Dr Troy Gaston

Senior Lecturer

School of Environmental and Life Sciences (Environmental Science and Management)

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
Development of environmental monitoring programs addressing water quality, ecosystem health and ecosystem processes. nderstanding trophic interactions, tracking nutrient sources, elucidating food webs and stable isotope analysis in benthic, planktonic and pelagic estuarine, coastal and systems. Quantifying anthropogenic disturbances on estuarine and coastal ecosystems. Novel bycatch reduction methods in prawn trawl fisheries.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of New South Wales
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of New South Wales
  • Graduate Certificate in University Teach & Learn, University of Tasmania

Keywords

  • Bycatch Reduction in Fisheries
  • Ecosystem Health
  • Ecosystem Processes
  • Estuarine Ecology
  • Estuarine, Coastal and Marine Ecology
  • GIS and Remote Sensing
  • Human Disturbance
  • Marine Ecology
  • Oceanography
  • Trophic Interactions

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050102 Ecosystem Function 30
050204 Environmental Impact Assessment 35
050206 Environmental Monitoring 35

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/03/2012 -  Lecturer - Environmental Science University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia
1/07/2005 - 1/03/2012 Lecturer - Marine Biology and Ecology University of Tasmania
Australia
1/03/2002 - 1/06/2005 Postdoctoral Researcher University of the Sunshine Coast
Australia
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Maynard D, Gaston T, Beneath the Tamar. More than Silt, NRM North, Launceston, Tasmania, 123 (2010) [A2]

Journal article (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Park JM, Gaston TF, Williamson JE, 'Resource partitioning in gurnard species using trophic analyses: The importance of temporal resolution', Fisheries Research, 186 301-310 (2017)

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.Dietary habits and intra- and inter-specific trophic ecology of co-occurring Lepidotrigla mulhalli and L. vanessa from south-eastern Australia were analysed u... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.Dietary habits and intra- and inter-specific trophic ecology of co-occurring Lepidotrigla mulhalli and L. vanessa from south-eastern Australia were analysed using stomach content and stable isotope ratios (d13C and d15N). Both species are bottom-feeding carnivores that consumed mainly benthic crustaceans, but teleosts were also abundant in the diet of larger L. vanessa. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) ordination and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) of dietary data revealed significant inter-specific dietary differences; i.e. food resource partitioning. Carbon (d13C) and nitrogen (d15N) stable isotope values were similar between L. mulhalli and L. vanessa, however, suggesting similar trophic positioning. Ontogenetic changes in diet composition and stable isotope values were evident. As L. vanessa grew, they preyed upon larger individuals, such as teleosts and caridean shrmips, but no such trend was observed in the diets of L. mulhalli. Adults of both species were significantly enriched in 15N relative to juvenile conspecifics thus supporting these data. Consequently, in this study, both methodologies, i.e. stomach content and stable isotope analyses, provided evidence of inter- and/or intra-specific dietary segregations and trophic niche partitioning between co-occurring L. mulhalli and L. vanessa off Tasmanian waters.

DOI 10.1016/j.fishres.2016.10.005
2016 Martin CL, Momtaz S, Gaston T, Moltschaniwskyj NA, 'A systematic quantitative review of coastal and marine cultural ecosystem services: Current status and future research', Marine Policy, 74 25-32 (2016)

© 2016Cultural ecosystem services (CES) are the non-material benefits obtained from ecosystems that contribute to human well-being. They are often under-represented in ecosystem ... [more]

© 2016Cultural ecosystem services (CES) are the non-material benefits obtained from ecosystems that contribute to human well-being. They are often under-represented in ecosystem services assessments due to difficulties identifying and valuing intangible attributes. This risks a lack of understanding and consideration of CES by decision-makers. A systematic review was done on coastal and marine CES to identify: geographic distribution of research; effective methods for assessing CES; specific habitats/ecosystems that supply CES; subcategories most frequently addressed; and knowledge gaps. Results revealed limited information exists about coastal and marine CES. There is a disparity in the global distribution of studies with little knowledge about CES in developing countries, as well as a disparity within developed countries; with most research undertaken in Europe and North America. There is a dearth of information on CES derived from specific coastal and marine habitats/ecosystems, reflecting a poor understanding of socio-ecological relationships and the different values people assign to these areas. There is a need to develop indicators with the capacity to measure and track changes in CES over time. Participatory approaches using qualitative methods were most effective in identifying CES; however, these lacked a deliberative element that would provide a comprehensive assessment of shared values in public areas. Overall, publications typically theorised about the usefulness of data on CES to inform and support decision makers, and more research is required on how qualitative data on CES can be represented for practical use by coastal and marine resource managers, and the value of these in the real world.

