Dr Andrea Griffin

Senior Lecturer

School of Psychology (Psychology)

Career Summary

Biography

1996-1998: MSc University of Geneva, Switzerland 1998-2002: PhD Macquarie University, Australia 2002-2004: Swiss National Science Post-doctoral Fellow, McGill University, Canada 2004-2005: Leave of absence 2005-2010: Australian Research Council Fellow: University of Newcastle, Australia 2009-ongoing: Lecturer University of Newcastle (School of Psychology)

Research Expertise
My research interests fall broadly into the areas of learning and cognition. I am particularly interested in understanding how animals solve ecologically relevant problems they encounter in the wild. In my comparative cognition lab, we use the Indian mynah, a highly invasive and urbanized social songbird, to explore the mechanisms of social learning. Mynahs are also remarkably innovative in the foraging context, so they provide the opportunity to explore relationships between foraging innovation, ecological success and urbanization using both captive and field experimental approaches. We are also comparing the performance of mynahs to a variety of other native and non native Australian bird species. Our findings provide important information into the cognitive and ecological attributes of a highly invasive avian species. As such, they allow us to test theoretical models of animal cognition, but also to inform the development of wildlife management strategies for avian pests. Finally, my work in comparative cognition extends to humans, since together social psychologist, Dr Stefania Paolini (School of Psychology, University of Newcastle), I am exploring the role of individual and social learning in the development of intergroup anxiety. For more details, go to http://andreasgriffin.weebly.com/


Qualifications

  • PhD, Macquarie University

Keywords

  • Animal innovation
  • Comparative cognition
  • Learning

Languages

  • German (Fluent)
  • French (Fluent)

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
060399Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified15
170299Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified85

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2015 - Senior LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia
1/01/2010 - 29/01/2010Post Doctoral Research FellowUniversity of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2006 - 1/12/2010Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship - ARCARC
Australia

Awards

Distinction

YearAward
2001Warder Clyde Allee contest (honourable mention)
Animal Behavior Society
2001The Bolliger Award
Australian Mammal Society
2001Student award contest
Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
1999Griffin AS, 'Dead reckoning (Path integration), landmarks, and representation of space in a comparative perspective.', , John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America 197-228 (1999) [B1]

Journal article (29 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Griffin AS, Guillette LM, Healy SD, 'Cognition and personality: An analysis of an emerging field', Trends in Ecology and Evolution, (2015)

It is now well established that individuals can differ consistently in their average levels of behaviour across different contexts. There have recently been calls to apply the same adaptive framework to interindividual differences in cognition. These calls have culminated in the suggestion that variation in personality and cognition should correlate. We suggest that both these appealing notions are conceptually and logistically problematic. We identify the first crucial step for establishing any cognition-personality relationship. This is to determine the degree to which cognitive abilities yield consistent task performance. We then suggest how to establish whether such consistency exists. Finally, we discuss why formulating predictions about how cognition might be related to personality is much more difficult than is currently realised.

DOI10.1016/j.tree.2015.01.012
2015Griffin AS, Guillette LM, Healy SD, 'Cognition and personality: An analysis of an emerging field', Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 30 207-214 (2015)

It is now well established that individuals can differ consistently in their average levels of behaviour across different contexts. There have recently been calls to apply the same adaptive framework to interindividual differences in cognition. These calls have culminated in the suggestion that variation in personality and cognition should correlate. We suggest that both these appealing notions are conceptually and logistically problematic. We identify the first crucial step for establishing any cognition-personality relationship. This is to determine the degree to which cognitive abilities yield consistent task performance. We then suggest how to establish whether such consistency exists. Finally, we discuss why formulating predictions about how cognition might be related to personality is much more difficult than is currently realised.

