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Professor Ronald Plotnikoff

Professor & Chair PA & PHE

School of Education (Education)

An active pursuit

Professor Ron Plotnikoff is on a mission to get Australians moving.

Professor Ron Plotnikoff sitting on a starting block at the ocean baths

The University of Newcastle's first Chair in Physical Education and Population Health, and founding director of the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, believes inactivity is one of the greatest health challenges facing our society.

"Research demonstrates that over 50 per cent of our population do not meet recommended physical activity guidelines," he says.

"Australians love their sport but there is a significant disconnect between spectator interest and participation levels.  The nation's health would be vastly different story if Australia's passion for sport translated into more people being active."

The stakes are high. Plotnikoff cites a 2008 report commissioned by a major health insurer which estimated the cost of physical inactivity to the Australian economy was $14 billion a year and found it contributed to approximately 16,000 fatalities annually.

"Inactivity is a major national issue given the benefits of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of a wide range of health conditions and the prevalence of people in our community who are inactive," Plotnikoff says.

An internationally recognised researcher with an extensive background working in public health in his native Canada, Plotnikoff believes the new centre will be the perfect vehicle for promoting better health and quality of life. He says drawing on the expertise in the University across a number of disciplines will add significant value to the centre's research capability.

A joint initiative between the Faculty of Health and Faculty of Education and Arts, the centre's researchers are drawn from the schools of Education, Health Sciences, Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, and Medicine and Public Health.

"My own background encompasses kinesiology, education and physical education, epidemiology and community medicine.  It makes very good sense to establish this centre with a genuine interdisciplinary approach to these complex problems," Plotnikoff says.

"Through designing new research interventions for physical activity and nutrition that are evidence-based, sustainable and cost-effective, we aim to shift the statistical population curve in the right direction."

Professor Ron Plotnikoff researches in collaboration with the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) Cardiovascular Health Program. HMRI is a partnership between the University, the Hunter New England Local Health District and the community.

Visit the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition website

Visit the HMRI website

Professor Ron Plotnikoff in front of a swimmer at the ocean baths

An active pursuit

Professor Ron Plotnikoff is on a mission to get Australians moving.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Professor Ron Plotnikoff is the Founding Chair in Physical Activity and Population Health Education at the University of Newcastle which he commenced in June 2009. In 2010 he also took on the role as the Founding Director of the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition.

Professor Plotnikoff relocated from the University of Alberta, Canada (School of Public Health and Faculty of Physical Education) where he held a nationally-funded Chair in Physical Activity and Population Health and directed the Physical Activity and Population Health Research Laboratory Track record: Professor Plotnikoff is an internationally regarded researcher in population health and physical activity research.

He has over 245 peer-reviewed publications in print/press (153 in the past 5 years); over $8 million as a Chief Investigator and over $40 million as a co-investigator on population health research grants. He has received 5 Salary Research Awards which include a Canadian Institutes for Health Research-funded Applied Public Health Chair Award, an Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research-funded Health Scholar Award and most recently, a 5 year NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship.

Professor Plotnikoff's research focuses on intervention development (social-cognitive theory testing) related to physical activity promotion for the prevention and management of chronic diseases, with a specific focus on Type 2 Diabetes, as well as the promotion of healthy body weight and general health.  This research is conducted across various settings (i.e., schools, clinics, workplaces, community) and target populations.  Most of his research, in both Canada and Australia, involves inter-sectorial partnerships including public health authorities, health and education government sectors (national, provincial, regional), school boards, workplace organisations, and health professional affiliations (e.g., physician groups).

He has been involved in the supervision of over 50 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows.

Research Expertise
In June 2009 I was appointed as Chair in Physical Activity and Population Health Education at the University of Newcastle. I've held 5 major research salary awards over the past 10 years while at the University of Alberta, Canada, including a Canadian Applied Public Health Chair (in Physical Activity and Population Health) funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR); CIHR is equivalent to Australia's NHMRC. I have published 170 refereed papers. I have generated over $8M as Chief Investigator and over $40M as a Co-Investigator in operating grant funding. I have supervised 9 Post-doctoral Fellows and been involved in the supervision of over 50 higher degree students. I have served on several national (Canadian) grant review panels and prior to leaving Canada, I declined an invitation to serve on a National Institutes of Health (US) special panel on knowledge translation research grants related to diabetes prevention.

I have multi-disciplinary training which includes Kinesiology, Education (2 Masters Degrees), Behavioural Epidemiology (PhD) & Community Medicine (Post-doc). My interdisciplinary research and publications over the past 15 years cross the fields of public health, health psychology, health promotion/education, exercise psychology, and behavioural epidemiology. My early career/publications were focused on teacher education. In 1998 I was recruited as the founding faculty for University of Alberta's Centre for Health Promotion Studies (an interdisciplinary centre integrating all 6 of the University's allied health-related faculties). I was also selected to serve on a number of University committees regarding recommendations for interdisciplinary research and teaching, and social science research related to research funding.

Most of my research in both Canada and Australia involves intersectoral partnerships including public health authorities, health and education national/ provincial/ regional government sectors, school boards, workplace organizations, health professional affiliations (e.g. physician groups). For example, I am the co-Director/Chief Investigator for the Healthy Alberta Community project (ongoing since 1994) for chronic disease prevention and obesity reduction in Alberta Communities. This is a government and university-based partnership (with initial funding of $3M) and a World Health Organisation (WHO) Demonstration Project. I have also lead national policy initiatives/documents related to a number of health- related issues (e.g. women and cardiovascular disease, workplace health which required modified Delphi techniques in establishing consensus with academics, NGOs and related sectors).

