place under simulated physiologic conditions, this molecule described as the 10-23 general purpose RNA-cleaving DNA enzyme, has potential as a therapeutic agent. To further explore the character of this prototype, we examined the influence of base substitution and binding arm length asymmetry on its RNA cleaving activity. Surprisingly, substitution of the proximal nucleotide on the 3'-arm, to allow nonstandard Watson-Crick interactions, was found in some instances to improve the cleavage reaction rate. Although the identity of the unpaired purine in the RNA substrate cleavage site was found to have only a subtle influence on the rate of catalysis, with a slight decrease observed when a G at this position was changed to an A, nucleotide substitution (G to C) in the core motif at position 14 was found to completely abolish catalysis. The effect of arm length reduction varied with RNA substrate sequence and extent of helix asymmetry. Where the cleavage rate of one substrate was impaired by truncation of the deoxyribozymes 5'-arm (6 bp), the same modification in reactions with a different sequence produced a rate enhancement. Truncation of the 3'-arm, however, had no effect on the reaction rate of the one substrate tested yet nearly halved the cleavage rate in another substrate.

Citations Scopus - 27
2000 Cairns MJ, King A, Sun LQ, 'Nucleic acid mutation analysis using catalytic DNA.', Nucleic acids research, 28 (2000)

The sequence specificity of the '10-23' RNA-cleaving DNA enzyme (deoxyribozyme) was utilised to discriminate between subtle differences in nucleic acid sequence in a relatively co... [more]

The sequence specificity of the '10-23' RNA-cleaving DNA enzyme (deoxyribozyme) was utilised to discriminate between subtle differences in nucleic acid sequence in a relatively conserved segment of the L1 gene from a number of different human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes. DNA enzymes specific for the different HPV types were found to cleave their respective target oligoribonucleotide substrates with high efficiency compared with their unmatched counterparts, which were usually not cleaved or cleaved with very low efficiency. This specificity was achieved despite the existence of only very small differences in the sequence of one binding arm. As an example of how this methodology may be applied to mutation analysis of tissue samples, type-specific deoxyribozyme cleavable substrates were generated by genomic PCR using a chimeric primer containing three bases of RNA. The RNA component enabled each amplicon to be cleavable in the presence of its matching deoxyribozyme. In this format, the specificity of deoxyribozyme cleavage is defined by Watson-Crick interactions between one substrate-binding domain (arm I) and the polymorphic sequence which is amplified during PCR. Deoxy-ribozyme-mediated cleavage of amplicons generated by this method was used to examine the HPV status of genomic DNA derived from Caski cells, which are known to be positive for HPV16. This method is applicable to many types of nucleic acid sequence variation, including single nucleotide polymorphisms.

Citations Scopus - 33
1999 Sun LQ, Cairns MJ, Gerlach WL, Witherington C, Wang L, King A, 'Suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation by a c-myc RNA-cleaving deoxyribozyme.', The Journal of biological chemistry, 274 17236-17241 (1999)
DOI 10.1074/jbc.274.24.17236
1999 Temple MD, Cairns MJ, Kim A, Murray V, 'Protein-DNA footprinting of the human e-globin promoter in human intact cells using nitrogen mustard analogues and other DNA-damaging agents', Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Gene Structure and Expression, 1445 245-256 (1999)

Nitrogen mustard analogues, bleomycin and dimethyl sulphate (DMS) have been used as probes of protein-DNA interactions in intact human cells. The sites of damage have been determi... [more]

Nitrogen mustard analogues, bleomycin and dimethyl sulphate (DMS) have been used as probes of protein-DNA interactions in intact human cells. The sites of damage have been determined at base pair resolution in the single copy e-globin gene promoter in erythroid K562 cells, non-erythroid HeLa cells and purified DNA. Exponential amplification of gene-specific damage fragments was achieved using the ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LMPCR) technique and analysed on DNA sequencing gels. A comparison of the relative damage band intensities between purified DNA and intact cells revealed several significant differences - both protection (footprint) and enhancement. These differences occurred at putative transcription factor binding sites and hence are thought to be due to protein-DNA interactions. A major feature of the band intensity ratio plots was the footprint observed at the CCAAT box binding motif as revealed by nitrogen mustard analogues. Enhanced band intensity (hypersensitivity) was displayed at the 5'- and 3'- ends of the CCAAT box in K562 cells - this feature was absent in HeLa cells and in vitro reconstitutions. A footprint was found at the GATA-1 motif in K562 cells that was also absent in non-expressing HeLa cells. Footprints were also evident at the TATA box, CACC box and the eF1 DNA binding motif in K562 cells.

