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Mr Simon Clulow

Conjoint Fellow

School of Environmental and Life Sciences (Biological Sciences)

Career Summary

Biography

I am a biologist working in a variety of research fields including ecology, conservation, evolution and reproduction in terrestrial vertebrates.  I am passionate about amphibians and these often form the core models for my research, which has led me to work in the Amphibian Research Laboratory at the University of Newcastle.

Many of my research projects involve long-term field work collecting significant data sets to explain ecological and evolutionary processes over time. The conservation of Australia’s unique fauna is also a major driver for my work. This has seen a multi-million dollar research program established to investigate and reverse the decline of the green and golden bell frog.

A major component of my research career has been the investigation of the impact of invasive cane toads on terrestrial ecosystems in the Kimberley wilderness of northern Western Australia, where I have been gathering data on the fauna of the east Kimberley, before the onset of toads. This work has led to numerous high-impact publications on the impacts of toads on Australian ecosystems, and ways in which to mitigate this impact.

My interest in reproductive biology along with my passion for conservation has led me to become a major advocate for biotechnological approaches to conservation and stopping species extinctions, such as gene banking and assisted reproductive technologies. This work has also resulted in a cutting-edge collaborative project on de-extinction that saw the revival of live embryos of an extinct frog species through cloning – which was named in TIME magazine’s top 25 inventions of 2013.

Due to my expertise and experience with frogs, I have been invited as a specialist expert scientist to participate in numerous workshops to inform and direct policy and management of Australia’s frog fauna, and have been invited to participate in Australian Geographic scientific expeditions as the lead amphibian biologist in 2011, 2012 & 2013.

Research Expertise
My research is diverse and interdisciplinary, focused in the fields of ecology, evolutionary biology, conservation biology and reproductive biology (specifically Assisted Reproductive Technologies and Gene Banking) within terrestrial vertebrates. I choose often to focus upon amphibians as my core model, although I also work on reptiles, mammals and birds. These research fields and techniques often integrate, with many of my projects incorporating both field and laboratory elements. My work in the fields of ecology, conservation, and evolutionary biology has often involved large-scale and/or long-term field projects that have collected significant long-term data sets to explain ecological and evolutionary processes over time. This has also involved gathering a large amount of data on species that are in remote/difficult areas and have been little studied. A good example of this is a current project investigating the impact of invasive cane toads on terrestrial ecosystems in the remote Kimberley wilderness of the Western Australia tropics, gathering long-term baseline data on the fauna of the east Kimberley before the onset of toads. Many of the projects that I have established in these fields as chief investigator have involved establishing good working relationships with external collaborators, some of which are at the top of their fields (e.g. Professor H. Carl Gerhardt - looking at the evolution of complex acoustic signalling in frogs; Professor Mike Archer – De-extinction and ART in Australian frogs; Dr Sean Doody – impact of invasive cane toads on Kimberley fauna). My interest in reproductive biology along with my passion for conservation has led me to become a major advocate for biotechnological approaches to conservation and stopping species extinctions, such as gene banking and assisted reproductive technologies. This work has also resulted in a cutting-edge collaborative project on de-extinction that saw the revival of live embryos of an extinct frog species through cloning – which was named in TIME magazine’s top 25 inventions of 2013. Despite being in the early stages of my research career, I have made many significant contributions in my field to date. I have published in major international journals such as Biological Invasions, Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, Journal of Zoology and PLoS One. In my publications I have attempted to push new ground and have reported numerous novel findings e.g. investigating the drivers facilitating shifts between multiple spatio-temporal strategies in a single species (eastern grass owl) across its range. My work on de-extinction, which involved a collaborative project that saw the revival of live embryos of an extinct frog species through cloning, was named in TIME magazine’s top 25 inventions of 2013 – the only Australian invention to make the list. Current research projects include (some collaborative): - Impact of invasive cane toads in the Kimberley ranges, Western Australia - The development of cloning, Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) and gene banking for Australian frogs and reptiles - De-extinction of vertebrate fauna - Strategies for improving reproductive success in unpredictable environments using a model frog - Evolution of complex acoustic signalling in frogs - Social behaviour and complex nesting in the yellow-spotted monitor - Impact of introduced trout on threatened stream frogs in the NSW highlands - Investigations into the decline of the green and golden bell frog in NSW.