During my tenure at the University of Alberta, I was the Senior Research Associate with the Alberta Centre for Active Living a government/university partnership mandated to translate research for health and education practitioners in Canada and abroad (http://www.physedandrec.ualberta.ca/activeliving_centre.cfm). For example, I developed and tested a workplace program standard and audit instrument for workplace physical activity which has been adopted by organizations in numerous countries. Further, much of my research includes effectiveness studies; these research platforms assist in the translation of our efficacy studies in 'real-life' settings. Further, I was part of the Founding Faculty (with 5 other international academics) for developing and teaching an annual 4-day national course on Physical Activity and Public Health for Canadian health professionals and researchers.

Teaching Expertise
University of Alberta: 1998 - 2008 Centre for Health Promotion Studies graduate course taught: INTD 501 Foundations of Health Promotion (1998) Faculty of Physical Education graduate/undergraduate course taught: PERLS 582 Physical Activity and Population Health (2007, 2008) PERLS 541 Social Cognitive Approaches to Health Promoting Behaviour (1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006) HEED 321 Health Education - Individual Approaches to Health Education (2000, 2001) Faculty of Medicine graduate course taught: PHS 690 Advanced Methods in Epidemiology (2 x 3 hour sessions) (1999, 2000) University of Ottawa: 1994 1998 Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Teaching (and examining) in the medical undergraduate Community Medicine Program; and Sessional teaching of MSc Epidemiology classes - Details of the above specific courses can be provided upon request. Community Health Research Unit, (CHRU): University of Ottawa/ Ottawa-Carleton Health Department " Scientific Editor, CHRU Perspectives (Quarterly Research Newsletter disseminated nationally) 1996 - 1998. " Consultant on Women Take Charge Heart Health: Ottawa-Carleton Health Dept. 1998 - 1999. " Consultant on School-Aged, Heart Health Summer Program Study: Ottawa-Carleton Health Department, 1996. " Consultant on Adolescent Smoking Project: Ottawa-Carleton Health Dept. 1995 - 1996. " Chair of the Transtheoretical Model (Stages of Change) Think Tank, 1996 - 1998. " Member of Health Indicators Think Tank, 1994 - 1995. The University of Newcastle: 1986 - 1993 Faculty of Education A list of courses developed, taught and supervised in the Department of Educational Studies, Department of Pedagogy, and Division of Physical Education and Health from 1986 - 1993 can be provided upon request. Faculty of Medicine Tutor in Community Medicine; Examiner (orals) in Population Medicine.

Administrative Expertise
Since 2010 I have been the Director of the Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity & Nutrition at the University of Newcastle. I established and directed the Physical Activity and Population Health Research Laboratory at the University of Alberta for over 10 years. I was the core member (with 3 others) in establishing the recent Alberta Institute for Physical Activity and Health.

Collaborations
Prof. Plotnikoff's work over the past decade has focused on four spheres of research (i.e., physical activity/exercise, diabetes/cardiovascular disease, social-cognitive models, and ecological approaches). It is the interrelationship of these four areas that pivotally directs his research program on physical activity behaviour change interventions in the context of ecological frameworks for the prevention and management of diabetes and cardiovascular disease as well as the promotion of healthy body weight and general health of the population.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Medicine), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Education), Eastern Washington University - Cheney - USA
  • Master of Educational Studies, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Education, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Behavioural Epidemiology
  • Behavioural Medicine
  • Education
  • Exercise Psychology
  • Health Education
  • Health Promotion
  • Health Psychology
  • Physical Activity
  • Physical Activity & Population Health
  • Physical Activity & Public Health

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • Russian (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 15
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified 30
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 55

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor & Chair PA & PHE University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/02/2012 -  Fellow NHMRC

NHMRC - Research Fellowships Scheme

University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
1/01/2011 -  Adjunct Professor University of Alberta
Faculty Of Physical Education and Recreation
Canada
1/01/2011 -  Director – Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity & Nutrition University of Newcastle
Faculty of Education & Arts; Faculty of Health
Australia
1/01/2009 -  Professor and Chair in Physical Activity and Population Health Education

School of Education, Faculty of Education & Arts, The University of Newcastle

University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
1/01/2007 -  Adjunct Scholar Canadian Fitness Lifestyle Research Institute, Ottawa
Canada
1/01/2007 - 1/05/2009 Chair in Applied Public Health: Physical Activity & Public Health Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Centre for Health Promotion Studies
1/01/2007 - 1/12/2010 Director - Physical Activity & Population Health Lab University of Alberta
School of Public Health
Canada
1/01/2004 - 1/05/2009 Professor University of Alberta
Faculty of Physical Educ.and Rec. & Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health
Canada
1/07/2001 - 1/06/2003 Associate Professor University of Alberta
Centre for Health Promotion Studies & Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation
Canada
1/07/1998 - 1/06/2001 Assistant Professor University of Alberta
Centre for Health Promotion Studies & Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation
Canada
1/01/1997 - 1/12/1998 Investigator University of Ottawa
Centre for Advances in Health Behaviour Change, Faculty of Medicine
Canada
1/06/1996 - 1/07/1998 Assistant Professor University of Ottawa
Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine
Canada
1/01/1996 - 1/12/1998 Investigator University of Ottawa
Community Health Rsearch Unit, Faculty of Medicine
Canada
1/01/1995 - 1/12/1996 Postdoctoral Fellow University of Ottawa
Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine
Canada
1/01/1993 - 1/12/1993 Tutor University of Newcastle
Population Medicine, Faculty of Medicine
Australia
1/01/1990 - 1/12/1993 Lecturer University of Newcastle
Education and Arts
Australia
1/01/1990 - 1/12/1994 PhD Fellow University of Newcastle
Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine
Australia
1/01/1986 - 1/12/1989 Lecturer University of Newcastle
Education and Arts
Australia
1/01/1982 - 1/12/1986 School Teacher Queensland and New South Wales Education
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Member - Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science
Australia
Member - American Journal of Health Promotion American Journal of Health Promotion
United States

