Dr Craig Evans

Dr Craig Evans

Lecturer

School of Environmental and Life Sciences (Environmental Science and Management)

Career Summary

Biography

Since receiving a BSc degree with major in biochemistry from the University of New England, Craig has completed an honours degree and PhD at the University of Newcastle where he has continued with teaching, researching and post-graduate supervision. A widely varied set of undergraduate, honours and PhD study experiences have allowed the development of a diverse portfolio of teaching and research activities across the biological and environmental sciences. These activities, encompassing human and equine metabolism, applied and environmental microbiology, freshwater ecology, water quality assessment and contamination source tracking, have included investigations of:

- metabolic disturbances associated with autistic spectrum disorder;

- novel probiotic products for humans and livestock;

- performance and fatigue related amino acid losses in equine athletes;

- diversity and variability in bacterial populations in rainwater harvesting systems;

- the ecology and role of actinobacteria in taste and odour episodes in drinking water reservoirs;

- faecal sterols and optical brighteners as tools for tracking sources of faecal contamination in natural waterways.

Among the findings of these studies were several world firsts, including the first evidence of the influence of prevailing wind patterns on the microbial composition of roof-harvested rainwater; a potentially dynamic micro-ecology within rainwater storage systems; and the activity of prominent soil bacteria, Streptomyces spp, in aquatic systems and their potential role in taste and odour episodes in drinking water reservoirs.

Research Expertise

From an analytical perspective, Craig’s research has primarily involved the use of molecular (PCR) and selective cultivation techniques for detection, identification and enumeration of bacterial and fungal species in environmental samples; and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques for metabolic profiling of amino acids, organic acids, sugars, sterols and their derivatives in various biological tissues, fluids and environmental matrices.

Teaching Expertise

Craig’s teaching scope encompasses the fields of general biology, microbiology, biochemistry, freshwater systems, water quality assessment and water resource management.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Science), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Newcastle

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050206 Environmental Monitoring 50
060504 Microbial Ecology 25
069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified 25

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
ENVS2009 Catchment and water Resource Management
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science and IT
Lecturer 1/07/2012 - 8/01/2014
ENVS2009 Catchment and Water Resource Management
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science and IT
Course Coordinator 1/07/2014 - 8/01/2017
BIOL2010 Biochemistry
University of Newcastle
Lecturer 1/02/2008 - 30/06/2008
BIOL1003 Professional Skills for Biological Sciences
University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Head Demonstrator/Assistant Coordinator 1/07/2010 - 31/12/2010
SCIT2000 Science in Practice
University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Course Coordinator/Lecturer 1/02/2012 - 30/06/2012
BIOL1003 Professional Skills for Biological Sciences
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science and IT
Head Demonstrator/ Assistant Coordinator 1/07/2014 - 8/01/2016
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (16 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Ranadheera CS, Evans CA, Adams M, Baines SK, 'Co-culturing of probiotics influences the microbial and physico-chemical properties but not sensory quality of fermented dairy drink made from goats' milk', Small Ruminant Research, 136 104-108 (2016)

© 2016 Elsevier B.V..Seven different types of fermented drinking milk were made from goats' milk using various culture compositions of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5, Bifidobacte... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V..Seven different types of fermented drinking milk were made from goats' milk using various culture compositions of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and novel putative probiotic Propionibacterium jensenii 702. Probiotic viability, physico-chemical and sensory properties of fermented milk were measured during 3 weeks of storage at 4 °C. All three probiotics were able to maintain high viability (>107 cfu mL-1) during fermentation and subsequent storage regardless of the culture composition in goats' milk without major antagonistic effects. Acidity of all fermented milk samples increased during storage, however there were no significant differences among preparations for organoleptic properties. Generally, lower sensory acceptability was recorded for the samples stored for 3 weeks than the respective fresh products.

