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Dr Quan Vuong

Lecturer

School of Environmental and Life Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
My earlier career research interests (MSc and PhD) were related to green tea. I investigated aqueous extraction methods for the isolation of the bioactive components from green tea under household and laboratory conditions. I developed methods to produce decaffeinated green tea to meet changing market demands. I also prepared high caffeinated green tea extracts and decaffeinated green tea catechin extracts for utilisation in the food industry. My current interests have extended to the identification, extraction and purification of bioactive compounds from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, native fruits, algae and sea sponges for utilisation in the food and pharmaceutical industries. I am interested in the utilisation of waste from food processing to add value to the food industry. I am also interested in the development of functional foods from natural extracts, and the improvement of the postharvest shelf-life of fresh produce through the application of packaging technologies and edible coatings.

Teaching Expertise
My teaching expertise lies in the field of food science. I teach a 1st-year course on Foods and Nutrients, a 2nd-year course on Animal Food Products, and a 3rd-year course on Food Processing and Quality Management.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Food Preservation & Processing, Hanoi Agricultural University No 1- Viet Nam
  • Master of Food Technology, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Animal food products
  • Antioxidants
  • Bioactive compounds
  • Edible films
  • Encapsulation
  • Extraction, isolation and identification
  • Food and nutrients
  • Functional foods
  • Plant food products
  • Post harvest

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • Vietnamese (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
070605 Post Harvest Horticultural Technologies (incl. Transportation and Storage) 25
090801 Food Chemistry and Molecular Gastronomy (excl. Wine) 50
090899 Food Sciences not elsewhere classified 25

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Scarlett CS, Vuong QV, Plant Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Prevention and Treatment, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., New York (2015)
Co-authors C Scarlett

Chapter (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Vuong QV, Scarlett CJ, 'Selected Australian Flora As Potential Sources of Anti-Cancer Agents', Plant Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Prevention and Treatment, Nova Science Publishers , Inc., New York 195-217 (2015)
Co-authors C Scarlett
2015 Bowyer MC, McCluskey A, Scarlett CJ, Vuong QV, 'Pancreatic Cancer drugs: Case Studies in Synthesis and Production', Plant Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Prevention and Treatment (Cancer Etiology, Diagnosis and Treatments), Nova Science Publishers, New York 145-193 (2015)
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Adam Mccluskey
2015 Scarlett CJ, Vuong QV, McCluskey A, Bowyer MC, 'Pancreatic Cancer Drugs: Case Studies in Synthesis and Production', Plant Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Prevention and Treatment, Nova Science Publishers , Inc., New York 145-193 (2015)
Co-authors Adam Mccluskey, C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2013 Vuong QV, Scarlett CJ, Roach PD, 'Green tea and pancreatic cancer chemoprevention', Green Tea: Varieties, Production and Health Benefits, Nova Science Publishers, New York 75-90 (2013) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Paul Roach, C Scarlett
2011 Stathopoulos C, Vuong QV, 'Effect of heat on gluten', Gluten: Properties, Modifications and Dietary Intolerance, Nova Science Publishers, New York, NY 89-100 (2011) [B1]
Show 2 more chapters

Journal article (39 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Vuong QV, Zammit N, Munro BR, Murchie S, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Effect of Drying Conditions on Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties of V itex Agnus-Castus Leaves', Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, n/a-n/a (2015)
DOI 10.1111/jfpp.12506
2015 Nguyen VT, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Altena IAV, Scarlett CJ, 'Effects of Different Drying Methods on Bioactive Compound Yield and Antioxidant Capacity of Phyllanthus amarus', Drying Technology, 150211123721006-150211123721006 (2015)
DOI 10.1080/07373937.2015.1013197
2015 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Murchie S, Bowyer MC, et al., 'Antioxidant and anticancer capacity of saponin-enriched Carica papaya leaf extracts', International Journal of Food Science and Technology, 50 169-177 (2015)

Summary: The papaya (Carica papaya) leaf (PL) contains high levels of saponins and polyphenolic compounds, and historically, it has been used as a folk medicine for numerous ailme... [more]