DOI 10.1016/j.marpol.2016.09.004
Co-authors Natalie Moltschaniwskyj, Salim Momtaz
2016 Remon J, Bower DS, Gaston TF, Clulow J, Mahony MJ, 'Stable isotope analyses reveal predation on amphibians by a globally invasive fish (Gambusia holbrooki)', Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 26 724-735 (2016)

Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Biodiversity loss caused by invasive species is particularly problematic in freshwater ecosystems, which are among the world's most threat... [more]

Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Biodiversity loss caused by invasive species is particularly problematic in freshwater ecosystems, which are among the world's most threatened habitats. Invasive fish such as the eastern mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki, have been implicated in the decline of amphibians, which suffer high extinction rates globally. Although G. holbrooki is one of the most studied freshwater fish, its diet shows wide geographic variation and its impact on amphibian populations remains unclear. Stable isotopes 13C and 15N were used in 10 urban ponds in Sydney, Australia to compare the diet of G. holbrooki in January, April and May 2013 using a stable isotope mixing model. Gambusia holbrooki was carnivorous and fed on invertebrates (24¿39%), tadpoles (25¿32%) and conspecifics (20¿45%). In contrast to previous studies, primary producers were a negligible part of Gambusia holbrooki diet (<10%). Its diet in late autumn comprised a high proportion of conspecifics (up to 45%) owing to the depletion of other food sources before winter (metamorphosis of larvae). This study provides evidence of high rates of predation on native tadpoles and invertebrates by a highly invasive fish. This knowledge should be incorporated into amphibian releases through head-starting tadpoles or using soft releases where tadpoles are placed in predator-free enclosures until larvae are large enough to avoid predation. Considering the dire conservation status of amphibians globally and the growing interest for invertebrates, it is suggested that stable isotopes are valuable to identify threats from predation in order to target conservation practice toward suitable priorities. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI 10.1002/aqc.2631
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Clulow
2015 Raoult V, Gaston TF, Williamson JE, 'Not all sawsharks are equal: Species of co-existing sawsharks show plasticity in trophic consumption both within and between species', Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 72 1769-1775 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, National Research Council of Canada. All rights reserved.Despite the global distribution of sawsharks, little is known about their diets or their role in the marine biosp... [more]

© 2015, National Research Council of Canada. All rights reserved.Despite the global distribution of sawsharks, little is known about their diets or their role in the marine biosphere. As species in higher trophic positions are generally considered to be more at risk to perturbations such as fishing, understanding their role in the food chain will enable better conservation and management strategies for these species. Two sawshark species (Pristiophorus cirratus, Pristiophorus nudipinnis) co-occur in waters off east Tasmania, Australia. This study determined the trophic positions of these sawsharks and whether they avoided competing with each other through resource partitioning. Isotopic analysis of muscle tissue revealed that P. cirratus and P. nudipinnis had significantly different trophic levels, with P. cirratus likely to have a diet of primary consumers and P. nudipinnis likely to have a piscivorous diet. Owing to their different isotopic signatures, it is also likely that the sawshark rostrum has multiple functions. Both species shifted to higher trophic levels during ontogeny. Maternal isotopic signatures were detectable in P. cirratus juveniles.

DOI 10.1139/cjfas-2015-0307
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Hunt DE, Maynard DL, Gaston TF, 'Tailoring codend mesh size to improve the size selectivity of undifferentiated trawl species', Fisheries Management and Ecology, 21 503-508 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.Tiger flathead, Neoplatycephalus richardsoni (Castelnau), and sand flathead, Platycephalus bassensis Cuvier, are undifferentiated and managed with a ... [more]

© 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.Tiger flathead, Neoplatycephalus richardsoni (Castelnau), and sand flathead, Platycephalus bassensis Cuvier, are undifferentiated and managed with a common legal minimum length (LML). The Commonwealth Trawl Sector (CTS) and the Tasmanian Danish-seine fishery (TDSF) use a minimum codend mesh sizes of 90 and 70 mm, respectively. The codend mesh size should be tailored to the LML, which is based on the length of first maturity of females (M50). This study found the length-girth relationship of N. richardsoni and P. bassensis was not significantly different. Using the covered codend method, these two species had 50% retention lengths (L50) of 294 ± 2 and 307 ± 3 mm, in 70-mm and 90-mm codends, respectively. L50 estimates for mesh sizes from this study and others produced a curvilinear relationship: y = 120 ln(x) - 214, with an r2 of 0.8504. The size at maturity (M50) for female N. richardsoni was 337 mm, which is larger than the estimate for female P. bassensis (247 mm). There is a mismatch between the estimates of L50, the estimates of M50 and the LMLs in each fishery, leading to suboptimal exploitation of female Platycephalus. The model produced in this paper recommends a codend mesh size of 98 mm for both fisheries to exploit Platycephalus species sustainably.

