Dr Bryan Paton

Dr Bryan Paton

Associate Lecturer

School of Psychology (Psychology)

Career Summary

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Monash University

Keywords

  • Bayesian Modelling
  • Computational Modelling
  • Consciousness
  • EEG
  • Hardware development
  • Perception
  • Psychophysics
  • Software development
  • fMRI

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
170202 Decision Making 30
170205 Neurocognitive Patterns and Neural Networks 30
170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2014 - 13/12/2015 ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function Postdoctoral Research Fellow

A post-doctoral research fellowship in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function pursuing the development, integration and testing of a new integrated brain stimulation and neuro-imaging system.

Monash University
School of Psychological Sciences
Australia
1/01/2013 - 31/12/2013 Faculty of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences Bridging Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship Monash University
School of Psychological Sciences
Australia
2/04/2012 - 13/12/2015 Facilitiy Fellow

I helped manage and provided expert technical assistance to all aspects of the use and operation of clinical (human) biomedical imaging and related neuroimaging techologies.

Monash University
Monash Biomedical Imaging, Technology Research Platform, Monash University
Australia
1/07/2008 - 8/12/2015 Casual Research Assistant Monash University
Discipline of Philosophy, School of Philosophical, Historical and Internatonl Studies
Australia
2/01/2006 - 23/06/2008 Sessional Academic The University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
2/01/2006 - 23/06/2008 Casual Research Assistant The University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
PSYC4000 Advanced Methodology
The University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/01/2016 - 31/12/2016
PSYC4100 Critical Issues and Controversies in Psychology
Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
Course Co-ordinator 1/01/2016 - 31/12/2016
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Fitzgibbon BM, Kirkovski M, Fornito A, Paton B, Fitzgerald PB, Enticott PG, 'Emotion processing fails to modulate putative mirror neuron response to trained visuomotor associations.', Neuropsychologia, 84 7-13 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.01.033
2015 Palmer CJ, Paton B, Enticott PG, Hohwy J, '¿Subtypes¿ in the Presentation of Autistic Traits in the General Adult Population', Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45 1291-1301 (2015)

© 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York.The present study examined the presentation of autistic traits in a large adult population sample (n¿=¿2,343). Cluster analysis... [more]

© 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York.The present study examined the presentation of autistic traits in a large adult population sample (n¿=¿2,343). Cluster analysis indicated two subgroups with clearly distinguishable trait profiles. One group (n¿=¿1,059) reported greater social difficulties and lower detail orientation, while the second group (n¿=¿1,284) reported lesser social difficulties and greater detail orientation. We also report a three-factor solution for the autism-spectrum quotient, with two, related, social-themed factors (Sociability and Mentalising) and a third non-social factor that varied independently (Detail Orientation). These results indicate that different profiles of autistic characteristics tend to occur in the adult nonclinical population. Research into nonclinical variance in autistic features may benefit by considering social- and detail-related trait domains independently.

DOI 10.1007/s10803-014-2289-1
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Law PCF, Paton BK, Riddiford JA, Gurvich CT, Ngo TT, Miller SM, 'No Relationship Between Binocular Rivalry Rate and Eye-Movement Profiles in Healthy Individuals: A Bayes Factor Analysis', Perception, 44 643-661 (2015)

© 2015, © The Author(s) 2015.Binocular rivalry (BR) is an intriguing phenomenon in which conflicting images are presented, one to each eye, resulting in perceptual alternations ... [more]

© 2015, © The Author(s) 2015.Binocular rivalry (BR) is an intriguing phenomenon in which conflicting images are presented, one to each eye, resulting in perceptual alternations between each image. The rate of BR has been proposed as a potential endophenotype for bipolar disorder because (a) it is well established that this highly heritable psychiatric condition is associated with slower BR rate than in controls, and (b) an individual¿s BR rate is approximately 50% genetically determined. However, eye movements (EMs) could potentially account for the slow BR trait given EM anomalies are observed in psychiatric populations, and there has been report of an association between saccadic rate and BR rate in healthy individuals. Here, we sought to assess the relationship between BR rate and EMs in healthy individuals (N = 40, mean age = 34.4) using separate BR and EM tasks, with the latter measuring saccades during anticipatory, antisaccade, prosaccade, self-paced, free-viewing, and smooth-pursuit tasks. No correlation was found between BR rate and any EM measure for any BR task (p >.01) with substantial evidence favoring this lack of association (BF01 > 3). This finding is in contrast to previous data and has important implications for using BR rate as an endophenotype. If replicated in clinical psychiatric populations, EM interpretations of the slow BR trait can be excluded.