DOI 10.1016/S0167-4781(99)00057-3
Citations Scopus - 9
1999 Cairns MJ, Hopkins TM, Witherington C, Wang L, Sun LQ, 'Target site selection for an RNA-cleaving catalytic DNA.', Nature biotechnology, 17 480-486 (1999)
DOI 10.1038/8658
1998 Cairns MJ, Murray V, 'The DNA sequence specificity of hedamycin damage determined by ligation-mediated PCR and linear amplification', Biochemistry and Molecular Biology International, 46 267-275 (1998)

The DNA sequence specificity of hedamycin damage was compared using two techniques: Ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) and Linear Amplification (LA). The electrophoretic mobility of LA... [more]

The DNA sequence specificity of hedamycin damage was compared using two techniques: Ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) and Linear Amplification (LA). The electrophoretic mobility of LA products were made comparable with LMPCR products by using a primer with a 27 bp nonbinding 5'-extension. By direct comparison of the damage intensity (as represented by each of the methods), considerable bias was found in the LMPCR system with respect to LA - resulting in the under representation of lesions with T as the base 3' to the damage site. In view of this observation some caution should be exercised in the interpretation of data for DNA damage/repair specificity derived by LMPCR. In addition the extended primer LA method used in these experiments, could be applied to generate a dideoxy sequencing ladder for analysis of LMPCR products. This would negate the need to prepare Maxam-Gilbert chemical sequencing fragments for amplification through LMPCR.

Citations Scopus - 6
1998 Cairns MJ, 'Detection of protein-DNA interactions at ß-globin gene cluster in intact human cells utilizing hedamycin as DNA-damaging agent', DNA and Cell Biology, 17 325-333 (1998)

The DNA sequence specificity of hedamycin (HDM) damage was investigated in the single-copy human ß-globin gene cluster in an erythroid cell line, a nonerythroid cell line, and pu... [more]

The DNA sequence specificity of hedamycin (HDM) damage was investigated in the single-copy human ß-globin gene cluster in an erythroid cell line, a nonerythroid cell line, and purified genomic DNA. The target DNA sequences for this study were the ß-globin gene locus control region (LCR) hypersensitive site 2 (HS-2) and the ß-globin gene promoter. The DNA fragments produced by HDM damage in these target sequences were selectively amplified by the ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LMPCR) and analyzed at nucleotide resolution by DNA-sequencing gel electrophoresis. The DNA sequences damaged by HDM in the cellular environment were found to be similar to that observed in the purified genomic DNA. However, substantial differences did occur between the intensity of cellular and purified genomic DNA reaction products at discrete regions corresponding to transcription factor-binding motifs. This was most apparent in the LCR HS-2 at the tandem NF-E2/AP-1 motif, where the DNA damage activity of HDM was severely impaired. This motif has been shown to bind to the erythroid-specific nuclear factor- erythroid 2 (NF-E2) and the widely distributed activator protein-1 (AP-1). The HDM damage protection patterns or 'genomic footprints' observed at this motif were probably caused by protein-DNA interactions with one or both of these transcription factors. This result indicates that the DNA damaging activity of HDM in cells is sensitive to bound nuclear factors. Because HDM can enter intact cells, where its DNA damaging activity is modulated by protein-DNA interactions, it may have application in genomic footprinting experiments.

Citations Scopus - 11
1997 Temple MD, Cairns MJ, Denny WA, Murray V, 'Protein-DNA interactions in the human ß-globin locus control region hypersensitive site-2 as revealed by four nitrogen mustards', Nucleic Acids Research, 25 3255-3260 (1997)

Four nitrogen mustards have been used in this study to examine protein-DNA interactions in intact human cells, specifically at the locus control region hypersensitive site-2 (LCR ... [more]

Four nitrogen mustards have been used in this study to examine protein-DNA interactions in intact human cells, specifically at the locus control region hypersensitive site-2 (LCR HS-2) of the human ß-globin locus. Three of these nitrogen mustards are DNA-targeted by attachment of an acridine or amsacrine intercalating chromophore, while the fourth (chlorambucil) is a non-targeted mustard. The ligation-mediated PCR technique was used to determine the sites of damage at base pair resolution on DNA sequencing gels. A densitometric comparison was made between DNA damaged in intact erythroid K562 cells and in purified DNA. The intensity of DNA damage sites in the LCR HS-2 were found to differ significantly between intact K562 cells and purified DNA. At the NF-E2/AP-1 motif, pronounced damage protection was observed in DNA derived from drug treated cells. The nuclear factor-erythroid 2 (NF-E2) protein factor is thought to bind at this NF-E2/AP-1 motif in K562 cells. Other sites of protection and enhancement that corresponded to known transcription factor binding sites were also detected. These nitrogen mustards are therefore very effective compounds for detection of transcription factor binding to DNA in intact cells and are superior to other commonly used agents. The sequence selectivity of the compounds was determined using plasmid DNA and compared to that found in intact cells. The acridine-based nitrogen mustard had a preference for forming adducts at guanine bases, while the two amsacrine-based nitrogen mustards and chlorambucil formed adducts at both guanine and adenine bases.

