Dr Quan Vuong

Dr Quan Vuong

Senior Lecturer

School of Environmental and Life Sciences

Exploring the benefits from nature, and exploiting natural waste

A scientific forager with a culinary mind, Dr Quan Vuong is looking to prove there's much to benefit from understanding natural foods and industrial waste salvage, than is currently the case.

Dr Quan Vuong is exploring the benefits from a diversified array of natural products. His research interest is on compounds that have potent antioxidant capacity, and effective biological actions on human health, and which can be utilised in pharmaceutical and neutraceutical industries.

"I focus on identification, extraction and purification of bioactive compounds from various natural sources, such as medicinal plants, native flora and marine materials, as well as from the waste generated by agricultural and food production," the enthusiastic academic asserts.

"Though these constituents typically occur in small quantities, they often have big impacts on our health. They have been linked with prevention of cardiovascular diseases, microbial diseases, diabetes, obesity and certain types of cancer. Currently, 45 per cent of all anticancer drugs are derived directly or indirectly from plant compounds."

"In addition, as potent antioxidants, these compounds can prevent microbial growth, minimise the lipid oxidation, thus they have been fortified in foods to extend the shelf-life".

Tea and serendipity

Quan's research career began in 2008 when he commenced a PhD at the University of Newcastle. Capitalising on the "huge potential" of green tea, the four-year probe sought to produce safe, cheap and effective methods for the production of decaffeinated green tea and tea powder extracts.

"I developed a novel method to remove caffeine from tea," he recalls.

"I also established effective methods for the production of caffeine, decaffeinated green tea and decaffeinated green tea powders to meet changing market demands."

Quan established the optimal conditions for novel means of extracting, isolating and purifying the important components of green tea during his candidature, using a Preparative High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) System. Under these optimal conditions, all of the major bioactive compounds such as L-theanine and individual catechins, were effectively isolated for further utilisation.

"My goal is, and always has been, to add value to natural foods," he says.

Nurturing nature

Quan continued at the University after receiving his award in 2012, signing on to become a postdoctoral fellow and later a lecturer within the School of Environmental and Life Sciences. The expert has since pioneered a handful of successful research projects at the Ourimbah campus, most recently exploring the health properties and other benefits of Australian native flora.

Passionate about eucalyptus, which is mainly native to Australia, Quan is seeking to take advantage of this native plant exploring the potential within its 800 different species.

"We should be screening to find the specific eucalyptus species with the best aroma or highest level of essential oils," he shares.

"With more than 800 species, I think Australia has great potential for eucalyptus essential oil production. At present, essential eucalyptus oils have been widely used in the food, cosmetic or pharmaceutical industry."

Describing Australia as "a big, beautiful island," Quan is in the process of building a comprehensive knowledge base of its other native flora. As an island continent with diversified climatic conditions, Australia has a great advantage due to its unique botanical mixture, as many plants are only found here.

"Australia has huge potential for the discovery of important bioactive compounds," Quan states.

"Native Aboriginal people have long been using these flora as food and traditional medicine to treat a variety of ailments – the West is only just starting to catch on."

In addition, Quan has conducted studies on other Australian native flora such as Davidson' plum, maroon Bush Scaevola spinescens, lilly pilly and blueberry ash. These plant species have high levels of antioxidants and capacity for use in the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

Worth from Waste

A large quantity of waste is generated from agricultural and food production, potentially impacting humans, animals and the environment. Quan's interest in recovering bioactive compounds from waste for further utilisation could reduce the environmental risks and simultaneously add value for the food industry.

"Companies spend an awful lot of money on food waste treatment. We hope to reduce this burden by removing and repurposing by-products," he affirms.

One of his recent projects is recovering bioactive compounds from waste produced in the macadamia industry.

"Australia is the world's biggest exporter of macadamia nuts with production of around 300 thousand tonnes a year, of which skin and husk account for 80 per cent, but they are waste, and hence discarded. Our goal is to recover bioactive compounds from this waste for further utilisation," he says.

Hoping to use the husk as an edible coating for perishable products, Quan is collaborating with other researchers and research students on scientific approaches to isolation and application.

"Fresh fruit and vegetables have a respiration cycle just like humans, so they are alive and have a defined shelf life," he explains.

"We are trying to extend this shelf life with an edible coating, however the current technology for this has major limitations when applied to fresh produce. We hope to improve and overcome these limitations by using the bioactive compounds isolated from the waste of the nut industry. For example, lignins isolated from the macadamia husk can be added to the edible film to improve its mechanical properties and to inhibit microbial activity, thus they can improve the shelf-life of fresh produce."

In addition, Quan is also working on the recovery of bioactive compounds from waste generated in the juice industry.

"We're trying to develop safe and effective methods to recover the important bioactive compounds from waste generated from the juice factories, to use in functional foods or the pharmaceutical industry," Quan elaborates.

In all these endeavours, Quan is collaborating with a range of academics, and industrial partners, including active supervision of Honours, Master and PhD students from different countries.

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Quan Vuong

Exploring the benefits from nature, and exploiting natural waste

A scientific forager with a culinary mind, Dr Quan Vuong is looking to prove there's much to benefit from understanding natural foods and industrial waste sal

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
My earlier career research interests (MSc and PhD) were related to green tea. I investigated aqueous extraction methods for the isolation of the bioactive components from green tea under household and laboratory conditions. I developed methods to produce decaffeinated green tea to meet changing market demands. I also prepared high caffeinated green tea extracts and decaffeinated green tea catechin extracts for utilisation in the food industry. My current interests have extended to the identification, extraction and purification of bioactive compounds from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, native fruits, algae and sea sponges for utilisation in the food and pharmaceutical industries. I am interested in the utilisation of waste from food processing to add value to the food industry. I am also interested in the development of functional foods from natural extracts, and the improvement of the postharvest shelf-life of fresh produce through the application of packaging technologies and edible coatings.

Teaching Expertise
My teaching expertise lies in the field of food science. I teach a 1st-year course on Foods and Nutrients, a 2nd-year course on Animal Food Products, and a 3rd-year course on Food Processing and Quality Management.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Food Preservation & Processing, Hanoi Agricultural University No 1- Viet Nam
  • Master of Food Technology, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Animal food products
  • Antioxidants
  • Bioactive compounds
  • Edible films
  • Encapsulation
  • Extraction, isolation and identification
  • Food and nutrients
  • Functional foods
  • Plant food products
  • Post harvest

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • Vietnamese (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
070605 Post Harvest Horticultural Technologies (incl. Transportation and Storage) 25
090801 Food Chemistry and Molecular Gastronomy (excl. Wine) 50
090899 Food Sciences not elsewhere classified 25

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
4/05/2017 -  Editorial Board of Cogent Chemistry Cogent OA| Taylor & Francis Group
United States
31/08/2016 -  Editorial Board of Cogent Food & Agriculture Cogent OA| Taylor & Francis Group
United States
17/07/2016 -  Editorial Board of Beverages MDPI
Switzerland

Awards

Award

Year Award
2015 Vice-Chancellor's Award for Research and Innovation Excellence 2015
The University of Newcastle
2015 2015 Faculty Award for Research and Innovation Excellence
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Vuong QV, Utilisation of Bioactive Compounds from Agricultural and Food Waste, CRC Press, 248 (2016)
2015 Scarlett CS, Vuong QV, Plant Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Prevention and Treatment, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., New York (2015) [A3]
Co-authors C Scarlett
2014 Scarlett CJ, Vuong QV, Preface (2014)
Co-authors C Scarlett

Chapter (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Vuong QV, Scarlett CJ, 'Selected Australian Flora As Potential Sources of Anti-Cancer Agents', Plant Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Prevention and Treatment, Nova Science Publishers , Inc., New York 195-217 (2015) [B1]
Co-authors C Scarlett
2015 Bowyer MC, McCluskey A, Scarlett CJ, Vuong QV, 'Pancreatic Cancer drugs: Case Studies in Synthesis and Production', Plant Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Prevention and Treatment, Nova Science Publishers, New York 145-193 (2015) [B1]
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Adam Mccluskey, C Scarlett
2013 Vuong QV, Scarlett CJ, Roach PD, 'Green tea and pancreatic cancer chemoprevention', Green Tea: Varieties, Production and Health Benefits, Nova Science Publishers, New York 75-90 (2013) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors C Scarlett, Paul Roach
2011 Stathopoulos C, Vuong QV, 'Effect of heat on gluten', Gluten: Properties, Modifications and Dietary Intolerance, Nova Science Publishers, New York, NY 89-100 (2011) [B1]
Show 1 more chapter

