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Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett

Associate Professor

School of Environmental and Life Sciences (Applied Sciences)

Career Summary

Biography

I undertook my Bachelor of Science (Hons I) studies at the University of Newcastle. I then completed my PhD through the University of Sydney, Faculty of Medicine where I established a novel proteomic initiative with the specific aim of using proteomics as a tool to answer clinically relevant questions. Using this approach I identified unique markers of pancreatic and bile duct cancer by creating powerful new diagnostic models for the improved diagnosis of pancreatico-biliary malignancies. I then continued my interest in pancreatic cancer research by joining the Pancreatic Cancer Research Group at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in 2007.

In my early post-doctoral years, I was awarded an NHMRC Postdoctoral Training Fellowship (Peter Doherty) and was funded as a Cancer Institute NSW Early Career Development Fellow at the Garvan Institute. My research interests primarily focussed on signalling pathways in pancreatic cancer to identify novel therapeutic and chemopreventative strategies, as well as defining the role of bone marrow derived cells in the development of the normal pancreas, pancreatic injury and regeneration, and pancreatic cancer.

Recognition of these contributions included a feature article in the CINSW Cancer Research Achievement Report 2008; A celebration of the outstanding contributions made to cancer research in NSW. I am also is a Cancer Institute NSW Career Development Fellow investigating novel therapeutic approaches to pancreatic cancer, and was awarding the Cancer Research Network Innovation Award (Sydney Cancer Conference 2010).

I am also investigating the personalised treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer based on genomic sequence data acquired through the Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative, as part of the International Cancer Genome Consortium.

I moved to the University of Newcastle in early 2012 to take a position within the School of Environmental and Life Sciences,and am now driving a research program investigating aberrations in nutrient-gene interactions to define clinically relevant phenotypes of pancreatic cancer, as well as examining the efficacy of bioactive compounds as novel therapeutics in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

Research Expertise
My research interests have primarily focused on signalling pathways in pancreatic cancer to identify novel therapeutic and chemopreventative strategies, as well as defining the role of bone marrow derived cells in the development of the normal pancreas, pancreatic injury and regeneration, and pancreatic cancer.

I am also investigating novel therapeutic approaches to pancreatic cancer in addition to investigating personalised treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer based on genomic sequence data acquired through the Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative, as part of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC). Upon my move to the University of Newcastle, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, I have been investigating aberrations in nutrient-gene interactions to define clinically relevant phenotypes of pancreatic cancer, as well as examining the efficacy of bioactive compounds as novel therapeutics in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

Teaching Expertise
I have been involved in coordinating and teaching core courses for the Bachelor of Food Science and Human Nutrition Program, in particular BIOL2011 - Fundamentals of Biology and Biochemistry; and FSHN2100 - Microbiology, Food Safety and Immunology.

Collaborations
I am an Associate Investigator for the Australian Pancreatic Cancer Network, based at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, which provides direct links to the clinical management of patients facilitating rapid translation of scientific discoveries to patient care, providing a unique opportunity for translational research efforts in pancreatic cancer in Australia.

I am also contributing to the Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative (APGI), which aims to sequence ~400 individual pancreatic cancers as part of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC).

I have been awarded project grant funding through the Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme, co-funded by Cancer Australia and the Cure Cancer Australia Foundation (CIA; 2012-1013). I am also a Co-Investigator on a successful NHMRC program grant ($11,128,320; 2009-2013), and a Co-Chief Investigator on successful project grants through the NHMRC (CI-B; 2011-2013) and The Cancer Council NSW (CI-C; 2010-2012) in collaboration with Dr Tao Liu at the Children’s Cancer Institute Australia.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Biochemistry
  • Carcinogenesis
  • Metastases
  • Microbiology
  • Mouse Models
  • Novel Therapeutics
  • Pancreatic Cancer
  • Research Methods

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111201 Cancer Cell Biology 20
111204 Cancer Therapy (excl. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy) 20
111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified 60

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/06/2012 - 1/02/2013 Fellow

Cancer Institute NSW:- Career Development Fellowship

University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia
1/03/2012 -  Honorary Scientist Garvan Institute of Medical Research
Cancer Research Program
Australia
1/01/2007 - 1/03/2012 Senior Research Officer Garvan Institute of Medical Research
Cancer Research Program
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Scarlett CS, Vuong QV, Plant Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Prevention and Treatment, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., New York (2015) [A3]
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong
2014 Scarlett CJ, Vuong QV, Preface (2014)
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong

Chapter (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Vuong QV, Scarlett CJ, 'Selected Australian Flora As Potential Sources of Anti-Cancer Agents', Plant Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Prevention and Treatment, Nova Science Publishers , Inc., New York 195-217 (2015) [B1]
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong
2015 Bowyer MC, McCluskey A, Scarlett CJ, Vuong QV, 'Pancreatic Cancer drugs: Case Studies in Synthesis and Production', Plant Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Prevention and Treatment, Nova Science Publishers, New York 145-193 (2015) [B1]
Co-authors Adam Mccluskey, Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer
2015 Thuong PT, Khoi NM, Scarlett CJ, Ito F, 'Vietnamese Medicinal Plants as Potential Anticancer Agents', Plant Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Prevention and Treatment, Nova Science Publishers, New York 219-252 (2015) [B1]
2013 Vuong QV, Scarlett CJ, Roach PD, 'Green tea and pancreatic cancer chemoprevention', Green Tea: Varieties, Production and Health Benefits, Nova Science Publishers, New York 75-90 (2013) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Paul Roach
Show 1 more chapter

Journal article (67 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Saberi B, Thakur R, Vuong QV, Chockchaisawasdee S, Golding JB, Scarlett CJ, Stathopoulos CE, 'Optimization of physical and optical properties of biodegradable edible films based on pea starch and guar gum', Industrial Crops and Products, 86 342-352 (2016)

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.The influence of process variables (pea starch, guar gum and glycerol) on the viscosity (V), solubility (SOL), moisture content (MC), transparency (TR), Hunte... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.The influence of process variables (pea starch, guar gum and glycerol) on the viscosity (V), solubility (SOL), moisture content (MC), transparency (TR), Hunter parameters (L, a, and b), total color difference (dE), yellowness index (YI), and whiteness index (WI) of the pea starch based edible films was studied using three factors with three level Box-Behnken response surface design. The individual linear effect of pea starch, guar and glycerol was significant (p < 0.05) on all the responses. However, a value was only significantly (p < 0.05) affected by pea starch and guar gum in a positive and negative linear term, respectively. The effect of interaction of starch × glycerol was also significant (p < 0.05) on TR of edible films. Interaction between independent variables starch × guar gum had a significant impact on the b and YI values. The quadratic regression coefficient of pea starch showed a significant effect (p < 0.05) on V, MC, L, b, dE, YI, and WI; glycerol level on dE and WI; and guar gum on dE and SOL value. The results were analyzed by Pareto analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the second order polynomial models were developed from the experimental design with reliable and satisfactory fit with the corresponding experimental data and high coefficient of determination (R2) values (>0.93). Three-dimensional response surface plots were established to investigate the relationship between process variables and the responses. The optimized conditions with the goal of maximizing TR and minimizing SOL, YI and MC were 2.5 g pea starch, 25% glycerol and 0.3 g guar gum. Results revealed that pea starch/guar gum edible films with appropriate physical and optical characteristics can be effectively produced and successfully applied in the food packaging industry.

DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2016.04.015
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong
2016 Nguyen VT, Bowyer MC, Van Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'Optimisation of microwave-assisted extraction from Phyllanthus amarus for phenolic compounds-enriched extracts and antioxidant capacity', Chemical Papers, 70 i-xiii (2016)

© 2016 Institute of Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences.Phyllanthus amarus is known as a healing herb which has traditionally been used in the treatment of various diseases suc... [more]

© 2016 Institute of Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences.Phyllanthus amarus is known as a healing herb which has traditionally been used in the treatment of various diseases such as hepatitis, diabetes and cancer. The extraction parameters have great effects on the extraction efficiency of bioactive compounds and pharmacological activity of the extracts. This study sought to optimise the microwave-assisted extraction parameters for phenolic compounds-enriched extracts and antioxidant capacity from P. amarus using response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that the optimal microwave-assisted extraction parameters were an extraction time of 30 min, an irradiation time of 14 s min-1 and a ratio of solvent to sample of 150 mL g-1. The total phenolic content, phenolic extraction efficiency, saponin content, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging capacity, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity and ferric reducing antioxidant power of the P. amarus achieved under these optimal parameters were 87.3 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE) per gram of dried sample, 69.7 %, 134.9 mg of escin equivalents (EE) per gram of dried sample, 997.8, 604.7 and 437.3 all in mg of trolox equivalents (TE) per gram of dried sample, respectively, which were not significantly different from the predicted values (86.9 mg of GAE per gram of dried sample, 67.3 %, 123.5 mg of EE per gram of dried sample, 1013.3 mg of TE per gram of dried sample, 530.6 mg of TE per gram of dried sample and 423.5 mg of TE per gram of dried sample, respectively). Accordingly, the optimal microwave-assisted extraction parameters of 30 min, 14 s min-1 and 150 mL g-1 are recommended for the extraction of enriched phenolics from P. amarus for potential application in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries.

DOI 10.1515/chempap-2016-0009
Co-authors Michael Bowyer
2016 Nguyen VT, Pham NMQ, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, van Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemical retention and antioxidant capacity of xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera) root as prepared by different drying methods', Drying Technology, 34 324-334 (2016)

© 2016, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.Xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) has been used as an herbal medicine for the treatment of cancer or cancer-like diseases in ... [more]

© 2016, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.Xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) has been used as an herbal medicine for the treatment of cancer or cancer-like diseases in recent years, particularly in Vietnam. Drying is an important step for preparation of dried materials for storage and further investigation; however, the effects of drying must be taken into account when processing samples, because this can have profound effects on the stability of phytochemical compounds and the biological activity of the dried P. trimera root. As such, this study assessed the effects of four different drying methods (conventional, hot air, vacuum, and microwave) on phytochemical retention and antioxidant capacity of P. trimera root, to identify an optimal drying method for P. trimera root. The results showed that the drying methods significantly affected phytochemical levels and antioxidant capacity of P. trimera root and that among the four drying methods tested, microwave drying (400¿W) had the highest levels of phytochemical compounds, with total phenolic, total flavonoid, proanthocyanidin, and saponin contents of 11.27¿mg GAE, 19.88¿mg RE, 3.98¿mg CE, and 267.15¿mg EE/gram of dried sample, respectively. Dried sample prepared using this method had antioxidant capacity comparable to that of other drying methods. In addition, this method had the shortest drying time (0.28¿h) and consumed the least energy (0.28¿kWh). Therefore, microwave drying should be considered for drying P. trimera root for further investigation and utilization.

DOI 10.1080/07373937.2015.1053566
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong
2016 Bhuyan DJ, Vuong QV, Chalmers AC, Van Altena IA, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Investigation of phytochemicals and antioxidant capacity of selected Eucalyptus species using conventional extraction', Chemical Papers, 70 567-575 (2016)

© 2015 Institute of Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences.Eucalyptus species have found their place in traditional medicine and pharmacological research and they have also been s... [more]

© 2015 Institute of Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences.Eucalyptus species have found their place in traditional medicine and pharmacological research and they have also been shown to possess a large number of phenolic compounds and antioxidants. The present study sought to implement conventional extraction to yield maximal total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), proanthocyanidins, antioxidants, and saponins from E. robusta using different solvents. The most suitable extraction solvent was further employed for extracting phytochemicals from E. saligna, E. microcorys, and E. globulus to select the Eucalyptus species with the greatest bioactive compound content. The results emphasised the efficiency of water in extracting TPC ((150.60 ± 2.47) mg of gallic acid equivalents per g), TFC ((38.83 ± 0.23) mg of rutin equivalents per g), proanthocyanidins ((5.14 ± 0.77) mg of catechin equivalents per g), and antioxidants ABTS ((525.67 ± 1.99) mg of trolox equivalents (TE) per g), DPPH ((378.61 ± 4.72) mg of TE per g); CUPRAC ((607.43 ± 6.69) mg of TE per g) from E. robusta. Moreover, the aqueous extract of E. robusta had the highest TPC, TFC and antioxidant values among the other Eucalyptus species tested. These findings highlighted the efficiency of conventional extraction in extracting natural bioactive compounds from Eucalyptus species for pharmaceutical and nutraceutical applications.

DOI 10.1515/chempap-2015-0237
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer, Anita Chalmers
2016 Nguyen VT, Pham HNT, Bowyer MC, Van Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'Influence of solvents and novel extraction methods on bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity of Phyllanthus amarus', Chemical Papers, 70 556-566 (2016)

© 2015 Institute of Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences.Phyllanthus amarus (P. amarus) is a herbal plant used in the treatment of various diseases such as hepatitis, diabetes, ... [more]

© 2015 Institute of Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences.Phyllanthus amarus (P. amarus) is a herbal plant used in the treatment of various diseases such as hepatitis, diabetes, and cancer. Efficiency of its bioactive compounds extraction and therefore the biological activity of the extracts are significantly influenced by both solvent character and extraction method. This study is aimed at the determination of the influence of six various solvents (water, acetonitrile, ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate, and dichloromethane) and nine different extraction methods (conventional, ultrasound-assisted, microwave-assisted, and six novel methods) on the extraction efficiency and antioxidant capacity of P. amarus. The results indicated that water extracted the maximal amount of phenolics from P. amarus and had the highest antioxidant capacity, while microwave-assisted extraction provided the highest yields of phenolics and saponins, and the highest antioxidant capacity with the lowest energy consumption when compared to the other extraction methods. These findings implied that water and microwave-assisted extraction are recommended as the most effective solvent and method for the extraction of bioactive compounds from P. amarus for potential application in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries.

DOI 10.1515/chempap-2015-0240
Co-authors Michael Bowyer
2016 Dang TT, Vuong QV, Schreider MJ, Bowyer MC, Van Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'The Effects of Drying on Physico-Chemical Properties and Antioxidant Capacity of the Brown Alga (Hormosira banksii (Turner) Decaisne)', Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, (2016)
DOI 10.1111/jfpp.13025
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer, Maria Schreider
2016 Thuy Pham HN, Nguyen VT, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Bioactive compound yield and antioxidant capacity of Helicteres hirsuta Lour. stem as affected by various solvents and drying methods', Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, (2016)
DOI 10.1111/jfpp.12879
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer
2016 Papoutsis K, Pristijono P, Golding J, Stathopoulos C, Bowyer M, Vuong QV, Scarlett C, 'Optimisation of aqueous extraction conditions for the recovery of phenolic compounds and antioxidants from lemon pomace', International Journal of Food Science & Technology, (2016)
DOI 10.1111/ijfs.13168
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer
2016 Bailey P, Chang DK, Nones K, Johns AL, Patch AM, Gingras MC, et al., 'Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer.', Nature, 531 47-52 (2016)
DOI 10.1038/nature16965
Citations Scopus - 7
2015 Saberi B, Vuong QV, Chockchaisawasdee S, Golding J, Scarlett C, Stathopoulos C, 'Water Sorption Isotherm of Pea Starch Edible Films and Prediction Models', Foods, 5 (2015)
DOI 10.3390/foods5010001
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong
2015 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Murchie S, Bowyer MC, et al., 'Antioxidant and anticancer capacity of saponin-enriched Carica papaya leaf extracts', International Journal of Food Science and Technology, 50 169-177 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Institute of Food Science and Technology.Summary: The papaya (Carica papaya) leaf (PL) contains high levels of saponins and polyphenolic compounds, and historically, it ha... [more]

© 2014 Institute of Food Science and Technology.Summary: The papaya (Carica papaya) leaf (PL) contains high levels of saponins and polyphenolic compounds, and historically, it has been used as a folk medicine for numerous ailments, including cancer. PL is traditionally prepared by hot water extraction; however, optimised extraction conditions have not been assessed. This study optimised conditions for the extraction of saponins from PL and assessed their antioxidant capacity and antipancreatic cancer activity. Optimisation was achieved using response surface methodology. Saponins and total phenolic compounds were assessed for their antioxidant, free radical scavenging, ion-reducing capacity, and antipancreatic cancer activity. Optimal aqueous extraction conditions were 85 °C, 25 min. and a water-to-leaf ratio of 20:1 mL g-1. Ethanol extracts demonstrated higher antioxidant, free radical scavenging and ion-reducing capacity, as well as antipancreatic cancer activity. This study revealed that the PL contains numerous bioactive compounds, with significant anticancer activity warranting further studies on the isolation and characterisation of individual bioactive compounds from the PL.