Teaching Expertise
Teaching duties have included the preparation and delivery of lectures, tutorials, running practical classes such as laboratories and field trips, and course coordination roles. Lecturing duties have included preparing and delivering a series of 6 lectures on invasive species biology for a 3rd year biology course. I have also been the head tutor and had program convenor (course co-ordinator) responsibilities for a 1st year biology course (Organisms to Ecosystems) and a 2nd year course (Science in Practice), which is a compulsory course for all B. Sc. Students (approximately 165 students per year). Courses taught include BIOL1002 Organisms to Ecosystems; BIOL1003 Professional Skills for Biological Sciences 1; EMGT2050 Australian Fauna; BIOL2002 Laboratory Skills in Biological Systems; BIOL2070 Ecology; SCIT2000 Science in Practice; BIOL3350 Ecological Research and EMGT3030 Conservation Biology. 

Collaborations
I have been fortunate enough to collaborate with several researchers at the top of their game which have led to ground breaking research outcomes including: Professor H. Carl Gerhardt - Looking at the evolution of complex acoustic signalling in frogs Professor Mike Archer – De-extinction and ART in Australian frogs Dr Sean Doody & Dr Colin McHenry – Impact of invasive cane toads on Kimberley fauna.


Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Teaching, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Conservation
  • Ecology
  • Evolution
  • Herpetology
  • Reproduction

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity 30
060208 Terrestrial Ecology 40
060399 Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Doody JS, James H, Colyvas K, Mchenry CR, Clulow S, 'Deep nesting in a lizard, déjà vu devil's corkscrews: First helical reptile burrow and deepest vertebrate nest', Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, (2015)

Dating back to 255 Mya, a diversity of vertebrate species have excavated mysterious, deep helical burrows called Daimonelix (devil's corkscrews). The possible functions of such st... [more]

Dating back to 255 Mya, a diversity of vertebrate species have excavated mysterious, deep helical burrows called Daimonelix (devil's corkscrews). The possible functions of such structures are manifold, but their paucity in extant animals has frustrated their adaptive explanation. We recently discovered the first helical reptile burrows, created by the monitor lizard Varanus panoptes. The plugged burrows terminated in nest chambers that were the deepest known of any vertebrate, and by far the deepest of any reptile (mean = 2.3 m, range = 1.0-3.6 m, N = 52). A significant positive relationship between soil moisture and nest depth persisted at depths > 1 m, suggesting that deep nesting in V. panoptes may be an evolutionary response to egg desiccation during the long (approximately 8 months) dry season incubation period. Alternatively, lizards may avoid shallower nesting because even slight daily temperature fluctuations are detrimental to developing embryos; our data show that this species may have the most stable incubation environment of any reptile and possibly any ectotherm. Soil-filled burrows do not support the hypothesis generated for Daimonelix that the helix would provide more consistent temperature and humidity as a result of limited air circulation in dry palaeoclimates. We suggest that Daimonelix were used mainly for nesting or rearing young, because helical burrows of extant vertebrates are generally associated with a nest. The extraordinary nesting in this lizard reflects a system in which adaptive hypotheses for the function of fossil helical burrows can be readily tested.

DOI 10.1111/bij.12589
2015 Doody JS, Clulow S, Kay G, D'Amore D, Rhind D, Wilson S, et al., 'The Dry Season Shuffle: Gorges Provide Refugia for Animal Communities in Tropical Savannah Ecosystems.', PLoS One, 10 e0131186 (2015)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0131186
2015 Germano JM, Field KJ, Griffiths RA, Clulow S, Foster J, Harding G, Swaisgood RR, 'Mitigation-driven translocations: are we moving wildlife in the right direction?', FRONTIERS IN ECOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, 13 100-105 (2015)
DOI 10.1890/140137
Citations Web of Science - 1
2015 Pizzatto L, Stockwell M, Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony M, 'Finding a place to live: conspecific attraction affects habitat selection in juvenile green and golden bell frogs', Acta Ethologica, (2015)