DOI 10.1177/0301006615594267
2015 Palmer CJ, Paton B, Kirkovski M, Enticott PG, Hohwy J, 'Context sensitivity in action decreases along the autism spectrum: A predictive processing perspective', Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282 1-9 (2015)

© 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society.Recent predictive processing accounts of perception and action point towards a key challenge for the nervous system in dynamic... [more]

© 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society.Recent predictive processing accounts of perception and action point towards a key challenge for the nervous system in dynamically optimizing the balance between incoming sensory information and existing expectations regarding the state of the environment. Here, we report differences in the influence of the preceding sensory context on motor function, varying with respect to both clinical and subclinical features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Reach-to-grasp movements were recorded subsequent to an inactive period in which illusory ownership of a prosthetic limb was induced. We analysed the sub-components of reach trajectories derived using a minimum-jerk fitting procedure. Non-clinical adults low in autistic features showed disrupted movement execution following the illusion compared to a control condition. By contrast, individuals higher in autistic features (both those with ASD and non-clinical individuals high in autistic traits) showed reduced sensitivity to the presence of the illusion in their reaching movements while still exhibiting the typical perceptual effects of the illusion. Clinical individuals were distinct from non-clinical individuals scoring high in autistic features, however, in the early stages of movement. These results suggest that the influence of high-level representations of the environment differs between individuals, contributing to clinical and subclinical differences in motor performance that manifest in a contextual manner. As high-level representations of context help to explain fluctuations in sensory input over relatively longer time scales, more circumscribed sensitivity to prior or contextual information in autistic sensory processing could contribute more generally to reduced social comprehension, sensory impairments and a stronger desire for predictability and routine.

DOI 10.1098/rspb.2014.1557
Citations Scopus - 2
2015 Van Doorn G, Paton B, Howell J, Hohwy J, 'Attenuated self-tickle sensation even under trajectory perturbation', Consciousness and Cognition, 36 147-153 (2015)

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.The efference copy account of the tickle effect (i.e., our inability to tickle ourselves) predicts no tickle effect (i.e., an ability to tickle ourselves) whe... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.The efference copy account of the tickle effect (i.e., our inability to tickle ourselves) predicts no tickle effect (i.e., an ability to tickle ourselves) when the trajectory of a tactile stimulus is perturbed relative to the associated movement, and there is evidence in support of this. The active inference account, however, predicts the tickle effect should survive trajectory perturbation. We test these accounts of the tickle effect under the hypothesis that previous findings are due to attentional modulation, and that the tickle effect will be found in a paradigm with no conscious attention directed to the trajectory perturbation. We thus expected to find support for active inference. Our first experiment confirms this hypothesis, while our second seeks to explain previous findings in terms of the modulation of the tickle sensation when there is awareness of, and different degrees of attention to, the spatial tactile and kinesthetic trajectories.

DOI 10.1016/j.concog.2015.06.016
2015 Hohwy J, Paton B, Palmer C, 'Distrusting the present', Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences, (2015)

© 2015 Springer Science+Business Media DordrechtWe use the hierarchical nature of Bayesian perceptual inference to explain a fundamental aspect of the temporality of experience, ... [more]

© 2015 Springer Science+Business Media DordrechtWe use the hierarchical nature of Bayesian perceptual inference to explain a fundamental aspect of the temporality of experience, namely the phenomenology of temporal flow. The explanation says that the sense of temporal flow in conscious perception stems from probabilistic inference that the present cannot be trusted. The account begins by describing hierarchical inference under the notion of prediction error minimization, and exemplifies distrust of the present within bistable visual perception and action initiation. Distrust of the present is then discussed in relation to previous research on temporal phenomenology. Finally, we discuss how there may be individual differences in the experience of temporal flow, in particular along the autism spectrum. The resulting view is that the sense of temporal flow in conscious perception results from an internal, inferential process.