Awards

Recipient

Year Award
2012 Senior Research Fellowship
NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
2007 Chair in Applied Public Health – Physical Activity and Public Health
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
2004 Senior Awards: Health Scholar
Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR)
2002 New Investigator Award
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
2001 Senior Awards:
Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR)

Research Award

Year Award
2007 Canadian Psychiatric Association (CPA) Council of Psychiatric Continuing Education (COPCE) Annual Award
Canadian Psychiatric Association
2007 Killam Professorship
University of Alberta
2004 Martha Cook-Piper Research Award
University of Alberta
2002 Researcher of the Year
University of Alberta
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (289 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Cohen KE, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Barnett LM, Lubans DR, 'Improvements in fundamental movement skill competency mediate the effect of the SCORES intervention on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in children', Journal of Sports Sciences, 33 1908-1918 (2015)

Abstract: Numerous studies have identified a positive association between fundamental movement skill (FMS) competency and physical activity in children; however, the causal pathwa... [more]

Abstract: Numerous studies have identified a positive association between fundamental movement skill (FMS) competency and physical activity in children; however, the causal pathways have not been established. The aim of this study is to determine if changes in FMS competency mediated the effect of the Supporting Children¿s Outcomes using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) intervention on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in children. Eight primary schools (25 classes) and 460 children (aged 8.5¿±¿0.6, 54% girls) were randomised to the SCORES intervention or control group for the 12-month study. The outcomes were accelerometer-determined moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and cardiorespiratory fitness. The hypothesised mediators were actual FMS competency and perceived sport competence. Mediation analyses were conducted using multilevel linear analysis in MPlus. From the original sample, 138 (30.0%) and 370 (80.4%) children provided useable physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness data at post-test assessments. There were significant treatment effects for locomotor skills and overall FMSs. Changes in MVPA were associated with changes in object-control skills, overall FMSs and perceived competence. The overall FMSs had a significant mediating effect on MVPA (AB¿=¿2.09, CI¿=¿0.01¿4.55). Overall FMSs (AB¿=¿1.19, CI¿=¿0.002¿2.79) and locomotor skills (AB¿=¿0.74, CI¿=¿0.01¿1.69) had a significant mediating effect on cardiorespiratory fitness. The results of this study conclude that actual but not perceived movement skill competency mediated the effect of the SCORES intervention on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1017734
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2015 Scott JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, 'Reliability and validity of a single-item physical activity measure for adolescents', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 51 787-793 (2015)

Aims The aim of this study was to examine the test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of an adolescent single-item physical activity measure by comparing it with the exist... [more]

Aims The aim of this study was to examine the test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of an adolescent single-item physical activity measure by comparing it with the existing Oxford Physical Activity Questionnaire (OPAQ) and accelerometer output. Methods Participants were 123 adolescents (14.7 ± 0.5 years) from three secondary schools in New South Wales, Australia. To determine reliability, participants completed both questionnaires on two occasions separated by 2 weeks. To assess validity, participants wore Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers for a 7-day monitoring period and completed both physical activity questionnaires. Bivariate correlations between self-reported moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and accelerometer MVPA min/day were calculated. Results The single-item (intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.64-0.83, P < 0.001) ) and the OPAQ (ICC = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.69-0.86, P < 0.001) were both found to have moderate-to-strong reliability. Correlations between self-reported and objectively measured MVPA were similar for the single-item measure (r = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.24-0.63, P < 0.001) and the OPAQ (r = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.30-0.65, P < 0.001). Conclusions These findings suggest the single-item measure can provide a reliable and valid assessment of youth physical activity.

DOI 10.1111/jpc.12836
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2015 Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'A Test of Social Cognitive Theory to Explain Men's Physical Activity During a Gender-Tailored Weight Loss Program.', Am J Mens Health, (2015)
DOI 10.1177/1557988315600063
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Myles Young
2015 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'Characteristics of men classified at high-risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus using the AUSDRISK screening tool', Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 108 45-54 (2015)

Aims: The primary aim was to describe characteristics of men identified at high-risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using the Australian diabetes risk assessment (AUSDRISK) t... [more]

Aims: The primary aim was to describe characteristics of men identified at high-risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using the Australian diabetes risk assessment (AUSDRISK) tool. Secondary aims were to determine the prevalence of pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome in these men. Methods: Men (n = 209) completed the AUSDRISK tool, with 165 identified as high-risk for T2DM (score = 12, maximum 38). Demographic, anthropometric, physiological and behavioural outcomes were assessed for 101 men. Comparisons (one-way ANOVA) among three AUSDRISK score groups (12-15, 16-19, = 20) were performed (significance level, P < 0.05). Results: Common risk factors (percentages) among high-risk men were waist circumference (>90cm; 93%), age (>44 years; 79%), physical activity level (<150minwk-1; 59%), family history of diabetes (39%) and previously high blood glucose levels (32%). Men with AUSDRISK scores =20 had higher (mean±SD) HbA1C (6.0±0.4% [42±4.4mmol.mol-1], P<0.001), FPG (5.3±0.6mmol.L-1, P=0.001) and waist circumference (113.2±9.8cm, P=0.026) than men with scores of 12-15. Mean FPG for the sample was 5.0±0.6mmol.L-1, whereas mean HbA1C was 5.8±0.5% [40±5.5mmol.mol-1]. Pre-diabetes prevalence was 70% and metabolic syndrome prevalence was 62%. Conclusions: The AUSDRISK tool identified men who were mostly older than 44, and had large waist circumferences and elevated HbA1C. These findings provide evidence supporting the usefulness of the AUSDRISK screening tool for T2DM screening in clinical and research settings.