Journal article (69 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Van TN, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Van Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'MICROWAVE-ASSISTED EXTRACTION FOR SAPONINS AND ANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY FROM XAO TAM PHAN (PARAMIGNYA TRIMERA) ROOT', JOURNAL OF FOOD PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION, 41 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/jfpp.12851
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Ian Vanaltena
2017 Bhuyan DJ, Vuong QV, Chalmers AC, van Altena IA, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemical, antibacterial and antifungal properties of an aqueous extract of Eucalyptus microcorys leaves', South African Journal of Botany, 112 180-185 (2017)

© 2017 SAABAustralia is home to over 800 different species of Eucalyptus and traditionally, many Eucalyptus species have been utilised to heal wounds and treat fungal infections ... [more]

© 2017 SAABAustralia is home to over 800 different species of Eucalyptus and traditionally, many Eucalyptus species have been utilised to heal wounds and treat fungal infections by the Indigenous people of Australia. In view of this, our study was designed to investigate the phytochemical, antibacterial and antifungal properties of crude aqueous extract of E. microcorys leaves. The freeze-dried powdered extract was prepared and the phytochemical profile was studied by analysing the total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), proanthocyanidins, antioxidants and saponins. The TPC, TFC and proanthocyanidin values found were: 501.76¿±¿14.47¿mg of gallic acid equivalents per g, 61.53¿±¿0.83¿mg of rutin equivalents per g and 10.76¿±¿0.89¿mg of catechin equivalents per g, respectively. The antioxidant values expressed in mg trolox equivalents per g of extract (mg TE/g) were: ABTS¿=¿1073.13¿±¿10.73¿mg TE/g, DPPH¿=¿1035.44¿±¿65.54¿mg TE/g and CUPRAC¿=¿1524.30¿±¿66.43¿mg TE/g. The powdered extract was also evaluated for activity against three pathogenic bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Staphylococcus lugdunensis); and three fungal strains (Geotrichum candidum, Aspergillus brasiliensis and Candida albicans) using the disc diffusion method and 96 well plate-based method with resazurin dye. The extract exhibited clear zones of inhibition against the tested bacteria and fungi. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were demonstrated to be: A. brasiliensis¿=¿2.44¿µg/mL, G. candidum¿=¿4.88¿µg/mL, S. lugdunensis¿=¿78¿µg/mL, E. coli¿=¿156.25¿µg/mL, E. aerogenes¿=¿312.5¿µg/mL and C. albicans¿=¿1250¿µg/mL. These results reveal the significant potential of E. microcorys as a source of phenolics, antioxidants and antimicrobial agents and also highlight the necessity of further purification and characterisation of solitary bioactive compounds for their prospective applications in food, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries.

DOI 10.1016/j.sajb.2017.05.030
Co-authors Ian Vanaltena, Anita Chalmers, Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2017 Saberi B, Thakur R, Bhuyan DJ, Vuong QV, Chockchaisawasdee S, Golding JB, et al., 'Development of edible blend films with good mechanical and barrier properties from pea starch and guar gum', STARCH-STARKE, 69 (2017)
DOI 10.1002/star.201600227
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors C Scarlett
2017 Bhuyan DJ, Vuong QV, Chalmers AC, van Altena IA, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Development of the ultrasonic conditions as an advanced technique for extraction of phenolic compounds from Eucalyptus robusta', SEPARATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 52 100-112 (2017)
DOI 10.1080/01496395.2016.1250777
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Anita Chalmers, Michael Bowyer, Ian Vanaltena, C Scarlett
2017 Bhuyan DJ, Vuong QV, Bond DR, Chalmers AC, van Altena IA, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Exploring the Least Studied Australian Eucalypt Genera: Corymbia and Angophora for Phytochemicals with Anticancer Activity against Pancreatic Malignancies.', Chem Biodivers, 14 (2017)
DOI 10.1002/cbdv.201600291
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Ian Vanaltena, Anita Chalmers, Danielle Bond, C Scarlett
2017 Pham HNT, van Vuong Q, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemical profiles and antioxidant capacity of the crude extracts, aqueous- and saponin-enriched butanol fractions of Helicteres hirsuta Lour. leaves and stems', Chemical Papers, 1-10 (2017)

© 2017 Institute of Chemistry, Slovak Academy of SciencesThis study aimed to compare phytochemical profiles and antioxidant capacity of various extracts including crude extracts,... [more]

© 2017 Institute of Chemistry, Slovak Academy of SciencesThis study aimed to compare phytochemical profiles and antioxidant capacity of various extracts including crude extracts, aqueous- and saponin-enriched butanol fractions prepared from the stems and leaves of Helicteres hirsuta Lour. The results revealed that all the three powdered extracts from the leaves and the stems possessed high levels of phenolics (177.07¿241.03 mg GAE g-1), flavonoids (158.03¿280.06 mg CE g-1) and saponins (165.77¿1035.33 mg ESE g-1) and exhibited strong antioxidant capacity. HPLC analysis identified nine major compounds in the leaf powder crude extract; however, the leaf aqueous fraction had three extra compounds; whereas, the saponin-enriched butanol leaf fraction had seven extra compounds. For the stems, twelve main compounds were evident in either the powdered crude extract or the aqueous fraction, and five new compounds were revealed in the saponin-enriched butanol fraction. The findings revealed that the powdered aqueous fractions and saponin-enriched butanol fractions are potential sources of biologically active compounds for further investigation and industrial utilisation.

DOI 10.1007/s11696-017-0216-6
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2017 Pham HNT, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Effect of extraction solvents and thermal drying methods on bioactive compounds and antioxidant properties of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don (Patricia White cultivar)', Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, (2017)

© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don (C. roseus) is well known as an important medicinal plant, with compounds such as the vinca alkaloids isolated for t... [more]

© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don (C. roseus) is well known as an important medicinal plant, with compounds such as the vinca alkaloids isolated for their anticancer activity. As such, it is important to determine the effective solvent for bioactive compound extraction from this plant and the suitable drying methods for preparation of starting material. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of extraction solvents and drying methods on bioactive compounds and antioxidant properties of C. roseus. Water was found to be the optimal solvent for phenolic and flavonoid extraction; whereas, methanol was the best solvent for saponin and proanthocyanidin extraction. The data also revealed that vacuum drying at 50°C was suitable for drying the leaf and the flower which contained high levels of phenolics and flavonoids, while infrared drying at 35°C was recommended for drying the stem and the root which had high saponin content. Practical applications: This study suggested that different parts of C. roseus had different suitable thermal drying methods. For the leaf and the flower, vacuum drying at 50°C was the optimal drying method, whereas infrared drying at 35°C was suitable for drying the stem and the root. These drying conditions can be easily applied for preparation of dried plant parts with high levels of bioactive compounds in the large scale. Importantly, the data indicated that the stem and the root of C. roseus which were considered as waste when the leaf was used for exploiting alkaloids, possessed great content of saponins. Therefore, these parts can be further used for isolation and purification of saponins.

DOI 10.1111/jfpp.13199
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2017 Papoutsis K, Pristijono P, Golding JB, Stathopoulos CE, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, Vuong QV, 'Effect of vacuum-drying, hot air-drying and freeze-drying on polyphenols and antioxidant capacity of lemon (Citrus limon) pomace aqueous extracts', International Journal of Food Science and Technology, 52 880-887 (2017)

© 2017 Institute of Food Science and TechnologyThe aim of this study was to investigate the effect of freeze-drying, hot air-drying and vacuum-drying at 70, 90 and 110¿°C, on d... [more]

© 2017 Institute of Food Science and TechnologyThe aim of this study was to investigate the effect of freeze-drying, hot air-drying and vacuum-drying at 70, 90 and 110¿°C, on dried lemon pomace polyphenols and antioxidant capacity. The total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity were higher in lemon pomace dried by hot air or under vacuum than those dried by freeze-drying and increased as the temperature increased. The highest total flavonoid content was recorded in the pomace dried under vacuum at 70 and 90¿°C. Lemon pomace dried by freeze-drying had the highest neohesperidin content, whereas pomace dried under vacuum at 70¿°C had the highest rutin and p-coumaric acid content. The highest gallic acid content was recorded in the pomace dried by hot air at 110¿°C. The results of this study indicate that drying technique should be carefully selected according to the bioactive compounds aimed to be extracted.

