Profile Image

Associate Professor Martin Veysey

Associate Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

I completed my undergraduate training at the UMDS, Guys and St Thomas’ Hospitals, University of London in 1991 and my Internship at Guys and Lewisham Hospitals during the following 12 months. I then moved to South Wales where I spent the next two years as a basic trainee at the Princess of Wales Hospital, Bridgend.

In mid 1994, I gained membership to the Royal College of Physicians of London. Later that year, I took up a research position at Guys Hospital and completed my MD thesis entitled, “The role of intestinal transit in the pathogenesis of octreotide-induced gallstones”, awarded by the University of London in January 2001. I commenced Advanced Training in Gastroenterology and General Internal Medicine in the South East Thames Rotation in 1997. After two years at Greenwich District Hospital, I spent the next 18 months at Kings College Hospital working as the Registrar to the Liver Unit. I spent the next 12 months in Australia as a Medical Registrar at Gosford Hospital, before completing my training at St Thomas Hospital, London, in 2002.

I migrated to Australia in 2003 with my family, upon obtaining my current position, and have lived and worked on the Central Coast since that time. I have significant experience in the management of the full range of gastroenterological, liver and general medical conditions. My clinical and research interests include medical education, molecular nutrition, colorectal cancer and luminal gastrointestinal disease. I am Director of the Teaching & Research Unit at Gosford Hospital and Clinical Dean of the Central Coast Clinical School of the Joint Medical Program, coordinating the clinical placements of 80 year 4 and 5 medical students.

Research Expertise
Having completed a MD research program in the UK between 1994 and 1997 and developed an international reputation as a bile acid researcher, I came to the University in 2003 after five years of clinical training with no active research activity. Since that time, I have assisted in the development of a completely novel research program with my colleagues in the Nutrition, Food and Health Research Group at the Ourimbah Campus investigating the role of B vitamins in degenerative illnesses, specifically vascular disease and cancer. I have co-supervised, and currently have, a number of PhD students working with me. More recently, I have negotiated with a number of industry partners to put together and lead a multidisciplinary team across three universities to investigate the health impacts of retirement village living, using B vitamin metabolism and vascular health as clinical markers. This work was supported by the ARC and is currently being evaluated.

Teaching Expertise
I have extensive experience in both undergraduate and postgraduate education. Through my role as Associate Professor at the University I have a significant tertiary teaching load and administrative responsibility. I am the Year Chair for years 1 and 2 of the Joint Medicial Program. I am also Course Coordinator for two first year courses (MEDI1011 Introduction to professional practice and MEDI1014 Professional Practice 1). Through my role as the Clinical Dean of the Central Coast Clinical School, I coordinate and teach Medicine to 80 Year 4 and 5 students at Gosford. I am involved in the JMP committee, assessment and admissions sub-committees and I am active member of the Medical Education Unit. I have also been involved in AMC and FRACP training. I have organised the FRACP Adult Medicine examination at Gosford, initially as a Regional Examiner, and in the last seven years as a Member of National and Senior Examining Panels. Since 2003, I have been an active member of the Central Coast Health Service General Clinical Training Committee monitoring and supporting the education of PGY1 and 2 doctors. Through the roles outlined above, I have developed a clear knowledge and understanding of modern educational principles including adult learning, problem based and self directed learning, e-learning and the delivery of educational courses over a wide footprint. I have completed a Graduate Certificate in the Practice of Tertiary Teaching with the University of Newcastle and a Master of Clinical Education with Flinders University, South Australia.

Administrative Expertise
Current University Administrative Roles Year 1/2 Chair, JMP (since 2011) Course coordinator MEDI 1011 (since 2011), MEDI 1014 JMP (since 2005) Clinical Dean, Central Coast Clinical School, JMP (since 2008) Current Committee Experience University of Newcastle, Faculty of Health, Executive Committee (since 2004) University of Newcastle, School of Medicine and Public Health, Executive Committee (since 2005) University of Newcastle, School of Medicine and Public Health, JMP Teaching & Learning Committee (since 2003), JMP Assessment Committee (since 2010), JMP Admission Committee (since 2011), JMP Medical Education Unit (since 2011), JMP CDWP (since 2014, Chair Phase 1 JMP-MD) Central Coast Local Health District, Research Advisory Committee (since 2003, Chair 2005-11, since 2014) Central Coast Local Health District, Drugs & Therapeutics Committee (since 2005) Central Coast Local Health District, MDAAC (since 2006) Royal Australasian College of Physicians, OTP Committee (since 2015, Chair) Royal Australasian College of Physicians, College Education Committee (since 2014) Previous Committee Experience Postgraduate Medical Council, NSW, Core Curriculum Implementation Committee (2005-06) Northern Sydney Central Coast Health, Human Research Ethics Committee (2003-08, Deputy Chair 2006-08) Northern Sydney Central Coast Health, Area Research Advisory Committee (2005-08) Central Coast Local Health District, Clinical Council (2005-13) University of Newcastle, School of Medicine and Public Health, Research Advisory Committee (2006-10) University of Newcastle, Research Committee (2013-14) Northern Sydney Central Coast Health, Health Technology Evaluation Committee (2006-10, Co-Chair 2007-10) Royal Australasian College of Physicians, NSW State Committee (2006-12, co-chair 2006-12) Royal Australasian College of Physicians, Adult Medicine OTP Sub-Committee (2008-15, AON Lead Fellow 2009-12, Chair 2012-15 ) Royal Australasian College of Physicians, Adult Medicine Division Education Committee (2012-15) GMCT Gastroenterology Executive Committee (2006-13) Chairman, Gosford Hospital Medical Staff Council (2009-13) Other Relevant Administrative Experience Medical Coordinator for the Rotary Bowelscan Faecal Occult Blood Screening Program (Northern Sydney and Central Coast Regions) (since 2003) Member of the AMC Database for Accreditation Activities (since 2005) Regional Examiner for the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (since 2004) Member of National and Senior Examining Panels for the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (since 2006) Medical Coordinator for the Rotary Bowelscan Faecal Occult Blood Screening Program (Northern Sydney and Central Coast Regions) (since 2003) Chairman, Gosford Hospital Medical Staff Council (2009-13) Member of Supervision Policy Development Working Group for Royal Australasian College of Physicians (2013-14) Chair of Selection into Training Policy Development Working Group for the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (since 2014) Chair of Curriculum Advisory Group for Royal Australasian College of Physicians (since 2014)