Summary: The papaya (Carica papaya) leaf (PL) contains high levels of saponins and polyphenolic compounds, and historically, it has been used as a folk medicine for numerous ailments, including cancer. PL is traditionally prepared by hot water extraction; however, optimised extraction conditions have not been assessed. This study optimised conditions for the extraction of saponins from PL and assessed their antioxidant capacity and antipancreatic cancer activity. Optimisation was achieved using response surface methodology. Saponins and total phenolic compounds were assessed for their antioxidant, free radical scavenging, ion-reducing capacity, and antipancreatic cancer activity. Optimal aqueous extraction conditions were 85 °C, 25 min. and a water-to-leaf ratio of 20:1 mL g-1. Ethanol extracts demonstrated higher antioxidant, free radical scavenging and ion-reducing capacity, as well as antipancreatic cancer activity. This study revealed that the PL contains numerous bioactive compounds, with significant anticancer activity warranting further studies on the isolation and characterisation of individual bioactive compounds from the PL.

DOI 10.1111/ijfs.12618
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2015 Vuong QV, Van TN, Dang TT, Bhuyan DJ, Goldsmith CD, Sadeqzadeh E, et al., 'Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions for euphol from the medicinal plant, Euphorbia tirucalli, using response surface methodology', INDUSTRIAL CROPS AND PRODUCTS, 63 197-202 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2014.09.057
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2015 Nguyen VT, Bowyer MC, Vuong QV, Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemicals and antioxidant capacity of Xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera) root as affected by various solvents and extraction methods', Industrial Crops and Products, 67 192-200 (2015)

Xao tam phan (. Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) is a Vietnamese traditionally medicinal plant used in the treatment of numerous cancers. The preparation of Xao tam phan extra... [more]

Xao tam phan (. Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) is a Vietnamese traditionally medicinal plant used in the treatment of numerous cancers. The preparation of Xao tam phan extracts including solvent type and extraction method have significant effects on extraction efficiency, phytochemical profile and biological activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of five various solvents (water, acetonitrile, methanol, ethyl acetate and hexane) and three different extraction methods (conventional, ultrasound-assisted and microwave-assisted) on phytochemical yield and antioxidant capacity of P. trimera root from Vietnam. The results indicate that methanol extracted the maximal yield of phytochemicals from P. trimera and exhibited the greatest antioxidant capacity, with eleven compounds were identified and quantified. Microwave-assisted extraction produced the maximal phytochemical yields (except for total flavonoids) and antioxidant capacity, when compared to conventional and ultrasound-assisted extractions. These data reveal that the use of methanol and microwave-assisted extraction are recommended for extraction of biologically active phytochemicals from P. trimera root for application in the nutraceutical and/or pharmaceutical industries.

DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2015.01.051
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2015 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Murchie S, Bowyer MC, et al., 'Antioxidant and anticancer capacity of saponin-enriched Carica papaya leaf extracts', International Journal of Food Science and Technology, 50 169-177 (2015)

Summary: The papaya (Carica papaya) leaf (PL) contains high levels of saponins and polyphenolic compounds, and historically, it has been used as a folk medicine for numerous ailme... [more]

Summary: The papaya (Carica papaya) leaf (PL) contains high levels of saponins and polyphenolic compounds, and historically, it has been used as a folk medicine for numerous ailments, including cancer. PL is traditionally prepared by hot water extraction; however, optimised extraction conditions have not been assessed. This study optimised conditions for the extraction of saponins from PL and assessed their antioxidant capacity and antipancreatic cancer activity. Optimisation was achieved using response surface methodology. Saponins and total phenolic compounds were assessed for their antioxidant, free radical scavenging, ion-reducing capacity, and antipancreatic cancer activity. Optimal aqueous extraction conditions were 85 °C, 25 min. and a water-to-leaf ratio of 20:1 mL g-1. Ethanol extracts demonstrated higher antioxidant, free radical scavenging and ion-reducing capacity, as well as antipancreatic cancer activity. This study revealed that the PL contains numerous bioactive compounds, with significant anticancer activity warranting further studies on the isolation and characterisation of individual bioactive compounds from the PL.