DOI 10.1093/nar/25.16.3255
Citations Scopus - 14
1996 Cairns MJ, Murray V, 'Influence of chromatin structure on bleomycin-DNA interactions at base pair resolution in the human ß-globin gene cluster', Biochemistry, 35 8753-8760 (1996)

The DNA sequence specificity of bleomycin was examined in human cells and in purified genomic DNA. In each case, DNA damage sites were determined at nucleotide resolution in the h... [more]

The DNA sequence specificity of bleomycin was examined in human cells and in purified genomic DNA. In each case, DNA damage sites were determined at nucleotide resolution in the human single-copy ß-globin promoter and the locus control region (LCR) hypersensitive site 2 (HS-2). Exponential amplification of gene-specific genomic fragments was achieved by ligation- mediated PCR, and labeled reaction products were analyzed directly by sequencing gel electrophoresis. Bleomycin was found to cleave DNA preferentially at GC, GT, and GA dinucleotides. This study represents the first occasion that the sequence specificity of bleomycin has been determined in intact human cells at the single-copy gene level. The intensity of bleomycin damage sites in the LCR HS-2 was found to differ substantially between intact cells and purified DNA at putative transcription factor binding sites. Bleomycin activity was greatly reduced in cells at a tandem NF-E2/AP1 DNA sequence element. This footprint was strongest in K562 cells where the nuclear factor-erythroid 2 (NF-E2) is thought to bind. Protection and enhancement were also observed at other sequence elements in the HS-2 that associate with erythroid-specific and ubiquitous transcription factors. These results suggest that the activity of bleomycin is significantly reduced at the site of protein-DNA interactions in intact cells. This property of bleomycin is extremely useful in genomic 'footprinting', where it has significant advantages over other commonly used agents.

DOI 10.1021/bi9600207
Citations Scopus - 23
1994 Cairns MJ, Murray V, 'Comparison of the sequence specificity of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) damage in guanine- and 7-deazaguanine-containing DNA', BBA - Gene Structure and Expression, 1218 315-321 (1994)

The N7 of guanine is thought to be the primary target for adduct and crosslink formation between cisplatin and DNA. However, reactive sites in DNA other than the N7 of guanine may... [more]

The N7 of guanine is thought to be the primary target for adduct and crosslink formation between cisplatin and DNA. However, reactive sites in DNA other than the N7 of guanine may also participate in the formation of adducts with cisplatin. The possibility that these interactions arise and form DNA polymerase blocking lesions was investigated by primer extension reactions with Taq DNA polymerase. To differentiate between damage produced at relatively weak sites from those formed at the N7 of guanine, a modified DNA template was synthesised with the N7 of guanine replaced with a carbon atom. This was achieved in a PCR designed to incorporate 7-deazaguanine instead of normal guanine. The sequence specificity of cisplatin damage in the modified and unmodified DNA substrates was compared (after linear amplification) by DNA sequencing gel analysis. For concentrations of cisplatin (1 to 5 µM) that induce blocking lesions in normal DNA, no significant damage was observed in the modified DNA. This confirmed that the N7 of guanine is the major site of adduct formation in normal DNA. At higher concentrations of cisplatin (50 µM and 100 µM), lesions were found at AA dinucleotides and other novel sites in the modified DNA. These results indicate that the N7 of guanine is not required in the formation of some cisplatin adducts. © 1994.

DOI 10.1016/0167-4781(94)90183-X
Citations Scopus - 4
1994 Cairns MJ, Murray V, 'Dideoxy genomic sequencing of a single-copy mammalian gene using more than two hundred cycles of linear amplification', BioTechniques, 17 910-913+914 (1994)

We explored the possibility of using a large number of reaction cycles to achieve genomic DNA sequencing in single-copy mammalian genes. A section of the ß-globin promoter was se... [more]

We explored the possibility of using a large number of reaction cycles to achieve genomic DNA sequencing in single-copy mammalian genes. A section of the ß-globin promoter was sequenced directly from a sample of human white blood cell DNA. The sequencing fragments were extended from a single, 5'- terminal-labeled oligonucleotide primer by Taq DNA Polymerase in the presence of dideoxyribonucleotides and more than 200 thermal cycles of denaturation, annealing and extension. The labeled sequencing fragments produced in this linear amplification were detected after electrophoresis on a DNA-sequencing gel. We propose that this scheme could be adopted in some instances as an alternative to conventional sequencing.