DOI 10.1111/ijfs.12618
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong
2015 Vuong QV, Van TN, Dang TT, Bhuyan DJ, Goldsmith CD, Sadeqzadeh E, et al., 'Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions for euphol from the medicinal plant, Euphorbia tirucalli, using response surface methodology', INDUSTRIAL CROPS AND PRODUCTS, 63 197-202 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2014.09.057
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong
2015 Nguyen VT, Bowyer MC, Vuong QV, Altena IAV, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemicals and antioxidant capacity of Xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera) root as affected by various solvents and extraction methods', Industrial Crops and Products, 67 192-200 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.Xao tam phan (. Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) is a Vietnamese traditionally medicinal plant used in the treatment of numerous cancers. The preparation ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.Xao tam phan (. Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) is a Vietnamese traditionally medicinal plant used in the treatment of numerous cancers. The preparation of Xao tam phan extracts including solvent type and extraction method have significant effects on extraction efficiency, phytochemical profile and biological activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of five various solvents (water, acetonitrile, methanol, ethyl acetate and hexane) and three different extraction methods (conventional, ultrasound-assisted and microwave-assisted) on phytochemical yield and antioxidant capacity of P. trimera root from Vietnam. The results indicate that methanol extracted the maximal yield of phytochemicals from P. trimera and exhibited the greatest antioxidant capacity, with eleven compounds were identified and quantified. Microwave-assisted extraction produced the maximal phytochemical yields (except for total flavonoids) and antioxidant capacity, when compared to conventional and ultrasound-assisted extractions. These data reveal that the use of methanol and microwave-assisted extraction are recommended for extraction of biologically active phytochemicals from P. trimera root for application in the nutraceutical and/or pharmaceutical industries.

DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2015.01.051
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong
2015 Moran-Jones K, Gloss BS, Murali R, Chang DK, Colvin EK, Jones MD, et al., 'Connective tissue growth factor as a novel therapeutic target in high grade serous ovarian cancer', Oncotarget, 6 44551-44562 (2015) [C1]

Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death among women with gynecologic cancer. We examined molecular profiles of fibroblasts from normal ovary and high-grade serous ovarian... [more]

Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death among women with gynecologic cancer. We examined molecular profiles of fibroblasts from normal ovary and high-grade serous ovarian tumors to identify novel therapeutic targets involved in tumor progression. We identified 2,300 genes that are significantly differentially expressed in tumor-associated fibroblasts. Fibroblast expression of one of these genes, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. CTGF protein expression in ovarian tumor fibroblasts significantly correlated with gene expression levels. CTGF is a secreted component of the tumor microenvironment and is being pursued as a therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. We examined its effect in in vitro and ex vivo ovarian cancer models, and examined associations between CTGF expression and clinico-pathologic characteristics in patients. CTGF promotes migration and peritoneal adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. These effects are abrogated by FG-3019, a human monoclonal antibody against CTGF, currently under clinical investigation as a therapeutic agent. Immunohistochemical analyses of high-grade serous ovarian tumors reveal that the highest level of tumor stromal CTGF expression was correlated with the poorest prognosis. Our findings identify CTGF as a promoter of peritoneal adhesion, likely to mediate metastasis, and a potential therapeutic target in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. These results warrant further studies into the therapeutic efficacy of FG-3019 in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

DOI 10.18632/oncotarget.6082
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Munro B, Bowyer MC, et al., 'Physicochemical, antioxidant and anti-cancer activity of a Eucalyptus robusta (Sm.) leaf aqueous extract', INDUSTRIAL CROPS AND PRODUCTS, 64 167-174 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2014.10.061
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer, Anita Chalmers, Jennette Sakoff
2015 Susanto JM, Colvin EK, Pinese M, Chang DK, Pajic M, Mawson A, et al., 'The epigenetic agents suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and 5-AZA-2' deoxycytidine decrease cell proliferation, induce cell death and delay the growth of MiaPaCa2 pancreatic cancer cells in vivo', International Journal of Oncology, 46 2223-2230 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Spandidos Publications. All rights reserved.Despite incremental advances in the diagnosis and treatment for pancreatic cancer (PC), the 5-year survival rate remains <5%. ... [more]

© 2015, Spandidos Publications. All rights reserved.Despite incremental advances in the diagnosis and treatment for pancreatic cancer (PC), the 5-year survival rate remains <5%. Novel therapies to increase survival and quality of life for PC patients are desperately needed. Epigenetic therapeutic agents such as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTi) have demonstrated therapeutic benefits in human cancer. We assessed the efficacy of these epigenetic therapeutic agents as potential therapies for PC using in vitro and in vivo models. Treatment with HDACi [suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)] and DNMTi [5-AZA-2' deoxycytidine (5-AZA-dc)] decreased cell proliferation in MiaPaCa2 cells, and SAHA treatment, with or without 5-AZA-dc, resulted in higher cell death and lower DNA synthesis compared to 5-AZA-dc alone and controls (DMSO). Further, combination treatment with SAHA and 5-AZA-dc significantly increased expression of p21WAF1, leading to G1 arrest. Treatment with epigenetic agents delayed tumour growth in vivo, but did not decrease growth of established pancreatic tumours. In conclusion, these data demonstrate a potential role for epigenetic modifier drugs for the management of PC, specifically in the chemoprevention of PC, in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents.

DOI 10.3892/ijo.2015.2894
2015 Goldsmith CD, Vuong QV, Sadeqzadeh E, Stathopoulos CE, Roach PD, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemical properties and anti-proliferative activity of Olea Europaea L. leaf extracts against pancreatic cancer cells', Molecules, 20 12992-13004 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/molecules200712992
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Paul Roach, Vanquan Vuong
2015 Hirun S, Choi JH, Ayarungsaritkul J, Pawsaut C, Sutthiwanjampa C, Vuong QV, et al., 'Optimization of far-infrared vacuum drying conditions for Miang leaves (Camellia sinensis var. assamica) using response surface methodology', Food Science and Biotechnology, 24 461-469 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology and Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.Far-infrared (FIR) vacuum is an advanced drying technique that has recentl... [more]

© 2015, The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology and Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.Far-infrared (FIR) vacuum is an advanced drying technique that has recently been applied in food processing. Optimal drying conditions for processing tea from Miang leaves using FIR vacuum drying were investigated. Response surface methodology with a central composite design was used to design, analyze, and predict the optimal time and temperature conditions for FIR vacuum drying, taking into account the physicochemical properties of Miang leaves. When the temperature increased from 50 to 65°C and the time from 60 to 120 min, the amount of epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin gallate, and total catechins significantly (p<0.05) increased while the moisture content and water activity significantly (p<0.05) decreased, compared with controls. The physicochemical properties of dried Miang leaves were significantly (p>0.05) influenced by time and temperature, compared with controls. Drying conditions of 65°C for 120 min are recommended for optimization of drying.