DOI10.1016/j.tree.2015.01.012
2015Griffin AS, Diquelou MC, 'Innovative problem solving in birds: A cross-species comparison of two highly successful passerines', Animal Behaviour, 100 84-94 (2015)

Macro-ecological comparisons have repeatedly demonstrated that the taxonomic distribution of foraging innovations coincides with the ability to adjust to novel and changing environments. We sought to obtain experimental support for the link between innovative foraging and opportunism by measuring the innovation abilities of two highly successful passerines on the east coast of Australia with very different success strategies. The ecological success of the introduced Indian myna, Acridotheres tristis, has been linked to its ability to occupy opportunistically an ecological niche that most natives cannot, whereas the native noisy miner, Manorina melanocephala, owes its success to its ability to aggressively outcompete other avian species. Indian mynas were significantly more neophobic than noisy miners. Yet, when tested on a range of innovative foraging tasks, Indian mynas consistently outperformed noisy miners. The ability to use the beak in a greater range of ways, and more flexibly, was highly repeatable in Indian mynas, and underpinned their superior problem-solving performance. We discuss the results in the light of potential methodological influences, but also the idea that necessity may facilitate innovation not only in less competitive individuals, as is documented in the literature, but also in species with less competitive lifestyles.

DOI10.1016/j.anbehav.2014.11.012
2014Griffin AS, Diquelou M, Perea M, 'Innovative problem solving in birds: a key role of motor diversity', ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, 92 221-227 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.anbehav.2014.04.009Author URL
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2014Griffin AS, Guez D, 'Innovation and problem solving: A review of common mechanisms', BEHAVIOURAL PROCESSES, 109 121-134 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.beproc.2014.08.027Author URL
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2013Griffin AS, Lermite F, Perea M, Guez D, 'To innovate or not: contrasting effects of social groupings on safe and risky foraging in Indian mynahs', ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, 86 1291-1300 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.anbehav.2013.09.035Author URL
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2013Griffin AS, Guez D, Lermite FCC, Patience M, 'Tracking Changing Environments: Innovators Are Fast, but Not Flexible Learners', PloS one, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0084907
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2012Sol D, Griffin AS, Bartomeus I, 'Consumer and motor innovation in the common myna: The role of motivation and emotional responses', Animal Behaviour, 83 179-188 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 11
2012Sol D, Bartomeus I, Griffin AS, 'The paradox of invasion in birds: Competitive superiority or ecological opportunism?', Oecologia, 169 553-564 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 18Web of Science - 16
2011Sol D, Griffin AS, Bartomeus I, Boyce HM, 'Exploring or avoiding novel food resources?: The novelty conflict in an invasive bird', PLoS ONE, 6 1-7 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0019535
CitationsScopus - 25Web of Science - 24
2011Griffin AS, Haythorpe KM, 'Learning from watching alarmed demonstrators: Does the cause of alarm matter?', Animal Behaviour, 81 1163-1169 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 3
2010Griffin AS, Boyce HM, Macfarlane GR, 'Social learning about places: Observers may need to detect both social alarm and its cause to learn', Animal Behaviour, 79 459-465 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.anbehav.2009.11.029
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsGeoff Macfarlane
2009Griffin AS, Boyce HM, 'Indian mynahs, Acridotheres tristis, learn about dangerous places by observing the fate of others', Animal Behaviour, 78 79-84 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.anbehav.2009.03.012
CitationsScopus - 15Web of Science - 14
2009Griffin AS, 'Temporal limitations on social learning of novel predators by Indian Mynahs, Acridotheres tristis', Ethology, 115 287-295 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1439-0310.2008.01594.x
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2008Griffin AS, 'Social learning in Indian mynahs, Acridotheres tristis: The role of distress calls', Animal Behaviour, 75 79-89 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.anbehav.2007.04.008
CitationsScopus - 16Web of Science - 15
2008Griffin AS, 'Socially acquired predator avoidance: Is it just classical conditioning?', Brain Research Bulletin, 76 264-271 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.brainresbull.2008.02.005
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 6
2005Griffin AS, Savani RS, Hausmanis K, Lefebvre L, 'Mixed-species aggregations in birds: zenaida doves, Zenaida aurita, respond to the alarm calls of carib grackles, Quiscalus lugubris', ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, 70 507-515 (2005) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.anbehav.2004.11.023Author URL
CitationsScopus - 22Web of Science - 22
2005Griffin AS, Galef Jr BG, 'Social learning about predators: Does timing matter?', Animal Behaviour, 69 669-678 (2005) [C1]