Citations Scopus - 1
1993 Murray V, Monchawin C, Cairns MJ, England PR, Leigh D, McDonald BL, 'Detection of polymorphisms using thermal cycling with a single oligonucleotide on a DNA sequencing gel', Human Mutation, 2 118-122 (1993)

A method is described for the detection of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in single copy genes in mammalian cells using one 5'-labelled oligonucleotide. This li... [more]

A method is described for the detection of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in single copy genes in mammalian cells using one 5'-labelled oligonucleotide. This linear amplification (LA) method employs a single oligonucleotide as primer, which is extended by Taq DNA polymerase up to a restriction enzyme cleavage site. The products are arithmetically amplified by thermal cycling. The size of the products are determined by the sequence of the oligonucleotide and the position of the restriction enzyme cleavage site. Hence, an RFLP can be observed by measuring the size of the products. Polymorphisms which differ in size by a small number of base pairs, as are found in (CA)n repeats, are especially suitable for analysis by the LA procedure since the products are run on DNA sequencing gels. A number of genes were examined by the procedure and all produced a satisfactory signal including a GC-rich template. It is proposed that the LA method would be suitable for large-scale genetic linkage analysis. The LA procedure has many advantages including the ability to multiplex signals under the same conditions, and lower cost since only one primer is needed. © 1993 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Citations Scopus - 1
Show 77 more journal articles