Qualifications

  • PhD (Medicine), University of London
  • Bachelor of Medicine & Surgery, University of London
  • Diploma of Royal College of Physicians, Royal College of Physicians - London

Keywords

  • B vitamins
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Degenerative disease
  • Gastroenterology
  • Healthy ageing
  • Medical Education
  • Medicine
  • Molecular nutrition
  • Nutritional genetics
  • Supervision

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
060199Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified25
110399Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified25
060499Genetics not elsewhere classified50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2014 - Associate ProfessorUniversity of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/03/2015 - Chair of OTP CommitteeRoyal Australasian College of Physicians
1/11/2014 - Chair of Curriculum Advisory GroupRoyal Australasian College of Physicians
1/01/2014 - Chair of Selection into Training Working GroupRoyal Australasian College of Physicians
1/02/2003 - Clinical AcademicCentral Coast Local Health District
Teaching & Research Unit
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (68 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Lucock M, Yates Z, Martin C, Choi J-H, Beckett E, Boyd L, et al., 'Methylation diet and methyl group genetics in risk for adenomatous polyp occurrence', BBA Clinical, 3 107-112 (2015)

Purpose: The aim of this study is to explore whether a methylation diet influences risk for adenomatous polyps (AP) either independently, or interactively with one-carbon metabolism-dependent gene variants, and whether such a diet modifies blood homocysteine, a biochemical phenotype closely related to the phenomenon of methylation. Methods: 249 subjects were examined using selective fluorescence, PCR and food frequency questionnaire to determine homocysteine, nine methylation-related gene polymorphisms, dietary methionine, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, vitamins B6 and B12. Results: 1). Both dietary methionine and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate intake are significantly associated with plasma homocysteine. 2). Dietary methionine is related to AP risk in 2R3R-TS wildtype subjects, while dietary B12 is similarly related to this phenotype in individuals heterozygous for C1420T-SHMT, A2756G-MS and 844ins68-CBS, and in those recessive for 2R3R-TS. 3). Dietary methionine has a marginal influence on plasma homocysteine level in C1420T-SHMT heterozygotes, while B6 exhibits the same effect on homocysteine in C776G-TCN2 homozygote recessive subjects. Natural 5-methyltetrahydrofolate intake is interesting: Wildtype A1298C-MTHFR, heterozygote C677T-MTHFR, wildtype A2756G-MS and recessive A66G-MSR individuals all show a significant reciprocal association with homocysteine. 4). Stepwise regression of all genotypes to predict risk for AP indicated A2756G-MS and A66G-MSR to be most relevant (p= 0.0176 and 0.0408 respectively). Results were corrected for age and gender. Conclusion: A methylation diet influences methyl group synthesis in the regulation of blood homocysteine level, and is modulated by genetic interactions. Methylation-related nutrients also interact with key genes to modify risk of AP, a precursor of colorectal cancer. Independent of diet, two methylation-related genes (A2756G-MS and A66G-MSR) were directly associated with AP occurrence.

DOI10.1016/j.bbacli.2014.11.005
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2015Siow WH, Hawken G, Russell A, Singh S, Hampe T, Veysey M, 'Education and imaging. Gastrointestinal: multiple inflammatory myoglandular polyps in a single patient.', J Gastroenterol Hepatol, 30 231 (2015)
DOI10.1111/jgh.12822Author URL
2015Choi JH, Yates Z, Martin C, Boyd L, Ng X, Skinner V, et al., 'Genetic Variation in Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II and Interaction with Dietary Natural Vitamin C May Predict Risk for Adenomatous Polyp Occurrence.', Asian Pac J Cancer Prev, 16 4383-4386 (2015)
Author URL
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2015Lucock M, Jones P, Martin C, Beckett E, Yates Z, Furst J, Veysey M, 'Vitamin D: Beyond Metabolism.', J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med, (2015)
DOI10.1177/2156587215580491Author URL
Co-authorsZoe Yates, John Furst, Mark Lucock
2015Duvivier R, Kelly B, Veysey M, 'Selection and study performance', Medical Education, 49 638-639 (2015)
DOI10.1111/medu.12691
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsRobbert Duvivier, Brian Kelly
2014Beckett EL, Yates Z, Veysey M, Duesing K, Lucock M, 'The role of vitamins and minerals in modulating the expression of microRNA.', Nutr Res Rev, 27 94-106 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1017/S0954422414000043Author URL
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2014Beckett EL, Martin C, Duesing K, Jones P, Furst J, Yates Z, et al., 'Vitamin D Receptor Genotype Modulates the Correlation between Vitamin D and Circulating Levels of let-7a/b and Vitamin D Intake in an Elderly Cohort.', J Nutrigenet Nutrigenomics, 7 264-273 (2014)
DOI10.1159/000381676Author URL
Co-authorsJohn Furst, Zoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2014Beckett EL, Yates Z, Veysey M, Duesing K, Lucock M, 'The role of vitamins and minerals in modulating the expression of microRNA', Nutrition Research Reviews, 27 94-106 (2014) [C1]

A growing number of studies in recent years have highlighted the importance of molecular nutrition as a potential determinant of health and disease. In particular, the ability of micronutrients to regulate the final expression of gene products via modulation of transcription and translation is now being recognised. Modulation of microRNA (miRNA) by nutrients is one pathway by which nutrition may mediate gene expression. MiRNA, a class of non-coding RNA, can directly regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. In addition, miRNA are able to indirectly influence gene expression potential at the transcriptional level via modulation of the function of components of the epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation and histone modifications). These mechanisms interact to form a complex, bi-directional regulatory circuit modulating gene expression. Disease-specific miRNA profiles have been identified in multiple disease states, including those with known dietary risk factors. Therefore, the role that nutritional components, in particular, vitamins and minerals, play in the modulation of miRNA profiles, and consequently health and disease, is increasingly being investigated, and as such is a timely subject for review. The recently posited potential for viable exogenous miRNA to enter human blood circulation from food sources adds another interesting dimension to the potential for dietary miRNA to contribute to gene modulation. © 2014 The Authors.