Conspecific attraction plays an important role in habitat selection of several taxa and can affect and determine distribution patterns of populations. The behaviour is largely stu... [more]

Conspecific attraction plays an important role in habitat selection of several taxa and can affect and determine distribution patterns of populations. The behaviour is largely studied and widespread among birds, but in amphibians, its occurrence seems limited to breeding habitats of adults and gregarious tadpoles. The Australian green and golden bell frogs (Litoria aurea) have suffered considerable shrinking of their original distribution in south-eastern Australia since the 1970s. Currently, with only about 40 populations remaining, the species is considered nationally threatened. In natural conditions, these frogs are aggregated in the landscape and do not seem to occupy all suitable ponds within the occurrence area. To date, studies focusing on the frogs¿ habitat have failed in finding a general habitat feature that explains current or past occupancy. This led us to the hypothesis that social cues may play a key role in habitat selection in this species. Using two choice experiments, we tested the preference of juvenile green and golden bell frogs for habitats containing cues of conspecifics of similar size versus habitats without conspecific cues. Tested frogs did not show a preference for habitats containing only scent from conspecifics but did prefer habitats where conspecifics were present. Our results show that conspecific attraction is a determining factor in juvenile green and golden bell frog habitat selection. To our knowledge, this is the first time the behaviour is shown to occur in juvenile frogs in the habitat selection context. From a conservation management point of view, the behaviour may help to explain the failure of reintroductions to areas where the frogs have been extinct, and the non-occupation of suitable created habitats in areas where they still inhabit and develop appropriated management strategies.

DOI 10.1007/s10211-015-0218-8
Co-authors John Clulow
2014 Doody JS, James H, Ellis R, Gibson N, Raven M, Mahony S, et al., 'Cryptic and Complex Nesting in the Yellow-Spotted Monitor, Varanus panoptes', JOURNAL OF HERPETOLOGY, 48 363-370 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1670/13-006
Citations Web of Science - 1
2014 Pizzatto L, Stockwell M, Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony M, 'Chemical communication in green and golden bell frogs: do tadpoles respond to chemical cues from dead conspecifics?', Chemoecology, (2014) [C1]

Captive bred animals often lack the ability of predator recognition and predation is one of the strongest causes of failure of breed and release projects. Several tadpole and fish... [more]

Captive bred animals often lack the ability of predator recognition and predation is one of the strongest causes of failure of breed and release projects. Several tadpole and fish species respond defensively to chemical cues from injured or dead conspecifics, often referred to as alarm pheromones. In natural conditions and in species that school, the association of chemical cues from predators to alarm pheromones released by attacked conspecifics may lead to the learning of the predator-related danger without experiencing an attack. In the laboratory, this chemical communication can also be used in associative learning techniques to teach naïve tadpoles to avoid specific predators and improve survivorship of released animals. In our experimental trials, tadpoles of the threatened green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea) did not avoid or decrease their activity when exposed to solutions of conspecific macerate, suggesting that the chemicals released into the water by dead/injured conspecifics do not function as an alarm pheromone. This non-avoidance of dead conspecific chemicals may explain why green and golden bell frog tadpoles have seemingly not developed any avoidance behaviour to the presence of introduced mosquito fish, and may render attempts to teach naïve tadpoles to avoid this novel predator more difficult. © 2014 Springer Basel.

DOI 10.1007/s00049-014-0159-0
Co-authors Michelle Stockwell, John Clulow
2014 Doody JS, Mayes P, Clulow S, Rhind D, Green B, Castellano CM, et al., 'Impacts of the invasive cane toad on aquatic reptiles in a highly modified ecosystem: the importance of replicating impact studies', Biological Invasions, 1-7 (2014) [C1]

Invasive species can have dramatic and detrimental effects on native species, and the magnitude of these effects can be mediated by a plethora of factors. One way to identify medi... [more]