DOI 10.1111/ijfs.13351
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2017 Pristijono P, Papoutsis K, Scarlett CJ, Bowyer MC, Vuong QV, Stathopoulos CE, Golding JB, 'Postharvest UV-C treatment combined with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), followed by storage in continuous low-level ethylene atmosphere, improves the quality of tomatoes', Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology, 1-9 (2017)

© 2017 The Journal of Horticultural Science & Biotechnology TrustMature green tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv Neang Pich) were exposed to 13.6 kJ m-2 UV-C or 0.5¿µL L-1 1-... [more]

© 2017 The Journal of Horticultural Science & Biotechnology TrustMature green tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv Neang Pich) were exposed to 13.6 kJ m-2 UV-C or 0.5¿µL L-1 1-MCP or combination of 13.6 kJ m-2 UV-C and 0.5¿µL L-1 1-MCP, with appropriate untreated controls. After treatment, tomatoes were stored in air containing 0.1¿µL L-1 ethylene at 20°C and 100% RH. The untreated fruit ripened significantly faster than those of all other treatments. UV-C treatment alone was able to delay fruit ripening by up to 5 days longer compared to untreated fruits whilst the additional of 1-MCP further delayed fruit ripening. UV-C and 1-MCP treatments alone or in combination had significantly slower ethylene production rates throughout the storage period. The fruit treated with the combination of 1-MCP and UV-C was significantly firmer and had higher total phenolic content compared to that of the other treatments. However, there was no difference between treatments in soluble solids content/titratable acids ratio, chlorophyll content, lycopene content and total antioxidant activity. These results show that UV-C and 1-MCP treatment delay ripening and improve the quality of tomatoes in the presence of low-level ethylene during storage. This new treatment could be used to extend the shelf-life of mature green tomatoes through the supply chain without the use of refrigeration.

DOI 10.1080/14620316.2017.1300512
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2017 Bowyer MC, Pristijono P, Scarlett C, Vuong Q, Stathopoulos C, Jessup A, Golding J, 'Use of low-pressure storage to improve the quality of tomatoes', The journal of horticultural science & biotechnology, (2017)
DOI 10.1080/14620316.2017.1301222
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2017 Bhuyan DJ, Sakoff J, Bond DR, Predebon M, Vuong QV, Chalmers AC, et al., 'In vitro anticancer properties of selected Eucalyptus species.', In Vitro Cell Dev Biol Anim, (2017)
DOI 10.1007/s11626-017-0149-y
Co-authors Anita Chalmers, Ian Vanaltena, Danielle Bond, Michael Bowyer, Jennette Sakoff, C Scarlett
2017 Thakur R, Saberi B, Pristijono P, Stathopoulos C, Golding J, Scarlett C, et al., 'Use of response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize pea starch¿chitosan novel edible film formulation', Journal of Food Science and Technology, (2017)
DOI 10.1007/s13197-017-2664-y
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2017 Ngo TV, Scarlett CJ, Bowyer MC, Ngo PD, Vuong QV, 'Impact of different extraction solvents on bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity from the root of Salacia chinensis L', Journal of Food Quality, 2017 (2017)

© 2017 Thanh Van Ngo et al. This study aimed to study the impact of selected common organic solvents on extractable solids, phytochemical composition, and antioxidant capacity of... [more]

© 2017 Thanh Van Ngo et al. This study aimed to study the impact of selected common organic solvents on extractable solids, phytochemical composition, and antioxidant capacity of S. chinensis. The results showed that the tested solvents played an important role in extraction of total solid and phytochemical composition as well as antioxidant capacity of S. chinensis. Acetone (50% v/v) was found to be the optimal extraction solvent for extractable solids (12.2%), phenolic compounds (60mg GAE/g DW), flavonoids (100mg CE/g DW), proanthocyanidins (47.4mg CE/g DW), and saponins (754mg EE/g DW) as well as antioxidant capacity (ABTS 334mMTE/g DW, DPPH 470mM TE/g DW, FRAP 347mM TE/g DW, and CUPRAC 310mM TE/g DW). The extract prepared from 50% acetone had high levels of bioactive compounds (TPC 555mg GAE/g CRE, flavonoids 819mg CE/g CRE, proanthocyanidins 392mg CE/g CRE, and saponins 1,880mg EE/g CRE) as well as antioxidant capacity (ABTS 414mM TE/g, DPPH 407mM TE/g, FRAP 320mg TE/g, and CUPRAC 623mM TE/g), thus further confirming that 50% acetone is the solvent of choice. Therefore, 50% acetone is recommended for extraction of phenolic compounds, their secondary metabolites, saponins, and antioxidant capacity from the root of S. chinensis for further isolation and utilisation.

DOI 10.1155/2017/9305047
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2017 Vu HT, Scarlett CJ, Vuong QV, 'Effects of drying conditions on physicochemical and antioxidant properties of banana (Musa cavendish) peels', Drying Technology, 1-11 (2017)

© 2017 Taylor & Francis A significant amount of banana peels is generated as waste annually and shows great potential as a lead material for further utilization in the nutraceu... [more]

© 2017 Taylor & Francis A significant amount of banana peels is generated as waste annually and shows great potential as a lead material for further utilization in the nutraceutical industry. However, potentiality of banana peel utilization largely depends on the favorable drying condition of the material before it can be used for further processing. Therefore, it is necessary to identify the suitable drying conditions for banana peel. This study investigated the effect of six different drying methods on the quality of banana peels. The results showed that different drying conditions significantly affected the physical, chemical, and antioxidant properties of dried peels. Microwave irradiation at the power level of 960¿W for 6¿min was the most suitable condition, as these dried peels had good physical properties, minimum loss of bioactive compounds, and antioxidant properties. This was followed by freeze-drying, vacuum oven at 60°C, hot air oven at 120°C, dehumidified air at 60°C, and sun drying. The peels dried by microwave possessed a total phenolic content of 25.26¿mg of gallic acid equivalents/g of dry matter (DM) and potent antioxidant capacity [(1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) of 37.70; 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid of 46.35; ferric reducing antioxidant power of 45.94; and cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity of 64.55¿mg of trolox equivalents/g of DM] . Therefore, the study recommends the use of microwave irradiation under the studied condition (power level of 960¿W for 6¿min) for further processing and utilization.

DOI 10.1080/07373937.2016.1233884
Co-authors C Scarlett
2017 Pham HNT, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Optimum conventional extraction conditions for phenolics, flavonoids, and antioxidant capacity of Helicteres hirsuta Lour.', Asia-Pacific Journal of Chemical Engineering, 12 332-347 (2017)

© 2017 Curtin University of Technology and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Helicteres hirsuta Lour. (H.¿hirsuta L.) has been used as a traditional medicine for treatment of various ai... [more]

© 2017 Curtin University of Technology and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Helicteres hirsuta Lour. (H.¿hirsuta L.) has been used as a traditional medicine for treatment of various ailments such as malaria and diabetes in Southeast Asian countries. This study aimed to optimize the conventional extraction conditions for obtaining the highest levels of phenolics, flavonoids, and antioxidant activities within H.¿hirsuta L. using response surface methodology. The Box¿Behnken design was employed to evaluate the effects of extraction time, temperature, and the sample-to-solvent ratio on bioactive compound yield and antioxidant capacity of H.¿hirsuta L. The results indicated that the sample-to-solvent ratio had the strongest impact on bioactive compounds and antioxidant power of H.¿hirsuta L. and revealed the optimum extraction conditions to include temperature of 60¿°C, time of 35¿min at the sample-to-solvent ratio of 1¿:¿100¿g/mL using 40% (v/v) methanol as the solvent. Under these conditions, the highest levels of total phenolic content and total flavonoid content were 16.87¿mg GAE/g and 17.55¿mg CE/g, respectively, significantly higher than the values obtained using water as the solvent. When preparing powered crude extract from H.¿hirsuta L., the ratio of 3¿:¿100 (g/mL) was suggested for the saving of 67% of solvent volume and energy required for solvent removal, as similar total phenolic content and total flavonoid content yield (86¿87%) as well as antioxidant activities were obtained in comparison with the ratio of 1¿:¿100 (g/mL). © 2017 Curtin University of Technology and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI 10.1002/apj.2076
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2016 Saberi B, Thakur R, Vuong QV, Chockchaisawasdee S, Golding JB, Scarlett CJ, Stathopoulos CE, 'Optimization of physical and optical properties of biodegradable edible films based on pea starch and guar gum', Industrial Crops and Products, 86 342-352 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.The influence of process variables (pea starch, guar gum and glycerol) on the viscosity (V), solubility (SOL), moisture content (MC), transparency (TR), Hunte... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.The influence of process variables (pea starch, guar gum and glycerol) on the viscosity (V), solubility (SOL), moisture content (MC), transparency (TR), Hunter parameters (L, a, and b), total color difference (dE), yellowness index (YI), and whiteness index (WI) of the pea starch based edible films was studied using three factors with three level Box-Behnken response surface design. The individual linear effect of pea starch, guar and glycerol was significant (p < 0.05) on all the responses. However, a value was only significantly (p < 0.05) affected by pea starch and guar gum in a positive and negative linear term, respectively. The effect of interaction of starch × glycerol was also significant (p < 0.05) on TR of edible films. Interaction between independent variables starch × guar gum had a significant impact on the b and YI values. The quadratic regression coefficient of pea starch showed a significant effect (p < 0.05) on V, MC, L, b, dE, YI, and WI; glycerol level on dE and WI; and guar gum on dE and SOL value. The results were analyzed by Pareto analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the second order polynomial models were developed from the experimental design with reliable and satisfactory fit with the corresponding experimental data and high coefficient of determination (R2) values (>0.93). Three-dimensional response surface plots were established to investigate the relationship between process variables and the responses. The optimized conditions with the goal of maximizing TR and minimizing SOL, YI and MC were 2.5 g pea starch, 25% glycerol and 0.3 g guar gum. Results revealed that pea starch/guar gum edible films with appropriate physical and optical characteristics can be effectively produced and successfully applied in the food packaging industry.

DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2016.04.015
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 4
Co-authors C Scarlett
2016 Vu HT, Scarlett CJ, Vuong QV, 'Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions for recovery of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity from banana (Musa cavendish) peel', Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, (2016)

© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.A large quantity of banana peel is generated annually and is considered as waste with low value. This study aimed to optimize five extraction parame... [more]

© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.A large quantity of banana peel is generated annually and is considered as waste with low value. This study aimed to optimize five extraction parameters; including ultrasonic temperature, time and power, as well as acetone concentration and sample to solvent ratio, for maximum recovery of phenolic compounds, flavonoids, proanthocyanidins and antioxidant properties from banana (Musa cavendish) peel using response surface methodology. The results showed that recovery yields of phenolic compounds, flavonoids, proanthocyanidins and antioxidant properties were affected by the extraction parameters; of which the acetone concentration had the greatest effect. Optimal extraction conditions were found to be at ultrasonic temperature of 30°C, ultrasonic time of 5 min, ultrasonic power of 150 W, sample to solvent ratio of 8:100 g/mL and acetone concentration of 60%. Under these optimal conditions, 23.49 mg of phenolic compounds, 39.46 mg of flavonoids and 13.11 mg of proanthocyanidins could be extracted from 1 g of banana (M. cavendish) peel. Practical applications: Banana peel known as waste is generated in a big quantity with limited utilization. Therefore, it is necessary to utilize this by-product for adding value to food industry. This study was designed to establish a simple, effective extraction method for maximum recovery of phenolic compounds from banana peel. Findings from this study can be used for further isolation and purification of phenolic compounds from banana peel for subsequent application in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industry.

DOI 10.1111/jfpp.13148
Co-authors C Scarlett
2016 Chockchaisawasdee S, Golding JB, Vuong QV, Papoutsis K, Stathopoulos CE, 'Sweet cherry: Composition, postharvest preservation, processing and trends for its future use', Trends in Food Science and Technology, 55 72-83 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Background Sweet cherries (Prunus avium L.) are a nutritious fruit which are rich in polyphenols and have high antioxidant potential. Most sweet cherries are ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Background Sweet cherries (Prunus avium L.) are a nutritious fruit which are rich in polyphenols and have high antioxidant potential. Most sweet cherries are consumed fresh and a small proportion of the total sweet cherries production is value added to make processed food products. Sweet cherries are highly perishable fruit with a short harvest season, therefore extensive preservation and processing methods have been developed for the extension of their shelf-life and distribution of their products. Scope and approach In this review, the main physicochemical properties of sweet cherries, as well as bioactive components and their determination methods are described. The study emphasises the recent progress of postharvest technology, such as controlled/modified atmosphere storage, edible coatings, irradiation, and biological control agents, to maintain sweet cherries for the fresh market. Valorisations of second-grade sweet cherries, as well as trends for the diversification of cherry products for future studies are also discussed. Key findings and conclusions Sweet cherry fruit have a short harvest period and marketing window. The major loss in quality after harvest include moisture loss, softening, decay and stem browning. Without compromising their eating quality, the extension in fruit quality and shelf-life for sweet cherries is feasible by means of combination of good handling practice and applications of appropriate postharvest technology. With the drive of health-food sector, the potential of using second class cherries including cherry stems as a source of bioactive compound extraction is high, as cherry fruit is well-known for being rich in health-promoting components.

DOI 10.1016/j.tifs.2016.07.002
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
2016 Dang TT, Vuong QV, Schreider MJ, Bowyer MC, Altena IAV, Scarlett CJ, 'The Effects of Drying on Physico-Chemical Properties and Antioxidant Capacity of the Brown Alga (Hormosira banksii (Turner) Decaisne)', Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, (2016)

© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Hormosira banksii is a rich source of polyphenols, which can be utilized in the food or pharmaceutical industries. This study aimed to determine th... [more]

© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Hormosira banksii is a rich source of polyphenols, which can be utilized in the food or pharmaceutical industries. This study aimed to determine the impact of six drying methods on properties of the alga H. banksii. Our data revealed that drying conditions significantly affected recovery yield, residual moisture, extraction yield, total phenolic content (TPC) as well as antioxidant capacity of H. banksii (P < 0.05). Optimal conditions for oven, vacuum and de-humidification were 40, 50 and 50C, respectively, and microwave power is 840 W. Under optimal conditions, H. banksii prepared by freeze, de-humidification and vacuum had significantly higher levels of TPC, total flavonoid content (TFC) and proanthocyanidins as well as possessing stronger antioxidant capacity in comparison with those prepared by sun, microwave and oven drying methods. As freeze drying is costly and time-consuming, de-humidification (50C, air in and out of 11.1 and 15.4%) and vacuum (50C, 10 psi) were recommended for drying H. banksii Practical Applications: Algae possess various antioxidants with potential benefits for health. Drying is considered as a method for preserving materials, transport with low costs and especially first step for extraction, isolation and purification of active compounds. Thus, it is important to investigate the effects of drying conditions on the properties of the dried alga H. banksii. From the findings, the different drying conditions significantly affected the phytochemical profile and antioxidant activity of the dried alga and the optimal drying conditions could be applied for preparation of dried H. banksii for further processing (extraction, fractionation and isolation of bioactive compounds) as well as potential industrial applications (as a reference for drying H. banksii and other algae).

DOI 10.1111/jfpp.13025
Co-authors Maria Schreider, Ian Vanaltena, C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2016 Nguyen VT, Pham NMQ, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, van Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemical retention and antioxidant capacity of xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera) root as prepared by different drying methods', Drying Technology, 34 324-334 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.Xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) has been used as an herbal medicine for the treatment of cancer or cancer-like diseases in ... [more]

© 2016, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.Xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) has been used as an herbal medicine for the treatment of cancer or cancer-like diseases in recent years, particularly in Vietnam. Drying is an important step for preparation of dried materials for storage and further investigation; however, the effects of drying must be taken into account when processing samples, because this can have profound effects on the stability of phytochemical compounds and the biological activity of the dried P. trimera root. As such, this study assessed the effects of four different drying methods (conventional, hot air, vacuum, and microwave) on phytochemical retention and antioxidant capacity of P. trimera root, to identify an optimal drying method for P. trimera root. The results showed that the drying methods significantly affected phytochemical levels and antioxidant capacity of P. trimera root and that among the four drying methods tested, microwave drying (400¿W) had the highest levels of phytochemical compounds, with total phenolic, total flavonoid, proanthocyanidin, and saponin contents of 11.27¿mg GAE, 19.88¿mg RE, 3.98¿mg CE, and 267.15¿mg EE/gram of dried sample, respectively. Dried sample prepared using this method had antioxidant capacity comparable to that of other drying methods. In addition, this method had the shortest drying time (0.28¿h) and consumed the least energy (0.28¿kWh). Therefore, microwave drying should be considered for drying P. trimera root for further investigation and utilization.