In Pavlovian conditioning, animals acquire a response to a previously neutral stimulus (conditioned stimulus, CS), such as a light, if that stimulus predicts a biologically important event (unconditioned stimulus, US), such as delivery of food. Learning typically occurs when the CS precedes the US (forward conditioning), and not when the CS follows the US (backward conditioning). In social learning about predators, the predator stimulus is considered to be the CS to which observers acquire avoidance responses after the stimulus has been presented in contiguity with an alarmed demonstrator, the US. We tested the prediction that social learning of response to a predator would occur even if the social alarm cues (the US) appeared before the predatory stimulus (the CS). Carib grackles, Quiscalus lugubris, responded to a familiar predator presented at close range by suppressing alarm calls. Presentation of an unfamiliar avian model (black-and-yellow pigeon) also decreased calling, and this inhibition of calling was enhanced following a training session in which the model stimulus was presented in association with grackle alarm calls. Acquired inhibition of calling was independent of the order of presentation of the model and an alarm chorus. These are the first results to indicate that social acquisition of predator avoidance is not dependent upon a particular temporal relationship between predators and social alarm cues. Evolution may have modified some properties of Pavlovian conditioning to accommodate social learning about potentially dangerous stimuli. © 2004 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI10.1016/j.anbehav.2004.05.020
CitationsScopus - 19
2004Griffin AS, 'Social learning about predators: A review and prospectus', Learning and Behavior, 32 131-140 (2004) [C1]

In comparison with social learning about food, social learning about predators has received little attention. Yet such research is of potential interest to students of animal cognition and conservation biologists. I summarize evidence for social learning about predators by fish, birds, eutherian mammals, and marsupials. I consider the proposal that this phenomenon is a case of S-S classical conditioning and suggest that evolution may have modified some of the properties of learning to accommodate for the requirements of learning socially about danger. I discuss some between-species differences in the properties of socially acquired predator avoidance and suggest that learning may be faster and more robust in species in which alarm behavior reliably predicts high predatory threat. Finally, I highlight how studies of socially acquired predator avoidance can inform the design of prerelease antipredator training programs for endangered species.

CitationsScopus - 143
2003Griffin AS, Evans CS, 'Social learning of antipredator behaviour in a marsupial', ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, 66 485-492 (2003) [C1]
DOI10.1006/anbe.2003.2207Author URL
CitationsScopus - 35Web of Science - 31
2003Griffin AS, Evans CS, 'The role of differential reinforcement in predator avoidance learning', BEHAVIOURAL PROCESSES, 61 87-94 (2003) [C1]
DOI10.1016/S0376-6357(02)00169-9Author URL
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 11
2003Griffin AS, 'Training tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) to respond to predators: A review linking experimental Psychology to Conservation', International Journal of Comparative Psychology, 16 111-129 (2003) [C1]
2002Griffin AS, Evans CS, Blumstein DT, 'Selective learning in a marsupial', Ethology, 108 1103-1114 (2002) [C1]

Behavioural plasticity allows animals to adjust rapidly to local environmental conditions, but at the risk of erroneously changing behaviour in response to irrelevant events. Adaptive biases or predispositions constrain learning and reduce such potential costs. Preferential learning about complex biologically-meaningful stimuli, such as predators, has been investigated in only a few systems and there have been no experimental tests for the presence of adaptive biases in a marsupial. We have previously shown that tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) became fearful of a model fox (Vulpes vulpes) after it was repeatedly paired with an aversive event. Tammars generalized their acquired response to a cat (Fells catus), but not to a non-predator (juvenile goat, Capra hircus), suggesting that they might have a bias to associate predators with frightening events. The present study tested this idea directly. We used an experimental design identical to that of earlier predator-training experiments, but substituted a model goat for the fox as the stimulus predicting a capture attempt. A control group had the same total experience of the goat and of a human with a net, but without any predictive relationship between these two events. We detected no change in behaviour towards the goat, or to any of an array of control stimuli, as a consequence of training. This finding contrasts strongly with the effects of the same pairing procedure using a fox model. Taken together, these studies provide the first evidence for an adaptive predisposition to acquire a fear of predators in marsupials. Learning processes in this group are thus evolutionarily convergent with those previously described in eutherian mammals.