DOI 10.1007/s10068-015-0061-8
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong
2015 Munro B, Vuong QV, Chalmers AC, Goldsmith CD, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemical, Antioxidant and Anti-Cancer Properties of Euphorbia tirucalli Methanolic and Aqueous Extracts.', Antioxidants, 4 647-661 (2015) [C1]
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer, Anita Chalmers
2015 Bhuyan DJ, Quan VV, Chalmers AC, van Altena IA, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Microwave-assisted extraction of Eucalyptus robusta leaf for the optimal yield of total phenolic compounds', INDUSTRIAL CROPS AND PRODUCTS, 69 290-299 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2015.02.044
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Anita Chalmers, Michael Bowyer
2015 Chuen TLK, Vuong QV, Hirun S, Bowyer MC, Goldsmith CD, Scarlett CJ, 'Optimum aqueous extraction conditions for preparation of a phenolic-enriched Davidson¿s plum (Davidsonia pruriens F. Muell) extract', International Journal of Food Science and Technology, 50 2475-2482 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ijfs.12915
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong
2015 Waddell N, Pajic M, Patch AM, Chang DK, Kassahn KS, Bailey P, et al., 'Whole genomes redefine the mutational landscape of pancreatic cancer', Nature, 518 495-501 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal of malignancies and a major health burden. We performed whole-genome seq... [more]

© 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal of malignancies and a major health burden. We performed whole-genome sequencing and copy number variation (CNV) analysis of 100 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). Chromosomal rearrangements leading to gene disruption were prevalent, affecting genes known to be important in pancreatic cancer (TP53, SMAD4, CDKN2A, ARID1A and ROBO2) and new candidate drivers of pancreatic carcinogenesis (KDM6A and PREX2). Patterns of structural variation (variation in chromosomal structure) classified PDACs into 4 subtypes with potential clinical utility: the subtypes were termed stable, locally rearranged, scattered and unstable. A significant proportion harboured focal amplifications, many of which contained druggable oncogenes (ERBB2, MET, FGFR1, CDK6, PIK3R3 and PIK3CA), but at low individual patient prevalence. Genomic instability co-segregated with inactivation of DNA maintenance genes (BRCA1, BRCA2 or PALB2) and a mutational signature of DNA damage repair deficiency. Of 8 patients who received platinum therapy, 4 of 5 individuals with these measures of defective DNA maintenance responded.

DOI 10.1038/nature14169
Citations Scopus - 139Web of Science - 26
2015 Vuong QV, Zammit N, Munro BR, Murchie S, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Effect of drying conditions on physicochemical and antioxidant properties of vitex agnus-castus leaves', Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Vitex agnus-castus (VitexAC) leaves have been used for medicinal purposes for many years. Drying is important to prepare starting materials for fur... [more]

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Vitex agnus-castus (VitexAC) leaves have been used for medicinal purposes for many years. Drying is important to prepare starting materials for further processing, as it is associated with production cost and quality of the materials. Herein, the effects of five different drying conditions on the physical, chemical and antioxidant properties of VitexAC were evaluated. The results showed that 30% of dried leaves with moisture content of less than 7% could be produced from fresh leaves. VitexAC leaves dried by freeze and vacuum drying at 65C had higher levels of bioactive compounds as well as higher antioxidant capacity in comparison with other drying conditions, revealing that these drying conditions are more suitable for drying VitexAC leaves. However, freeze drying is costly and time-consuming; thus, vacuum drying at 65C is suggested for drying the VitexAC leaves as the starting materials for further processing steps. Practical Applications: As drying is an important process to prepare starting materials for further processing steps, it is important to compare different drying methods to identify the most suitable method with low cost and less effect on material quality. The results showed that inappropriate drying conditions resulted in big loss of bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity. Vacuum drying at 65C was found to be the most suitable method, which can be easily applied for drying Vitex agnus-castus leaves in the industrial scale.

DOI 10.1111/jfpp.12506
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer
2015 Nguyen VT, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Altena IAV, Scarlett CJ, 'Effects of Different Drying Methods on Bioactive Compound Yield and Antioxidant Capacity of Phyllanthus amarus', Drying Technology, 33 1006-1017 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/07373937.2015.1013197
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong
2015 Thuy Pham HN, Nguyen VT, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Effect of Extraction Solvents and Drying Methods on the Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties of Helicteres hirsuta Lour. Leaves', Technologies, 3 285-301 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/technologies3040285
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer
2015 Vuong QV, Chalmers AC, Jyoti Bhuyan D, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Botanical, phytochemical, and anticancer properties of the eucalyptus species', Chemistry and Biodiversity, 12 907-924 (2015) [C1]

Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.The genus Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) is mainly native to Australia; however, some species are now distributed globally. Euc... [more]

Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.The genus Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) is mainly native to Australia; however, some species are now distributed globally. Eucalyptus has been used in indigenous Australian medicines for the treatment of a range of aliments including colds, flu, fever, muscular aches, sores, internal pains, and inflammation. Eucalyptus oils containing volatile compounds have been widely used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries for a multitude of purposes. In addition, Eucalyptus extracts containing nonvolatile compounds are also an important source of key bioactive compounds, and several studies have linked Eucalyptus extracts with anticancer properties. With the increasing research interest in Eucalyptus and its health properties, this review briefly outlines the botanical features of Eucalyptus, discusses its traditional use as medicine, and comprehensively reviews its phytochemical and anticancer properties and, finally, proposes trends for future studies.

DOI 10.1002/cbdv.201400327
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Anita Chalmers, Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer
2014 Shahbazi J, Scarlett CJ, Norris MD, Liu B, Haber M, Tee AE, et al., 'Histone Deacetylase 2 and N-Myc reduce p53 protein phosphorylation at serine 46 by repressing gene transcription of tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1', Oncotarget, 5 4257-4268 (2014) [C1]

Myc oncoproteins and histone deacetylases (HDACs) exert oncogenic effects by modulating gene transcription. Paradoxically, N-Myc induces p53 gene expression. Tumor protein 53-indu... [more]

Myc oncoproteins and histone deacetylases (HDACs) exert oncogenic effects by modulating gene transcription. Paradoxically, N-Myc induces p53 gene expression. Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) phosphorylates p53 protein at serine 46, leading to enhanced p53 activity, transcriptional activation of p53 target genes and programmed cell death. Here we aimed to identify the mechanism through which N-Myc overexpressing p53 wild-type neuroblastoma cells acquired resistance to apoptosis. TP53INP1 was found to be one of the genes most significantly repressed by HDAC2 and N-Myc according to Affymetrix microarray gene expression datasets. HDAC2 and N-Myc reduced TP53INP1 gene expression by direct binding to the TP53INP1 gene promoter, leading to transcriptional repression of TP53INP1, p53 protein de-phosphorylation at serine 46, neuroblastoma cell proliferation and survival. Moreover, low levels of TP53INP1 expression in human neuroblastoma tissues correlated with high levels of N-Myc expression and poor patient outcome, and the BET bromodomain inhibitors JQ1 and I-BET151 reduced N-Myc expression and reactivated TP53INP1 expression in neuroblastoma cells. These findings identify TP53INP1 repression as an important co-factor for N-Myc oncogenesis, and provide further evidence for the potential application of BET bromodomain inhibitors in the therapy of N-Myc-induced neuroblastoma.

Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 5
2014 Nagrial AM, Chang DK, Nguyen NQ, Johns AL, Chantrill LA, Humphris JL, et al., 'Adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients with pancreatic cancer', British Journal of Cancer, 110 313-319 (2014) [C1]

Background:Adjuvant chemotherapy improves survival for patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Elderly patients are under-represented in Phase III clinical trials, and as a cons... [more]

Background:Adjuvant chemotherapy improves survival for patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Elderly patients are under-represented in Phase III clinical trials, and as a consequence the efficacy of adjuvant therapy in older patients with pancreatic cancer is not clear. We aimed to assess the use and efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in older patients with pancreatic cancer.Methods:We assessed a community cohort of 439 patients with a diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma who underwent operative resection in centres associated with the AUSn Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative.Results:The median age of the cohort was 67 years. Overall only 47% of all patients received adjuvant therapy. Patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy were predominantly younger, had later stage disease, more lymph node involvement and more evidence of perineural invasion than the group that did not receive adjuvant treatment. Overall, adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with prolonged survival (median 22.1 vs 15.8 months; P<0.0001). Older patients (aged =70) were less likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy (51.5% vs 29.8%; P<0.0001). Older patients had a particularly poor outcome when adjuvant therapy was not delivered (median survival=13.1 months; HR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.27-2.78, P=0.002).Conclusion:Patients aged =70 are less likely to receive adjuvant therapy although it is associated with improved outcome. Increased use of adjuvant therapy in older individuals is encouraged as they constitute a large proportion of patients with pancreatic cancer. © 2014 Cancer Research UK.