Invasive species can have dramatic and detrimental effects on native species, and the magnitude of these effects can be mediated by a plethora of factors. One way to identify mediating factors is by comparing attributes of natural systems in species with heterogeneity of responses to the invasive species. This method first requires quantifying impacts in different habitats, ecosystems or geographic locations. We used a long-term, before-and-after study to quantify the impacts of the invasive and toxic cane toad (Rhinella marina) on two predators in a highly modified ecosystem: an irrigation channel in an agricultural landscape. Survey counts spanning 8¿years indicated a severe population-level decline of 84¿% in Merten's Water Monitor (Varanus mertensi) that was coincident with the arrival of cane toads. The impact of cane toads on V. mertensi was similar to that found in other studies in other habitats, suggesting that cane toads severely impact V. mertensi populations, regardless of habitat type or geographic location. In contrast, a decline was not detected in the Freshwater Crocodile (Crocodylus johnstoni). There is now clear evidence that some C. johnstoni populations are vulnerable to cane toads, while others are not. Our results reinforce the need for the replication of impact studies within and among species; predicting impacts based on single studies could lead to overgeneralizations and potential mismanagement. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

DOI 10.1007/s10530-014-0665-6
2013 Rhind D, Doody JS, Ellis R, Ricketts A, Scott G, Clulow S, McHenry C, 'Varanus glebopalma (black-palmed monitor) nocturnal activity and foraging', Herpetological Review, 44 687-688 (2013) [C3]
2013 Doody JS, James H, Dunlop D, D'Amore D, Edgar M, Fidel M, et al., 'Strophurus ciliaris (northern spiny-tailed gecko) communal nesting', Herpetological Review, 44 685 (2013) [C3]
2013 Mahony MJ, Hamer AJ, Pickett EJ, McKenzie DJ, Stockwell MP, Garnham JI, et al., 'Identifying Conservation and Research Priorities in the Face of Uncertainty: A Review of the Threatened Bell Frog Complex in Eastern Australia.', Herpetological Conservation and Biology, 8 519-538 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Michelle Stockwell, John Clulow
2013 Lawson B, Clulow S, Mahony MJ, Clulow J, 'Towards Gene Banking Amphibian Maternal Germ Lines: Short-Term Incubation, Cryoprotectant Tolerance and Cryopreservation of Embryonic Cells of the Frog, Limnodynastes peronii', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0060760
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Clulow
2012 Clulow J, Clulow S, Guo J, French AJ, Mahony MJ, Archer M, 'Optimisation of an oviposition protocol employing human chorionic and pregnant mare serum gonadotropins in the Barred Frog Mixophyes fasciolatus (Myobatrachidae)', Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, 10 60 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Clulow
2011 Clulow S, Blundell AT, 'Deliberate insectivory by the fruit bat Pteropus poliocephalus by aerial hunting', Acta Chiropterologica, 13 201-205 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.3161/150811011X578750
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2011 Clulow S, Peters KL, Blundell AT, Kavanagh RP, 'Resource predictability and foraging behaviour facilitate shifts between nomadism and residency in the eastern grass owl', Journal of Zoology, 284 294-299 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-7998.2011.00805.x
Citations Scopus - 1
2008 Stockwell MP, Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony MJ, 'The impact of the amphibian Chytrid Fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis on a Green and Golden Bell Frog Litoria aurea reintroduction program at the Hunter Wetlands Centre Australia in the Hunter Region of NSW', Australian Zoologist, 34 379-386 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15
Co-authors Michelle Stockwell, John Clulow
Show 12 more journal articles