DOI 10.1016/j.diabres.2015.01.017
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2015 Cohen KE, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Lubans DR, 'Physical activity and skills intervention: SCORES cluster randomized controlled trial', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 47 765-774 (2015)

Purpose: Physical activity (PA) declines dramatically during adolescence, and activity levels are consistently lower among children living in low-income communities. Competency in... [more]

Purpose: Physical activity (PA) declines dramatically during adolescence, and activity levels are consistently lower among children living in low-income communities. Competency in a range of fundamental movement skills (FMS) may serve as a protective factor against the decline in PA typically observed during adolescence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a 12-month multicomponent PA and FMS intervention on children attending primary schools in low-income communities. Methods: The Supporting Children's Outcomes using Rewards, Exercise, and Skills intervention was evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial. The sample included 25 classes from eight primary schools located in low-income communities. Participants were 460 children (54.1% girls) age 8.5 T 0.6 yr. Primary outcomes were objectively measured PA (ActiGraph GT3X and GT3X+ accelerometers), FMS competency (Test of Gross Motor Development 2, six locomotor and six object control skills), and cardiorespiratory fitness (20-m multistage fitness test) assessed at baseline, midprogram (6-months), and at posttest (12 months). Linear mixed models, adjusted for sex, age, body mass index z-score, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, and school class as a random factor, were used to assess the effect of the intervention. Results: At midprogram, there were no significant intervention effects for any of the outcomes. At posttest (study's primary time point), there were intervention effects for daily moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) (adjusted mean difference, 12.7 minIdj1 of MVPA; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.0-20.5), overall FMS competency (4.9 units; 95% CI, -0.04 to 9.8), and cardiorespiratory fitness (5.4 laps; 95% CI, 2.3-8.6). Conclusions: A school-based multicomponent PA and FMS intervention maintained daily MVPA, improved overall FMS competency, and increased cardiorespiratory fitness among children attending primary schools in low-income communities.

DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000452
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2015 Cohen KE, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Barnett LM, Lubans DR, 'Improvements in fundamental movement skill competency mediate the effect of the SCORES intervention on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in children', Journal of Sports Sciences, (2015)

Numerous studies have identified a positive association between fundamental movement skill (FMS) competency and physical activity in children; however, the causal pathways have no... [more]

Numerous studies have identified a positive association between fundamental movement skill (FMS) competency and physical activity in children; however, the causal pathways have not been established. The aim of this study is to determine if changes in FMS competency mediated the effect of the Supporting Children¿s Outcomes using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) intervention on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in children. Eight primary schools (25 classes) and 460 children (aged 8.5¿±¿0.6, 54% girls) were randomised to the SCORES intervention or control group for the 12-month study. The outcomes were accelerometer-determined moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and cardiorespiratory fitness. The hypothesised mediators were actual FMS competency and perceived sport competence. Mediation analyses were conducted using multilevel linear analysis in MPlus. From the original sample, 138 (30.0%) and 370 (80.4%) children provided useable physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness data at post-test assessments. There were significant treatment effects for locomotor skills and overall FMSs. Changes in MVPA were associated with changes in object-control skills, overall FMSs and perceived competence. The overall FMSs had a significant mediating effect on MVPA (AB¿=¿2.09, CI¿=¿0.01¿4.55). Overall FMSs (AB¿=¿1.19, CI¿=¿0.002¿2.79) and locomotor skills (AB¿=¿0.74, CI¿=¿0.01¿1.69) had a significant mediating effect on cardiorespiratory fitness. The results of this study conclude that actual but not perceived movement skill competency mediated the effect of the SCORES intervention on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1017734
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 16 376-392 (2015)

A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity... [more]

A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n=139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n=55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n=60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P<0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P<0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P<0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12268
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Megan Rollo, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Young MD, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Behavioral Mediators of Weight Loss in the SHED-IT Community Randomized Controlled Trial for Overweight and Obese Men', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 49 286-292 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s12160-014-9657-0
Co-authors Myles Young, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2015 Young MD, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Behavioral Mediators of Weight Loss in the SHED-IT Community Randomized Controlled Trial for Overweight and Obese Men', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 49 286-292 (2015)

Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpose: The aim of the current study was to ident... [more]

Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpose: The aim of the current study was to identify behavioral mediators of weight loss in the male-only Self-Help, Exercise, and Diet using Information Technology (SHED-IT) community weight loss study. Methods: A randomized controlled trial with 159 overweight/obese men [mean (SD) age = 47.5 (11.0) years; body mass index = 32.7 (3.5) kg/m2] assessed at baseline, 3¿months (post-test) and 6¿months (follow-up). Results: In an intention-to-treat, multiple-mediator model, the significant intervention effect on weight at 6¿months (-3.70¿kg; p < 0.001) was mediated by increases in physical activity (steps/day) and decreases in takeaway meals (kJ/day) and portion size at 3¿months. The largest mediation effect was for physical activity (-0.6¿kg; 95¿% confidence interval -1.4, -0.1). Overall, the targeted mediators accounted for 47.0¿% of the intervention¿s effect on weight. Conclusion: Step counts, takeaway food consumption, and portion sizes may be key areas to target in future weight loss programs for men (ACTRN12610000699066).

DOI 10.1007/s12160-014-9657-0
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Myles Young
2015 Young MD, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Behavioral Mediators of Weight Loss in the SHED-IT Community Randomized Controlled Trial for Overweight and Obese Men', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 49 286-292 (2015)

Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpose: The aim of the current study was to ident... [more]

Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpose: The aim of the current study was to identify behavioral mediators of weight loss in the male-only Self-Help, Exercise, and Diet using Information Technology (SHED-IT) community weight loss study. Methods: A randomized controlled trial with 159 overweight/obese men [mean (SD) age = 47.5 (11.0) years; body mass index = 32.7 (3.5) kg/m2] assessed at baseline, 3¿months (post-test) and 6¿months (follow-up). Results: In an intention-to-treat, multiple-mediator model, the significant intervention effect on weight at 6¿months (-3.70¿kg; p < 0.001) was mediated by increases in physical activity (steps/day) and decreases in takeaway meals (kJ/day) and portion size at 3¿months. The largest mediation effect was for physical activity (-0.6¿kg; 95¿% confidence interval -1.4, -0.1). Overall, the targeted mediators accounted for 47.0¿% of the intervention¿s effect on weight. Conclusion: Step counts, takeaway food consumption, and portion sizes may be key areas to target in future weight loss programs for men (ACTRN12610000699066).