DOI10.1017/S0954422414000043
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2014Beckett EL, Yates Z, Veysey M, Duesing K, Lucock M, 'The role of vitamins and minerals in modulating the expression of microRNA', Nutrition Research Reviews, 27 94-106 (2014)
DOI10.1017/S0954422414000043
Co-authorsMark Lucock, Zoe Yates
2014Beckett EL, Martin C, Yates Z, Veysey M, Duesing K, Lucock M, 'Bitter taste genetics-the relationship to tasting, liking, consumption and health', Food and Function, 5 3040-3054 (2014) [C1]

Bitter is the most complex of human tastes, and is arguably the most important. Aversion to bitter taste is important for detecting toxic compounds in food; however, many beneficial nutrients also taste bitter and these may therefore also be avoided as a consequence of bitter taste. While many polymorphisms in TAS2R genes may result in phenotypic differences that influence the range and sensitivity of bitter compounds detected, the full extent to which individuals differ in their abilities to detect bitter compounds remains unknown. Simple logic suggests that taste phenotypes influence food preferences, intake and consequently health status. However, it is becoming clear that genetics only plays a partial role in predicting preference, intake and health outcomes, and the complex, pleiotropic relationships involved are yet to be fully elucidated. This journal is

DOI10.1039/c4fo00539b
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2014Lucock MD, Martin CE, Yates ZR, Veysey M, 'Diet and Our Genetic Legacy in the Recent Anthropocene: A Darwinian Perspective to Nutritional Health', Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 19 68-83 (2014) [C1]

Nutrient-gene research tends to focus on human disease, although such interactions are often a by-product of our evolutionary heritage. This review explores health in this context, reframing genetic variation/epigenetic phenomena linked to diet in the framework of our recent evolutionary past. This "Darwinian/evolutionary medicine" approach examines how diet helped us evolve among primates and to adapt (or fail to adapt) our metabolome to specific environmental conditions leading to major diseases of civilization. This review presents updated evidence from a diet-gene perspective, portraying discord that exists with respect to health and our overall nutritional, cultural, and activity patterns. While Darwinian theory goes beyond nutritional considerations, a significant component within this concept does relate to nutrition and the mismatch between genes, modern diet, obesogenic lifestyle, and health outcomes. The review argues that nutritional sciences should expand knowledge on the evolutionary connection between food and disease, assimilating it into clinical training with greater prominence. © The Author(s) 2013.

DOI10.1177/2156587213503345
CitationsScopus - 3
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2014Choi J-H, Yates Z, Veysey M, Heo Y-R, Lucock M, 'Contemporary issues surrounding folic acid fortification initiatives', Preventive Nutrition and Food Science, 19 247-260 (2014) [C1]

The impact of folate on health and disease, particularly pregnancy complications and congenital malformations, has been extensively studied. Mandatory folic acid fortification therefore has been implemented in multiple countries, resulting in a reduction in the occurrence of neural tube defects. However, emerging evidence suggests increased folate intake may also be associated with unexpected adverse effects. This literature review focuses on contemporary issues of concern, and possible underlying mechanisms as well as giving consideration the future direction of mandatory folic acid fortification. Folate fortification has been associated with the presence of unmetabolized folic acid (PteGlu) in blood, masking of vitamin B12 deficiency, increased dosage for anti-cancer medication, photo-catalysis of PteGlu leading to potential genotoxicity, and a role in the pathoaetiology of colorectal cancer. Increased folate intake has also been associated with twin birth and insulin resistance in offspring, and altered epigenetic mechanisms of inheritance. Although limited data exists to elucidate potential mechanisms underlying these issues, elevated blood folate level due to the excess use of PteGlu without consideration of an individual's specific phenotypic traits (e.g. genetic background and undiagnosed disease) may be relevant. Additionally, the accumulation of unmetabolized PteGlu may lead to inhibition of dihydrofolate reductase and other enzymes. Concerns notwithstanding, folic acid fortification has achieved enormous advances in public health. It therefore seems prudent to target and carefully monitor high risk groups, and to conduct well focused further research to better understand and to minimize any risk of mandatory folic acid fortification.