Conference (22 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Aitken J, Clulow J, Freeman E, Metcalfe S, Fraser B, Clulow S, Mahony M, 'Biobanking spermatozoa to preserve endangered amphibian species.', 12th International Symposium on Spermatology, Newcastle, Australia (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Brian Fraser, John Aitken, John Clulow
2014 D'Amore D, McHenry C, Doody S, Clulow S, Rhind D, 'Claw morphometrics in Western Australian monitor lizards: Functional morphology and niche separation within a top predator guild.', Society of Vertebrate Paleontology 74th Annual Meeting. Meeting Program and Abstracts, Berlin, Germany (2014) [E3]
2014 Valdez J, Stockwell M, Klop-Toker K, Bainbridge L, Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony M, 'Ensuring successful habitat creation despite ecological experimental design constraints.', 4th International Statistical Ecology Conference. Book of Abstracts, Montpellier, France (2014) [E3]
Co-authors John Clulow, Michelle Stockwell
2013 Magin N, Clulow S, Clulow J, 'Limitations of CASA for the assessment of sperm motility of myobatrachid and hylid sperm stored in an inactivated state', Proceedings of the 37th Meeting of the Australian Society of Herpetologists, Point Wolstoncroft, Australia, Point Wolstoncroft, Australia (2013)
2013 Valdez J, Stockwell M, Klop-Toker K, Bainbridge L, Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony M, 'Created habitat features selected for by the endangered green and golden bell frog', Proceedings of the 37th Meeting of the Australian Society of Herpetologists, Point Wolstoncroft, Australia, Point Wolstoncroft, Australia (2013)
2013 Bainbridge L, Stockwell M, Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony M, 'Considering the effect of disturbance during late habitat succession on green and golden bell frog occupancy', Proceedings of the 37th Meeting of the Australian Society of Herpetologists, Point Wolstoncroft, Australia, Point Wolstoncroft, Australia (2013)
2013 Lawson B, Clulow S, Mahony M, Clulow J, 'Cryoprotectant tolerance and cryopreservation of embryonic cells of the frog, Limnodynastes peronii', Proceedings of the 37th Meeting of the Australian Society of Herpetologists, Point Wolstoncroft, Australia, Point Wolstoncroft, Australia (2013)
2013 Klop-Toker K, Stockwell M, Valdez J, Bainbridge L, Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony M, 'Soft-release at a larger body size improves apparent survivorship of green and golden bell frogs (Litoria aurea) in a breed and release program', Proceedings of the 37th Meeting of the Australian Society of Herpetologists, Point Wolstoncroft, Australia, Point Wolstoncroft, Australia (2013)
2013 Klop-Toker K, Stockwell M, Valdez J, Bainbridge L, Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony M, 'A pathogen's impact on the reintroduction of a threatened frog species', EcoTas 13 Handbook, Auckland (2013) [E3]
Co-authors John Clulow, Michelle Stockwell
2013 Valdez J, Stockwell M, Klop-Toker K, Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony M, 'Comparison of habitat selection by an endangered amphibian in a natural and created landscape', EcoTas 13 Handbook, Auckland, New Zealand (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Michelle Stockwell, John Clulow
2013 Wright D, Stockwell M, Clulow J, Clulow S, Mahony M, 'Modelling landscape level distribution and habitat requirements for the green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea)', The Australian Society of Herpetologists Conference. Point Wolstoncroft, Australia, Point Wolstoncroft, Australia (2013)
2013 Doody JS, Clulow S, Kay G, Wilson S, D'Amore D, Castellano C, et al., 'Mass movements across a landscape reveal that vertebrates use gorges as dry season refugia in a tropical woodland savannah', Proceedings of the 11th International Congress of Ecology, London, United Kingdom, London, Uk (2013) [E3]
2012 Clulow S, Harris MS, Mahony MJ, 'Measuring amphibian immunocompetence: Validation of the Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity (DTH) assay in multiple Australian frogs', 2012 World Congress of Herpetology, Vancouver, CA (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Merrilee Harris
2010 Clulow S, Clulow J, 'Temporal and seasonal use of compensatory nest boxes by vertebrate fauna in the Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia', Australasian Wildlife Management Society: Book of Abstracts, Torquay, Victoria (2010) [E3]
2010 Clulow S, Mahony MJ, 'Understanding phenotypic plasticity in amphibian metamorphosis: could the costs outweigh the benefits?', Australian Society of Herpetologists: Conference Abstracts, Barmera, South Australia (2010) [E3]
2009 Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony MJ, 'Predicting amphibian occurrence and distribution by habitat association: A case study of two threatened stream frogs in south-east Australia', 10th International Congress of Ecology Abstracts, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
Co-authors John Clulow
2009 Clulow S, Peters K, Blundell A, Kavanagh R, 'Selective predator or opportunist? Diet of the Eastern Grass Owl in south-east Australia and its relation to prey availability', 10th International Congress of Ecology Abstracts, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
2009 Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony MJ, 'The relationship between habitat attributes and the occurence and distribution of two threatened stream frogs in south-east Australia (stuttering frog, Mixophyes balbus and glandular frog, Litoria subglandulosa): Implications for conservation and management', Conservation Management of Herpetofauna: Second Meeting of the Australasian Societies for Herpetology, Auckland, NZ (2009) [E3]
Co-authors John Clulow
2008 Clulow S, Mahony MJ, Clulow J, 'Developmental plasticity in an Australian anuran wet forest ephemeral specialist: The Sandpaper frog, Lechriodus fletcheri', 6th World Congress of Herpetology CD-ROM, Manaus, Brazil (2008) [E3]
Co-authors John Clulow
2008 Clulow S, Peters KL, Blundell AT, Kavanagh R, 'Diet of a permanently resident (non-nomadic) population of the Eastern Grass Owl Tyto longimembris on the mid-north coast of New South Wales and its relation to seasonality and prey availability', Australasian Raptor Association National Conference Programme, Coffs Harbour, NSW (2008) [E3]
2008 Blundell AT, Clulow S, Peters KL, Kavanagh R, 'Distribution, habitat usage and observed behaviour of a southern resident population of the Eastern Grass Owl Tyto longimembris near Newcastle, New South Wales', Australasian Raptor Association National Conference Programme, Coffs Harbour, NSW (2008) [E3]
2007 Clulow S, Mahony MJ, Clulow J, 'The evolution of developmental plasticity in an amphibian ephemeral specialist: A density and food recouse independent model of phenotypic plasticity in the Sandpiper Frog, Lechriodus fletcheri', ASH 2007 Program and Abstracts, Albany, W.A. (2007) [E3]
Co-authors John Clulow
Show 19 more conferences