DOI 10.1007/s12160-014-9657-0
Co-authors Myles Young, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2015 Babic MJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lonsdale C, Eather N, Skinner G, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' (S4HM): A cluster randomized controlled trial to reduce recreational screen time in adolescents', Contemporary Clinical Trials, 40 150-158 (2015)

Introduction: Excessive recreational screen time (i.e., screen use for entertainment) is a global public health issue associated with adverse mental and physical health outcomes. ... [more]

Introduction: Excessive recreational screen time (i.e., screen use for entertainment) is a global public health issue associated with adverse mental and physical health outcomes. Considering the growing popularity of screen-based recreation in adolescents, there is a need to identify effective strategies for reducing screen time among adolescents. The aim of this paper is to report the rationale and study protocol for the 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' (S4HM) study, an intervention designed to reduce recreational screen time among adolescents. Methods: The S4HM intervention will be evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial in eight secondary schools (. N=. 322 students) in New South Wales, Australia. The 6-month multi-component intervention will encourage adolescents to manage their recreational screen time using a range of evidence-based strategies. The intervention is grounded in Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and includes the following components: an interactive seminar for students, eHealth messaging, behavioral contract and parental newsletters. All outcomes will be assessed at baseline and at 6-months (i.e., immediate post-test). The primary outcome is recreational screen time measured by the Adolescent Sedentary Activity Questionnaire (ASAQ). Secondary outcomes include: self-reported psychological well-being, psychological distress, global physical self-concept, resilience, pathological video gaming and aggression, and objectively measured physical activity (accelerometry) and body mass index (BMI). Hypothesized mediators of behavior change will also be explored. Discussion: The S4HM study will involve the evaluation of an innovative, theory-driven, multi-component intervention that targets students and their parents and is designed to reduce recreational screen time in adolescents. The intervention has been designed for scalability and dissemination across Australian secondary schools.

DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2014.12.001
Co-authors Geoff Skinner, Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Amanda Baker, Narelle Eather
2015 McCabe BE, Plotnikoff RC, Dewar DL, Collins CE, Lubans DR, 'Social Cognitive Mediators of Dietary Behavior Change in Adolescent Girls', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH BEHAVIOR, 39 51-61 (2015)
DOI 10.5993/AJHB.39.1.6
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors David Lubans, Clare Collins
2015 Trinh L, Plotnikoff RC, Rhodes RE, North S, Courneya KS, 'Changes in motivational outcomes following a supervised physical activity program with behavioral counseling in kidney cancer survivors: A pilot study', Psycho-Oncology, (2015)
DOI 10.1002/pon.3754
2015 Scott JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, 'Reliability and validity of a single-item physical activity measure for adolescents.', J Paediatr Child Health, 51 787-793 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/jpc.12836
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2015 Barnes AT, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of the M.A.D.E (Mothers And Daughters Exercising) 4 Life Program: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.', J Phys Act Health, (2015)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2014-0331
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2015 Short CE, James EL, Girgis A, D'Souza MI, Plotnikoff RC, 'Main outcomes of the Move More for Life Trial: A randomised controlled trial examining the effects of tailored-print and targeted-print materials for promoting physical activity among post-treatment breast cancer survivors', Psycho-Oncology, 24 771-778 (2015)

Background Participation in physical activity can improve the health outcomes of breast cancer survivors. To impact public health, broad-reaching sustainable interventions that pr... [more]

Background Participation in physical activity can improve the health outcomes of breast cancer survivors. To impact public health, broad-reaching sustainable interventions that promote physical activity are needed. Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of two distance-based interventions for promoting physical activity among breast cancer survivors compared with a standard recommendation control. Methods Breast cancer survivors who had finished 'active' cancer treatment were eligible to participate. Participants (n = 330) were randomly assigned to receive one of the following mail-delivered interventions: three computer-tailored newsletters, a previously developed breast cancer-specific physical activity booklet or a pamphlet detailing the public health recommendations for physical activity (control). Primary outcomes were self-reported moderate to vigorous aerobic activity and participant's self-reported resistance training activity at 4 months post-baseline. Secondary outcomes were pedometer step counts, whether or not participants were meeting the physical activity guidelines, time spent in sedentary behaviour, fatigue and health-related quality of life. Results Participants randomised into the tailored-print intervention group were three times more likely to commence resistance training and meet the resistance-training guidelines immediately after the intervention than participants allocated to the control group. There were no other significant intervention effects. Conclusion Computer-tailored newsletters may be an effective strategy for enhancing resistance-based physical activity among breast cancer survivors. The null findings relating to other outcomes may be due to ceiling effects (in the case of aerobic activity, fatigue and health-related quality of life) or the sensitivity of the measure used (in the case of sitting time). These issues require further exploration.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3639
Co-authors Erica James
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, (2015)

Summary: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight an... [more]

Summary: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n=139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n=55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n=60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P<0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P<0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P<0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12268
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Megan Rollo, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 16 376-392 (2015)

A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity... [more]

A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n=139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n=55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n=60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P<0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P<0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P<0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12268
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Megan Rollo, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Macdonald-Wicks LK, Gallagher LM, Snodgrass SJ, Guest M, Kable A, James C, et al., 'Difference in perceived knowledge, confidence and attitudes between dietitians and other health professionals in the provision of weight management advice', Nutrition and Dietetics, 72 114-121 (2015)