DOI10.3746/pnf.2014.19.4.247
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2014Lucock M, Yates Z, Martin C, Choi JH, Boyd L, Tang S, et al., 'Vitamin D, folate, and potential early lifecycle environmental origin of significant adult phenotypes.', Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health, 2014 69-91 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1093/emph/eou013
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock, Paul Roach, John Furst
2014Beckett EL, Martin C, Yates Z, Veysey M, Duesing K, Lucock M, 'Bitter taste genetics--the relationship to tasting, liking, consumption and health.', Food Funct, 5 3040-3054 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c4fo00539bAuthor URL
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2014Martin CE, Veysey M, Yates Z, Lucock MD, 'Vitamin D: Genetics, Environment & Health', Food and Nutritional Disorders, 3 1-19 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.4172/2324-9323.1000155
Co-authorsMark Lucock, Zoe Yates
2013Lucock MD, Martin C, Boyd L, Naumovski N, Roach P, Yates Z, Veysey M, 'Response to 'calcium, phosphate and the risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality in a population with stable coronary heart disease'', HEART, 99 349-350 (2013) [C3]
DOI10.1136/heartjnl-2012-302480Author URL
Co-authorsPaul Roach, Zoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2013Lucock M, Yates Z, Boyd L, Naylor C, Choi J, Ng X, et al., 'Vitamin C-related nutrient-nutrient and nutrient-gene interactions that modify folate status', European Journal of Nutrition, 52 569-582 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s00394-012-0359-8Author URL
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock, Paul Roach
2013Lucock M, Yates Z, Martin C, Choi J, Boyd L, Tang S, et al., 'Hydrogen sulphide-related thiol metabolism and nutrigenetics in relation to hypertension in an elderly population', Genes & Nutrition, 8 221-229 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s12263-012-0317-3Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsPaul Roach, Zoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2011Lucock MD, Ng X, Boyd L, Skinner VM, Wai R, Tang S, et al., 'TAS2R38 bitter taste genetics, dietary vitamin C, and both natural and synthetic dietary folic acid predict folate status, a key micronutrient in the pathoaetiology of adenomatous polyps', Food & Function, 2 457-465 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c1fo10054h
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsPaul Roach, Zoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2010Jootun NR, Cheah HP, Fernando SC, Munro WS, Veysey M, 'Heterotopic pancreas causing intussusception in a child', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 192 542-542 (2010) [C3]
Author URL
2010Naumovski N, Veysey M, Ng X, Boyd L, Dufficy L, Blades BL, et al., 'The folic acid endophenotype and depression in an elderly population', Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging, 14 829-833 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s12603-010-0135-5
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsMaureen Townley-Jones, Paul Roach, Zoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2009Ng X, Boyd L, Dufficy L, Naumovski N, Blades BL, Travers C, et al., 'Folate nutritional genetics and risk for hypertension in an elderly population sample', Journal of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics, 2 1-8 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1159/000160079
CitationsScopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Maureen Townley-Jones, Mark Lucock, Paul Roach
2009Blacklaws H, Veysey H, Skinner VM, Reid RS, Hawken G, Veysey M, 'Interferon treatment for chronic hepatitis C: A family impact study', Gastroenterology Nursing, 32 377-383 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1097/SGA.0b013e3181c10759
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 4
2008Ng X, Lucock M, Veysey M, 'Physicochemical effect of pH and antioxidants on mono- and triglutamate forms of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, and evaluation of vitamin stability in human gastric juice: Implications for folate bioavailability (vol 106, pg 200, 2008)', FOOD CHEMISTRY, 110 1000-1000 (2008) [C3]
DOI10.1016/j.foodchem.2008.04.001Author URL
Co-authorsMark Lucock
2008Ng X, Lucock MD, Veysey MJ, 'Physicochemical effect of pH and antioxidants on mono- and triglutamate forms of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, and evaluation of vitamin stability in human gastric juice: Implications for folate bioavailability', Food Chemistry, 106 200-210 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.foodchem.2007.05.057
CitationsScopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authorsMark Lucock
2007Lucock MD, Yates ZR, Ng X, Veysey MJ, Blades BL, Travers C, et al., 'Preliminary evidence for genetic selection of 677T-MTHFR by natural annual cycle of folate abundance', Journal of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics, 1 24-29 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1159/000109872
CitationsScopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock, Paul Roach
2006Dufficy L, Naumovski N, Ng X, Blades BL, Yates ZR, Travers C, et al., 'G80A reduced folate carrier SNP influences the absorption and cellular translocation of dietary folate and its association with blood pressure in an elderly population', Life Sciences, 79 957-966 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.lfs.2006.05.009
CitationsScopus - 19Web of Science - 19
Co-authorsPaul Roach, Mark Lucock, Zoe Yates
2006Veysey M, King K, Walsh P, Vigenser B, Leijten W, 'What happens to older and younger people with a national bowel cancer screening program?', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY, 21 A285-A285 (2006)
Author URL
2006Veysey M, Blacklaws H, Decker E, Chaussivert I, Mackender D, 'Nurse-led liver clinics: do they work?', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY, 21 A319-A319 (2006)
Author URL
2005Lucock MD, Ng X, Veysey MJ, Yates ZR, 'Folic acid: An essential nutrient with added health benefits', Biologist, 52 21-27 (2005) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 2
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2005Thomas LA, Veysey MJ, Murphy GM, Jones DR, French GL, Wass JA, Dowling RH, 'Octreotide-induced prolongation of colonic transit increases faecal anaerobic bacteria, bile acid metabolising enzymes, and serum deoxycholic acid in patients with acromegaly', Gut, 54 630-635 (2005) [C1]
DOI10.1136/gut.2003.028431
CitationsScopus - 19Web of Science - 19
2005Lipski PS, Veysey M, 'A prospective audit of major adverse drug reactions causing acute hospital admission of elderly patients', AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL ON AGEING, 24 A44-A44 (2005)
Author URL
2001Veysey MJ, Thomas LA, Mallet A, Jenkins P, Besser P, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'Colonic transit influences deoxycholic acid kinetics', Gastroenterology, (2001) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 20Web of Science - 18
2001Thomas LA, Veysey MJ, French G, Hylemon P, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'Bile acid metabolism by fresh human colonic contents: a comparison of caecal versus faecal samples', GUT, (2001) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 39Web of Science - 42
2001Veysey MJ, Malcolm P, Mallet A, Jenkins P, Besser P, Wass JA, et al., 'The effects of cisapride on gallbladder emptying, intestinal transit and serum deoxycholate: a prospective randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trial.', Gut, (2001) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 13Web of Science - 11
2001Thomas LA, Veysey MJ, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'Influence of pH on the phase distribution of nascent deoxycholic acid in fresh human caecal aspirates', Am J Physiol, (2001) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2000Stellini M, Sanderson JD, Jenkins PJ, Fairclough PD, Besser GM, Veysey MJ, et al., 'A novel explanation for the high prevalence of colorectal adenomas and cancers seen in acromegaly.', GASTROENTEROLOGY, 118 A60-A60 (2000)
Author URL
2000Thomas LA, Veysey MJ, Bathgate T, King A, French G, Smeeton NC, et al., 'Mechanism for the transit-induced increase in colonic deoxycholic acid formation in cholesterol cholelithiasis', GASTROENTEROLOGY, 119 806-815 (2000)
DOI10.1053/gast.2000.16495Author URL
CitationsScopus - 64Web of Science - 53
1999Veysey MJ, Thomas LA, Mallet AI, Jenkins PJ, Besser GM, Wass JAH, et al., 'Prolonged large bowel transit increases serum deoxycholic acid: a risk factor for octreotide induced gallstones', GUT, 44 675-681 (1999)
Author URL
CitationsScopus - 46Web of Science - 42
1999Veysey MJ, Kamanyire R, Volans GN, 'Effects of drug overdose in television drama on presentations for self poisoning - Antifreeze poisonings give more insight into copycat behaviour', BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 319 1131-1131 (1999)
Author URL
CitationsScopus - 10Web of Science - 9
1999Veysey MJ, Kamanyire R, Volans GN, Pell J, Murdoch R, Davies SJC, et al., 'Effects of drug overdose in television drama on presentations for self poisoning (multiple letters) [1]', British Medical Journal, 319 1131-1132 (1999)
1998Thomas LA, Bathgate T, Veysey MJ, King A, French GL, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'Increases in luminal pH promote the absorption of deoxycholic acid from the colon of patients with cholesterol gallbladder stones (GBS).', GASTROENTEROLOGY, 114 A545-A545 (1998)
DOI10.1016/S0016-5085(98)82217-8Author URL
1998Thomas LA, Bathgate T, Veysey MJ, Smeeton N, French GL, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'Is cholelithiasis an intestinal disease? Multivariate analyses of five pathogenetic factors.', GASTROENTEROLOGY, 114 A546-A546 (1998)
Author URL
1998Thomas LA, Bathgate T, Veysey MJ, Powrie J, Russell-Jones D, Wass JAH, et al., 'Roles of colonic transit, bacteriology, bile acid metabolizing enzymes and deoxycholic acid in the pathogenesis of gallstones and colorectal cancer in acromegalic patients before and during octreotide treatment.', GASTROENTEROLOGY, 114 A546-A546 (1998)
Author URL
1998Veysey MJ, Mallet A, Jenkins P, Besser GM, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'The effects of octreotide on the kinetics of deoxycholic and cholic acid.', GASTROENTEROLOGY, 114 A548-A548 (1998)
DOI10.1016/S0016-5085(98)82229-4Author URL
1998Veysey MJ, Mallet A, Jenkins P, Besser GM, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'Deoxycholic (DCA) and cholic acid (CA) kinetics in acromegalic patients treated with octreotide (OT)', GUT, 42 A11-A11 (1998)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 2
1998Thomas LA, Bathgate T, Veysey MJ, King A, French GL, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'In studies of deoxycholic acid (DCA) formation and absorption, is it important to obtain caecal, rather than faecal, samples?', GUT, 42 A11-A11 (1998)
Author URL
1997Jenkins PJ, Veysey MJ, Arraton SRD, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, Besser GM, Wass JAH, 'O-055. Acromegalic patients have increased large bowel transit time (LBTT) and serum deoxycholic acid levels (% DCA) after long-term octreotide therapy', Endocrinology and Metabolism, Supplement, 4 30-30 (1997)