DOI10.1046/j.1439-0310.2002.00840.x
CitationsScopus - 14
2002Blumstein DT, Mari M, Daniel JC, Ardron JG, Griffin AS, Evans CS, 'Olfactory predator recognition: Wallabies may have to learn to be wary', Animal Conservation, 5 87-93 (2002) [C1]

Many species modify their behaviour in response to the scents of their predators, but species or populations living without predators may lose such abilities. This loss has been suggested to be irreversible, and to constitute a significant hurdle in restoring historical ecosystems. Olfactory predator recognition was studied in two macropodid marsupials - the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and the red-necked pademelon (Thylogale thetis). Both species are in the 'critical weight range' of Australian native mammals that have been negatively affected by the introduction of novel predators since European settlement. Predator-naive animals were tested by exposing subjects simultaneously to two feeders with either a predator or a herbivore faecal or urine sample beneath the food tray. The presence of predator olfactory cues beneath the feeder did not affect foraging behaviour or feeder use when compared to control stimuli (herbivore faeces or urine). Previous studies have found that predator-experienced herbivorous marsupials modify their behaviour in the presence of predator scents. In contrast, our studies of predator-naïve individuals found no evidence of such selectivity, suggesting that marsupial herbivores may have to learn to modify their behaviour in response to olfactory cues from predators. This implies that the loss of olfactory predator recognition may not be irreversible. Animals translocated from predator-free areas could potentially be trained to recognise the smells of their predator. © 2002 The Zoological Society of London.

DOI10.1017/S1367943002002123
CitationsScopus - 41
2001Griffin AS, Evans CS, Blumstein DT, 'Learning specificity in acquired predator recognition', Animal Behaviour, 62 577-589 (2001) [C1]

Predator recognition is often dependent upon experience. This behavioural plasticity can potentially be exploited to enhance the antipredator behaviour of captive-bred animals, but it is first necessary to understand the specificity of learning. We enhanced the responses of tammar wallabies, Macropus eugenii, to a model fox, Vulpes vulpes, by presenting this novel predator in conjunction with a human simulating a capture procedure. A control group had identical total exposure to fox and human, but with no such predictive relationship between these two events. Animals that experienced paired presentations of fox and human behaved more cautiously towards the fox after training than controls. To assess whether this learnt response was specific to the fox, we presented the animals with an array of visual stimuli both before and after training. The tammars generalized their acquired response from the predator with which they were trained to a predator with which they were not trained (cat, Felis catus), but not to a nonpredator (goat, Capra hircus). Tammars also exhibited a transient increase in response to a model wallaby after training. We suggest that this effect is more likely to reflect social behaviour than generalization of the learnt response from predator to conspecific. Two additional controls revealed that changes in behaviour after training were not attributable to the presentation device and were not caused by a general decrease in response threshold associated with training. Our results suggest that tammar wallabies perceive predators as a natural category. © 2001 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

DOI10.1006/anbe.2001.1781
CitationsScopus - 109
2000Griffin AS, Blumstein DT, Evans CS, 'Training captive-bred or translocated animals to avoid predators', Conservation Biology, 14 1317-1326 (2000) [C1]

Animal reintroductions and translocations are potentially important interventions to save species from extinction, but most are unsuccessful Mortality due to predation is a principal cause of failure. Animals that have been isolated from predators, either throughout their lifetime or over evolutionary time, may no longer express appropriate antipredator behavior. For this reason, conservation biologists are beginning to include antipredator training in pre-release preparation procedures. We describe the evolutionary and ontogenetic circumstances under which antipredator behavior may degenerate or be lost, and we use principles from learning theory to predict which elements can be enhanced or recovered by training. The empirical literature demonstrates that training can improve antipredator skills, but the effectiveness of such interventions is influenced by a number of constraints. We predict that it will be easier to teach animals to cope with predators if they have experienced ontogenetic isolation than if they have undergone evolutionary isolation. Similarly, animals should learn more easily if they have been evolutionarily isolated from some rather than all predators. Training to a novel predator may be more successful if a species has effective responses to similar predators. In contrast, it may be difficult to teach proper avoidance behavior, or to introduce specialized predator-specific responses, if appropriate motor patterns are not already present. We conclude that pre-release training has the potential to enhance the expression of preexisting antipredator behavior. Potential training techniques involve classical conditioning procedures in which animals learn that model predators are predictors of aversive events. However, wildlife managers should be aware that problems, such as the emergence of inappropriate responses, may arise during such training.