DOI 10.1080/07373937.2015.1053566
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Ian Vanaltena
2016 Thuy Pham HN, Nguyen VT, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Bioactive compound yield and antioxidant capacity of Helicteres hirsuta Lour. stem as affected by various solvents and drying methods', Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, (2016)
DOI 10.1111/jfpp.12879
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2016 Papoutsis K, Pristijono P, Golding JB, Stathopoulos CE, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, Vuong QV, 'Enhancement of the total phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of aqueous Citrus limon L. pomace extract using microwave pretreatment on the dry powder', Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, (2016)

© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.The effect of microwave pretreatment on the levels of total phenolic compounds, flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, and individual major compounds as wel... [more]

© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.The effect of microwave pretreatment on the levels of total phenolic compounds, flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, and individual major compounds as well as the total antioxidant activity of the dried lemon pomace was investigated. The results showed that microwave pretreatment significantly affected all the examined parameters. The total phenolic content, total flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, as well as the total antioxidant activity significantly increased as the microwave radiation time and power increased (e.g., 2.5-fold for phenolics, 1.4-fold for flavonoids, and 5.5-fold for proanthocyanidins); however, irradiation of more than 480 W for 5 min resulted in the decrease of these parameters. These findings indicate that microwave irradiation time and power may enhance higher levels of the phenolic compounds as well as the antioxidant capacity of the dried lemon pomace powder. However, higher and longer irradiation may lead to a degradation of phenolic compounds and lower the antioxidant capacity of the dried lemon pomace. Practical applications: Lemon pomace could be a good source of bioactive compounds and antioxidants. Microwave irradiation could be applied for the enhancement of the total phenolic compounds and antioxidants of the lemon pomace-dried powder. The findings of this study can be applied for enhancing the bioactive compounds and the antioxidant activity of the dried lemon pomace for further extraction, isolation, and utilisation.

DOI 10.1111/jfpp.13152
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2016 Papoutsis K, Pristijono P, Golding J, Stathopoulos C, Bowyer M, Scarlett C, Vuong QV, 'Optimisation of aqueous extraction conditions for the recovery of phenolic compounds and antioxidants from lemon pomace', International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 51 2009-2018 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ijfs.13168
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2016 Papoutsis K, Pristijono P, Golding JB, Stathopoulos CE, Scarlett CJ, Bowyer MC, Vuong QV, 'Impact of different solvents on the recovery of bioactive compounds and antioxidant properties from lemon (Citrus limon L.) pomace waste', Food Science and Biotechnology, 25 971-977 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology and Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. The effects of different solvents on the recovery of (i) extractable soli... [more]

© 2016, The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology and Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. The effects of different solvents on the recovery of (i) extractable solids (ES), (ii) total phenolic compounds (TPC), (iii) total flavonoid content (TFC), (iv) vitamin C, and (v) antioxidant activity from lemon pomace waste were investigated. The results revealed that solvents significantly affected the recovery of ES, TPC, TFC, and antioxidant properties. Absolute methanol and 50% acetone resulted in the highest extraction yields of TPC, whereas absolute methanol resulted in the highest extraction of TFC, and water had the highest recovery of vitamin C. 50% ethanol, and 50% acetone had higher extraction yields for TPC, and TFC, as well as higher antioxidant activity compared with their absolute solvents and water. TPC and TFC were shown to be the major components contributing to the antioxidant activity of lemon pomace.

DOI 10.1007/s10068-016-0158-8
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2016 Saberi B, Vuong QV, Chockchaisawasdee S, Golding JB, Scarlett CJ, Stathopoulos CE, 'Mechanical and Physical Properties of Pea Starch Edible Films in the Presence of Glycerol', JOURNAL OF FOOD PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION, 40 1339-1351 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jfpp.12719
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors C Scarlett
2016 Bhuyan D, Vuong QV, Chalmers A, van Altena I, Bowyer M, Scarlett C, 'Investigation of phytochemicals and antioxidant capacity of selected Eucalyptus species using conventional extraction', Chemical Papers, 70 567-575 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1515/chempap-2015-0237
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Anita Chalmers, Ian Vanaltena
2016 Dailey A, Vuong QV, 'Optimum Conditions for Microwave Assisted Extraction for Recovery of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Capacity from Macadamia (Macadamia tetraphylla) Skin Waste Using Water', PROCESSES, 4 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/pr4010002
Citations Web of Science - 1
2016 Papoutsis K, Vuong QV, Pristijono P, Golding JB, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, Stathopoulos CE, 'Enhancing the Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidants of Lemon Pomace Aqueous Extracts by Applying UV-C Irradiation to the Dried Powder', FOODS, 5 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/foods5030055
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2016 Saberi B, Vuong QV, Chockchaisawasdee S, Golding J, Scarlett C, Stathopoulos C, 'Water Sorption Isotherm of Pea Starch Edible Films and Prediction Models', Foods, 5 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/foods5010001
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors C Scarlett
2016 Chuen TLK, Vuong QV, Hirun S, Bowyer MB, Predebon MJ, Goldsmith CD, et al., 'Antioxidant and anti-proliferative properties of Davidson¿s plum (Davidsonia pruriens F. Muell) phenolic-enriched extracts as affected by different extraction solvents', Journal of Herbal Medicine, 6 187-192 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.hermed.2016.08.005
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Jennette Sakoff
2016 Thakur R, Saberi B, Pristijono P, Golding J, Stathopoulos C, Scarlett C, et al., 'Characterization of rice starch-L-carrageenan biodegradable edible film. Effect of stearic acid on the film properties', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES, 93 952-960 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2016.09.053
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2015 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Murchie S, Bowyer MC, et al., 'Antioxidant and anticancer capacity of saponin-enriched Carica papaya leaf extracts', International Journal of Food Science and Technology, 50 169-177 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Institute of Food Science and Technology.Summary: The papaya (Carica papaya) leaf (PL) contains high levels of saponins and polyphenolic compounds, and historically, it ha... [more]

© 2014 Institute of Food Science and Technology.Summary: The papaya (Carica papaya) leaf (PL) contains high levels of saponins and polyphenolic compounds, and historically, it has been used as a folk medicine for numerous ailments, including cancer. PL is traditionally prepared by hot water extraction; however, optimised extraction conditions have not been assessed. This study optimised conditions for the extraction of saponins from PL and assessed their antioxidant capacity and antipancreatic cancer activity. Optimisation was achieved using response surface methodology. Saponins and total phenolic compounds were assessed for their antioxidant, free radical scavenging, ion-reducing capacity, and antipancreatic cancer activity. Optimal aqueous extraction conditions were 85 °C, 25 min. and a water-to-leaf ratio of 20:1 mL g-1. Ethanol extracts demonstrated higher antioxidant, free radical scavenging and ion-reducing capacity, as well as antipancreatic cancer activity. This study revealed that the PL contains numerous bioactive compounds, with significant anticancer activity warranting further studies on the isolation and characterisation of individual bioactive compounds from the PL.

DOI 10.1111/ijfs.12618
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2015 Vuong QV, Van TN, Dang TT, Bhuyan DJ, Goldsmith CD, Sadeqzadeh E, et al., 'Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions for euphol from the medicinal plant, Euphorbia tirucalli, using response surface methodology', INDUSTRIAL CROPS AND PRODUCTS, 63 197-202 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2014.09.057
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2015 Nguyen VT, Bowyer MC, Vuong QV, Altena IAV, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemicals and antioxidant capacity of Xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera) root as affected by various solvents and extraction methods', Industrial Crops and Products, 67 192-200 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.Xao tam phan (. Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) is a Vietnamese traditionally medicinal plant used in the treatment of numerous cancers. The preparation ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.Xao tam phan (. Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) is a Vietnamese traditionally medicinal plant used in the treatment of numerous cancers. The preparation of Xao tam phan extracts including solvent type and extraction method have significant effects on extraction efficiency, phytochemical profile and biological activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of five various solvents (water, acetonitrile, methanol, ethyl acetate and hexane) and three different extraction methods (conventional, ultrasound-assisted and microwave-assisted) on phytochemical yield and antioxidant capacity of P. trimera root from Vietnam. The results indicate that methanol extracted the maximal yield of phytochemicals from P. trimera and exhibited the greatest antioxidant capacity, with eleven compounds were identified and quantified. Microwave-assisted extraction produced the maximal phytochemical yields (except for total flavonoids) and antioxidant capacity, when compared to conventional and ultrasound-assisted extractions. These data reveal that the use of methanol and microwave-assisted extraction are recommended for extraction of biologically active phytochemicals from P. trimera root for application in the nutraceutical and/or pharmaceutical industries.

DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2015.01.051
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Ian Vanaltena, C Scarlett
2015 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Munro B, Bowyer MC, et al., 'Physicochemical, antioxidant and anti-cancer activity of a Eucalyptus robusta (Sm.) leaf aqueous extract', INDUSTRIAL CROPS AND PRODUCTS, 64 167-174 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2014.10.061
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Jennette Sakoff, Anita Chalmers
2015 Goldsmith CD, Vuong QV, Sadeqzadeh E, Stathopoulos CE, Roach PD, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemical properties and anti-proliferative activity of Olea Europaea L. leaf extracts against pancreatic cancer cells', Molecules, 20 12992-13004 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/molecules200712992
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Paul Roach, C Scarlett
2015 Hirun S, Choi JH, Ayarungsaritkul J, Pawsaut C, Sutthiwanjampa C, Vuong QV, et al., 'Optimization of far-infrared vacuum drying conditions for Miang leaves (Camellia sinensis var. assamica) using response surface methodology', Food Science and Biotechnology, 24 461-469 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology and Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.Far-infrared (FIR) vacuum is an advanced drying technique that has recentl... [more]

© 2015, The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology and Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.Far-infrared (FIR) vacuum is an advanced drying technique that has recently been applied in food processing. Optimal drying conditions for processing tea from Miang leaves using FIR vacuum drying were investigated. Response surface methodology with a central composite design was used to design, analyze, and predict the optimal time and temperature conditions for FIR vacuum drying, taking into account the physicochemical properties of Miang leaves. When the temperature increased from 50 to 65°C and the time from 60 to 120 min, the amount of epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin gallate, and total catechins significantly (p<0.05) increased while the moisture content and water activity significantly (p<0.05) decreased, compared with controls. The physicochemical properties of dried Miang leaves were significantly (p>0.05) influenced by time and temperature, compared with controls. Drying conditions of 65°C for 120 min are recommended for optimization of drying.

DOI 10.1007/s10068-015-0061-8
Co-authors C Scarlett
2015 Dailey A, Vuong QV, 'Effect of extraction solvents on recovery of bioactive compounds and antioxidant properties from macadamia ( Macadamia tetraphylla ) skin waste', Cogent Food & Agriculture, 1 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/23311932.2015.1115646
2015 Munro B, Vuong QV, Chalmers AC, Goldsmith CD, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemical, Antioxidant and Anti-Cancer Properties of Euphorbia tirucalli Methanolic and Aqueous Extracts.', Antioxidants, 4 647-661 (2015) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 5
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Anita Chalmers
2015 Dailey A, Vuong QV, 'Optimization of Aqueous Extraction Conditions for Recovery of Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Properties from Macadamia (Macadamia tetraphylla) Skin Waste.', Antioxidants, 4 699-718 (2015) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 4
2015 Bhuyan DJ, Quan VV, Chalmers AC, van Altena IA, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Microwave-assisted extraction of Eucalyptus robusta leaf for the optimal yield of total phenolic compounds', INDUSTRIAL CROPS AND PRODUCTS, 69 290-299 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2015.02.044
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Anita Chalmers, Ian Vanaltena, C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2015 Chuen TLK, Vuong QV, Hirun S, Bowyer MC, Goldsmith CD, Scarlett CJ, 'Optimum aqueous extraction conditions for preparation of a phenolic-enriched Davidson¿s plum (Davidsonia pruriens F. Muell) extract', International Journal of Food Science and Technology, 50 2475-2482 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ijfs.12915
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2015 Vuong QV, Zammit N, Munro BR, Murchie S, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Effect of drying conditions on physicochemical and antioxidant properties of vitex agnus-castus leaves', Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Vitex agnus-castus (VitexAC) leaves have been used for medicinal purposes for many years. Drying is important to prepare starting materials for fur... [more]

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Vitex agnus-castus (VitexAC) leaves have been used for medicinal purposes for many years. Drying is important to prepare starting materials for further processing, as it is associated with production cost and quality of the materials. Herein, the effects of five different drying conditions on the physical, chemical and antioxidant properties of VitexAC were evaluated. The results showed that 30% of dried leaves with moisture content of less than 7% could be produced from fresh leaves. VitexAC leaves dried by freeze and vacuum drying at 65C had higher levels of bioactive compounds as well as higher antioxidant capacity in comparison with other drying conditions, revealing that these drying conditions are more suitable for drying VitexAC leaves. However, freeze drying is costly and time-consuming; thus, vacuum drying at 65C is suggested for drying the VitexAC leaves as the starting materials for further processing steps. Practical Applications: As drying is an important process to prepare starting materials for further processing steps, it is important to compare different drying methods to identify the most suitable method with low cost and less effect on material quality. The results showed that inappropriate drying conditions resulted in big loss of bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity. Vacuum drying at 65C was found to be the most suitable method, which can be easily applied for drying Vitex agnus-castus leaves in the industrial scale.

DOI 10.1111/jfpp.12506
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2015 Dailey A, Vuong QV, 'Optimisation of Ultrasonic Conditions as an Advanced Extraction Technique for Recovery of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity from Macadamia (Macadamia tetraphylla) Skin Waste', Technologies, 3 302-320 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/technologies3040302
2015 Nguyen VT, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Altena IAV, Scarlett CJ, 'Effects of Different Drying Methods on Bioactive Compound Yield and Antioxidant Capacity of Phyllanthus amarus', Drying Technology, 33 1006-1017 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/07373937.2015.1013197
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Ian Vanaltena, C Scarlett
2015 Thuy Pham HN, Nguyen VT, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Effect of Extraction Solvents and Drying Methods on the Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties of Helicteres hirsuta Lour. Leaves', Technologies, 3 285-301 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/technologies3040285
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2015 Vuong QV, Chalmers AC, Jyoti Bhuyan D, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Botanical, phytochemical, and anticancer properties of the eucalyptus species', Chemistry and Biodiversity, 12 907-924 (2015) [C1]

Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.The genus Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) is mainly native to Australia; however, some species are now distributed globally. Euc... [more]

Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.The genus Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) is mainly native to Australia; however, some species are now distributed globally. Eucalyptus has been used in indigenous Australian medicines for the treatment of a range of aliments including colds, flu, fever, muscular aches, sores, internal pains, and inflammation. Eucalyptus oils containing volatile compounds have been widely used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries for a multitude of purposes. In addition, Eucalyptus extracts containing nonvolatile compounds are also an important source of key bioactive compounds, and several studies have linked Eucalyptus extracts with anticancer properties. With the increasing research interest in Eucalyptus and its health properties, this review briefly outlines the botanical features of Eucalyptus, discusses its traditional use as medicine, and comprehensively reviews its phytochemical and anticancer properties and, finally, proposes trends for future studies.

DOI 10.1002/cbdv.201400327
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Anita Chalmers
2014 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Bowyer MC, Chalmers AC, et al., 'Physicochemical composition, antioxidant and anti-proliferative capacity of a lilly pilly (Syzygium paniculatum) extract', Journal of Herbal Medicine, 4 134-140 (2014) [C1]

Lilly pilly (LP) fruit (Syzygium paniculatum Gaertn.) is widely grown in eastern Australia and has been used as food by indigenous Australians. However, there is limited informati... [more]

Lilly pilly (LP) fruit (Syzygium paniculatum Gaertn.) is widely grown in eastern Australia and has been used as food by indigenous Australians. However, there is limited information on its bioactivity. This study investigated the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of the crude fruit extract, identified its bioactive compounds and also assessed its potential anti-proliferative effect on pancreatic cancer cells. Our data showed that the LP extract was water-soluble and possessed a total phenolic content of 96 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g, flavonoid levels of 52 mg catechin equivalents (CAE)/g, proanthocyanidin levels of 29 mg CAE/g. Several phenolic compounds such as gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, catechin and epicatechin were identified in the LP extract with levels of 0.39, 2.35, 0.47 and 2.9 mg/g, respectively. Results from six different antioxidant assays revealed that the LP extract pocessed potent antioxidant and free radical scavenging capacity. Although antioxidant capacity of the extract was lower than that of vitamin E, vitamin C and BHT, it could be significantly improved if the extract was to be further purified. We also showed that the LP extract (200 µg/mL) significantly reduced the viability of MiaPaCa-2 and ASPC-1 pancreatic cancer cells to levels comparable to that of the chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine. For this reason lilly pilly should be further investigated for its health promoting and potential anti-cancer benefits, particularly for pancreatic cancer. © 2014 Elsevier GmbH.