Background: Octreotide (OT) therapy causes the formation of gallbladder stones (GBS) in up to 50% of acromegalic patients, due to an increase in the % DCA and the cholesterol saturation of gallbladder bile, together with impairment of meal-stimulated gallbladder emptying. Prolongation of intestinal transit has been proposed as the mechanism for the increase in the % DCA, but our earlier unpaired studies did not show any significant effect of OT on large bowel transit - important since the colon is the site of DCA formation and absorption. Objective: To assess LBTT and biliary DCA before and during long-term (>3 months) OT treatment. Methods: LBTT was measured using radio-opaque marker shapes in 8 acromegalic patients (age range 22-69 yrs; 4 women). As there is an exchange, and ultimately an equilibrium, between bile acids in serum and bile, fasting serum levels of DCA provide an accurate estimate of biliary levels. The % DCA was therefore measured in fasting serum of 6 patients. Results: The mean LBTT increased from 42±SEM 4.3 h before to 55±5.1 h during OT treatment (p<0.0001) and the mean % DCA increased from 15±2.5% to 28±4.7% (p<0.05). There was a significant linear relationship between LBTT and % DCA (r = 0.87; p<0.0005). Conclusions: These results show that long-term OT therapy prolongs LBTT and that this prolongation is associated with an increase in % DCA in serum, and by implication in bile - factors important in the pathogenesis of OT-induced gallstones.

1997Veysey MJ, Gathercole DJ, Mallet A, Jenkins P, Besser GM, Wass JAH, et al., 'Large bowel transit time influences deoxycholic acid input rate and pool size - Risk factors for octreotide-induced gallstones.', GASTROENTEROLOGY, 112 A525-A525 (1997)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 5
1997Veysey MJ, Gathercole DJ, Thomas LA, Jenkins P, Fairclough PD, Besser GM, et al., 'Fasting serum deoxycholic acid concentrations are increased in acromegalic patients with colorectal adenoma or carcinoma.', GASTROENTEROLOGY, 112 A674-A674 (1997)
Author URL
1997Veysey MJ, Gathercole DJ, Thomas LA, Jenkins P, Besser GM, Fairclough PD, et al., 'In acromegalics with colorectal adenomas or carcinomas, serum deoxycholic acid is increased', GUT, 40 TH194-TH194 (1997)
Author URL
1997Veysey MJ, Gathercole DJ, Mallet A, Jenkins P, Besser GM, Wass JAH, et al., 'The pathogenesis of octreotide-induced gallbladder stones - Prolonged large bowel transit increases deoxycholic acid (DCA) input rate and pool size', GUT, 40 F264-F264 (1997)
Author URL
1997Thomas LA, Veysey MJ, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, King A, French GR, 'Bile acid metabolising intestinal bacterial enzyme activity: A novel factor in cholesterol gallstone pathogenesis', GUT, 40 F266-F266 (1997)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
1997Thomas LA, Bathgate T, Veysey MJ, King A, French GL, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'Is cholelithiasis an intestinal disease?', GUT, 41 A2-A2 (1997)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 6
1997Dowling RH, Hussaini SH, Murphy GM, Pereira SP, Thomas LA, Veysey MJ, Wass JAH, 'Role of intestinal transit and DCA', GUT, 41 A31-A32 (1997)
Author URL
1997Thomas LA, Bathgate T, Veysey MJ, King A, French GR, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'Do changes in colonic luminal pH explain the increased proportions of serum and biliary deoxycholic acid seen in patients with cholesterol gallbladder stones (GBS)?', GUT, 41 A32-A33 (1997)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 2
1997Veysey MJ, Mills TD, Reynolds CR, Jenkins P, Besser GM, Dowling RH, '''Colonomegaly'' in acromegaly - A link with colorectal neoplasia?', GUT, 41 A121-A121 (1997)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
1997Veysey MJ, Jenkins P, Besser GM, Wass JAH, Dowling RH, 'The effect of cisapride on large bowel transit time: A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study in four groups of individuals', GUT, 41 A123-A123 (1997)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
1997Thomas LA, Bathgate T, Veysey MJ, King A, French GR, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'In cholesterol gallstone disease, prolongation of large bowel transit time (LBTT) is associated with increases in the number of anaerobes and the activities of the deoxycholate-forming bacterial enzymes, in the right colon', GUT, 41 A241-A242 (1997)
Author URL
1997Thomas LA, Bathgate T, Veysey MJ, King A, French GL, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'Mechanism for increased deoxycholic acid (DCA) formation in acromegalic patients treated with octreotide (OT)', GUT, 41 A250-A251 (1997)
Author URL
1997Veysey MJ, Gathercole DJ, Jenkins P, Besser GM, Fairclough PD, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'Acromegalics with colorectal adenomas or carcinomas have increased serum deoxycholic acid (DCA) levels', GUT, 41 A251-A251 (1997)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
1997Behr ER, Veysey MJ, Berry D, Volans GN, 'Optimum dose of digoxin', LANCET, 349 1845-1845 (1997)
DOI10.1016/S0140-6736(05)61735-7Author URL
1997Zuccala G, Pedone C, Carosella L, Carbonin P, Bernabei R, Behr ER, et al., 'Optimum dose of digoxin (multiple letters) [9]', Lancet, 349 1845-1845 (1997)
CitationsScopus - 1
1997Pereira SP, Veysey MJ, Kennedy C, Hussaini SH, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'Gallstone dissolution with oral bile acid therapy - Importance of pretreatment CT scanning and reasons for nonresponse', DIGESTIVE DISEASES AND SCIENCES, 42 1775-1782 (1997)
DOI10.1023/A:1018834103873Author URL
CitationsScopus - 19Web of Science - 14
1997Dowling RH, Veysey MJ, Pereira SP, Hussaini SH, Thomas LA, Wass JAH, Murphy GM, 'Role of intestinal transit in the pathogenesis of gallbladder stones', CANADIAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY, 11 57-64 (1997)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 32
1997Dowling RH, Veysey MJ, Pereira SP, Hussaini SH, Thomas LA, Wass JAH, Murphy GM, 'Role of intestinal transit in the pathogenesis of gallbladder stones', Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology, 11 57-64 (1997)