DOI 10.1016/j.smallrumres.2016.01.016
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Surinder Baines
2016 Luo J, Ranadheera CS, King S, Evans CA, Baines SK, 'Potential influence of dairy propionibacteria on the growth and acid metabolism of Streptococcus bovis and Megasphaera elsdenii.', Benef Microbes, 1-10 (2016)
DOI 10.3920/BM2016.0044
Co-authors Surinder Baines
2015 Ranadheera CS, Evans CA, Adams MC, Baines SK, 'Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and Propionibacterium jensenii 702 by spray drying in goat's milk', Small Ruminant Research, 123 155-159 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V.A mixture of probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and novel potential probiotic Propionibacterium jensenii 7... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V.A mixture of probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and novel potential probiotic Propionibacterium jensenii 702 was resuspended in reconstituted (20% w/v) goat's milk, spray dried in a mini spray dryer (inlet temperature=195°C and outlet temperature=85°C) and the spray dried powder was stored in air tight glass jars at 4°C and 30°C for 24 weeks. Powder quality and probiotic viability after spray drying and subsequent storage were measured. Spray drying probiotics in reconstituted goat's milk resulted in a significant reduction in the viability of all three probiotics. However, all three probiotics were able to maintain satisfactory viability levels (106-108cfu/g) after spray drying. While storage temperature did not appear to have a significant effect on moisture content, the viability of all three strains declined dramatically when stored at 30°C but lactobacilli and propionibacteria remained virtually unaffected under storage at 4°C, satisfying recommendations regarding the level of viable cells in probiotic foods.

DOI 10.1016/j.smallrumres.2014.10.012
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Surinder Baines
2015 Geary PM, Evans CA, Maswabi MT, Lee CCC, Zammit A, Webster G, Hunter M, 'Monitoring and tracking contaminant sources in catchments and estuaries', Water Practice and Technology, 10 601-608 (2015) [C1]

© IWA Publishing 2015.In managing water quality in catchments and estuaries, faecal contamination is typically assessed using microbial indicators, such as faecal coliform bacter... [more]

© IWA Publishing 2015.In managing water quality in catchments and estuaries, faecal contamination is typically assessed using microbial indicators, such as faecal coliform bacteria. Bacteriological indicators however cannot be used to distinguish whether the faecal contamination has been derived from human or animal sources. The ability to track contamination and distinguish between sources is particularly important where water is used for potable supply, recreational purposes and where commercial aquaculture for human consumption is undertaken. Various chemicals associated with human metabolism and activities which are present in faecal material (such as faecal sterol, pharmaceutical and fluorescent whitening compounds present in wastewaters) can be utilized to identify a human signal and therefore whether the faecal contamination in water is likely to have been derived from human sources. This paper demonstrates an approach and methodology for future work using a combination of these methods to distinguish human contaminant sources in stormwater runoff in an estuary where aquaculture is practised.

DOI 10.2166/wpt.2015.070
Co-authors Phil Geary
2015 Dunstan RH, Sparkes DL, Dascombe BJ, Evans CA, Macdonald MM, Crompton M, et al., 'Sweat facilitated losses of amino acids in Standardbred horses and the application of supplementation strategies to maintain condition during training', Comparative Exercise Physiology, 11 201-212 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3920/CEP150027
Co-authors Diane Sparkes, Hugh Dunstan, Tim Roberts, Ben Dascombe
2014 Ranadheera CS, Evans CA, Adams MC, Baines SK, 'Effect of dairy probiotic combinations on in vitro gastrointestinal tolerance, intestinal epithelial cell adhesion and cytokine secretion', Journal of Functional Foods, 8 18-25 (2014) [C1]

Gastrointestinal tolerance, adhesion to intestinal epithelium and immunomodulation are critical factors in maintaining probiotic efficacy. Seven different types of fermented milk ... [more]

Gastrointestinal tolerance, adhesion to intestinal epithelium and immunomodulation are critical factors in maintaining probiotic efficacy. Seven different types of fermented milk were made from goat's milk using various culture compositions of three probiotics: Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and Propionibacterium jensenii 702 and in vitro gastrointestinal tolerance, adhesion ability and stimulation of cytokine production by probiotics were evaluated. All probiotics and combinations demonstrated significantly lower viability after exposure to simulated gastric (pH 2.0) and intestinal (with 0.3% bile, pH 8.0) fluids (p < 0.05). The ability of probiotics to adhere to Caco-2 cells appeared to be influenced by the specific probiotic strains with which they were combined in the manufacturing of fermented milk. Only monocultures of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and their co-cultures were able to induce low levels of IL-6 and TNF-a production from Caco-2 cells. It seems likely that co-cultures of various probiotics may affect their functional properties. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.jff.2014.02.022
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Surinder Baines
2013 Asquith EA, Evans CA, Geary PM, Dunstan RH, Cole B, 'The role of Actinobacteria in taste and odour episodes involving geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol in aquatic environments', Journal of Water Supply: Research and Technology - AQUA, 62 452-467 (2013) [C1]

The secondary metabolites geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) provide soil with its characteristic earthy-musty odour, being notably produced by the abundant spore-forming fila... [more]