DOI 10.1111/ijfs.12618
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2015 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Munro B, Bowyer MC, et al., 'Physicochemical, antioxidant and anti-cancer activity of a Eucalyptus robusta (Sm.) leaf aqueous extract', INDUSTRIAL CROPS AND PRODUCTS, 64 167-174 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2014.10.061
Co-authors C Scarlett, Jennette Sakoff, Anita Chalmers, Michael Bowyer
2015 Bhuyan DJ, Van Vuong Q, Chalmers AC, van Altena IA, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Microwave-assisted extraction of Eucalyptus robusta leaf for the optimal yield of total phenolic compounds', Industrial Crops and Products, 69 290-299 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2015.02.044
2015 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Murchie S, Bowyer MC, et al., 'Antioxidant and anticancer capacity of saponin-enriched Carica papaya leaf extracts', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 50 169-177 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/ijfs.12618
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2015 Nguyen VT, Pham NMQ, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, van Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemical Retention and Antioxidant Capacity of Xao Tam Phan ( Paramignya trimera ) Root as Prepared by Different Drying Methods', Drying Technology, 150622104916001-150622104916001 (2015)
DOI 10.1080/07373937.2015.1053566
Co-authors C Scarlett
2015 Hirun S, Choi J-H, Ayarungsaritkul J, Pawsaut C, Sutthiwanjampa C, Vuong QV, et al., 'Optimization of far-infrared vacuum drying conditions for Miang leaves (Camellia sinensis var. assamica) using response surface methodology', Food Science and Biotechnology, 24 461-469 (2015)

Far-infrared (FIR) vacuum is an advanced drying technique that has recently been applied in food processing. Optimal drying conditions for processing tea from Miang leaves using F... [more]

Far-infrared (FIR) vacuum is an advanced drying technique that has recently been applied in food processing. Optimal drying conditions for processing tea from Miang leaves using FIR vacuum drying were investigated. Response surface methodology with a central composite design was used to design, analyze, and predict the optimal time and temperature conditions for FIR vacuum drying, taking into account the physicochemical properties of Miang leaves. When the temperature increased from 50 to 65°C and the time from 60 to 120 min, the amount of epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin gallate, and total catechins significantly (p<0.05) increased while the moisture content and water activity significantly (p<0.05) decreased, compared with controls. The physicochemical properties of dried Miang leaves were significantly (p>0.05) influenced by time and temperature, compared with controls. Drying conditions of 65°C for 120 min are recommended for optimization of drying.

DOI 10.1007/s10068-015-0061-8
Co-authors C Scarlett
2015 Bhuyan DJ, Quan VV, Chalmers AC, van Altena IA, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Microwave-assisted extraction of Eucalyptus robusta leaf for the optimal yield of total phenolic compounds', INDUSTRIAL CROPS AND PRODUCTS, 69 290-299 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2015.02.044
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Anita Chalmers, C Scarlett
2015 Nguyen VT, Van Vuong Q, Bowyer MC, Van Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'Effects of Different Drying Methods on Bioactive Compound Yield and Antioxidant Capacity of Phyllanthus amarus', Drying Technology, 33 1006-1017 (2015)

Phyllanthus amarus (P. amarus) has been used as a herbal medicine, particularly for liver support, in many countries and its extracts have been shown to possess potent antioxidant... [more]

Phyllanthus amarus (P. amarus) has been used as a herbal medicine, particularly for liver support, in many countries and its extracts have been shown to possess potent antioxidant and anticancer properties in vitro. The preparation of dried sample is crucial for further extraction and isolation of phytochemicals. In this study, the effects of six different drying methods (hot air, low-temperature air, infrared, microwave, sun, and vacuum drying) on the phytochemical yield and antioxidant capacity were determined to identify the optimal drying method for P. amarus. The results showed that different drying methods, as well as different drying conditions within each method, significantly affected phytochemical yield and antioxidant capacity of P. amarus extracts. Infrared drying at 30°C was the best method for both retention of bioactive compound yield and antioxidant capacity of P. amarus extract, with 12 compounds were identified. In contrast, low-temperature-air drying at 25°C not only required the longest drying time but also significantly reduced the levels of bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity of P. amarus. Therefore, infrared drying at 30°C is suggested for drying P. amarus for subsequent assessment of bioactivity.