Other (17 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Wright D, Stockwell M, Clulow J, Mahony M, Clulow S, 'Modelling landscape level distribution and habitat restoration requirements for the green and golden Bell frog (Litoria aurea) in south-eastern Australia.', ( pp.32-33): Society of Ecological Restoration Australasia (2014) [O1]
2014 James M, Stockwell M, Clulow J, Clulow S, Mahony M, 'Investigating behaviour for conservation goals: Conspecific call playback can be used to alter amphibian distribution within ponds.', ( pp.34-34): Society of Ecological Restoration Australasia (2014) [O1]
2014 James M, Stockwell M, Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony M, 'The role of conspecific call attraction in the local distribution of the green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea)', ( pp.19): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 James M, Clulow J, Pizzatto do Prado L, Stockwell M, Clulow S, Mahony M, 'Conspecific avoidance in the endangered green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea): Do juveniles avoid chorusing males?', ( pp.31-31): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 Sanders M, Clulow S, Bower D, Clulow J, Mahony J, 'Predator presence and vegetation density affect capture rates and detectability of aquatic vertebrates: wide-ranging implications for a common survey technique.', ( pp.47-47): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 Doody S, Clulow S, McHenry C, 'Project Kimberley: Toad impacts, mitigation and education.', ( pp.21-21): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 Campbell L, Bower D, Stockwell M, Clulow S, Mahony M, 'Exposure of the green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea) to Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis does not affect immunocompetence or locomotor performance independent of infection.', ( pp.16-16): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 Green J, Doody S, McHenry C, Clulow S, 'A cause for concern: high levels of ecological overlap between the invasive cane toad and magnificent tree frog provide avenues for potential impact.', ( pp.25-25): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 Callen A, Pizzatto do Prado L, Stockwell M, Clulow J, Clulow S, Mahony M, 'Picking a pond - Do juvenile green and golden bell frogs have a preference for pond type?', ( pp.16-16): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 McHenry C, Clulow S, Doody S, 'Cane toad impact in the East Kimberley ¿ the same old story again?', ( pp.38-38): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 Vladez J, Stockwell M, Klop-Toker K, Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony M, 'A frog in a bog: Trying to find a home for the endangered green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea).', ( pp.51-51): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 Abu-Bakar A, Bower D, Stockwell M, Clulow J, Clulow S, Mahony M, 'Ontogenetic variation in the susceptibility of an endangered frog species (Litoria aurea) to the lethal disease, chytridiomycosis.', ( pp.11-11): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 Klop-Toker K, Stockwell M, Valdez J, Bainbridge L, Clulow S, Clulow J, Mahony M, 'Year-round effect of disease on a reintroduced population of threatened frogs', ( pp.34-34): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 Gould J, Stockwell M, Clulow S, 'Transmission of the amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) on the external leg surfaces of the adult female mosquito.', ( pp.25-25): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 Mahony M, Clulow J, Clulow S, 'Why is extinction still occurring? Proof of concept for the establishment of animal genome banks.', ( pp.37-37): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 James H, Doody S, Clulow S, McHenry C, 'Delving deep into the nesting biology of the yellow-spotted monitor.', ( pp.30-30): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
2014 Clulow S, Doody S, McHenry C, 'On the fence: Biodiversity and the invasive cane toad in the Kimberley.', ( pp.19-19): Australian Society of Herpetologists (2014) [O1]
Show 14 more others
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 7
Total funding $2,482,159