DOI10.1046/j.1523-1739.2000.99326.x
CitationsScopus - 184
2000Blumstein DT, Daniel JC, Griffin AS, Evans CS, 'Insular tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) respond to visual but not acoustic cues from predators', Behavioral Ecology, 11 528-535 (2000) [C1]

We studied the way in which a population of tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii), which have been isolated from mammalian predators since the last ice age, responded to the sight and sound of historical and ontogenetically and evolutionarily novel predators. Tammars were shown a range of visual stimuli, including taxidermic mounts of two evolutionarily novel predators, a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and a cat (Felis catus), and a model of an extinct predator, the thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus). Controls were a conspecific, the cart on which all mounts were presented, and blank trials in which spontaneous change in behavior was measured. We played back recorded sounds to characterize responses to acoustic cues from predators and to a putative conspecific antipredator signal. Treatments included the howls of dingoes (Canis lupus dingo), an evolutionarily novel predator; calls of a wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax), a historical and current predator; and wallaby foot thumps. Controls were the song of an Australian magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen) and a blank trial. After seeing a fox, wallabies thumped their hind feet in alarm, suppressed foraging, and increased looking. The sight of a cat similarly suppressed foraging and increased looking. The sounds of predators did not influence responsiveness, but wallabies foraged less and looked more after thump playbacks. Our results suggest that tammars respond to the sight, but not the sounds, of predators. In contrast, the response to foot thumps demonstrates that this particular sound functions as an antipredator signal. We suggest that responsiveness to visual cues has been preserved under relaxed selection because predator morphology is convergent, but vocalizations are not.

CitationsScopus - 79
1998Etienne AS, Maurer R, Berlie J, Derivaz V, Georgakopoulos J, Griffin AS, Rowe T, 'Cooperation between dead reckoning (path integration) and external position cues', Journal of Navigation, 51 23-34 (1998) [C1]
1998Griffin AS, Etienne AS, 'Updating the path integrator through a visual fix', Psychobiology, 26 240-248 (1998) [C1]
Show 26 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2010Griffin AS, 'Learning and conservation', Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior (2010) [D1]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants20
Total funding$627,635

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $9,000

How well do people fit their social group and thus should be stereotyped?$9,000

Funding body: Keats Endowment Research Fund

Funding bodyKeats Endowment Research Fund
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin, Doctor Stefania Paolini
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1500215
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20145 grants / $204,727

OvoControl contraception as a myna management tool $73,751

Funding body: NSW Environmental Trust

Funding bodyNSW Environmental Trust
Project TeamProfessor John Rodger, Doctor Andrea Griffin
SchemeEnvironmental Research (Major Grant)
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1300311
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

OvoControl contraception as a myna management tool $73,751

Funding body: NSW Environmental Trust

Funding bodyNSW Environmental Trust
Project TeamProfessor John Rodger, Doctor Andrea Griffin
SchemeEnvironmental Research (Major Grant)
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1300311
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category1NS
UONY

The role of behavioural interactions in shaping invasion dynamics: A global synthesis using the common myna as a model system$33,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamAssociate Professor Salit Kark, Doctor Andrea Griffin, Professor Timothy Blackburn, Dr Berndt Van Rensburg, Associate Professor Julie Lockwood
SchemeDiscovery Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400515
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Behaviour and social dynamics of crop raiding in Asian elephants: does social learning influence behaviour around beehive fence protected farms?$22,225

Funding body: Mr Des Carty

Funding bodyMr Des Carty
Project TeamAssociate Professor Natalie Moltschaniwskyj, Doctor Andrea Griffin, Dr Lucy King
SchemeMemorial Scholarship
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400301
Type Of FundingDonation - Aust Non Government
Category3AFD
UONY

Faculty PVC Conference Assistance Grant 2014$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin
SchemePVC Conference Assistance Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1401191
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20133 grants / $13,998

The movement ecology of Indian Mynas (Sturnus tristis) in Lake Macquarie Council: assessing Myna movement patterns and their implications for control measures$9,851

Funding body: Lake Macquarie City Council

Funding bodyLake Macquarie City Council
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin, Ms Marie Diquelou
SchemeLake Macquarie Environmental Research Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1200119
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Local
Category2OPL
UONY