DOI 10.1111/fme.12099
2014 Perraton SC, Blackwell BD, Fischer A, Gaston TF, Meyers GD, 'Systemic barriers to wastewater reuse in Australia: some jurisdictional examples', Australasian Journal of Environmental Management, (2014) [C1]

This article describes the regulatory framework and assessment process of urban wastewater reuse in two distinct regions of Australia, the Tamar Valley in northern Tasmania and th... [more]

This article describes the regulatory framework and assessment process of urban wastewater reuse in two distinct regions of Australia, the Tamar Valley in northern Tasmania and the Hunter region of New South Wales. Relative similarities are evident between human population, water availability and recent necessity for reuse feasibility assessments. In the Hunter, assessments informed a state government led catchment-scale water security strategy. In Launceston, the need for assessments stems from a condition of the environmental permits for individual facilities. Salient institutional, social, economic and political barriers mire the assessment process for, and success of, wastewater reuse. Distinct legal, policy and procedural differences exist between the two cases. Future reuse guidelines should identify the different drivers for wastewater reuse and avoid studies that meet administratively predetermined selection.

DOI 10.1080/14486563.2014.955889
2009 Connolly RM, Schlacher TA, Gaston TF, 'Stable isotope evidence for trophic subsidy of coastal benthic fisheries by river discharge plumes off small estuaries', MARINE BIOLOGY RESEARCH, 5 164-171 (2009)
DOI 10.1080/17451000802266625
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 26
2009 Schlacher TA, Connolly RM, Skillington AJ, Gaston TF, 'Can export of organic matter from estuaries support zooplankton in nearshore, marine plumes?', AQUATIC ECOLOGY, 43 383-393 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10452-008-9196-5
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 23
2008 Schlacher TA, Skillington AJ, Connolly RM, Robinson W, Gaston TF, 'Coupling between Marine Plankton and Freshwater Flow in the Plumes off a Small Estuary', INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF HYDROBIOLOGY, 93 641-658 (2008)
DOI 10.1002/iroh.200711050
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
2006 Gaston TF, Schlacher TA, Connolly RM, 'Flood discharges of a small river into open coastal waters: Plume traits and material fate', ESTUARINE COASTAL AND SHELF SCIENCE, 69 4-9 (2006)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecss.2006.03.015
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 29
2005 Schlacher TA, Liddell B, Gaston TF, Schlacher-Hoenlinger M, 'Fish track wastewater pollution to estuaries', OECOLOGIA, 144 570-584 (2005)
DOI 10.1007/s00442-005-0041-4
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 59
2004 Gaston TF, Suthers IM, 'Spatial variation in delta C-13 and delta N-15 of liver, muscle and bone in a rocky reef planktivorous fish: the relative contribution of sewage', JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL MARINE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY, 304 17-33 (2004)
DOI 10.1016/j.jembe.2003.11.022
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 49
2004 Gaston TF, Kostoglidis A, Suthers IM, 'The C-13, N-15 and S-34 signatures of a rocky reef planktivorous fish indicate different coastal discharges of sewage', MARINE AND FRESHWATER RESEARCH, 55 689-699 (2004)
DOI 10.1071/MF03142
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20
Show 10 more journal articles

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Bond D, Turner A, Richmond R, Sadeqzadeh E, Vuong Q, Bhuyan D, et al., 'THE SEARCH FOR NOVEL TREATMENT AGENTS FOR PANCREATIC CANCER: TALES FROM THE LAND AND SEA', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Judith Weidenhofer, Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer, Anita Chalmers, Ian Vanaltena, Jennette Sakoff, C Scarlett
2014 Sadeqzadeh E, Vuong QV, Goldsmith CD, Nguyen VT, Bhuyan DJ, Trung TD, et al., 'A NATURAL PRODUCT DRUG DISCOVERY PIPELINE FOR NOVEL PANCREATIC CANCER THERAPIES: A NEW CANCER RESEARCH HUB FOR THE HUNTER REGION OF NSW', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors C Scarlett, Vanquan Vuong, Judith Weidenhofer, Rick Thorne, Ian Vanaltena, Michael Bowyer, Natalie Moltschaniwskyj, Anita Chalmers
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current3

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.05

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Assessing and Modelling the Cumulative Impact of Industrialisation on Environment and Spontaneous Urban Growth in Bangladesh Using GIS and Remote Sensing Techniques: Case Study Dhaka Export Processing Zone (DEPZ)
PhD (Sustainable Res Mngt), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Immaterial benefits and values derived from estuaries in New South Wales, Australia
PhD (Sustainable Res Mngt), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Using artificial seagrass as a monitoring and restoration tool: spatial and temporal differences in seagrass meadows of Lake Macquarie
PhD (Marine Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
Edit

Dr Troy Gaston

Position

Senior Lecturer
Marine Science
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Focus area

Environmental Science and Management

Contact Details

Email troy.gaston@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4349 4569
Mobile 0414251775
Fax (02) 4348 4145

Office

Room E1.39
Building Science Offices.
Location Ourimbah
10 Chittaway Road
Ourimbah, NSW 2258
Australia
Edit