DOI 10.1007/s11097-015-9439-6
2013 Palmer CJ, Paton B, Hohwy J, Enticott PG, 'Movement under uncertainty: The effects of the rubber-hand illusion vary along the nonclinical autism spectrum', Neuropsychologia, 51 1942-1951 (2013)

Recent research has begun to investigate sensory processing in relation to nonclinical variation in traits associated with the autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We propose that exi... [more]

Recent research has begun to investigate sensory processing in relation to nonclinical variation in traits associated with the autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We propose that existing accounts of autistic perception can be augmented by considering a role for individual differences in top-down expectations for the precision of sensory input, related to the processing of state-dependent levels of uncertainty. We therefore examined ASD-like traits in relation to the rubber-hand illusion: an experimental paradigm that typically elicits crossmodal integration of visual, tactile, and proprioceptive information in an unusual illusory context. Individuals with higher ASD-like traits showed reduced effects of the rubber-hand illusion on perceived arm position and reach-to-grasp movements, compared to individuals with lower ASD-like traits. These differences occurred despite both groups reporting the typical subjective experience of the illusion concerning visuotactile integration and ownership for the rubber hand. Together these results suggest that the integration of proprioceptive information with cues for arm position derived from the illusory context differs between individuals partly in relation to traits associated with ASD. We suggest that the observed differences in sensory integration can be best explained in terms of differing expectations regarding the precision of sensory estimates in contexts that suggest uncertainty. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.06.020
Citations Scopus - 9
2013 Paton B, Skewes J, Frith C, Hohwy J, 'Skull-bound perception and precision optimization through culture', Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 36 222 (2013)

Clark acknowledges but resists the indirect mind-world relation inherent in prediction error minimization (PEM). But directness should also be resisted. This creates a puzzle, whi... [more]

Clark acknowledges but resists the indirect mind-world relation inherent in prediction error minimization (PEM). But directness should also be resisted. This creates a puzzle, which calls for reconceptualization of the relation. We suggest that a causal conception captures both aspects. With this conception, aspects of situated cognition, social interaction and culture can be understood as emerging through precision optimization. © 2013 Cambridge University Press.

DOI 10.1017/S0140525X12002191
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Law PCF, Paton BK, Thomson RH, Liu GB, Miller SM, Ngo TT, 'Dichoptic viewing methods for binocular rivalry research: Prospects for large-scale clinical and genetic studies', Twin Research and Human Genetics, 16 1033-1078 (2013)

Binocular rivalry (BR) is an intriguing phenomenon that occurs when two different images are presented, one to each eye, resulting in alternation or rivalry between the percepts. ... [more]

Binocular rivalry (BR) is an intriguing phenomenon that occurs when two different images are presented, one to each eye, resulting in alternation or rivalry between the percepts. The phenomenon has been studied for nearly 200 years, with renewed and intensive investigation over recent decades. The rate of perceptual switching has long been known to vary widely between individuals but to be relatively stable within individuals. A recent twin study demonstrated that individual variation in BR rate is under substantial genetic control, a finding that also represented the first report, using a large study, of genetic contribution for any post-retinal visual processing phenomenon. The twin study had been prompted by earlier work showing BR rate was slow in the heritable psychiatric condition, bipolar disorder (BD). Together, these studies suggested that slow BR may represent an endophenotype for BD, and heralded the advent of modern clinical and genetic studies of rivalry. This new focus has coincided with rapid advances in 3D display technology, but despite such progress, specific development of technology for rivalry research has been lacking. This review therefore compares different display methods for BR research across several factors, including viewing parameters, image quality, equipment cost, compatibility with other investigative methods, subject group, and sample size, with a focus on requirements specific to large-scale clinical and genetic studies. It is intended to be a resource for investigators new to BR research, such as clinicians and geneticists, and to stimulate the development of 3D display technology for advancing interdisciplinary studies of rivalry. © The Authors 2013.