The secondary metabolites geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) provide soil with its characteristic earthy-musty odour, being notably produced by the abundant spore-forming filamentous bacterial genus Streptomyces, among other Actinobacteria. Taste and odour (T&O) problems attributed to these compounds affect drinking water supplies worldwide, often occurring sporadically and untraced to their biological origins. A number of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms are recognised geosmin and 2-MIB producers in aquatic environments. However, the focus of this paper is to assess the potential contribution of Actinobacteria to this water quality issue. To date, the aquatic ecology of these bacteria remains poorly understood and debate surrounds whether they exist solely as dormant spores of terrestrial origin or are capable of growing and biosynthesising these odourous compounds in aquatic environments. The Actinobacteria which are known to produce geosmin and 2-MIB are identified and a critical assessment of habitats within aquatic environments in which they may be metabolically active residents and thus potential sources of T&O is provided. Current understandings of the chemical ecology and biosynthetic pathways of geosmin and 2-MIB, as well as the conditions under which these secondary metabolites are produced by Streptomyces, are reviewed. © IWA Publishing 2013.

DOI 10.2166/aqua.2013.055
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Phil Geary, Hugh Dunstan
2013 Ranadheera CS, Evans CA, Adams MC, Baines SK, 'Production of probiotic ice cream from goat's milk and effect of packaging materials on product quality', Small Ruminant Research, 112 174-180 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.smallrumres.2012.12.020
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Surinder Baines
2012 Ranadheera S, Evans CA, Adams MC, Baines SK, 'Probiotic viability and physico-chemical and sensory properties of plain and stirred fruit yogurts made from goat's milk', Food Chemistry, 135 1411-1418 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Surinder Baines
2012 Ranadheera S, Evans CA, Adams MC, Baines SK, 'In vitro analysis of gastrointestinal tolerance and intestinal cell adhesion of probiotics in goat's milk ice cream and yogurt', Food Research International, 49 619-625 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Surinder Baines
2012 Asquith EA, Geary PM, Nolan AL, Evans CA, 'Comparative bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil by biostimulation, bioaugmentation and surfactant addition', Journal of Environmental Science and Engineering A, 1 637-650 (2012) [C1]
Co-authors Phil Geary
2009 Evans CA, Coombes PJ, Dunstan RH, Harrison TL, 'Extensive bacterial diversity indicates the potential operation of a dynamic micro-ecology within domestic rainwater storage systems', Science of the Total Environment, 407 5206-5215 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2009.06.009
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan
2008 Evans CA, Dunstan RH, Rothkirch TB, Roberts TK, Reichelt KL, Cosford RE, et al., 'Altered amino acid excretion in children with autism', Nutritional Neuroscience, 11 9-17 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1179/147683008x301360
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Tim Roberts, Diane Sparkes, Tony Rothkirch, Hugh Dunstan
2008 Evans CA, Coombes PJ, Dunstan RH, Harrison TL, Martin A, Morrow AC, 'Rainwater tanks and microbial water quality: Are the indications clear?', Australian Journal of Water Resources, 12 143-152 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan
2007 Evans CA, Coombes PJ, Dunstan RH, Harrison TL, 'Identifying the major influences on the microbial composition of roof harvested rainwater and the implications for water quality', Water Science and Technology, 55 245-253 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.2166/wst.2007.115
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan
2006 Evans CA, Coombes PJ, Dunstan RH, 'Wind, rain and bacteria: The effect of weather on the microbial composition of roof-harvested rainwater', Water Research, 40 37-44 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2005.10.034
Citations Scopus - 85Web of Science - 70
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan
Show 13 more journal articles