DOI 10.1038/bjc.2013.722
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 3
2014 Morran DC, Wu J, Jamieson NB, Mrowinska A, Kalna G, Karim SA, et al., 'Targeting mTOR dependency in pancreatic cancer', Gut, 63 1481-1489 (2014) [C1]

Objective: Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the Western world. Current chemotherapy regimens have modest survival benefit. Thus, novel, effective th... [more]

Objective: Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the Western world. Current chemotherapy regimens have modest survival benefit. Thus, novel, effective therapies are required for treatment of this disease. Design Activating KRAS mutation almost always drives pancreatic tumour initiation, however, deregulation of other potentially druggable pathways promotes tumour progression. PTEN loss leads to acceleration of Kras G12Ddriven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in mice and these tumours have high levels of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. To test whether these KRAS PTEN pancreatic tumours show mTOR dependence, we compared response to mTOR inhibition in this model, to the response in another established model of pancreatic cancer, KRAS P53. We also assessed whether there was a subset of pancreatic cancer patients who may respond to mTOR inhibition. Results: We found that tumours in KRAS PTEN mice exhibit a remarkable dependence on mTOR signalling. In these tumours, mTOR inhibition leads to proliferative arrest and even tumour regression. Further, we could measure response using clinically applicable positron emission tomography imaging. Importantly, pancreatic tumours driven by activated KRAS and mutant p53 did not respond to treatment. In human tumours, approximately 20% of cases demonstrated low PTEN expression and a gene expression signature that overlaps with murine KRAS PTEN tumours. Conclusions: KRAS PTEN tumours are uniquely responsive to mTOR inhibition. Targeted anti-mTOR therapies may offer clinical benefit in subsets of human PDAC selected based on genotype, that are dependent on mTOR signalling. Thus, the genetic signatures of human tumours could be used to direct pancreatic cancer treatment in the future.

DOI 10.1136/gutjnl-2013-306202
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 7
2014 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Phillips PA, Chuen TLK, Bowyer MC, Goldsmith CD, Scarlett CJ, 'Fruit-derived phenolic compounds and pancreatic cancer: Perspectives from Australian native fruits', JOURNAL OF ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, 152 227-242 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jep.2013.12.023
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer
2014 Hirun S, Utama-ang N, Vuong QV, Scarlett CJ, 'Investigating the Commercial Microwave Vacuum Drying Conditions on Physicochemical Properties and Radical Scavenging Ability of Thai Green Tea', DRYING TECHNOLOGY, 32 47-54 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/07373937.2013.811249
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong
2014 Sun Y, Liu PY, Scarlett CJ, Malyukova A, Liu B, Marshall GM, et al., 'Histone deacetylase 5 blocks neuroblastoma cell differentiation by interacting with N-Myc', Oncogene, 33 2987-2994 (2014) [C1]

The N-Myc oncoprotein induces neuroblastoma, which arises from undifferentiated neuroblasts in the sympathetic nervous system, by modulating gene and protein expression and conseq... [more]

The N-Myc oncoprotein induces neuroblastoma, which arises from undifferentiated neuroblasts in the sympathetic nervous system, by modulating gene and protein expression and consequently causing cell differentiation block and cell proliferation. The class IIa histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) represses gene transcription, and blocks myoblast, osteoblast and leukemia cell differentiation. Here we showed that N-Myc upregulated HDAC5 expression in neuroblastoma cells. Conversely, HDAC5 repressed the ubiquitin-protein ligase NEDD4 gene expression, increased Aurora A gene expression and consequently upregulated N-Myc protein expression. Genome-wide gene expression analysis and protein co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that HDAC5 and N-Myc repressed the expression of a common subset of genes by forming a protein complex, whereas HDAC5 and the class III HDAC SIRT2 independently repressed the expression of another common subset of genes without forming a protein complex. Moreover, HDAC5 blocked differentiation and induced proliferation in neuroblastoma cells. Taken together, our data identify HDAC5 as a novel co-factor in N-Myc oncogenesis, and provide the evidence for the potential application of HDAC5 inhibitors in the therapy of N-Myc-induced neuroblastoma and potentially other c-Myc-induced malignancies.. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved 0950-9232/14.

DOI 10.1038/onc.2013.253
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 4
2014 Colyin EK, Scarlett CJ, 'A historical perspective of pancreatic cancer mouse models', SEMINARS IN CELL & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, 27 96-105 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.semcdb.2014.03.025
Citations Scopus - 4
2014 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Bowyer MC, Chalmers AC, et al., 'Physicochemical composition, antioxidant and anti-proliferative capacity of a lilly pilly (Syzygium paniculatum) extract', Journal of Herbal Medicine, 4 134-140 (2014) [C1]

Lilly pilly (LP) fruit (Syzygium paniculatum Gaertn.) is widely grown in eastern Australia and has been used as food by indigenous Australians. However, there is limited informati... [more]

Lilly pilly (LP) fruit (Syzygium paniculatum Gaertn.) is widely grown in eastern Australia and has been used as food by indigenous Australians. However, there is limited information on its bioactivity. This study investigated the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of the crude fruit extract, identified its bioactive compounds and also assessed its potential anti-proliferative effect on pancreatic cancer cells. Our data showed that the LP extract was water-soluble and possessed a total phenolic content of 96 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g, flavonoid levels of 52 mg catechin equivalents (CAE)/g, proanthocyanidin levels of 29 mg CAE/g. Several phenolic compounds such as gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, catechin and epicatechin were identified in the LP extract with levels of 0.39, 2.35, 0.47 and 2.9 mg/g, respectively. Results from six different antioxidant assays revealed that the LP extract pocessed potent antioxidant and free radical scavenging capacity. Although antioxidant capacity of the extract was lower than that of vitamin E, vitamin C and BHT, it could be significantly improved if the extract was to be further purified. We also showed that the LP extract (200 µg/mL) significantly reduced the viability of MiaPaCa-2 and ASPC-1 pancreatic cancer cells to levels comparable to that of the chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine. For this reason lilly pilly should be further investigated for its health promoting and potential anti-cancer benefits, particularly for pancreatic cancer. © 2014 Elsevier GmbH.