DOI 10.1016/j.hermed.2014.04.003
Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors C Scarlett, Anita Chalmers, Michael Bowyer
2014 Tan SP, Vuong QV, Stathopoulos CE, Parks SE, Roach PD, 'Optimized Aqueous Extraction of Saponins from Bitter Melon for Production of a Saponin-Enriched Bitter Melon Powder', Journal of Food Science, 79 (2014) [C1]

Bitter melon, Momordica charantia L. (Cucurbitaceae), aqueous extracts are proposed to have health-promoting properties due to their content of saponins and their antioxidant acti... [more]

Bitter melon, Momordica charantia L. (Cucurbitaceae), aqueous extracts are proposed to have health-promoting properties due to their content of saponins and their antioxidant activity. However, the optimal conditions for the aqueous extraction of saponins from bitter melon and the effects of spray drying have not been established. Therefore, this study aimed to optimize the aqueous extraction of the saponins from bitter melon, using response surface methodology, prepare a powder using spray drying, and compare the powder's physical properties, components, and antioxidant capacity with aqueous and ethanol freeze-dried bitter melon powders and a commercial powder. The optimal aqueous extraction conditions were determined to be 40 °C for 15 min and the water-to-sample ratio was chosen to be 20:1 mL/g. For many of its physical properties, components, and antioxidant capacity, the aqueous spray-dried powder was comparable to the aqueous and ethanol freeze-dried bitter melon powders and the commercial powder. The optimal conditions for the aqueous extraction of saponins from bitter melon followed by spray drying gave a high quality powder in terms of saponins and antioxidant activity. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®.

DOI 10.1111/1750-3841.12514
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Paul Roach
2014 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Phillips PA, Chuen TLK, Bowyer MC, Goldsmith CD, Scarlett CJ, 'Fruit-derived phenolic compounds and pancreatic cancer: Perspectives from Australian native fruits', JOURNAL OF ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, 152 227-242 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jep.2013.12.023
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 13
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2014 Hirun S, Utama-ang N, Vuong QV, Scarlett CJ, 'Investigating the Commercial Microwave Vacuum Drying Conditions on Physicochemical Properties and Radical Scavenging Ability of Thai Green Tea', DRYING TECHNOLOGY, 32 47-54 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/07373937.2013.811249
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
Co-authors C Scarlett
2014 Vuong QV, 'Epidemiological Evidence Linking Tea Consumption to Human Health: A Review', Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 54 523-536 (2014) [C1]

Tea has been widely consumed around the world for thousands of years and drinking tea is a daily habit for people of all ages. Tea is a major source of flavanoids, which have beco... [more]

Tea has been widely consumed around the world for thousands of years and drinking tea is a daily habit for people of all ages. Tea is a major source of flavanoids, which have become well known as antioxidants. Tea also contains caffeine and theanine, which have been found to associate with health benefits. Many animal and epidemiological studies have been conducted to investigate the link between tea consumption and human health. However, common questions that arise about tea consumption include: whether all teas are the same, why drinking tea is linked with health benefits, how do the different ways of tea preparation impact on availability of tea components, how much and how long a person should consume tea to obtain health benefits, and whether there is any negative health effect associated with drinking tea. To answer these questions, this paper outlines the tea components and their link to human health, discusses major factors affecting availability of tea components in a tea cup, and reviews the latest epidemiological evidence linking tea consumption to human health. © 2014 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/10408398.2011.594184
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
2014 Vuong QV, Roach PD, 'Caffeine in Green Tea: Its Removal and Isolation', SEPARATION AND PURIFICATION REVIEWS, 43 155-174 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/15422119.2013.771127
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Paul Roach
2014 Vuong QV, Sadeqzadeh E, Hirun S, Goldsmith CD, Zammitt N, Bowyer MB, et al., 'Phenolic Compounds, Antioxidant and Anti-Cancer Properties of the Australian Maroon Bush Scaevola spinescens (Goodeniaceae)', Journal of Bioanalysis & Biomedicine, S12 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/1948-593X.S12-002
Co-authors C Scarlett, Jennette Sakoff, Michael Bowyer, Judith Weidenhofer, Rick Thorne
2014 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Bowyer MC, Chalmers AC, et al., 'Physicochemical composition, antioxidant and anti-proliferative capacity of a lilly pilly (Syzygium paniculatum) extract', JOURNAL OF HERBAL MEDICINE, 4 134-140 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.hermed.2014.04.003
Citations Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett, Anita Chalmers
2014 Goldsmith C, Vuong Q, Stathopoulos C, Roach P, Scarlett C, 'Optimization of the Aqueous Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Olive Leaves', Antioxidants, 3 700-712 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/antiox3040700
Co-authors Paul Roach, C Scarlett
2014 Vuong Q, Goldsmith C, Dang T, Nguyen V, Bhuyan D, Sadeqzadeh E, et al., 'Optimisation of Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction Conditions for Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Capacity from Euphorbia tirucalli Using Response Surface Methodology', Antioxidants, 3 604-617 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/antiox3030604
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2013 Vuong QV, Golding JB, Nguyen MH, Roach PD, 'Preparation of decaffeinated and high caffeine powders from green tea', Powder Technology, 233 169-175 (2013) [C1]

The aims of this study were to develop optimal conditions for decaffeination and spray drying procedures to produce decaffeinated and high caffeine powders from green tea (Camelli... [more]

The aims of this study were to develop optimal conditions for decaffeination and spray drying procedures to produce decaffeinated and high caffeine powders from green tea (Camellia sinensis). Blanching the tea leaves with water at 100. °C for 4. min at a water-to-tea ratio of 20:1. mL/g removed 83% of the caffeine while retaining 94% of the catechins. The optimal spray drying conditions, which gave the highest yield of green tea powder and the highest concentrations of the naturally occurring epistructured catechins were found to be 180. °C for the inlet temperature and 115. °C for the outlet temperature. Using these optimal conditions, a decaffeinated green tea powder (7 mg/g caffeine) and a high caffeine powder (95. mg/g) were produced. These two green tea powders had excellent physical properties and could be used as instant teas by consumers or utilized in the food, cosmetic and nutraceutical industries. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.powtec.2012.09.002
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Minh Nguyen, Paul Roach
2013 Vuong QV, Golding JB, Stathopoulos CE, Roach PD, 'Effects of aqueous brewing solution pH on the extraction of the major green tea constituents', Food Research International, 53 713-719 (2013) [C1]

The pH of the aqueous brewing solution was maintained at values ranging from 1 to 9 during the green tea extraction and the effects on the tea's extracted constituents were studie... [more]

The pH of the aqueous brewing solution was maintained at values ranging from 1 to 9 during the green tea extraction and the effects on the tea's extracted constituents were studied. The epistructured catechins were stable under acidic conditions but epimerized or degraded at pH. =. 6. The extractable solids contained more epistructured catechins at pHs 3-5 but more non-epistructured catechins at pHs 6-7. More tea cream was obtained at pH 1 but the concentration of catechins, caffeine and theanine was low in this fraction. Therefore, to maximize the extraction of the epistructured catechins and to minimize their epimerization and degradation and to maximize the extraction of caffeine and theanine, the results suggest that the pH should be maintained between 3 and 5.3 during the aqueous brewing process. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.foodres.2012.09.017
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Paul Roach
2013 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Roach PD, Bowyer MC, Phillips PA, Scarlett CJ, 'Effect of extraction conditions on total phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities of Carica papaya leaf aqueous extracts', JOURNAL OF HERBAL MEDICINE, 3 104-111 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.hermed.2013.04.004
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 30
Co-authors C Scarlett, Paul Roach, Michael Bowyer
2012 Vuong QV, Golding J, Nguyen MH, Roach PD, 'Production of caffeinated and decaffeinated green tea catechin powders from underutilised old tea leaves', Journal of Food Engineering, 110 1-8 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Paul Roach, Minh Nguyen
2012 Vuong QV, Tan SP, Stathopoulos C, Roach PD, 'Improved extraction of green tea components from teabags using the microwave oven', Journal of Food Composition and Analysis, 27 95-101 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Paul Roach
2011 Vuong QV, Stathopoulos C, Golding J, Nguyen MH, Roach PD, 'Optimum conditions for the water extraction of L -theanine from green tea', Journal of Separation Science, 34 2468-2474 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jssc.201100401
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Paul Roach, Minh Nguyen
2011 Vuong QV, Golding J, Stathopoulos C, Nguyen MH, Roach PD, 'Optimizing conditions for the extraction of catechins from green tea using hot water', Journal of Separation Science, 34 3099-3106 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jssc.201000863
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Paul Roach, Minh Nguyen
2011 Vuong QV, Nguyen V, Golding J, Roach PD, 'The content of bioactive constituents as a quality index for Vietnamese teas', International Food Research Journal, 18 329-336 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors Paul Roach
2011 Vuong QV, Durel M, Roach PD, Stathopoulos C, 'Preliminary study on the fortification of tofu with green tea catechins', International Food Research Journal, 18 1553-1557 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Paul Roach
2011 Vuong QV, Stathopoulos C, Nguyen MH, Golding J, Roach PD, 'Isolation of green tea catechins and their utilization in the food industry', Food Reviews International, 27 227-247 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/87559129.2011.563397
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Paul Roach, Minh Nguyen
2011 Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Roach PD, 'L-Theanine: Properties, synthesis and isolation from tea', Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 91 1931-1939 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jsfa.4373
Citations Scopus - 52Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Paul Roach
2010 Vuong QV, Golding J, Nguyen MH, Roach PD, 'Extraction and isolation of catechins from tea', Journal of Separation Science, 33 3415-3428 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jssc.201000438
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Paul Roach, Minh Nguyen
Show 66 more journal articles