DOI 10.1017/thg.2013.76
Citations Scopus - 2
2013 Palmer CJ, Paton B, Ngo TT, Thomson RH, Hohwy J, Miller SM, 'Individual differences in moral behaviour: A role for response to risk and uncertainty?', Neuroethics, 6 97-103 (2013)

Investigation of neural and cognitive processes underlying individual variation in moral preferences is underway, with notable similarities emerging between moral- and risk-based ... [more]

Investigation of neural and cognitive processes underlying individual variation in moral preferences is underway, with notable similarities emerging between moral- and risk-based decision-making. Here we specifically assessed moral distributive justice preferences and non-moral financial gambling preferences in the same individuals, and report an association between these seemingly disparate forms of decision-making. Moreover, we find this association between distributive justice and risky decision-making exists primarily when the latter is assessed with the Iowa Gambling Task. These findings are consistent with neuroimaging studies of brain function during moral and risky decision-making. This research also constitutes the first replication of a novel experimental measure of distributive justice decision-making, for which individual variation in performance was found. Further examination of decision-making processes across different contexts may lead to an improved understanding of the factors affecting moral behaviour. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

DOI 10.1007/s12152-012-9158-4
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Palmer CJ, Paton B, Barclay L, Hohwy J, 'Equality, Efficiency, and Sufficiency: Responding to Multiple Parameters of Distributive Justice During Charitable Distribution', Review of Philosophy and Psychology, 4 659-674 (2013)

Distributive justice decision making tends to require a trade off between different valued outcomes. The present study tracked computer mouse cursor movements in a forced-choice p... [more]

Distributive justice decision making tends to require a trade off between different valued outcomes. The present study tracked computer mouse cursor movements in a forced-choice paradigm to examine for tension between different parameters of distributive justice during the decision-making process. Participants chose between set meal distributions, to third parties, that maximised either equality (the evenness of the distribution) or efficiency (the total number of meals distributed). Across different formulations of these dilemmas, responding was consistent with the notion that individuals tend to base decisions in part on the magnitude of these parameters. In addition, dilemmas associated with inconsistent responding across the sample tended to elicit the greatest spatial deviation of the cursor, potentially reflecting dilemma difficulty. One interpretation of these results is that individuals value equality and efficiency in such a way that moral dilemmas are resolved by comparing the perceived value of these qualitatively different parameters, consistent with a value pluralistic framework of decision making. A post-hoc analysis indicated that individuals also incorporated sufficiency concerns during distributive justice decision making. The results are discussed in relation to political philosophy. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

DOI 10.1007/s13164-013-0157-0
Citations Scopus - 3
2012 Paton B, Hohwy J, Enticott PG, 'The rubber hand illusion reveals proprioceptive and sensorimotor differences in autism spectrum disorders', Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42 1870-1883 (2012)

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterised by differences in unimodal and multimodal sensory and proprioceptive processing, with complex biases towards local over global proc... [more]

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterised by differences in unimodal and multimodal sensory and proprioceptive processing, with complex biases towards local over global processing. Many of these elements are implicated in versions of the rubber hand illusion (RHI), which were therefore studied in high-functioning individuals with ASD and a typically developing control group. Both groups experienced the illusion. A number of differences were found, related to proprioception and sensorimotor processes. The ASD group showed reduced sensitivity to visuotactile-proprioceptive discrepancy but more accurate proprioception. This group also differed on acceleration in subsequent reach trials. Results are discussed in terms of weak top-down integration and precision-accuracy trade-offs. The RHI appears to be a useful tool for investigating multisensory processing in ASD. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.