Conference (49 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Ibrahim EC, Bergon A, Belzeaux R, Comte M, Pelletier F, Herve M, et al., 'Transcriptome Analyses of Human Brain and Blood Tissues Converge to Dysregulated Expression of CX3CR1', BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY, Toronto, CANADA (2015)
Co-authors Paul Tooney, Rodney Scott, Brian Kelly
2015 Cairns M, Geaghan M, Atkins J, Hollins S, 'GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINANTS OF MIRNA DYSREGULATION IN SCHIZOPHRENIA', SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN, Colorado Springs, CO (2015)
2014 Bond DR, Passfield C, Cairns M, Ashman LK, Weidenhofer J, 'Posttranscriptional regulation of tetraspanins CD151 & CD9 in breast & prostate cancers', CANCER RESEARCH, San Diego, CA (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1158/1538-7445.AM2014-4364
Co-authors Judith Weidenhofer, Leonie Ashman
2014 Dun MD, Kahl RGS, Flanagan H, Cairns MMJ, Smith ND, Enjeti AK, et al., 'IDENTIFICATION OF ONCOGENIC SIGNALLING PATHWAYS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKAEMIA (AML) PATIENTS BY PHOSPHOPROTEOMICS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Matt Dun, Nikki Verrills
2013 Bond D, Cairns M, Ashman L, Weidenhofer J, 'Post-transcriptional regulation of CD151 & CD9 by miRNAs in prostate cancer', BJU INTERNATIONAL (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Judith Weidenhofer, Leonie Ashman
2012 Gardiner EJ, Cairns MJ, Beveridge NJ, Liu B, Mossman D, Carr VJ, et al., 'Differential gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a large cohort of participants with schizophrenia', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting, Gold Coast, Queensland (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney, Rodney Scott
2012 Goldie BJ, Cairns MJ, 'Integration of subcellular miRNA and mRNA responses to differentiation and depolarisation in neuronal cells', Gene Silencing by Small RNAs. Keystone Symposia on Molecular and Cellular Biology, Vancouver, Canada (2012) [E3]
2012 Cairns MJ, 'Genetic and epigenetic regulation of schizophrenia associated microrna', Presentation Abstracts. XXth World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics, Hamburg, Germany (2012) [E3]
2012 Cairns MJ, 'MicroRNA in schizophrenia and developmental disorders', European Neuropsychopharmacology, Vienna, Austria (2012) [E3]
2012 Bond DR, Cairns MJ, Ashman LK, Weidenhofer JC, 'Investigating micro-RNA regulation of tetraspanins CD151 and CD9 in prostate cancer', Febs Journal, Seville, Spain (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Judith Weidenhofer, Leonie Ashman
2012 Goldie BJ, Cairns MJ, 'mRNA-miRNA responses to depolarization in neuronal cells', 45th Annual Winter Conference on Brain Research, Snowbird, Utah (2012) [E3]
2012 Cairns MJ, Santarelli DMF, Carroll AP, Beveridge NJ, Hollins SL, Goldie BJ, Gardiner EJ, 'miRNA: There importance for brain function and neuropsychiatry', Abstract Book. Biological Psychiatry Australia Scientific Meeting, Parkville, Vic (2012) [E3]
2012 Carroll AP, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Biological investigation of schizophrenia-associated miRNA dysregulation', Abstract Book. Biological Psychiatry Australia Scientific Meeting, Parkville, Vic (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2012 Dayas CV, Quinn RK, Goldie BJ, Brown AM, Levi EM, Smith DW, Cairns MJ, 'Association of miRNAs with addiction-relevant synaptic plasticity genes', Abstract Book. Biological Psychiatry Australia Scientific Meeting, Parkville, Vic (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Douglas Smith, Christopher Dayas
2012 Hollins SL, Goldie BJ, Carroll AP, Mason EA, Cairns MJ, Eyles D, 'Dynamic changes in microRNA expression during mammalian brain development coincides with forebrain maturation', Abstract Book. Biological Psychiatry Australia Scientific Meeting, Parkville, Vic (2012) [E3]
2011 Gupta P, Liu B, Wu JQ, Soriano V, Rodes B, Dyer WB, et al., 'Genome-wide mRNA and miRNA profiling from HCV, HIV and HIV+HCV co-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) reveal distinct micro-RNAs regulating HIV+HCV co-infection', Global Antiviral Journal, Kauai, Hawaii (2011) [E3]
2011 Gupta P, Liu B, Wu JQ, Dyer WB, Dwyer DE, Wang B, et al., 'Parallel miRNA and mRNA profiling in HCV-infected peripheral blood cells (PBMC) and tumor/non-tumor liver tissue from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) show correlation with cancer pathways', Global Antiviral Journal, Kauai, Hawaii (2011) [E3]
2011 Saksena NK, Gupta P, Liu B, Wu JQ, Soriano V, Rodes B, et al., 'Human microRNA (hsa-miR-21): A novel marker for HIV+HCV co-infection', Global Antiviral Journal, Kauai, Hawaii (2011) [E3]
2011 Cairns MJ, 'Repression of maternally expressed microRNA clustered on 14q32 is associated with schizophrenia', 75th Anniversary Scientific Symposium: Research for a Healthy Future. Symposium Handbook, Canberra, ACT (2011) [E3]
2011 Cairns MJ, Beveridge NJ, Schaefer A, Kenny P, 'MicroRNA in brain development, function, and pathology', Forty-Fourth Annual Winter Conference on Brain Research, Keystone, Colorado (2011) [E3]
2011 Sams M, Beveridge NJ, Newburn E, Cairns MJ, Hyde T, Kleinman J, Lipska B, 'MicroRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex during the human lifespan', Forty-Fourth Annual Winter Conference on Brain Research, Keystone, Colorado (2011) [E3]
2011 Mason EA, McGrath JJ, Cairns MJ, Eyles D, 'In silico mirna candidates regulating dopaminergic neuron development', Posters. Australian Neuroscience Society 31st Annual Meeting, Auckland, New Zealand (2011) [E3]
2011 Wu J, Tooney PA, Wang X, Cairns MJ, 'Quantitative transcriptome sequencing reveals altered presynaptic vesicle trafficking and myelination in the temporal cortex in schizophrenia', Presentation Abstracts: XIXth World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics, Washington, DC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2011 Mossman D, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, Kelly BJ, Carr V, Scott R, 'Identification of alternatively spliced gene variants in schizophrenia', Schizophrenia Bulletin, Colorado Springs, CO (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Brian Kelly, Paul Tooney
2011 Acikyol B, Johnstone DM, Trinder D, Cairns MJ, Milward AE, 'Gene expression changes relating to key brain functions and neuropsychiatric disorders in the TFR2 mutant mouse', Program Book: Fourth Congress of the International BioIron Society (IBIS), Vancouver, Canada (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Liz Milward