DOI 10.1080/07373937.2015.1013197
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2015 Goldsmith CD, Vuong QV, Sadeqzadeh E, Stathopoulos CE, Roach PD, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemical Properties and Anti-Proliferative Activity of Olea europaea L. Leaf Extracts against Pancreatic Cancer Cells.', Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), 20 12992-13004 (2015)
DOI 10.3390/molecules200712992
Co-authors Paul Roach, C Scarlett
2015 Vuong QV, Zammit N, Munro BR, Murchie S, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Effect of drying conditions on physicochemical and antioxidant properties of vitex agnus-castus leaves', Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, (2015)

Vitex agnus-castus (VitexAC) leaves have been used for medicinal purposes for many years. Drying is important to prepare starting materials for further processing, as it is associ... [more]

Vitex agnus-castus (VitexAC) leaves have been used for medicinal purposes for many years. Drying is important to prepare starting materials for further processing, as it is associated with production cost and quality of the materials. Herein, the effects of five different drying conditions on the physical, chemical and antioxidant properties of VitexAC were evaluated. The results showed that 30% of dried leaves with moisture content of less than 7% could be produced from fresh leaves. VitexAC leaves dried by freeze and vacuum drying at 65C had higher levels of bioactive compounds as well as higher antioxidant capacity in comparison with other drying conditions, revealing that these drying conditions are more suitable for drying VitexAC leaves. However, freeze drying is costly and time-consuming; thus, vacuum drying at 65C is suggested for drying the VitexAC leaves as the starting materials for further processing steps. Practical Applications: As drying is an important process to prepare starting materials for further processing steps, it is important to compare different drying methods to identify the most suitable method with low cost and less effect on material quality. The results showed that inappropriate drying conditions resulted in big loss of bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity. Vacuum drying at 65C was found to be the most suitable method, which can be easily applied for drying Vitex agnus-castus leaves in the industrial scale.

DOI 10.1111/jfpp.12506
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2015 Chuen TLK, Vuong QV, Hirun S, Bowyer MC, Goldsmith CD, Scarlett CJ, 'Optimum aqueous extraction conditions for preparation of a phenolic-enriched Davidson's plum ( Davidsonia pruriens F. Muell) extract', International Journal of Food Science & Technology, n/a-n/a (2015)
DOI 10.1111/ijfs.12915
2015 Vuong QV, Chalmers AC, Jyoti Bhuyan D, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Botanical, Phytochemical, and Anticancer Properties of the Eucalyptus Species.', Chem Biodivers, 12 907-924 (2015)
DOI 10.1002/cbdv.201400327
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Anita Chalmers
2014 Tan SP, Vuong QV, Stathopoulos CE, Parks SE, Roach PD, 'Optimized Aqueous Extraction of Saponins from Bitter Melon for Production of a Saponin-Enriched Bitter Melon Powder', Journal of Food Science, 79 (2014) [C1]

Bitter melon, Momordica charantia L. (Cucurbitaceae), aqueous extracts are proposed to have health-promoting properties due to their content of saponins and their antioxidant acti... [more]

Bitter melon, Momordica charantia L. (Cucurbitaceae), aqueous extracts are proposed to have health-promoting properties due to their content of saponins and their antioxidant activity. However, the optimal conditions for the aqueous extraction of saponins from bitter melon and the effects of spray drying have not been established. Therefore, this study aimed to optimize the aqueous extraction of the saponins from bitter melon, using response surface methodology, prepare a powder using spray drying, and compare the powder's physical properties, components, and antioxidant capacity with aqueous and ethanol freeze-dried bitter melon powders and a commercial powder. The optimal aqueous extraction conditions were determined to be 40 °C for 15 min and the water-to-sample ratio was chosen to be 20:1 mL/g. For many of its physical properties, components, and antioxidant capacity, the aqueous spray-dried powder was comparable to the aqueous and ethanol freeze-dried bitter melon powders and the commercial powder. The optimal conditions for the aqueous extraction of saponins from bitter melon followed by spray drying gave a high quality powder in terms of saponins and antioxidant activity. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®.