Increasing evidence implicates prolonged intestinal transit (slow transit constipation) in the pathogenesis of conventional gallbladder stones (GBS), and that of gallstones induced by long term octreotide (OT) treatment. Both groups of GBS patients have multiple abnormalities in the lipid composition and physical chemistry of their gallbladder bile - associated with, and possibly due to, an increased proportion of deoxycholic acid (DCA) (percentage of total bile acids). In turn, this increase in the percentage of DCA seems to be a consequence of prolonged colonic transit. Thus, in acromegalic patients OT treatment significantly prolongs large bowel transit time (LBTT) and leads to an associated increase of the percentage of DCA in fasting serum (and, by implication, in gallbladder bile). LBTT is linearly related to the percentage of DCA in fasting serum and correlates significantly with DCA input (into the enterohepatic circulation) and DCA pool size. However, these advances effects of OT can be overcome by the concomitant use of the prokinetic drug cisapride, which normalizes LBTT and prevents the rise in the percentage of serum DCA. Therefore, in OT-treated patients and other groups at high risk of developing stones, it may be possible to prevent GBS formation with the use of intestinal prokinetic drugs.

CitationsScopus - 28
1997Jenkins PJ, Crockett L, Veysey MJ, Fairclough PD, Besser GM, 'Increased serum deoxycholic acid levels in acromegalic patients with colorectal neoplasia', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER, 33 767-767 (1997)
Author URL
1996Hussaini SH, Pereira SP, Veysey MJ, Kennedy C, Jenkins P, Murphy GM, et al., 'Roles of gall bladder emptying and intestinal transit in the pathogenesis of octreotide induced gall bladder stones', GUT, 38 775-783 (1996)
DOI10.1136/gut.38.5.775Author URL
CitationsScopus - 50Web of Science - 53
Show 65 more journal articles