2011 Milward AE, Hollins SL, Graham R, Trinder D, Van Balen M, Olynyk J, et al., 'Iron and the biogenesis of melanin and melanosomes in the retina', Program Book: Fourth Congress of the International BioIron Society (IBIS), Vancouver, Canada (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Liz Milward
2011 Beveridge NJ, Santarelli DMF, Tooney PA, Webster MJ, Weickert CS, Cairns MJ, 'Maturation of the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex coincides with a dynamic shift in microRNA expression', The Proceedings of the First Scientific Meeting of Biological Psychiatry Australia, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2011 Cairns MJ, Wu JQ, Tooney PA, Wang X, 'RNA-seq reveals significant alteration of cortical promoter usage and splicing in schizophrenia', The Proceedings of the First Scientific Meeting of Biological Psychiatry Australia, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2011 Gardiner EJ, Beveridge NJ, Liu B, Carr VJ, Scott R, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Gene expression profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in schizophrenia', The Proceedings of the First Scientific Meeting of Biological Psychiatry Australia, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney, Rodney Scott
2011 Hollins SL, Mason EA, Cairns MJ, Eyles D, 'Genome-wide analysis of microRNA and gene expression in the developing rat brain', The Proceedings of the First Scientific Meeting of Biological Psychiatry Australia, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
2010 Gardiner EJ, Beveridge NJ, Santarelli DMF, Wu JQ, Carr V, Scott R, et al., 'Mirna expression profiling in patients with schizophrenia', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney, Rodney Scott
2010 Gardiner E, Beveridge NJ, Santarelli D, Wu J, Carr V, Scott RJ, et al., 'MIRNA EXPRESSION PROFILING IN PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Paul Tooney
2010 Beveridge NJ, Tooney PA, Webster M, Weickert CS, Cairns MJ, 'Microrna expression throughout postnatal development if the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Sydney, Australia (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2010 Cairns MJ, Beveridge NJ, Scarr E, Dean B, 'Potential role for gene directed micrornas in the pathophysiology of muscarinic receptor deficit schizophrenia', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Sydney, Australia (2010) [E3]
2010 Wu JQ, Cairns MJ, Scott R, Carr V, Mowry B, Jablensky A, et al., 'Genome wide analysis of DNA copy number in schizophrenia reveals loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 6P22.1 and 16P11.2-11.1', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Sydney, Australia (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Ulrich Schall, Paul Tooney, Rodney Scott
2010 Santarelli DMF, Beveridge NJ, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Upregulation of dicer and microrna expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's Area 46) in schizophrenia', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Sydney, Australia (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2010 Weickert CS, Duncan C, Beveridge NJ, Wong J, Webster MJ, Cairns MJ, 'Regulation of psychosis gene NPAS3 by microrna during postnatal development and in schizophrenia', Schizophrenia Research, Florence, Italy (2010) [E3]
2009 Cairns MJ, Beveridge NJ, Carroll AP, Gardiner EJ, Tooney PA, Santarelli DMF, 'Alteration of cortical microRNA biogenesis in schizophrenia and its influence on gene expression', XVIIth World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics: Abstract Book, San Diego, CA (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2009 Cairns MJ, Beveridge NJ, Carroll AP, Tooney PA, Gardiner EJ, Santarelli DMF, 'Alteration of microRNA biogenesis in schizophrenia and its implications for synaptic structure and function', Schizophrenia Bulletin, San Diego, CA (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1093/schbul/sbn173
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2009 Beveridge NJ, Carroll AP, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'MicroRNA changes in the prefrontal and temporal cortices in schizophrenia', Schizophrenia Bulletin, San Diego, CA (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1093/schbul/sbn173
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2008 Beveridge NJ, Carroll AP, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Dysregulation of miRNA 181b in the temporal cortex in schizophrenia', 2008 Lorne Genome Conference Delegate Handbook, Lorne, VIC (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2008 Carroll AP, Beveridge NJ, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Identification of biologically relevant miRNA targets through the bidirectional modulation of miRNA expression', 2008 Lorne Genome Conference Delegate Handbook, Lorne, VIC (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2008 Beveridge NJ, Tooney PA, Carroll AP, Cairns MJ, 'MicroRNA changes in the cerebral cortex in schizophrenia', Proceedings of the Australian Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Canberra, ACT (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2008 Gardiner EJ, Carroll AP, Beveridge NJ, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Investigation of miRNA influence on RGS4 and NRG1 gene expression in schizophrenia', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2008 Carroll AP, Beveridge NJ, Gardiner EJ, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'Identification of biologically relevant, schizophrenia-associated MicroRNA targets', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2008 Beveridge NJ, Carroll AP, Gardiner EJ, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, 'MicroRNA changes in the prefrontal and temporal cortices in schizophrenia', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney
2008 Cairns MJ, 'MiRNA and post-transcriptional regulation in schizophrenia', XVIth World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics: Abstract, Osaka, Japan (2008) [E3]
2007 Cairns MJ, Beveridge NJ, Carroll A, Scott R, Tooney PA, 'Investigation of post transcriptional gene silencing in schizophrenia', Schizophrenia Bulletin (Abstracts of the 11th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research), Colorado Springs, Colorado (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Tooney, Rodney Scott
2007 Tooney PA, Scott R, Cairns MJ, Bowden NA, 'Altered gene expression in the superior temporial gyrus in schizophrenia', Schizophrenia Bulletin (Abstracts of the 11th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research), Colorado Springs, Colorado (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Nikola Bowden, Rodney Scott, Paul Tooney
Show 46 more conferences
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 33
Total funding $6,444,854