Conference (11 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Geary PM, Evans CA, Kable J, Maswabi M, 'The Use of Fluorescent Whitening Compounds as Signals of Human Sourced Contamination', Proceedings 9th International Conference on Molluscan Shellfish Safety (2014) [E2]
Co-authors Phil Geary
2013 Ranadheera C, Evans C, Adams M, Baines S, 'THE IN VITRO FUNCTIONAL EFFICACY OF PROBIOTIC COMBINATIONS IN FERMENTED GOAT'S MILK', ANNALS OF NUTRITION AND METABOLISM (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Surinder Baines
2012 Geary PM, Evans CA, Kable J, 'Tracing wastewater sources in estuaries used for aquaculture', Australian Water Association Small Water & Wastewater Systems National Conference (2012) [E2]
Co-authors Phil Geary
2012 Geary PM, Evans CA, Kable J, 'Contaminant source tracking in estuaries', New Zealand Land Treatment Collective 2012 Annual Conference. Programme, Abstracts and Field Tour Notes (2012) [E2]
Co-authors Phil Geary
2007 Evans CA, Coombes PJ, Dunstan RH, Harrison TL, Martin A, Morrow AC, 'Roof harvested rainwater - Indicator organisms, water quality and risk assessment', Rainwater and Urban Design Conference 2007 (2007) [E1]
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan
2007 Morrow AC, Coombes PJ, Dunstan RH, Evans CA, Martin A, 'Elements in tank water - Comparisons with mains water & effects of locality & roofing materials', Rainwater and Urban Design Conference 2007 (2007) [E1]
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan
2007 Martin A, Coombes PJ, Dunstan RH, Evans CA, Morrow AC, 'The passage of direct precipitation to rainwater storage: A case study', Rainwater and Urban Design Conference 2007 (2007) [E1]
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan
2006 Evans CA, Coombes PJ, Dunstan RH, Harrison TL, 'Identifying the Main Influences on the Microbial Composition of Roof Harvested Rainwater and the Implications for Water Quality', Book of Proceedings (2006) [E1]
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan
2006 Coombes PJ, Dunstan RH, Spinks AT, Evans CA, Harrison TL, 'Key Messages from a Decade of Water Quality Research into Roof Collected Rainwater Supplies', Papers and Abstracts (2006) [E2]
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan
2004 Coombes PJ, Spinks AT, Evans CA, Dunstan RH, 'Performance of Rainwater Tanks at an Inner City House in Carrington NSW During a Drought', Cities as Catchments: WSUD2004 (2004) [E1]
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan
2004 Coombes PJ, Spinks AT, Evans CA, Dunstan RH, 'Performance of rainwater tanks in the inner city during drought', WSUD2004 Conference (2004) [E3]
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan
Show 8 more conferences
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 7
Total funding $150,247

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20152 grants / $60,000

Grahamstown Dam Water Quality Research Project$45,000

Funding body: Hunter Water Corporation

Funding body Hunter Water Corporation
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Geary, Doctor Craig Evans, Dr Abigail Morrow
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1501008
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Campvale canal water quality research project $15,000

Funding body: Hunter Water Corporation

Funding body Hunter Water Corporation
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Geary, Doctor Craig Evans, Dr Abigail Morrow
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500731
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20141 grants / $9,000

North Arm Cove Water Quality Study $9,000

Funding body: NSW Food Authority

Funding body NSW Food Authority
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Geary, Doctor Craig Evans, Mr Anthony Zammit
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400675
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20131 grants / $24,000

North Arm Cove Water Quality Study$24,000

Funding body: Great Lakes Council

Funding body Great Lakes Council
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Geary, Doctor Craig Evans
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1301013
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y

20122 grants / $47,279

Actinomycetes in Drinking Water Reservoirs & their Role in Taste & Odour$37,500

Funding body: Hunter Water Corporation

Funding body Hunter Water Corporation
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Geary, Doctor Craig Evans
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200448
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Water quality assessments and development of monitoring approaches for culturally significant waterholes in Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park$9,779

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Joseph Bidwell, Associate Professor Phillip Geary, Doctor Craig Evans
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1101122
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20111 grants / $9,968

The use of Fluorescent Whitening Compounds as Indicators of Human Faecal Contamination in Environmental Waters$9,968

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Geary, Professor Hugh Dunstan, Doctor Craig Evans
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100039
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed5
Current2

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.45

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Investigation of Lake Stratification and Environmental Variables Regulating Phytoplankton Growth in Grahamstown Reservoir
PhD (Environmental Sc), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD The Development of Microbial Fuel Cells Using High Mineral Ash Biochars
PhD (Chemistry), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Detecting Human Sourced Contamination in Surface Water Catchments Using Fluorescent Whitening Compounds and Simple Fluorometers
PhD (Environmental Sc), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Streptomyces as a Source of Geosmin and 2-Methylisoborneol Associated Taste and Odour Episodes in Drinking Water Reservoirs
PhD (Environmental Sc), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Investigation of the Potential Application of Dairy Propionibacteria for the Treatment and Prevention of Ruminal Acidosis
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Probiotic Application in the Development of Goat's Milk Products with Special Reference to Propionibacterium jensenii 702: Effects on Viability and Functionality
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Comparative Analysis of the Viability and Functional Performance of Mono- and Multi-Species Probiotic Cultures in a Non-Dairy Food Matrix
PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
Edit

Dr Craig Evans

Position

Lecturer
Environmental Water Science Group
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Focus area

Environmental Science and Management

Contact Details

Email craig.evans@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5630

Office

Room LS4.02
Building LIfe Sciences
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
Edit