DOI 10.1016/j.hermed.2014.04.003
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Anita Chalmers, Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong
2014 Vuong QV, Sadeqzadeh E, Hirun S, Goldsmith CD, Zammitt N, Bowyer MB, et al., 'Phenolic Compounds, Antioxidant and Anti-Cancer Properties of the Australian Maroon Bush Scaevola spinescens (Goodeniaceae)', Journal of Bioanalysis & Biomedicine, S12 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/1948-593X.S12-002
Co-authors Rick Thorne, Judith Weidenhofer, Jennette Sakoff, Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong
2014 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Bowyer MC, Chalmers AC, et al., 'Physicochemical composition, antioxidant and anti-proliferative capacity of a lilly pilly (Syzygium paniculatum) extract', JOURNAL OF HERBAL MEDICINE, 4 134-140 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.hermed.2014.04.003
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong, Anita Chalmers
2014 Goldsmith C, Vuong Q, Stathopoulos C, Roach P, Scarlett C, 'Optimization of the Aqueous Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Olive Leaves', Antioxidants, 3 700-712 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/antiox3040700
Co-authors Paul Roach, Vanquan Vuong
2014 Vuong Q, Goldsmith C, Dang T, Nguyen V, Bhuyan D, Sadeqzadeh E, et al., 'Optimisation of Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction Conditions for Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Capacity from Euphorbia tirucalli Using Response Surface Methodology', Antioxidants, 3 604-617 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/antiox3030604
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong
2013 Scarlett CJ, 'Contribution of bone marrow derived cells to the pancreatic tumor microenvironment', Frontiers in Physiology, 4 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2013.00056
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2013 Chang DK, Jamieson NB, Johns AL, Scarlett CJ, Pajic M, Chou A, et al., 'Histomolecular Phenotypes and Outcome in Adenocarcinoma of the Ampulla of Vater', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 31 1348-1356 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2012.46.8868
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 17
2013 Liu PY, Xu N, Malyukova A, Scarlett CJ, Sun YT, Zhang XD, et al., 'The histone deacetylase SIRT2 stabilizes Myc oncoproteins', CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION, 20 503-514 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/cdd.2012.147
Citations Scopus - 48Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Xu Zhang
2013 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Roach PD, Bowyer MC, Phillips PA, Scarlett CJ, 'Effect of extraction conditions on total phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities of Carica papaya leaf aqueous extracts', JOURNAL OF HERBAL MEDICINE, 3 104-111 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.hermed.2013.04.004
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Paul Roach, Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong
2012 Biankin AV, Waddell N, Kassahn KS, Gingras M-C, Muthuswamy LB, Johns AL, et al., 'Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes', Nature, 491 399-405 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 455Web of Science - 330
2012 Das A, Musgrove EA, Sutherland RL, Biankin AV, Humphris JL, Chang DK, et al., 'The prognostic and predictive value of serum CA19.9 in pancreatic cancer', Annals of Oncology, 23 1713-1722 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 42
2011 Marshall GM, Liu PY, Gherardi S, Scarlett CJ, Bedalov A, Xu N, et al., 'SIRT1 promotes N-Myc oncogenesis through a positive feedback loop involving the effects of MKP3 and ERK on N-Myc protein stability', PLoS Genetics, 7 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pgen.1002135
Citations Scopus - 68Web of Science - 50
2011 Colvin EK, Susanto JM, Kench JG, Ong VN, Mawson A, Pinese M, et al., 'Retinoid signaling in pancreatic cancer, injury and regeneration', PLoS ONE, 6 e29075 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0029075
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2011 Chong JJH, Chandrakanthan V, Xaymardan M, Asli NS, Li J, Ahmed I, et al., 'Adult cardiac-resident MSC-like stem cells with a proepicardial origin', Cell Stem Cell, 9 527-540 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.stem.2011.10.002
Citations Scopus - 141Web of Science - 106
2011 Scarlett CJ, Colvin EK, Pinese M, Chang DK, Morey AL, Musgrove EA, et al., 'Recruitment and activation of pancreatic stellate cells from the bone marrow in pancreatic cancer: A model of tumor-host interaction', PLoS One, 6 1-8 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0026088
Citations Scopus - 20
2011 Kwong RA, Scarlett CJ, Kalish LH, Cole IE, Kench JG, Sum EY, et al., 'LMO4 expression in squamous cell carcinoma of the anterior tongue', Histopathology, 58 477-480 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2559.2011.03765.x
Citations Scopus - 3
2011 Nguyen NQ, Johns AL, Gill AJ, Ring N, Chang DK, Clarkson A, et al., 'Clinical and immunohistochemical features of 34 solid pseudopapillary tumors of the pancreas', Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 26 267-274 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 12
2010 Xue A, Scarlett CJ, Chung L, Butturini G, Scarpa A, Gandy R, et al., 'Discovery of serum biomarkers for pancreatic adenocarcinoma using proteomic analysis', British Journal of Cancer, 103 391-400 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/sj.bjc.6605764
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 22
2010 Marshall GM, Gherardi S, Xu N, Neiron Z, Trahair T, Scarlett CJ, et al., 'Transcriptional upregulation of histone deacetylase 2 promotes Myc-induced oncogenic effects', Oncogene, 29 5957-5968 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 35
2009 Pinese M, Scarlett CJ, Kench JG, Colvin EK, Segara D, Henshall SM, et al., 'Messina: A novel analysis tool to identify biologically relevant molecules in disease', PLoS One, 4 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0005337
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2009 Biankin AV, Kench JG, Colvin EK, Segara D, Scarlett CJ, Nguyen NQ, et al., 'Expression of S100A2 Calcium-Binding Protein Predicts Response to Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Cancer', Gastroenterology, 137 558-568 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1053/j.gastro.2009.04.009
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 32
2009 Chang DK, Johns AL, Merrett ND, Gill AJ, Colvin EK, Scarlett CJ, et al., 'Margin Clearance and Outcome in Resected Pancreatic Cancer', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 27 2855-2862 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2008.20.5104
Citations Scopus - 127Web of Science - 92
2008 Murphy NC, Scarlett CJ, Kench JG, Sym EYM, Segara D, Colvin EK, et al., 'Expression of LMO4 and outcome in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma', British Journal of Cancer, 98 537-541 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/sj.bjc.6604177
Citations Scopus - 19
2008 Kuo SCL, Gananadha S, Scarlett CJ, Gill A, Smith RC, 'Sporadic pancreatic polypeptide secreting tumors (PPomas) of the pancreas', World Journal of Surgery, 32 1815-1822 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00268-008-9499-7
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 6
2008 Xue A, Scarlett CJ, Jackson CJ, Allen BJ, Smith RC, 'Prognostic significance of growth factors and the urokinase-type plasminogen activator system in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma', Pancreas, 36 160-167 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/MPA.0b013e31815750f0
Citations Scopus - 32
2007 Smith R, Xue A, Gill A, Scarlett C, Saxby A, Clarkson A, Hugh T, 'High expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) is a predictor of improved survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma', WORLD JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 31 493-503 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00268-006-0289-9
Citations Web of Science - 22
2007 Scarlett CJ, Samra SJ, Xue A, Baxter RC, Smith RC, 'Classification of pancreatic cystic lesions using SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 77 648-653 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.2007.04179.x
2007 O'Leary MJ, Xue A, Scarlett CJ, Sevette A, Kee AJ, Smith RC, 'Parenteral versus enteral nutrition: Effect on serum cytokines and the hepatic expression of mRNA of suppressor of cytokine signaling proteins, insulin-like growth factor-1 and the growth hormone receptor in rodent sepsis', CRITICAL CARE, 11 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/cc5972
Citations Web of Science - 5
2006 Scarlett CJ, Saxby AJ, Nielsen A, Bell C, Samra JS, Hugh T, et al., 'Proteomic profiling of cholangiocarcinoma: Diagnostic potential of SELDI-TOF MS in malignant bile duct stricture', Hepatology, 44 658-666 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/hep.21294
2006 Scarlett CJ, Smith RC, Saxby A, Nielsen A, Samra JS, Wilson SR, Baxter RC, 'Proteomic Classification of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Tissue Using Protein Chip Technology', Gastroenterology, 130 1670-1678 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1053/j.gastro.2006.02.036
2005 Saxby AJ, Nielsen A, Scarlett CJ, Clarkson A, Morey A, Gill A, Smith RC, 'Assessment of HER-2 status in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Correlation of immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and FISH with aneuploidy and survival', American Journal of Surgical Pathology, 29 1125-1134 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/01.pas.0000160979.85457.73
2005 Nielsen A, Scarlett CJ, Samra JS, Gill A, Li Y, Allen BJ, Smith RC, 'Significant overexpression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator in pancreatic adenocarcinoma using real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction', Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 20 256-263 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1746.2004.03531.x
2004 Scarlett CJ, O'Leary MJ, Kee AJ, Nielsen A, Sevette A, Baxter RC, Smith RC, 'A study of parenteral versus enteral nutrition following caecal ligation and puncture in the rat: Influence on survival and tissue protein turnover', Clinical Nutrition, 23 1135-1145 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.clnu.2004.02.008
2001 Scarlett CJ, Lin M, Aitken RJ, 'Actin polymerisation during morphogenesis of the acrosome as spermatozoa undergo epididymal maturation in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)', Journal of Anatomy, 198 93-101 (2001) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S0021878200007299
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Minjie Lin, John Aitken
Show 64 more journal articles

Review (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Scarlett CJ, Biankin A, 'S100A2 (S100 calcium binding protein A2; 1q21)', Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology (2011) [D2]
2011 Scarlett CJ, Salisbury EL, Biankin AV, Kench J, 'Precursor lesions in pancreatic cancer: Morphological and molecular pathology', Pathology (2011) [D1]
DOI 10.1097/PAT.0b013e3283445e3a
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 17
2011 Pajic M, Scarlett CJ, Chang DK, Sutherland RL, Biankin AV, 'Preclinical strategies to define predictive biomarkers for therapeutically relevant cancer subtypes', Human Genetics (2011) [D1]
DOI 10.1007/s00439-011-0990-0
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8