Cognition and brains of ecological invaders$2,147

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin
SchemeStrategic Initiative Research Fund (SIRF)
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1401034
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Faculty PVC Conference Assistance Grant 2013$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin
SchemePVC Conference Assistance Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1401159
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20124 grants / $61,842

Population control and adaptation to trapping in Indian mynas, Acridotheres tristis: mechanisms and recommendations$39,889

Funding body: Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry Australia

Funding bodyDepartment of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry Australia
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin
SchemeAustralian Pest Animal Research Program (APARP)
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200141
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

Understanding the behavioural and neuroendocrine mechanisms of invasiveness in an avian system: do Indian mynahs display a dopaminergic-dependent invasion syndrome?$12,211

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin, Doctor Chris Dayas, Doctor David Guez
SchemeStrategic Small Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1401098
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

DRD4 dopamine receptor genetics and microsatellite assays in the Indian myna: key analyses for future grants.$8,250

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin
SchemeStrategic Initiative Research Fund (SIRF)
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1401021
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Parent-offspring transmission of trap avoidance by Indian mynas in the wild$1,492

Funding body: Ecological Society of Australia Incorporated (ESA)

Funding bodyEcological Society of Australia Incorporated (ESA)
Project TeamMiss Marie Diquelou, Doctor Andrea Griffin
SchemeStudent Research Award
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200871
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20111 grants / $43,218

Behavioural flexibility and adaptation to trapping procedures in the Indian Mynah, Acridotheres tristis: mechanism and solutions$43,218

Funding body: Wyong Shire Council

Funding bodyWyong Shire Council
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100691
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Local
Category2OPL
UONY

20103 grants / $42,750

Indian Mynah (Acridotheres tristis) population expansion in the Hunter region: Underlying mechanisms and management solutions$33,750

Funding body: Port Stephens Council

Funding bodyPort Stephens Council
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG0900248
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Local
Category2OPL
UONY

Learning, cognition and evology of the Indian mynah (Acridotheres tristis)$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin
SchemeNew Staff Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000698
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Growing Anxious of Ethnic Others: Investigating the role of Observational Learning and Prior Intergroup Contact in the Development of Intergroup Email.$4,000

Funding body: Keats Endowment Research Fund

Funding bodyKeats Endowment Research Fund
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin, Doctor Stefania Paolini
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG0900231
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20071 grants / $1,100

International Brain Research Organisation satellite symposium: Brian mechanisms, cognition and behaviour in birds, 19/7/2007 - 23/7/2007, Heron Island QLD$1,100

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0187381
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20061 grants / $10,000

Video playback: a novel approach to studying the cultural transmission of predator avoidance$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin
SchemeEarly Career Researcher Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2006
Funding Finish2006
GNoG0186695
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20051 grants / $241,000

Social learning about predators: is it just Pavlovian conditioning?$241,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Andrea Griffin
SchemeDiscovery Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2005
Funding Finish2005
GNoG0184378
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY
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Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014Geographical Repartition of Personality in Indian Mynahs: A Key to Understanding Invasion Spread
Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
2014Behaviour and Social Dynamics of Crop Raiding in African and Asian Elephants: Does Social Learning Influence Behaviour Around Beehive Fence Protected Farms?
Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor
2011Aversive Learning and Experienced Prototypicality Shifts: How Stereotypes Develop and Change
Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor
2011Social Behaviour & Cognition of Birds
Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
2010An Investigation into the Acquisition, Generalisation, Facilitation and Immunisation of Intergroup Anxiety
Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor
2007Developing a technique for studying social learning in Indian mynahs: a comparison between responses to model and video stimuli
Psychology, University of Newcastle
Sole Supervisor
2007Social learning of trap avoidance in Indian mynahs (Acridotheres tristis)
Biol Sc Not Elsewhere Classifd, University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2007Developing a technique for studying social learning in Indian mynahs: a comparison between responses to model and video stimuli
Psychology, University of Newcastle
Sole Supervisor
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Dr Andrea Griffin

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Focus area

Psychology

Contact Details

Emailandrea.griffin@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 4348 4393
Fax(02) 4921 6980

Office

RoomSO.153 (Ourimbah)
BuildingScience Offices
LocationOurimbah
10 Chittaway Road
Ourimbah, NSW 2258
Australia
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