Aim: The aim of this analysis is to establish if dietitians have the knowledge, skills and attitude to provide support to other health professional (HP) groups in the provision of... [more]

Aim: The aim of this analysis is to establish if dietitians have the knowledge, skills and attitude to provide support to other health professional (HP) groups in the provision of weight management advice to overweight/obese patients. Methods: A secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional survey of HPs was undertaken to perform a gap analysis with regard to practices, knowledge, confidence and attitudes in the provision of weight management advice. Survey responses and additional measures (practice, knowledge, confidence and attitude scores) were compared between dietitians and other HPs. Descriptive statistics were undertaken, and differences between group ¿2 tests were performed for nominal data and the Wilcoxon rank sum test for ordinal and non-parametric data. Results: About 100% of dietitians had received initial weight management training and 85% had participated in professional development training, compared with 18 and 19% of HPs, respectively, although 70% believed it was within their scope of practice to provide evidence-based advice. Dietitian respondents achieved a higher median score (maximum 10) in the following areas (practice = 6.5, knowledge = 8.0, confidence = 8.3) when compared with HP respondents (practice = 4.2, knowledge = 7.0, confidence = 5.4). The median attitude score for both groups was 6.0. Conclusions: HPs are receptive to providing evidence-based weight loss messages to overweight/obese clients in their current practice. However, weight management training is required to enhance HPs' knowledge and skills in order to increase confidence and improve practice skills. Dietitians can assist HPs to ensure that clear, consistent, evidence-based messages are delivered to overweight clients throughout the health-care system.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12115
Co-authors Suzanne Snodgrass, Carole James, Samantha Ashby, Clare Collins, Ashley Kable, Lesley Wicks
2015 Trinh L, Larsen K, Faulkner GE, Plotnikoff RC, Rhodes RE, North S, Courneya KS, 'Social-ecological correlates of physical activity in kidney cancer survivors', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, (2015)

Purpose: Previous studies in cancer survivors have examined behavioral correlates of physical activity (PA), but no study to date has adopted a broader social-ecological framework... [more]

Purpose: Previous studies in cancer survivors have examined behavioral correlates of physical activity (PA), but no study to date has adopted a broader social-ecological framework in understanding PA. This study examined the associations among demographic, medical, social-cognitive, and environmental correlates of meeting PA guidelines among kidney cancer survivors (KCS). Methods: All 1985 KCS diagnosed between 1996 and 2010 identified through a Canadian provincial registry were mailed a survey that consisted of medical, demographic, and social-cognitive measures, as well as PA as measured by the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire. Environmental constructs were also assessed for both self-report and objective measures using geographic information systems (GIS). A series of binary logistic regression analyses were conducted in this cross-sectional study. Results: Completed surveys with geographical information were received from 432 KCS with Mage = 64.4 ± 11.1 years, 63.2 % male, and 82.2 % having localized kidney cancer. In the final multivariate model, meeting PA guidelines was associated with disease stage (OR = 0.25, p = .005), having drug therapy (OR = 3.98, p = .009), higher levels of instrumental attitudes (OR = 1.66, p = .053), higher levels of intention (OR = 1.72, p = .002), and the perceived presence of many retail shops in the neighborhood (OR = 1.37, p = .032). Conclusions: Meeting PA guidelines in KCS were associated with various aspects of the social-ecological model. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Understanding the social-ecological correlates for PA can provide insight into future interventions designed to increase PA in KCS. Prime targets for PA promotion should consider treatment-related factors, promote the benefits of PA, and enhance positive perceptions of the built environment.

DOI 10.1007/s11764-015-0462-y
2015 Plotnikoff RC, Costigan SA, Short C, Grunseit A, James E, Johnson N, et al., 'Factors associated with higher sitting time in general, chronic disease, and psychologically-distressed, adult populations: findings from the 45 & up study.', PLoS One, 10 e0127689 (2015)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0127689
Co-authors Natalie Johnson, Catherine Deste, Sarah Costigan, Erica James
2015 Plotnikoff R, Collins CE, Williams R, Germov J, Callister R, 'Effectiveness of interventions targeting health behaviors in university and college staff: A systematic review', American Journal of Health Promotion, 29 e169-e187 (2015) [C1]

Objective. Evaluate the literature on interventions targeting tertiary education staff within colleges and universities for improvements in health behaviors such as physical activ... [more]

Objective. Evaluate the literature on interventions targeting tertiary education staff within colleges and universities for improvements in health behaviors such as physical activity, dietary intake, and weight loss. Data Source. One online database, Medline, was searched for literature published between January 1970 and February 2013. Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria. All quantitative study designs, including but not limited to randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental studies, nonrandomized experimental trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies, were eligible. Data Extraction. Data extraction was performed by one reviewer using a standardized form developed by the researchers. Extraction was checked for accuracy and consistency by a second reviewer. Data Synthesis. Data in relation to the above objective were extracted and described in a narrative synthesis. Results. Seventeen studies were identified that focused on staff within the tertiary education setting. The review yielded overall positive results with 13 reporting significant health-related improvements. Weight loss, physical activity and fitness, and/or nutrition were the focus in more than half (n = 9) of the studies. Conclusion. This appears to be the first review to examine health interventions for tertiary education staff. There is scope to enhance cross-disciplinary collaboration in the development and implementation of a "Healthy University" settings-based approach to health promotion in tertiary education workplaces. Universities or colleges could serve as a research platform to evaluate such intervention strategies.