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20155 grants / $1,522,688

Translational genomics for schizophrenia: Using whole genome sequencing to define the network architecture for personalised interventions$800,000

Funding body: NSW Office for Health and Medical Research

Funding body NSW Office for Health and Medical Research
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Dr Melissa Green, Professor Vaughan Carr
Scheme NSW Genomics Collaborative Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401017
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Epigenetic mechanisms of brain dysfunction in psychotic and brain dysorders$601,328

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team
Scheme Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

RNA-guided genome editing to identify functional variants of schizophrenia-associated eQTLs$99,360

Funding body: Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

Funding body Brain & Behavior Research Foundation
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns
Scheme NARSAD Independent Investigator Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401403
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Emlyn and Jennie Thomas Postgraduate Medical Research Scholarship$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Miss Chantel Fitzsimmons, Mr Joshua Atkins
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500648
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

International Congress on Schizophrenia Research, Colorado USA, 28 March-1 April 2015$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500341
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20143 grants / $668,718

Modelling schizophrenia-associated changes in mir-137 expression$567,044

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Doctor Frederick Walker
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300360
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

JuLI Stage $71,674

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Depressive Symptoms: Trajectory and Outcomes in a Longitudinal Population Data Set$30,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Brian Kelly, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Professor Rodney Scott, Professor John Attia, Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Professor Vaughan Carr
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400594
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20136 grants / $291,490

Epistatic genetic effects on neuroanatomical subtypes of schizophrenia$194,894

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Dr Melissa Green, Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Professor Kristin Laurens, Professor Vaughan Carr
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201211
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Functional characterisation of schizophrenia-associated neurodevelopmental dysfunction of miR-137$25,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Doctor Frederick Walker, Professor Alan Brichta, Doctor Natalie Beveridge
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300468
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Functional characterisation of schizophrenia-associated neurodevelopmental dysfunction of miR-137$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Doctor Frederick Walker, Professor Alan Brichta, Doctor Natalie Beveridge
Scheme Near Miss
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300801
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

microRNA and translation dynamics of synaptic plasticity$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Professor Alan Brichta, Doctor Frederick Walker
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300463
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

International Congress on Schizophrenia Research, Florida 19-26 April 2013.$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300787
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20123 grants / $278,860

In Vivo Analysis Of The Molecular And Neural Mechanism That Underly An Association Of miRNAs With Mental Disorders$225,360

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Thomas Becker, Dr Silke Rinkwitz, Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200009
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Microscopic illumination system for advanced fluorescent protein technology$34,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Rick Thorne, Professor Xu Dong Zhang, Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Doctor Charles De Bock, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Doctor Severine Roselli, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Emeritus Professor Leonie Ashman, Professor Hubert Hondermarck
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100983
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Roles of post-transcriptional gene silencing in the functional regulation of neuronal gene expression and plasticity in schizophrenia$19,500

Funding body: Schizophrenia Research Institute

Funding body Schizophrenia Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Ms Belinda Goldie, Doctor Chris Dayas
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200761
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20113 grants / $472,000

The potential of non-coding RNAs in saliva and urine as prostate cancer biomarkers$447,000

Funding body: US Department of Defense

Funding body US Department of Defense
Project Team
Scheme Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Emerging Research Leaders Program 2011$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns
Scheme Emerging Research Leaders Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1101039
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

IMPLEN NanoPhotometer pearl$10,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Professor Alan Brichta, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Emeritus Professor Patricia Michie, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Ulli Schall, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Doctor Frederick Walker, Doctor Rick Thorne, Doctor Chris Dayas, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Doctor Janet Holt, Doctor Severine Roselli, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Associate Professor Liz Milward, Doctor Charles De Bock, Doctor Julie Merriman-Jones, Doctor Jing Qin Wu, Doctor Bing Liu, Mr Dan Johnstone, Ms Belinda Goldie, Doctor Natalie Beveridge
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100030
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20104 grants / $614,416

Molecular and cellular characterisation of schizophrenia associated dysfunction in microRNA biogenesis$478,500

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Professor Rodney Scott, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Professor Alan Brichta
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190196
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

NARSAD Young Investigators Award - Neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia-associated changes in gene silencing.$76,916

Funding body: Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

Funding body Brain & Behavior Research Foundation
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns
Scheme NARSAD Young Investigator Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0189432
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