Conference (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Pristijono P, bowyer, Scarlett, Vuong, Stathopoulos, Golding, 'Effect of UV-C irradiation on sprouting of potatoes in storage' (2016)
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong
2015 Jankowski H, Goldie B, Brzozowski J, Bond D, Scarlett C, Skelding KA, Weidenhofer J, 'Differences in extracellular vesicle nucleic acid content show promise as prostate cancer biomarkers' (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Kathryn Skelding, Judith Weidenhofer
2015 Chantrill LA, Pinho A, Wu J, Giry-Latierre M, Mawson A, Rees M, et al., 'Expression of the axon guidance protein Robo1 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma from smokers compared to nonsmokers', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
2015 Pristijono P, Golding J, Bowyer M, Scarlett C, Stathopoulos, 'Postharvest UV-C irradiation improves the quality of tomatoes and limes' (2015)
Co-authors Michael Bowyer
2015 Brzozowski J, Coldie B, Jankowski H, Bond D, Scarlett C, Dun M, et al., 'THE EFFECTS OF ALTERED CD9 AND CD151 EXPRESSION ON PROSTATE EXOSOMES', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Matt Dun, Judith Weidenhofer, Kathryn Skelding
2015 Jankowski H, Goldie B, Brzozowski J, Bond D, Scarlett C, Skelding K, Weidenhofer J, 'PROSTATE CANCER BIOMARKERS: ARE EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES THE SOLUTION?', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Kathryn Skelding, Judith Weidenhofer
2015 Bond D, Turner A, Richmond R, Sadeqzadeh E, Vuong Q, Bhuyan D, et al., 'THE SEARCH FOR NOVEL TREATMENT AGENTS FOR PANCREATIC CANCER: TALES FROM THE LAND AND SEA', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jennette Sakoff, Anita Chalmers, Troy Gaston, Judith Weidenhofer, Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong
2015 Predebon M, Bond D, Brzozowski J, Jankowski H, Deane F, Tarleton M, et al., 'A BISPIDINONE ANALOGUE INDUCES AN APOPTOSIS-MEDIATED CYTOTOXIC EFFECT ON PANCREATIC CANCER CELLS IN VITRO', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Adam Mccluskey, Judith Weidenhofer
2014 Shahbazi J, Scarlett CJ, Norris M, Liu B, Haber M, Tee AE, et al., 'Histone deacetylase 2 and N-Myc reduce p53 protein phosphorylation at serine 46 by repressing gene transcription of tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1', CANCER RESEARCH (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1158/1538-7445.AM2014-5138
2014 Sun Y, Liu PY, Scarlett CJ, Malyukova A, Liu B, Marshall GM, et al., 'Histone deacetylase 5 blocks neuroblastoma cell differentiation by forming a protein complex with N-Myc and repressing target gene transcription', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR MEDICINE (2014) [E3]
2014 Faulkner S, Roselli S, Thorne RF, Scarlett CJ, Walker MM, Hondermarck H, 'PRONGF AND SORTILIN EXPRESSION AND FUNCTION IN PANCREATIC CANCER', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Hubert Hondermarck, Rick Thorne, Marjorie Walker
2014 Goldsmith CD, Vuong QV, Sadeqzadeh E, Stathopoulos CE, Roach PD, Scarlett CJ, 'ANTI-PROLIFERATIVE CAPACITY OF OLEUROPEIN RICH OLIVE LEAF EXTRACTS AGAINST PANCREATIC CANCER CELLS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Roach, Vanquan Vuong
2014 Sadeqzadeh E, Vuong QV, Goldsmith CD, Nguyen VT, Bhuyan DJ, Trung TD, et al., 'A NATURAL PRODUCT DRUG DISCOVERY PIPELINE FOR NOVEL PANCREATIC CANCER THERAPIES: A NEW CANCER RESEARCH HUB FOR THE HUNTER REGION OF NSW', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Troy Gaston, Judith Weidenhofer, Anita Chalmers, Natalie Moltschaniwskyj, Michael Bowyer, Rick Thorne, Vanquan Vuong
2012 Chantrill L, Gill A, Johns A, Wu J, Scarlett CJ, Biankin A, Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative, 'The outliers of pancreatic cancer: Preliminary data for timeless expression as a prognostic biomarker', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology: Special Issue: Medical Oncology Group of Australia Incorporated Annual Scientific Meeting, Program and Abstracts: Targeting Cancer from Diagnosis to Cure (2012) [E3]
Show 11 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 25
Total funding $5,960,286

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $5,000

Equipment Grant: Developing Synthetic Exosomes to Target and Deliver Anti-Cancer Agents to Prostate Cancer$5,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Mr Joshua Brzozowski, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1601042
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20153 grants / $157,938

Live cell imager for enhancement of pre-clinical cancer studies in the Hunter Translational Cancer Research Centre$124,938

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland, Doctor Kelly Kiejda, Associate Professor Kevin Spring, Professor Xu Dong Zhang, Associate Professor Deborah Marsh, Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett, Doctor Pradeep Tanwar, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Doctor Rick Thorne, Doctor Nikola Bowden
Scheme Research Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500598
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Live cell imager for enhancement of pre-clinical cancer studies in the Hunter Translational Cancer Research Centre$25,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland, Doctor Kelly Kiejda, Associate Professor Kevin Spring, Professor Xu Dong Zhang, Associate Professor Deborah Marsh, Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett, Doctor Pradeep Tanwar, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Doctor Rick Thorne, Doctor Nikola Bowden
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500953
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Novel Drug Leads for Pancreatic Cancer Treatment$8,000

Funding body: Calvary Mater Newcastle

Funding body Calvary Mater Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett, Dr Jennette Sakoff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500436
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20148 grants / $3,038,592

Food & Beverage Supply Chain Optimisation Industrial Transformation Training Centre$2,119,872

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Rick Middleton, Associate Professor Regina Berretta, Associate Professor Michael Bowyer, Doctor Ali Eshragh, Doctor Masoud Talebian, Associate Professor Behnam Fahimnia, Professor Mathieu Savelsbergh, Professor Natashia Boland, Dr Costas Stathopoulos, Professor John Bartholdi, Doctor John Golding, Doctor Simon Dunstall, Mrs Carlee McGowan, Mr Robert McMahon, Mr Robert Scoines, Mr Tim Norris, Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett
Scheme Industrial Transformation Training Centres
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1301004
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

ARC ITTC ELS subaccount$621,021

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Michael Bowyer, Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett
Scheme Industrial Transformation Training Centres
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo GS150004
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Visualisation of microparticles for development of biomarkers and targeted drug delivery mechanisms$125,199

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Doctor Matt Dun, Doctor Kelly Kiejda, Professor Adam McCluskey, Ms Elham Sadeqzadeh, Professor Hubert Hondermarck, Doctor Rick Thorne, Professor Rodney Scott
Scheme Research Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400627
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Food & Beverage Supply Chain Optimisation Industrial Transformation Training Centre$90,000

Funding body: Coca Cola Amatil (Australia)

Funding body Coca Cola Amatil (Australia)
Project Team Professor Rick Middleton, Associate Professor Regina Berretta, Associate Professor Michael Bowyer, Doctor Ali Eshragh, Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett, Doctor Masoud Talebian, Associate Professor Behnam Fahimnia, Professor Mathieu Savelsbergh, Professor Natashia Boland, Dr Costas Stathopoulos, Professor John Bartholdi, Doctor John Golding, Doctor Simon Dunstall, Mrs Carlee McGowan, Mr Robert McMahon, Mr Robert Scoines, Mr Tim Norris
Scheme Industrial Transformation Training Centres Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1301129
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Food & Beverage Supply Chain Optimisation Industrial Transformation Training Centre$30,000

Funding body: Sanitarium Health and Wellbeing Company

Funding body Sanitarium Health and Wellbeing Company
Project Team Professor Rick Middleton, Associate Professor Regina Berretta, Associate Professor Michael Bowyer, Doctor Ali Eshragh, Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett, Doctor Masoud Talebian, Associate Professor Behnam Fahimnia, Professor Mathieu Savelsbergh, Professor Natashia Boland, Dr Costas Stathopoulos, Professor John Bartholdi, Doctor John Golding, Doctor Simon Dunstall, Mrs Carlee McGowan, Mr Robert McMahon, Mr Robert Scoines, Mr Tim Norris
Scheme Industrial Transformation Training Centres Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1301130
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Food & Beverage Supply Chain Optimisation Industrial Transformation Training Centre$30,000