DOI 10.1111/1750-3841.12514
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Paul Roach
2014 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Phillips PA, Chuen TLK, Bowyer MC, Goldsmith CD, Scarlett CJ, 'Fruit-derived phenolic compounds and pancreatic cancer: Perspectives from Australian native fruits', JOURNAL OF ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, 152 227-242 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jep.2013.12.023
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2014 Hirun S, Utama-ang N, Vuong QV, Scarlett CJ, 'Investigating the Commercial Microwave Vacuum Drying Conditions on Physicochemical Properties and Radical Scavenging Ability of Thai Green Tea', DRYING TECHNOLOGY, 32 47-54 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/07373937.2013.811249
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors C Scarlett
2014 Vuong QV, 'Epidemiological Evidence Linking Tea Consumption to Human Health: A Review', Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 54 523-536 (2014) [C1]

Tea has been widely consumed around the world for thousands of years and drinking tea is a daily habit for people of all ages. Tea is a major source of flavanoids, which have beco... [more]

Tea has been widely consumed around the world for thousands of years and drinking tea is a daily habit for people of all ages. Tea is a major source of flavanoids, which have become well known as antioxidants. Tea also contains caffeine and theanine, which have been found to associate with health benefits. Many animal and epidemiological studies have been conducted to investigate the link between tea consumption and human health. However, common questions that arise about tea consumption include: whether all teas are the same, why drinking tea is linked with health benefits, how do the different ways of tea preparation impact on availability of tea components, how much and how long a person should consume tea to obtain health benefits, and whether there is any negative health effect associated with drinking tea. To answer these questions, this paper outlines the tea components and their link to human health, discusses major factors affecting availability of tea components in a tea cup, and reviews the latest epidemiological evidence linking tea consumption to human health. © 2014 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/10408398.2011.594184
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2014 Vuong QV, Roach PD, 'Caffeine in Green Tea: Its Removal and Isolation', SEPARATION AND PURIFICATION REVIEWS, 43 155-174 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/15422119.2013.771127
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Paul Roach
2014 Vuong QV, Sadeqzadeh E, Hirun S, Goldsmith CD, Zammitt N, Bowyer MB, et al., 'Phenolic Compounds, Antioxidant and Anti-Cancer Properties of the Australian Maroon Bush Scaevola spinescens (Goodeniaceae)', Journal of Bioanalysis & Biomedicine, S12 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/1948-593X.S12-002
Co-authors Jennette Sakoff, Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett, Judith Weidenhofer, Rick Thorne
2014 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Bowyer MC, Chalmers AC, et al., 'Physicochemical composition, antioxidant and anti-proliferative capacity of a lilly pilly (Syzygium paniculatum) extract', JOURNAL OF HERBAL MEDICINE, 4 134-140 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.hermed.2014.04.003
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett, Anita Chalmers
2014 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Chuen TLK, Goldsmith CD, Bowyer MC, Chalmers AC, et al., 'Physicochemical composition, antioxidant and anti-proliferative capacity of a lilly pilly (Syzygium paniculatum) extract', Journal of Herbal Medicine, 4 134-140 (2014) [C1]

Lilly pilly (LP) fruit (Syzygium paniculatum Gaertn.) is widely grown in eastern Australia and has been used as food by indigenous Australians. However, there is limited informati... [more]

Lilly pilly (LP) fruit (Syzygium paniculatum Gaertn.) is widely grown in eastern Australia and has been used as food by indigenous Australians. However, there is limited information on its bioactivity. This study investigated the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of the crude fruit extract, identified its bioactive compounds and also assessed its potential anti-proliferative effect on pancreatic cancer cells. Our data showed that the LP extract was water-soluble and possessed a total phenolic content of 96 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g, flavonoid levels of 52 mg catechin equivalents (CAE)/g, proanthocyanidin levels of 29 mg CAE/g. Several phenolic compounds such as gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, catechin and epicatechin were identified in the LP extract with levels of 0.39, 2.35, 0.47 and 2.9 mg/g, respectively. Results from six different antioxidant assays revealed that the LP extract pocessed potent antioxidant and free radical scavenging capacity. Although antioxidant capacity of the extract was lower than that of vitamin E, vitamin C and BHT, it could be significantly improved if the extract was to be further purified. We also showed that the LP extract (200 µg/mL) significantly reduced the viability of MiaPaCa-2 and ASPC-1 pancreatic cancer cells to levels comparable to that of the chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine. For this reason lilly pilly should be further investigated for its health promoting and potential anti-cancer benefits, particularly for pancreatic cancer. © 2014 Elsevier GmbH.