DOI 10.4278/ajhp.130619-LIT-313
Co-authors Robin Callister, John Germov, Clare Collins
2015 Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of a male-only weight loss maintenance programme on social-cognitive determinants of physical activity and healthy eating: A randomized controlled trial.', Br J Health Psychol, (2015)
DOI 10.1111/bjhp.12137
Co-authors Myles Young, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2015 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Stodden DF, Lubans DR, 'Mediating effects of resistance training skill competency on health-related fitness and physical activity: the ATLAS cluster randomised controlled trial.', J Sports Sci, 1-8 (2015)
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1069383
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2015 Kable A, James C, Snodgrass S, Plotnikoff R, Guest M, Ashby S, et al., 'Nurse provision of healthy lifestyle advice to people who are overweight or obese.', Nurs Health Sci, (2015)
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12214
Co-authors Carole James, Ashley Kable, Clare Collins, Samantha Ashby
2015 Maher C, Ferguson M, Vandelanotte C, Plotnikoff R, De Bourdeaudhuij I, Thomas S, et al., 'A Web-Based, Social Networking Physical Activity Intervention for Insufficiently Active Adults Delivered via Facebook App: Randomized Controlled Trial', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 17 (2015)
DOI 10.2196/jmir.4086
2015 Plotnikoff RC, Costigan SA, Williams RL, Hutchesson MJ, Kennedy SG, Robards SL, et al., 'Effectiveness of interventions targeting physical activity, nutrition and healthy weight for university and college students: A systematic review and meta-analysis', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12 1-10 (2015) [C1]

To examine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving physical activity, diet, and/or weight-related behaviors amongst university/college students. Five online database... [more]

To examine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving physical activity, diet, and/or weight-related behaviors amongst university/college students. Five online databases were searched (January 1970 to April 2014). Experimental study designs were eligible for inclusion. Data extraction was performed by one reviewer using a standardized form developed by the researchers and checked by a second reviewer. Data were described in a narrative synthesis and meta-analyses were conducted when appropriate. Study quality was also established. Forty-one studies were included; of these, 34 reported significant improvements in one of the key outcomes. Of the studies examining physical activity 18/29 yielded significant results, with meta-analysis demonstrating significant increases in moderate physical activity in intervention groups compared to control. Of the studies examining nutrition, 12/24 reported significantly improved outcomes; only 4/12 assessing weight loss outcomes found significant weight reduction. This appears to be the first systematic review of physical activity, diet and weight loss interventions targeting university and college students. Tertiary institutions are appropriate settings for implementing and evaluating lifestyle interventions, however more research is needed to improve such strategies.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0203-7
Co-authors Jennifer Allen, Clare Collins, Sarah Costigan, Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister, John Germov
2015 Duncan MJ, Short C, Rashid M, Cutumisu N, Vandelanotte C, Plotnikoff RC, 'Identifying correlates of breaks in occupational sitting: a cross-sectional study', Building Research and Information, (2015)

Office workers are commonly targeted in interventions to modify their sitting behaviour, yet there is limited evidence of the correlates of breaks in sitting to inform interventio... [more]

Office workers are commonly targeted in interventions to modify their sitting behaviour, yet there is limited evidence of the correlates of breaks in sitting to inform intervention development. This study identifies the individual, workplace and spatial configuration correlates of the frequency of breaks in sitting (number/hour) in office workers (n¿=¿5531) stratified by office type (private-enclosed, shared, open plan). All behaviours and potential correlates were measured via self-report using an online cross-sectional survey. Regression analyses revealed age was the only socio-demographic characteristic associated with frequency of breaks in sitting in all office types. Greater job autonomy and local connectivity were positively associated with frequency of breaks in sitting in shared and open-plan offices. In open-plan offices co-worker proximity was negatively associated with frequency of breaks in sitting. Co-worker visibility was positively associated with frequency of breaks in sitting in all office types. This study demonstrates that individual, workplace and spatial configuration factors are all associated with the frequency of breaks in sitting and that these relationships differ by office type. These observations extend prior studies that have only examined correlates at a single level (e.g. the individual). This evidence could be useful to guide future interventions in the design of workplaces to increase breaks in sitting and workers¿ physical activity.

DOI 10.1080/09613218.2015.1045712
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2015 Macdonald-Wicks LK, Gallagher LM, Snodgrass SJ, Guest M, Kable A, James C, et al., 'Difference in perceived knowledge, confidence and attitudes between dietitians and other health professionals in the provision of weight management advice', Nutrition and Dietetics, 72 114-121 (2015)

Aim: The aim of this analysis is to establish if dietitians have the knowledge, skills and attitude to provide support to other health professional (HP) groups in the provision of... [more]