DOI 10.1007/s10803-011-1430-7
Citations Scopus - 18
2011 Karayanidis F, Provost AL, Brown SD, Paton BK, Heathcote AJ, 'Switch-specific and general preparation map onto different ERP components in a task-switching paradigm', Psychophysiology, 48 559-568 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-8986.2010.01115.x
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Scott Brown, Andrew Heathcote, Alexander Provost, Frini Karayanidis
2010 Hohwy J, Paton B, 'Explaining away the body: Experiences of supernaturally caused touch and touch on non-hand objects within the rubber hand illusion', PLoS ONE, 5 (2010)

Background: In rubber hand illusions and full body illusions, touch sensations are projected to non-body objects such as rubber hands, dolls or virtual bodies. The robustness, lim... [more]

Background: In rubber hand illusions and full body illusions, touch sensations are projected to non-body objects such as rubber hands, dolls or virtual bodies. The robustness, limits and further perceptual consequences of such illusions are not yet fully explored or understood. A number of experiments are reported that test the limits of a variant of the rubber hand illusion. Methodology/Principal Findings:A variant of the rubber hand illusion is explored, in which the real and foreign hands are aligned in personal space. The presence of the illusion is ascertained with participants' scores and temperature changes of the real arm. This generates a basic illusion of touch projected to a foreign arm. Participants are presented with further, unusual visuotactile stimuli subsequent to onset of the basic illusion. Such further visuotactile stimulation is found to generate very unusual experiences of supernatural touch and touch on a non-hand object. The finding of touch on a nonhand object conflicts with prior findings, and to resolve this conflict a further hypothesis is successfully tested: that without prior onset of the basic illusion this unusual experience does not occur. Conclusions/Significance:A rubber hand illusion is found that can arise when the real and the foreign arm are aligned in personal space. This illusion persists through periods of no tactile stimulation and is strong enough to allow very unusual experiences of touch felt on a cardboard box and experiences of touch produced at a distance, as if by supernatural causation. These findings suggest that one's visual body image is explained away during experience of the illusion and they may be of further importance to understanding the role of experience in delusion formation. The findings of touch on nonhand objects may help reconcile conflicting results in this area of research. In addition, new evidence is provided that relates to the recently discovered psychologically induced temperature changes that occur during the illusion. © 2010 Hohwy, Paton.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0009416
Citations Scopus - 48
2008 McIntyre KC, Paton BK, 'The mastering process and the systems model of creativity', Perfect Beat: The Pacific Journal of Research into Contemporary Music and Popular Culture, 8 64-81 (2008) [C1]
Co-authors Phillip Mcintyre
Show 12 more journal articles

Conference (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Wright MA, Timora JR, Paton B, Budd TW, 'Distinct Developmental Changes in Auditory and Somatosensory N1 ERP Enhancements at Rapid Stimulus Intervals', Frontiers Human Neuroscience (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Bill Budd
2010 Karayanidis F, Provost AL, Jamadar S, Brown SD, Paton BK, Heathcote AJ, 'Identification of ERP components underlying task-switching performance using variation across the RT distribution', Clinical EEG and Neuroscience (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Scott Brown, Frini Karayanidis, Andrew Heathcote, Alexander Provost
2010 Campbell LE, Fulham WR, Hughes M, Provost AL, Hanlon M-C, Karayanidis F, et al., 'Functional magnetic resonance brain imaging study on sensorimotoe gating in schizophrenia and parkinson's disease', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Ulrich Schall, Frini Karayanidis, Linda E Campbell, Mary-Claire Hanlon, Bill Budd, Alexander Provost
2008 Paton BK, 'The use of a new bio-potential measurement system: A critical review', Clinical EEG and Neuroscience (2008) [E3]
2008 Provost AL, Heathcote AJ, Brown SD, Paton BK, Karayanidis F, 'Integrating RT distribution analysis and ERPs associated with task switching', Clinical EEG and Neuroscience (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Frini Karayanidis, Scott Brown, Andrew Heathcote, Alexander Provost
2007 Nakamura T, Michie PT, Budd TW, Walker AK, Paton BK, Hunter M, Hodgson DM, 'Perinatal programming of infection of schizophrenia-like behaviour in rats: Research plan', Early Human Development (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Bill Budd, Pat Michie, Deborah Hodgson, Mick Hunter
2006 Paton BK, Hinwood M, Budd TW, 'The effects of MR scanner noise on auditory thresholds: a psychoacoustic study using SAM white noise, pure tones and complex tones', Clinical EEG and Neuroscience V37, April 2006, Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Psychophysiology (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Bill Budd, Madeleine Hinwood
2006 Hinwood M, Paton BK, Budd TW, 'Acoustic masking by EPI gradient sounds on detection thresholds for amplitude modulation as a function of a modulation rate', Clinical EEG and Neuroscience V37, April 2006, Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Psychophysiology (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Bill Budd, Madeleine Hinwood
2006 McIntyre KC, Paton BK, 'Don Bartley and the Systems model of creativity: Mastering as a domain of knowledge and its relationship to record production', Whose Music? Popularity, Industry and Property (2006) [E2]
Co-authors Phillip Mcintyre
Show 6 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 9
Total funding $387,300