DOI 10.1016/j.hermed.2014.04.003
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Anita Chalmers
2014 Goldsmith C, Vuong Q, Stathopoulos C, Roach P, Scarlett C, 'Optimization of the Aqueous Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Olive Leaves', Antioxidants, 3 700-712 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/antiox3040700
Co-authors C Scarlett, Paul Roach
2014 Vuong Q, Goldsmith C, Dang T, Nguyen V, Bhuyan D, Sadeqzadeh E, et al., 'Optimisation of Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction Conditions for Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Capacity from Euphorbia tirucalli Using Response Surface Methodology', Antioxidants, 3 604-617 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/antiox3030604
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2013 Vuong QV, Golding JB, Nguyen MH, Roach PD, 'Preparation of decaffeinated and high caffeine powders from green tea', Powder Technology, 233 169-175 (2013) [C1]

The aims of this study were to develop optimal conditions for decaffeination and spray drying procedures to produce decaffeinated and high caffeine powders from green tea (Camelli... [more]

The aims of this study were to develop optimal conditions for decaffeination and spray drying procedures to produce decaffeinated and high caffeine powders from green tea (Camellia sinensis). Blanching the tea leaves with water at 100. °C for 4. min at a water-to-tea ratio of 20:1. mL/g removed 83% of the caffeine while retaining 94% of the catechins. The optimal spray drying conditions, which gave the highest yield of green tea powder and the highest concentrations of the naturally occurring epistructured catechins were found to be 180. °C for the inlet temperature and 115. °C for the outlet temperature. Using these optimal conditions, a decaffeinated green tea powder (7 mg/g caffeine) and a high caffeine powder (95. mg/g) were produced. These two green tea powders had excellent physical properties and could be used as instant teas by consumers or utilized in the food, cosmetic and nutraceutical industries. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.powtec.2012.09.002
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Paul Roach, Minh Nguyen
2013 Vuong QV, Golding JB, Stathopoulos CE, Roach PD, 'Effects of aqueous brewing solution pH on the extraction of the major green tea constituents', Food Research International, 53 713-719 (2013) [C1]

The pH of the aqueous brewing solution was maintained at values ranging from 1 to 9 during the green tea extraction and the effects on the tea's extracted constituents were studie... [more]

The pH of the aqueous brewing solution was maintained at values ranging from 1 to 9 during the green tea extraction and the effects on the tea's extracted constituents were studied. The epistructured catechins were stable under acidic conditions but epimerized or degraded at pH. =. 6. The extractable solids contained more epistructured catechins at pHs 3-5 but more non-epistructured catechins at pHs 6-7. More tea cream was obtained at pH 1 but the concentration of catechins, caffeine and theanine was low in this fraction. Therefore, to maximize the extraction of the epistructured catechins and to minimize their epimerization and degradation and to maximize the extraction of caffeine and theanine, the results suggest that the pH should be maintained between 3 and 5.3 during the aqueous brewing process. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.foodres.2012.09.017
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Paul Roach
2013 Vuong QV, Hirun S, Roach PD, Bowyer MC, Phillips PA, Scarlett CJ, 'Effect of extraction conditions on total phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities of Carica papaya leaf aqueous extracts', JOURNAL OF HERBAL MEDICINE, 3 104-111 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.hermed.2013.04.004
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Paul Roach
2012 Vuong QV, Golding J, Nguyen MH, Roach PD, 'Production of caffeinated and decaffeinated green tea catechin powders from underutilised old tea leaves', Journal of Food Engineering, 110 1-8 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Minh Nguyen, Paul Roach
2012 Vuong QV, Tan SP, Stathopoulos C, Roach PD, 'Improved extraction of green tea components from teabags using the microwave oven', Journal of Food Composition and Analysis, 27 95-101 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Paul Roach
2011 Vuong QV, Stathopoulos C, Golding J, Nguyen MH, Roach PD, 'Optimum conditions for the water extraction of L -theanine from green tea', Journal of Separation Science, 34 2468-2474 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jssc.201100401
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Minh Nguyen, Paul Roach
2011 Vuong QV, Golding J, Stathopoulos C, Nguyen MH, Roach PD, 'Optimizing conditions for the extraction of catechins from green tea using hot water', Journal of Separation Science, 34 3099-3106 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jssc.201000863
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Minh Nguyen, Paul Roach
2011 Vuong QV, Nguyen V, Golding J, Roach PD, 'The content of bioactive constituents as a quality index for Vietnamese teas', International Food Research Journal, 18 329-336 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors Paul Roach
2011 Vuong QV, Durel M, Roach PD, Stathopoulos C, 'Preliminary study on the fortification of tofu with green tea catechins', International Food Research Journal, 18 1553-1557 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Paul Roach
2011 Vuong QV, Stathopoulos C, Nguyen MH, Golding J, Roach PD, 'Isolation of green tea catechins and their utilization in the food industry', Food Reviews International, 27 227-247 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/87559129.2011.563397
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Minh Nguyen, Paul Roach
2011 Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Roach PD, 'L-Theanine: Properties, synthesis and isolation from tea', Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 91 1931-1939 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jsfa.4373
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Paul Roach
2010 Vuong QV, Golding J, Nguyen MH, Roach PD, 'Extraction and isolation of catechins from tea', Journal of Separation Science, 33 3415-3428 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jssc.201000438
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Minh Nguyen, Paul Roach
Show 36 more journal articles