Conference (31 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Veysey M, Siow W, Niblett S, King K, Yates Z, Lucock M, 'Hepatic fibrosis in an elderly population', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Katrina King, Mark Lucock
2014Veysey M, Siow W, Niblett S, King K, Yates Z, Lucock M, 'White cell counts and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2013Veysey M, Siow W, Choi J-H, Martin C, Tang S, Yates ZR, Lucock M, 'A Bitter Taste Gene (P49a Variant of Tas2r38) Interacts With A1298c-MTHFR to Modify Risk for Adenomas in an Australian Population', GASTROENTEROLOGY, Orlando, FL (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2013Choi J, Siow W, Yates Z, Lucock M, Veysey M, 'Influence of synthetic folic acid concentration on Caco-2 cell growth', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2013Siow W, Niblett S, King K, Yates Z, Hampe T, Lucock M, Veysey M, 'Prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in an elderly Australian population', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsMark Lucock, Katrina King, Zoe Yates
2013Siow W, Niblett S, King K, Yates Z, Martin C, Lucock M, Veysey M, 'A community-based study of dietary macro and micronutrients and the risk of colorectal cancer in an elderly Australian population', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsMark Lucock, Zoe Yates, Katrina King
2012Kostalas S, Veysey M, 'IF YOU DON'T TAKE A TEMPERATURE YOU CAN'T FIND A FEVER', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL (2012) [E3]
Author URL
2011Choi J-H, Yates ZR, Boyd L, Veysey MJ, Lucock MD, 'Dietary folate vitamers as potential risk factors in the aetiology of adenomatous polyps', Australasian Medical Journal, Queenstown, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2011Yates ZR, Kho J, Choi J-H, Boyd L, Ng X, Skinner V, et al., 'C776G TCNII genotype influences the relationship between blood vitamin B12 and cellular folate', Australasian Medical Journal, Queenstown, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Lucock, Zoe Yates
2011Naylor C, Lucock MD, Veysey MJ, Naumovski N, Boyd L, Dufficy L, et al., 'Folate nutritional genetics and degenerative disorders in the elderly with special reference to hypertension and depression', Australasian Medical Journal, Queenstown, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Roach, Zoe Yates, Mark Lucock
2011Kostalas S, Dowsett J, Gilbert D, Gill R, Panetta J, Singh S, et al., 'Terlipressin is associated hyponatremia', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2011) [E3]
Author URL
2010Chang J, Lucock MD, Wai R, Boyd L, Ng X, Skinner VM, et al., 'Dietary folic acid, red cell folate and the risk of adenomatous polyps in an Australian population', Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Special Issue: Australian Gastroenterology Week 2010, Gold Coast, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Paul Roach, Mark Lucock
2009Veysey MJ, Boyd L, Wai R, Ng X, Skinner V, Tang S, et al., 'Preliminary data to support a relationship between taste genetics, folate status, folate genes and the development of colonic adenomas: A novel nutrigenomic circuit', Gastro 2009 UEGW/WCOG: Scientific Programme & EACCME, London, UK (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Paul Roach, Mark Lucock
2009Boyd L, Lucock MD, Wai R, Ng X, Yates ZR, Skinner V, et al., 'Folate status: A recognised determinant of colorectal neoplasia may be modified by bitter taste perception and genetics', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsZoe Yates, Paul Roach, Mark Lucock
2008Ng X, Boyd L, Dufficy L, Naumovski N, Blades BL, Travers C, et al., 'Folate genes and risk for hypertension in an elderly population sample', 3rd Asia Pacific Nutrigenomics Conference: Conference Program & Information, Melbourne, VIC (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Lucock, Paul Roach, Zoe Yates
2008Blacklaws H, Veysey H, Skinner V, Sheather-Reid R, Hawken G, Veysey M, 'Interferon and ribavirin combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C: a family impact study', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2008) [E3]
Author URL
2008Wai RKH, Boyd L, Ng X, King K, Skinner V, Roach PD, et al., 'Preliminary evidence that bitter taste perception can modify folate status: A recognised risk factor for colorectal neoplasia', Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Brisbane, QLD (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Roach, Mark Lucock, Zoe Yates
2008Boyd L, Wai RKH, Ng X, King K, Skinner V, Roach PD, et al., 'A preliminary study to examine whether common folate polymorphisms are risk factors for the development of adenomatous polyps', Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Brisbane, QLD (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Roach, Mark Lucock, Zoe Yates
2006Roach PD, Dufficy L, Naumovski N, Ng X, Blades BL, Travers C, et al., 'The association of dietary folate with serum and red cell folate is modulated by the G80A reduced folate carrier single nucloetide polymorphism in an elderly population sample', The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Sydney, NSW (2006) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Lucock, Paul Roach
2006Veysey M, King K, Walsh P, Vigenser B, Leijten W, 'Head-to-head comparison of the national bowel cancer screening pilot and rotary bowelscan', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2006)
Author URL
2006Blades BL, Naumovski N, Roach PD, Lucock MD, Travers C, Lewis PR, et al., 'Vitamin B12 is a better inverse correlate for homocysteine than folate in an elderly population sample', Atherosclerosis Supplements, Rome, Italy (2006) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Lucock, Paul Roach
2006Roach PD, Naumovski N, Blades BL, Lucock MD, Travers C, Lewis PR, et al., 'Serum vitamin B12 is inversely related to blood pressure and anxiety in elderly women but not in elderly men', Atherosclerosis Supplements, Rome, Italy (2006) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Roach, Mark Lucock
2006Naumovski N, Blades BL, Lucock MD, Travers C, Lewis PR, Sturm J, Veysey MJ, 'Serum vitamin B12 is inversely related to blood pressure and anxiety in women but not men in an elderly population sample', Heart Foundation Conference and Scientific Meeting, Sydney, NSW, Australia (2006) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Lucock
2006Naumovski N, Roach PD, Blades BL, Lucock MD, Travers C, Lewis PR, et al., 'Homocysteine, vitamin B12 and folate in an elderly population sample', Heart Foundation Conference and Scientific Meeting, Sydney, NSW, Australia (2006) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Roach, Mark Lucock
2006Roach PD, Dufficy L, Naumovski N, Ng X, Blades BL, Travers C, et al., 'The association of blood pressure with dietary folate in elderly females and its modulation by the G80A reduced folate carrier SNP', Program & Abstracts Australian Atherosclerosis Society, Couran Cove Island, Queensland (2006) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Lucock, Paul Roach
2005Roach PD, Naumovski N, Dufficy L, Lucock MD, Blades BL, Lewis (Ext) PR, et al., 'Folate, viamin B12, plasma thiols and cognitive funciton in an elderly population sample', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Melbourne, Victoria (2005) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Roach, Mark Lucock
2005Roach PD, Blades BL, Lucock MD, Naumovski N, Dufficy L, Lewis (Ext) PR, et al., 'Serum Vitamin B12 is Inversely Related to Blood Pressure in Women but not Men in an Elderly Population Sample', Proceedings of Annual Scientific Meeting 2005, Darwin, NT (2005) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Roach, Mark Lucock
2000Dowling RH, Hussaini SH, Veysey MJ, Thomas LA, French GL, Wass JAH, Murphy GM, 'The octreotide model', BILE ACIDS IN HEPATOBILIARY DISEASE, ROYAL INST GREAT BRITAIN, LONDON, ENGLAND (2000)
Author URL
2000Stellini M, Veysey MJ, Thomas LA, Milovic V, Jenkins PJ, Fairclough P, et al., 'Role of bile acids in colonic neoplasia - human studies', BILE ACIDS IN HEPATOBILIARY DISEASE, ROYAL INST GREAT BRITAIN, LONDON, ENGLAND (2000)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
1999Thomas LA, Bathgate T, Veysey MJ, Smeeton N, French GL, Murphy GM, Dowling RH, 'Transit-induced changes in colonic bacteriology, bile acid metabolizing enzymes and luminal pH influence deoxycholic acid metabolism', BILE ACIDS AND CHOLESTASIS, TITISEE, GERMANY (1999)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 2
1997Veysey MJ, Arraton SRD, Mallet A, Jenkins P, Murphy GM, Wass JAH, Dowling RH, 'Does cisapride overcome the effects of octreotide on intestinal transit, thereby reducing the proportion of deoxycholic acid in bile and serum?', BILE ACIDS IN HEPATOBILIARY DISEASES: BASIC RESEARCH AND CLINICAL APPLICATION, FREIBURG, GERMANY (1997)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
Show 28 more conferences
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants13
Total funding$1,133,736