Conference (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Pristijono P, Bowyer M, Scarlett C, Vuong Q, Stathopoulos C, Golding J, 'Effect of UV-C irradiation on sprouting of potatoes in storage' (2016)
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2015 Bond D, Turner A, Richmond R, Sadeqzadeh E, Vuong Q, Bhuyan D, et al., 'THE SEARCH FOR NOVEL TREATMENT AGENTS FOR PANCREATIC CANCER: TALES FROM THE LAND AND SEA', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Ian Vanaltena, Troy Gaston, Judith Weidenhofer, Jennette Sakoff, Danielle Bond, Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett, Anita Chalmers
2014 Goldsmith CD, Vuong QV, Sadeqzadeh E, Stathopoulos CE, Roach PD, Scarlett CJ, 'ANTI-PROLIFERATIVE CAPACITY OF OLEUROPEIN RICH OLIVE LEAF EXTRACTS AGAINST PANCREATIC CANCER CELLS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Roach, C Scarlett
2014 Sadeqzadeh E, Vuong QV, Goldsmith CD, Nguyen VT, Bhuyan DJ, Trung TD, et al., 'A NATURAL PRODUCT DRUG DISCOVERY PIPELINE FOR NOVEL PANCREATIC CANCER THERAPIES: A NEW CANCER RESEARCH HUB FOR THE HUNTER REGION OF NSW', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Troy Gaston, C Scarlett, Ian Vanaltena, Rick Thorne, Natalie Moltschaniwskyj, Anita Chalmers, Judith Weidenhofer
2011 Vuong QV, Tan SP, Stathopoulos C, Roach PD, 'Improving the extraction of the catechins from green tea in teabags using the microwave oven', Australasian Medical Journal (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Roach
2010 Vuong QV, Durel M, Tan S, Roach PD, Stathopoulos C, 'Utilisation of EGCG in tofu as functional food', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Roach
2010 Vuong QV, Nguyen MH, Golding J, Roach PD, 'Improving the efficiency of hot water extraction of theanine from green tea', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Minh Nguyen, Paul Roach
2009 Vuong QV, Nguyen V, Golding J, Roach PD, 'The content of bioactive constituents as a quality index for Vietnamese teas', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Roach
2009 Vuong QV, Nguyen MH, Golding J, Roach PD, 'Development of a microwave-assisted water method for the extraction of green tea bioactive constituents', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Minh Nguyen, Paul Roach
Show 6 more conferences

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Beckett EL, Vuong Q, 'What science says about getting the most out of your tea', The Conversation (2017)
Co-authors Emma Beckett
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 11
Total funding $1,571,983

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $45,000

Australian Citrus Postharvest Science Program$45,000

Funding body: NSW Department of Primary Industries

Funding body NSW Department of Primary Industries
Project Team Doctor John Golding, Emeritus Professor Ronald Wills, Doctor Quan Vuong, Associate Professor Michael Bowyer, Lluis Palou
Scheme Horticulture Innovation
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1700301
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON Y

20164 grants / $219,782

ECR HDR Candidate Scholarship$205,688

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Scheme The University of Newcastle/Australia
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

The relationship between sensory, affective and neurophysiological measures of the aromatic quality of eucalyptus oil and its species-specific biochemical composition$5,812

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
Project Team

Dr William Budd; Dr Quan Vuong; Dr Anita Chalmers

Scheme Faculty Small Grant Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Drying of carrot peel (Daucus carota L) and recovery of its bioactive compounds for further utilisation$4,975

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
Scheme New Staff Grant Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

2016 Faculty Visiting Fellowship$3,307

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
Scheme Early/Mid-Career Visiting Fellowship Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20152 grants / $9,525

Recovery of phenolic compounds and lignin from macadamia waste for utilisation as the food ingredients$7,525

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
Scheme Faculty Small Grant Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

PVC Conference Assistance Grant$2,000

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
Scheme PVC Conference Assistance Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20142 grants / $1,264,427

Food & Beverage Supply Chain Optimisation Industrial Transformation Training Centre$1,243,927

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Rick Middleton, Professor Regina Berretta, Associate Professor Michael Bowyer, Doctor Ali Eshragh, Doctor Masoud Talebian, Associate Professor Behnam Fahimnia, Professor Mathieu Savelsbergh, Professor Natashia Boland, Dr Costas Stathopoulos, Professor John Bartholdi, Doctor Simon Dunstall, Mrs Carlee McGowan, Mr Robert McMahon, Mr Tim Norris, Mr Robert Scoines, Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett, Doctor Quan Vuong
Scheme Industrial Transformation Training Centres
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1301004
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Identification and evaluation of anti-pancreatic cancer activity of cytotoxic compounds extracted from Australian sea sponges: a pilot study$20,500

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett, Doctor Quan Vuong, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Doctor Rick Thorne, Associate Professor Michael Bowyer, Doctor Troy Gaston
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401452
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20131 grants / $14,749

Extraction and identification of cytotoxic compounds from Australian sea sponges as novel therapeutic agents for pancreatic cancer.$14,749

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project Team Associate Professor Christopher Scarlett, Doctor Quan Vuong
Scheme Strategic Small Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1401071
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20121 grants / $18,500

Extraction and isolation of plant phenolics$18,500

Funding body: NSW Trade & Investment

Funding body NSW Trade & Investment
Project Team Doctor Quan Vuong, Doctor John Golding, Doctor Paul Roach
Scheme Gosford Horticultural Institute
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200689
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current14

Total current UON EFTSL

Masters0.15
PhD5.15

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Extraction and Use of Citrus Oil as Fungicide on Citrus Fruits PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Application of Packaging and Cooling Techniques to Optimize the Handling and Storage of Fresh Fruits to Maintain Quality and Reduce Losses PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Recovery of Bioactive Compounds from Food Processing Waste for Further Utilisation as Valuable Food Ingredients PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Nutritional and Bioactive Properties of Selected Australian Native Fruits and Their Potential Use as Functional Food Ingredients PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD The Effects of Green Tea Constituents on Psychocardiological Markers in Humans PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Isolation and Encapsulation of Bioactive Compounds From Maroon Bush (Scaevola Spiniscens) Plants Used as Traditional Indigenous Remedies PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Waste Utilisation PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Identification and Isolation of Bioactive Compounds from Selected Australian and Vietnamese Flora as Novel Agents for Prevention and Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Phytochemicals from Vietnamese and Australian Native Plants as Novel Anti-Cancer Agents for Gastro-Pancreatic Malignancies PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 Masters A Method to Estimate the Storage Potential of Blueberries under Modified Atmosphere Conditions M Philosophy (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Maximizing the Recovery of Bioactive compounds from Banana (Muss Cavendish) peel for Utilization as a Food Ingredient PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Anticancer Compounds from Plants Against Pancreatic Cancer Cells: Extraction, Purification and Characterization PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Edible Films for Improving Postharvest Life of Fresh Horticultural Produce. PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Interaction of gaseous signalling molecules ethylene, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulphide, on postharvest metabolism of banana fruit and the leafy vegetable, pak choy. PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 62
Viet Nam 13
United Kingdom 9
Korea, Republic of 5
Thailand 2
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Dr Quan Vuong

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email vanquan.vuong@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 43484124
Link Research Networks

Office

Building Chemistry Building
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