Conference (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Goldsmith CD, Vuong QV, Sadeqzadeh E, Stathopoulos CE, Roach PD, Scarlett CJ, 'ANTI-PROLIFERATIVE CAPACITY OF OLEUROPEIN RICH OLIVE LEAF EXTRACTS AGAINST PANCREATIC CANCER CELLS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors C Scarlett, Paul Roach
2014 Sadeqzadeh E, Vuong QV, Goldsmith CD, Nguyen VT, Bhuyan DJ, Trung TD, et al., 'A NATURAL PRODUCT DRUG DISCOVERY PIPELINE FOR NOVEL PANCREATIC CANCER THERAPIES: A NEW CANCER RESEARCH HUB FOR THE HUNTER REGION OF NSW', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Troy Gaston, Michael Bowyer, Judith Weidenhofer, Rick Thorne, C Scarlett, Anita Chalmers, Natalie Moltschaniwskyj
2011 Vuong QV, Tan SP, Stathopoulos C, Roach PD, 'Improving the extraction of the catechins from green tea in teabags using the microwave oven', Australasian Medical Journal, Queenstown, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Roach
2010 Vuong QV, Durel M, Tan S, Roach PD, Stathopoulos C, 'Utilisation of EGCG in tofu as functional food', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Perth, WA (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Roach
2010 Vuong QV, Nguyen MH, Golding J, Roach PD, 'Improving the efficiency of hot water extraction of theanine from green tea', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Perth, WA (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Minh Nguyen, Paul Roach
2009 Vuong QV, Nguyen V, Golding J, Roach PD, 'The content of bioactive constituents as a quality index for Vietnamese teas', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Roach
2009 Vuong QV, Nguyen MH, Golding J, Roach PD, 'Development of a microwave-assisted water method for the extraction of green tea bioactive constituents', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Minh Nguyen, Paul Roach
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $53,749

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20141 grants / $20,500

Identification and evaluation of anti-pancreatic cancer activity of cytotoxic compounds extracted from Australian sea sponges: a pilot study$20,500

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Christopher Scarlett, Doctor Quan Vuong, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Doctor Rick Thorne, Associate Professor Michael Bowyer, Doctor Troy Gaston
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401452
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20131 grants / $14,749

Extraction and identification of cytotoxic compounds from Australian sea sponges as novel therapeutic agents for pancreatic cancer.$14,749

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project Team Doctor Christopher Scarlett, Doctor Quan Vuong
Scheme Strategic Small Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1401071
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20121 grants / $18,500

Extraction and isolation of plant phenolics$18,500

Funding body: NSW Trade & Investment

Funding body NSW Trade & Investment
Project Team Doctor Quan Vuong, Doctor John Golding, Doctor Paul Roach
Scheme Gosford Horticultural Institute
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200689
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current4

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Identification and Isolation of Bioactive Compounds from Selected Australian and Vietnamese Flora as Novel Agents for Prevention and Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer
Food Science & Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Anticancer Compounds from Plants Against Pancreatic Cancer Cells: Extraction, Purification and Characterization
Food Science & Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Extracting and Utilizing Bioactive Components from the Waste of the Fruit and Fruit Juice Industries
Food Science & Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Regulation of Postharvest Leaf Senescence by Endogenous Nitric Oxide
Food Science & Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Dr Quan Vuong

Position

Lecturer
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Contact Details

Email vanquan.vuong@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 43484124
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