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20152 grants / $241,000

Is retirement village living good for health: Comparing the health of older adults living in retirement villages and the community$161,000

Funding body: Central Coast Local Health District

Funding bodyCentral Coast Local Health District
Project TeamAssociate Professor Martin Veysey, Doctor Katrina King, Doctor Suzanne Niblett
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1401449
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

"Same same but different" - how different institutional settings impact the delivery of a joint medical curriculum$80,000

Funding body: Central Coast Local Health District

Funding bodyCentral Coast Local Health District
Project TeamAssociate Professor Martin Veysey, Doctor Robbert Duvivier, Doctor Caragh Brosnan
SchemeResearch Sponsorship Scholarship
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1500446
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

20141 grants / $25,000

Activating natural protective and healing responses in chronic inflammatory bowel disease$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Simon Keely, Doctor Ellen Marks, Associate Professor Martin Veysey
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1401453
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20131 grants / $65,624

Development of a clinical supervision professional development program for registrars & Career Medical Officers (CMOs) across Hunter & Coast ICTN$65,624

Funding body: HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)

Funding bodyHETI (Health Education and Training Institute)
Project TeamProfessor Brian Jolly, Conjoint Associate Professor Jane Conway, Professor Kichu Nair, Associate Professor Martin Veysey
SchemeNSW ICTN Local Project Fund
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1201154
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

20121 grants / $24,500

Phase I and II detoxification genes; the correlation of epigenetic modifications with nutritional status, lifestyle factors, health and disease$24,500

Funding body: CSIRO - Energy Technology

Funding bodyCSIRO - Energy Technology
Project TeamAssociate Professor Mark Lucock, Associate Professor Martin Veysey, Doctor Zoe Yates, Miss Emma Beckett, Dr Konsta Duesing
SchemePostgraduate Research Scholarship
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200845
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

20101 grants / $36,364

Is retirement village living good for health: Comparing the health of older adults living in retirement villages and the community$36,364

Funding body: Valhalla Village Pty Ltd

Funding bodyValhalla Village Pty Ltd
Project TeamAssociate Professor Martin Veysey, Dr Peter Lewis, Associate Professor Mark Lucock, Doctor Paul Roach, Dr David Kennedy
SchemeLinkage Projects Partner funding
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000936
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

20091 grants / $61,281

The Association between Folate Nutritional Status and Folate Gene Polymorphisms in an Elderly Australian Population$61,281

Funding body: Central Coast Local Health District

Funding bodyCentral Coast Local Health District
Project TeamAssociate Professor Martin Veysey, Doctor Zoe Yates, Associate Professor Mark Lucock, Doctor Paul Roach
SchemeResearch Sponsorship Scholarship
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0190658
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

20084 grants / $660,923

Is retirement village living good for health: Comparing the health of older adults living in retirement villages and the community$390,173

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamAssociate Professor Martin Veysey, Dr Peter Lewis, Associate Professor Mark Lucock, Doctor Paul Roach, Dr David Kennedy
SchemeLinkage Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188386
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Is retirement village living good for health: Comparing the health of older adults living in retirement villages and the community$170,750

Funding body: Central Coast Local Health District

Funding bodyCentral Coast Local Health District
Project TeamAssociate Professor Martin Veysey, Dr Peter Lewis, Associate Professor Mark Lucock, Doctor Paul Roach, Dr David Kennedy
SchemeLinkage Projects Partner funding
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188995
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Is retirement village living good for health: Comparing the health of older adults living in retirement villages and the community$85,000

Funding body: UnitingCare Ageing NSW.ACT

Funding bodyUnitingCare Ageing NSW.ACT
Project TeamAssociate Professor Martin Veysey, Dr Peter Lewis, Associate Professor Mark Lucock, Doctor Paul Roach, Dr David Kennedy
SchemeLinkage Projects Partner funding
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0189230
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Is retirement village living good for health: Comparing the health of older adults living in retirement villages and the community$15,000

Funding body: Urbis Pty Ltd

Funding bodyUrbis Pty Ltd
Project TeamAssociate Professor Martin Veysey, Dr Peter Lewis, Associate Professor Mark Lucock, Doctor Paul Roach, Dr David Kennedy
SchemeLinkage Projects Partner funding
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0189232
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

20051 grants / $9,044

Central Coast Vascular Health in Retirement Village Residents Study, Phase 1$9,044

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamAssociate Professor Martin Veysey, Associate Professor Mark Lucock
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2005
Funding Finish2005
GNoG0184680
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20041 grants / $10,000

B-vitamin nutrigenomics in risk for, and progression of, dementia$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamAssociate Professor Martin Veysey
SchemeNew Staff Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2004
Funding Finish2004
GNoG0183895
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY
Edit

Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014Vitamin D Status of Older People in Relation to Non-Communicable Disease
Medical Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2012The Association of MIRNA Profiles and DNA Methylation with Micronutrient Intake & Status
Food Science & Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor
2010Genotype-Phenotype Relationships Relevant to the Lifecycle with Special Reference to Vitamin Nutrition
Food Science & Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014The Role of Folic Acid Related Nutritional Genetics in Common Chronic Degenerative Disorders
Food Science & Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor
2014In Vitro and In Vivo Approaches to the Examination of Folate-Related Nutritional Genetics in Health and Disease
Food Science & Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor
2009Physico-Chemical Properties and Genetic Factors That Influence the Bioavailability and Metabolism of Folic Acid: Implications in Health and Diseases
Food Science & Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor
Edit

Associate Professor Martin Veysey

Position

Associate Professor
Central Coast Health Teaching and Research
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Emailmartin.veysey@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 4320 3022
Fax(02) 4320 3508

Office

RoomGOS
BuildingGosford Hospital
LocationGosford
Cnr Henry Parry Drive and Margin Street
Gosford, NSW 2250
Australia
Edit