ABI 7500 Real Time PCR System $34,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Rick Thorne, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Doctor Doug Smith, Professor Gordon Burns, Emeritus Professor Leonie Ashman, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Doctor Charles De Bock, Doctor Chris Dayas, Doctor Brett Graham, Doctor Martin Horan, Doctor Rebecca Lim, Doctor Severine Roselli, Doctor Larisa Bobrovskaya, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Doctor Frederick Walker, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Associate Professor Philip Bolton, Professor Alan Brichta, Professor Robert Callister, Professor Trevor Day, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Professor Manohar Garg, Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Derek Laver, Associate Professor Eugene Nalivaiko, Emeritus Professor John Rostas
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000055
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Analysis of schizophrenia-associated gene and mircoRNA signatures in purified CD4 and CD8 positive T-cells$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Doctor Jing Qin Wu, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Professor Rodney Scott
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900188
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20091 grants / $19,719

Investigation of schizophrenia associated gene and miRNA expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex$19,719

Funding body: Schizophrenia Research Institute

Funding body Schizophrenia Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Associate Professor Paul Tooney
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190436
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20083 grants / $2,441,000

Neuro-behavioural genetics network research program$2,400,000

Funding body: NSW Health

Funding body NSW Health
Project Team Conjoint Professor Vaughan Carr, Professor Rodney Scott, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Professor Brian Kelly, Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189170
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

A road map of schizophrenia associated with gene and miRNA expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Associate Professor Paul Tooney
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188461
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Investigation of miRNA influence on NRG1 dysregulation in schizophrenia$16,000

Funding body: Schizophrenia Research Institute

Funding body Schizophrenia Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188594
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20074 grants / $115,963

Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing in Schizophrenia$59,761

Funding body: Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

Funding body Brain & Behavior Research Foundation
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns
Scheme NARSAD Young Investigator Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0186852
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Gene silencing in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia$23,750

Funding body: Schizophrenia Research Institute

Funding body Schizophrenia Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187724
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

The functional characterization of schizophrenia-associated non-coding RNA expression$23,750

Funding body: Schizophrenia Research Institute

Funding body Schizophrenia Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187725
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

Investigation of Genetic and epigenetic mechanism underlying dysregulation of RGS4 in schizophrenia$8,702

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187862
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20061 grants / $20,000

Investigation of miRNAs in schizophrenia$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Professor Rodney Scott
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186685
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed6
Current11

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD3.6

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Study of miRNA Role and Mechanism in Synaptic Plasticity and the Pathogenesis of Schizophrenia
Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Utilising High-Resolution Genomics to Resolve Genetic and Epigenetic Complexity in Schizophrenia
Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD MicroRNA Biogenesis in Neuronal Function and Schizophrenia
Medical Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD Role of miRNA in Addiction Vulnerability
Human Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Gene Expression in Brain of Hfe-/-xTfr2mut Mouse, A Model of Human Iron Overload
Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Tetraspanins CD151 and CD9 by Micro-RNA's in Prostate and Breast Cancers
Medical Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD The Role of miRNA and Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing in Mediating the Mammalian Brains Response to Environmental Stress During Development and Ageing
Medical Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2010 PhD Genome-wide Gene and MicroRNA expression analysis of HIV and HCV infections in humans and biomarker development
Medical Science, University of Sydney
Co-Supervisor
2008 Honours INVESTIGATION OF SCHIZOPHRENIA ASSOCIATED GENE AND MIRNA EXPRESSION IN THE DORSOLATERAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX
Biol Sc Not Elsewhere Classifd, University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2007 PhD Gene Silencing in the Pathogenesis of Schizophrenia
Medical Science, University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2007 PhD Functional Characterisation of Schizophrenia Associated Non-coding RNA Expression.
Medical Science, University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Roles of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing in the Functional Regulation of Neuronal Gene Expression and Plasticity
Medical Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 Masters Gene Expression in the Brain of Mutant Mouse Models of Human Iron Overload
Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Genomic Characterisation of Small RNA-Mediated Post-Transcriptional Gene Regulation
Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Functional Analysis of Gene and microRNA Expression Profiling in Schizophrenia: Brain, Blood and Antipsychotics
Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Post-Transcriptional Gene Regulation in Schizophrenia, Antipsychotic Drug Treatment and the Developing Brain
Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2011 PhD Post-transcriptional Gene Silencing in Neuronal Differentiation, Development and Schizophrenia
Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
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News

Associate Professor Murray Cairns

International Recognition for Schizophrenia Researcher

March 12, 2015

Associate Professor Murray Cairns  has been awarded the 2015 NARSAD Independent Investigator Grant.

Associate Professor Murray Cairns

Schizophrenia research first

March 4, 2015

Associate Professor Murray Cairns has received an $800,000 2014/15 NSW Genomics Collaborative Grant to explore better treatments for schizophrenia.

Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns

Position

Conjoint Associate Professor
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Pharmacy and Experimental Pharmacology

Contact Details

Email murray.cairns@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 8670
Fax (02) 4921 7903

Office

Room MSB512
Building Medical Sciences Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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