Funding body: Sunrice

Funding body Sunrice
Project Team Professor Rick Middleton, Associate Professor Regina Berretta, Associate Professor Michael Bowyer, Doctor Ali Eshragh, Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett, Doctor Masoud Talebian, Associate Professor Behnam Fahimnia, Professor Mathieu Savelsbergh, Professor Natashia Boland, Dr Costas Stathopoulos, Professor John Bartholdi, Doctor John Golding, Doctor Simon Dunstall, Mrs Carlee McGowan, Mr Robert McMahon, Mr Robert Scoines, Mr Tim Norris
Scheme Industrial Transformation Training Centres Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1301131
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Identification and evaluation of anti-pancreatic cancer activity of cytotoxic compounds extracted from Australian sea sponges: a pilot study$20,500

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett, Doctor Quan Vuong, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Doctor Rick Thorne, Associate Professor Michael Bowyer, Doctor Troy Gaston
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401452
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

2013 Vice Chancellor's Award for Research Excellence - Regional$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett
Scheme Award for Research Excellence
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301445
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20133 grants / $42,303

Gastro-pancreatic cancer research$20,050

Funding body: Terrigal Trotters Inc. Running Club

Funding body Terrigal Trotters Inc. Running Club
Project Team Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett
Scheme Bay to Bay Running Festival
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1301010
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Extraction and identification of cytotoxic compounds from Australian sea sponges as novel therapeutic agents for pancreatic cancer.$14,749

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project Team Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett, Doctor Quan Vuong
Scheme Strategic Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1401071
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Faculty Visiting Fellowship 2013$7,504

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project Team Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett
Scheme Visiting Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1401145
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20125 grants / $583,826

The therapeutic potential of targeting S100A2 calcium-binding protein in pancreatic cancer$177,451

Funding body: Cancer Australia

Funding body Cancer Australia
Project Team Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett
Scheme Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1200404
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The therapeutic potential of targeting S100A2 calcium-binding protein in pancreatic cancer$177,450

Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in Western societies with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Analysis of clinical material by our group demonstrate that S100A2 calcium-binding protein defines a specific pancreatic cancer phenotype, and suggests that S100A2 calcium-binding protein may either play a key role, or is a surrogate marker of a metastatic phenotype. In addition, our preliminary experiments suggest that S100A2 does play a key role in the metastatic process in PC. Gain of function studies showed increased invasion in vitro, and in vivo analyses demonstrated marked increased potential to develop liver metastases, the major cause of death for pancreatic cancer. Consequently, the overall aim of this proposal is to test the hypothesis that S100A2 plays a role in pancreatic cancer metastasis, and may be suitable as a therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer.

Funding body: Cure Cancer Australia Foundation

Funding body Cure Cancer Australia Foundation
Project Team

Chris Scarlett

Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Novel Targeted Therapies for Pancreatic Cancer$149,877

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett
Scheme Career Development Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200531
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Establishment of a pancreatic cancer research program for screening the activity and efficacy of natural bioactive compounds$74,048

Funding body: Ramaciotti Foundations

Funding body Ramaciotti Foundations
Project Team Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett
Scheme Establishment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200739
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Project support to develop pancreatic cancer research within the School$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200559
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20111 grants / $344,208

Targeting histone deacetylases for the therapy of Myc-induced malignancies$344,208

BACKGROUND: N-Myc and c-Myc oncoproteins are over-expressed in tumour tissues from neuroblastoma (N-Myc) and pancreatic cancer (c-Myc) patients, induce oncogenesis by modulating gene transcription (CIA, PNAS 2007), and are stabilized when phosphorylated by ERK. By repressing target gene transcription, histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) induces proliferation and blocks apoptosis in cancer cells, and HDAC5 blocks stem cell differentiation. HDAC inhibitors including panobinostat are highly effective anti-cancer agents in clinical trials. However, some patients are insensitive. The ERK inhibitor PD0325901 reduces Myc expression, induces tumour cell growth arrest and apoptosis, and blocks tumour growth in mice and in clinical trials. PRELIMINARY DATA: We have found in neuroblastoma and pancreatic cancer cells that Myc oncoproteins up-regulate HDAC2 and HDAC5 expression, that HDAC2 promotes cell proliferation and HDAC5 blocks cell differentiation, and that HDAC2 and Myc commonly repress the transcription of a subset of genes and form a protein complex. Moreover, HDAC2 protein expression is up-regulated in Myc over-expressing neuroblastoma and pancreatic cancer tissues, and panobinostat and PD0325901 exert synergistic anti-cancer effects in vitro. AIMS: To define the roles of HDAC2 up-regulation in Myc-induced transcriptional repression, cell proliferation and/or apoptosis, HDAC5 up-regulation in Myc-induced cell differentiation block, HDAC2 and HDAC5 in the initiation and progression of neuroblastoma and pancreatic cancer in vivo, and the anti-cancer efficacy of panobinostat and PD0325901 combination therapy against neuroblastoma and pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. SIGNIFICANCE: This innovative project addresses an unrecognised interaction between HDAC2, HDAC5 and Myc. Successful completion of this project will provide direct evidence for clinical trials of the combination therapy for the treatment of neuroblastoma and pancreatic cancer patients.

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Dr Tao Liu

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20102 grants / $919,181

Novel Targeted Therapies for Pancreatic Cancer$599,681

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team

Chris Scarlett

Scheme Career Development Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Targeting Myc onco-protein degradation for the treatment of Myc-induced malignancies$319,500

Neuroblastoma is the commonest solid tumour in early childhood. Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in adults with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. We will define how proteins called histone deacetylases promote cancer initiation and progression, and whether specific inhibitors of the histone deacetylases exert anti-cancer effects in animal models of neuroblastoma and pancreatic cancer.

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team

Dr Tao Liu

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20091 grants / $330,000

Continuing infrastructure support for the ACRF Genomics Facility$330,000

Continuing infrastructure support for the ACRF Genomics Facility

Funding body: Cancer Instititue NSW

Funding body Cancer Instititue NSW
Project Team

Prof Sue Clark

Scheme Research Infrastructure Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20071 grants / $539,238

Adult Haematopoietic Stem Cells in The Evolution of Pancreatic Cancer$539,238

This project sought to define the role for bone marrow-derived cells in normal pancreatic development, pancreatic injury and regeneration and pancreatic cancer.

Funding body: Cancer Instititue NSW

Funding body Cancer Instititue NSW
Project Team

Chris Scarlett

Scheme Early Career Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current17

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD6

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Targeting the S100A2 Axis as a Novel Therapeutic Target for Pancreatic Cancer
PhD (Biological Sciences), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Factors Relating to the Physical and Cognitive Performance of Rugby League Referees
PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Waste Utilisation
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Identification and Isolation of Bioactive Compounds from Selected Australian and Vietnamese Flora as Novel Agents for Prevention and Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Phytochemicals from Vietnamese and Australian Native Plants as Novel Anti-Cancer Agents for Gastro-Pancreatic Malignancies
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Anticancer Compounds from Plants Against Pancreatic Cancer Cells: Extraction, Purification and Characterization
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Circulating Exosomes in Pancreatic Cancer as a Source of Novel Diagnostic Biomarkers
PhD (Biological Sciences), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Extracting and Utilizing Bioactive Components from the Waste of the Fruit and Fruit Juice Industries
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Edible Films for Improving Postharvest Life of Fresh Horticultural Produce.
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Identification of Biomarkers and Novel Targets for Prostate Cancer from Exosomes
PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Developing Synthetic Exosomes to Target and Deliver Anti-Cancer Agents to Prostate Cancer Cells
PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Evaluation of Edible Coating Application on Different Fruits
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Brown Algae as a Source of Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Treatment
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Bioactive Compounds, Antioxidant and Anti-Pancreatic Cancer Capacity of Two Vietnamese Medicinal Plants: Phyllanthus Amarus and Paramignya Trimera
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Phytochemicals Derived From Australian Eucalypts as Anticancer Agents for Pancreatic Malignancies
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Olive Waste Products as a Source of Phenolic Compounds with Chemotherapeutic and Chemopreventative Efficacy Against Pancreatic Cancer
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Development of Valid Performance Testing Protocols for Cross-country Mountain Bikers
PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
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Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett

Position

Associate Professor
Food Science & Human Nutrition
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Focus area

Applied Sciences

Contact Details

Email c.scarlett@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4348 4680

Office

Room SO E1.46
Building Science Offices
Location Ourimbah
10 Chittaway Road
Ourimbah, NSW 2258
Australia
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