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20122 grants / $14,000

Faculty Visiting Fellowship 2012$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project Team Mr Simon Clulow
Scheme Visiting Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1401122
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Preventing an iconic species from decline: the magnificent tree frog and the toad$4,000

Funding body: Australian Geographic

Funding body Australian Geographic
Project Team Mr Simon Clulow
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1300014
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20111 grants / $1,405,781

Research and monitoring program for BHP Billiton's Litoria Aurea (Green and Golden Bell frog) compensatory habitat program for the period 2010-2015$1,405,781

Funding body: Newcastle Innovation

Funding body Newcastle Innovation
Project Team Professor Michael Mahony, Doctor John Clulow, Ms Michelle Stockwell, Mr Simon Clulow
Scheme Administered Research
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000939
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20103 grants / $1,032,678

Landscape and population dynamics of Kooragang and Ash Island bell frogs$759,877

Funding body: Port Waratah Coal Services Limited

Funding body Port Waratah Coal Services Limited
Project Team Professor Michael Mahony, Doctor John Clulow, Ms Michelle Stockwell, Mr Simon Clulow
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000779
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Establishing a captive breeding and translocation program for the reintroduction of the endangered Green and Golden Bell Frog into trial habitat areas on Kooragang and Ash Island$262,811

Funding body: Newcastle Innovation

Funding body Newcastle Innovation
Project Team Mr Simon Clulow, Ms Michelle Stockwell, Doctor John Clulow, Professor Michael Mahony
Scheme Administered Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000440
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Continuation of established transect monitoring for the study of trout impacts on endangered frog demographics in the Styx river catchment - Year 4$9,990

Funding body: NSW Trade & Investment

Funding body NSW Trade & Investment
Project Team Professor Michael Mahony, Mr Simon Clulow, Doctor John Clulow
Scheme Recreational Fishing Trust
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000370
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20091 grants / $29,700

Surveys for the endangered Booroolong Frog in the Central West Catchment of NSW$29,700

Funding body: Newcastle Innovation

Funding body Newcastle Innovation
Project Team Mr Simon Clulow
Scheme Administered Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G1000412
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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News

Ecologist Simon Clulow with Goanna

Kimberley extinction prevention plan

January 21, 2014

Gene bank insures Kimberley wildlife against cane toad threat

Michael Mahony, Simon Clulow and John Clulow

Gastric Brooding Frog

November 22, 2013

University of Newcastle researchers are responsible for one of the world's most significant inventions of 2013, according to TIME Magazine's 25 Best Inventions of the year 2013, just released.

Mr Simon Clulow

Positions

Conjoint Fellow
Amphibian Research Group
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Casual Academic
Amphibian Research Group
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Focus area

Biological Sciences

Contact Details

Email simon.clulow@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5811

Office

Room BLG10
Building Biology Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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