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20152 grants / $173,000

Monash University NHMRC Equipment Grant - MRI compatible EEG system$150,000

Funding for a Brain Products MRI compatible EEG system.

Funding body: Monash University

Funding body Monash University
Project Team

Bryan Paton, Gary Egan, Jeroen Van Boxtel, Nao Tsuchiya

Scheme Monash University Grant Support Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Monash University Psychology Initiative Grant - VPixx Psychophysics LCD monitor$23,000

Funding for a VPixx LCD Psychophysics monitor system.

Funding body: Monash University

Funding body Monash University
Project Team

Bryan Paton, Jeroen Van Boxtel

Scheme Monash University Grant Support Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20142 grants / $130,000

Stimulating brain connections: an atlas of effective connections in the human brain (simultaneous MRI & TMS)$125,000

A fellowship and equipment funds to establish a facility for simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

Funding body: Monash University

Funding body Monash University
Project Team

Bryan Paton, Gary Egan, Alex Fornito, Arthur Lowrey, Jakob Hohwy, Marcello Rosa

Scheme Monash University Interdisciplinary Research Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

The dynamics of deep and superficial cortical layers of visual cortex as measured by high resolution and ultra-high field MRI$5,000

A combined Monash Biomedical Imaging and Monash University School of Psychological Sciences neuroimaging grant investigating the dynamics of deep and superficial cortical layers of visual cortex as measured by high resolution and ultra-high field MRI.

Funding body: Monash University

Funding body Monash University
Project Team

Bryan Paton, Jakob Hohwy, Jeroen Van Boxtel, Gary Egan, Nao Tsuchiya

Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20132 grants / $67,500

Decoding visual awareness: The role of attention and consciousness in visual processing.$60,000

Funding body: Monash University

Funding body Monash University
Project Team

Bryan Paton, Gary Egan, Jakob Hohwy, Nao Tsuchiya

Scheme Faculty of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences Post-doctoral Bridging Fellowship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Attention, Predictability and Conscious Access in the Ventriloquist Effect.$7,500

Funding body: Monash University

Funding body Monash University
Project Team

Bryan Paton, Jakob Hohwy, Gary Egan, Nao Tsuchiya

Scheme Monash Biomedical Imaging & School of Psychology, Monash University Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20121 grants / $7,500

The neuronal basis of the opposing effects of attention and consciousness in afterimage formation.$7,500

Funding body: Monash University

Funding body Monash University
Project Team

Bryan Paton, Jakob Hohwy, Gary Egan, Nao Tsuchiya

Scheme Monash Biomedical Imaging & School of Psychology, Monash University Small Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20091 grants / $7,000

Collier Charitable Fund - ADinstruments PowerLab 26T Psychophysiology System$7,000

Funding body: Collier Charitable Fund

Funding body Collier Charitable Fund
Project Team

Bryan Paton, Jakob Hohwy

Scheme Collier Charitable Fund - Equipment
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20081 grants / $2,300

Collier Charitable Fund - Z800 Dual Pro virtual reality HMD$2,300

Funding body: Collier Charitable Fund

Funding body Collier Charitable Fund
Project Team

Bryan Paton, Jakob Hohwy

Scheme Collier Charitable Fund - Equipment
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.15

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014 PhD Multimodal Analysis of Individual Differences in Cognitive Control
PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Dr Bryan Paton

Position

Associate Lecturer
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Focus area

Psychology

Contact Details

Email bryan.paton@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4985 4120
Fax (02) 4921 6980

Office

Room W235
Building Behavioural Sciences Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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