Aim: The aim of this analysis is to establish if dietitians have the knowledge, skills and attitude to provide support to other health professional (HP) groups in the provision of weight management advice to overweight/obese patients. Methods: A secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional survey of HPs was undertaken to perform a gap analysis with regard to practices, knowledge, confidence and attitudes in the provision of weight management advice. Survey responses and additional measures (practice, knowledge, confidence and attitude scores) were compared between dietitians and other HPs. Descriptive statistics were undertaken, and differences between group ¿2 tests were performed for nominal data and the Wilcoxon rank sum test for ordinal and non-parametric data. Results: About 100% of dietitians had received initial weight management training and 85% had participated in professional development training, compared with 18 and 19% of HPs, respectively, although 70% believed it was within their scope of practice to provide evidence-based advice. Dietitian respondents achieved a higher median score (maximum 10) in the following areas (practice = 6.5, knowledge = 8.0, confidence = 8.3) when compared with HP respondents (practice = 4.2, knowledge = 7.0, confidence = 5.4). The median attitude score for both groups was 6.0. Conclusions: HPs are receptive to providing evidence-based weight loss messages to overweight/obese clients in their current practice. However, weight management training is required to enhance HPs' knowledge and skills in order to increase confidence and improve practice skills. Dietitians can assist HPs to ensure that clear, consistent, evidence-based messages are delivered to overweight clients throughout the health-care system.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12115
Co-authors Lesley Wicks, Clare Collins, Samantha Ashby, Ashley Kable, Suzanne Snodgrass, Carole James
2015 Costigan SA, Eather N, Plotnikoff RC, Taaffe DR, Lubans DR, 'High-intensity interval training for improving health-related fitness in adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.', Br J Sports Med, (2015)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-094490
Co-authors David Lubans, Sarah Costigan
2015 Barnes AT, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Maternal Correlates of Objectively Measured Physical Activity in Girls.', Matern Child Health J, (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s10995-015-1752-8
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2015 Plotnikoff R, Collins CE, Williams R, Germov J, Callister R, 'Effectiveness of interventions targeting health behaviors in university and college staff: a systematic review.', Am J Health Promot, 29 e169-e187 (2015)
DOI 10.4278/ajhp.130619-LIT-313
Co-authors Clare Collins, John Germov, Robin Callister
2014 Lloyd AB, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Paternal Lifestyle-Related Parenting Practices Mediate Changes in Children's Dietary and Physical Activity Behaviors: Findings From the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids Community Randomized Controlled Trial.', J Phys Act Health, (2014)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2014-0367
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2014 Aparcio-Ting FE, Friedenreich CM, Kopciuk KA, Plotnikoff RC, Bryant HE, 'Intrapersonal and social environment correlates of leisure-time physical activity for cancer prevention: a cross-sectional study among Canadian Adults', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 11 790-800 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2012-0110
2014 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Salmon J, Okely AD, et al., 'Smart-phone obesity prevention trial for adolescent boys in low-income communities: the ATLAS RCT.', Pediatrics, 134 e723-e731 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1542/peds.2014-1012
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Kerry Dally, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2014 Snodgrass SJ, Carter AE, Guest M, Collins CE, James C, Kable AK, et al., 'Weight management including dietary and physical activity advice provided by Australian physiotherapists: a pilot cross-sectional survey.', Physiother Theory Pract, 30 409-420 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/09593985.2013.877112
Co-authors Samantha Ashby, Clare Collins, Ashley Kable, Carole James, Suzanne Snodgrass
2014 Babic MJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lonsdale C, White RL, Lubans DR, 'Physical Activity and Physical Self-Concept in Youth: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis', Sports Medicine, (2014) [C1]

Background Evidence suggests that physical self-concept is associated with physical activity in children and adolescents, but no systematic review of this literature has been cond... [more]

Background Evidence suggests that physical self-concept is associated with physical activity in children and adolescents, but no systematic review of this literature has been conducted. Objective The primary aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the strength of associations between physical activity and physical self-concept (general and sub-domains) in children and adolescents. The secondary aim was to examine potential moderators of the association between physical activity and physical self-concept. Methods A systematic search of six electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, ERIC, Web of Science and Scopus) with no date restrictions was conducted. Random effects meta-analyses with correction for measurement were employed. The associations between physical activity and general physical self-concept and sub-domains were explored. A risk of bias assessment was conducted by two reviewers. Results The search identified 64 studies to be included in the meta-analysis. Thirty-three studies addressed multiple outcomes of general physical self-concept: 28 studies examined general physical self-concept, 59 examined perceived competence, 25 examined perceived fitness, and 55 examined perceived appearance. Perceived competence was most strongly associated with physical activity (r = 0.30, 95 % CI 0.24-0.35, p < 0.001), followed by perceived fitness (r = 0.26, 95 % CI 0.20-0.32, p < 0.001), general physical self-concept (r = 0.25, 95 % CI 0.16-0.34, p < 0.001) and perceived physical appearance (r = 0.12, 95 % CI 0.08-0.16, p < 0.001). Sex was a significant moderator for general physical self-concept (p < 0.05), and age was a significant moderator for perceived appearance (p = 0.01) and perceived competence (p < 0.05). No significant moderators were found for perceived fitness. Conclusion Overall, a significant association has been consistently demonstrated between physical activity and physical self-concept and its various sub-domains in children and adolescents. Age and sex are key moderators of the association between physical activity and physical self-concept. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0229-z
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2014 Babic MJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lonsdale C, White RL, Lubans DR, 'Physical activity and physical self-concept in youth: systematic review and meta-analysis.', Sports Med, 44 1589-1601 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0229-z
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2014 Babic MJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lonsdale C, White RL, Lubans DR, 'Physical activity and physical self-concept in youth: systematic review and meta-analysis', Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.), 44 1589-1601 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0229-z
Co-authors David Lubans
2014 Vella SA, Schranz NK, Davern M, Hardy LL, Hills AP, Morgan PJ, et al., 'The contribution of organised sports to physical activity in Australia: Results and directions from the Active Healthy Kids Australia 2014 Report Card on physical activity for children and young people', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, (2014)

Youth participation in organised sport and physical activity is important for healthy development, growth and wellbeing. In 2014, Active Healthy Kids Australia released its inaugu... [more]

Youth participation in organised sport and physical activity is important for healthy development, growth and wellbeing. In 2014, Active Healthy Kids Australia released its inaugural Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Young People, which synthesised the best available national- and state-level data for children and young people (<18 years). This paper provides a more detailed examination of the evidence informing the grade for Organised Sport from the 2014 Report Card, compares Australia's Organised Sport grade with other countries, identifies future directions for research and surveillance, and explores possible beneficial strategies. The Report Card highlighted that between 64% and 85% of Australians aged 5-17 years participate in organised sports, a rate higher than alternate forms of physical activity such as active transportation, active play and school based physical activity. This finding reflects Australia's position as one of the global leaders for participating in organised sport. Future research and surveillance methodologies however, need to incorporate standardised metrics that aim to capture more detailed data regarding organised sport participation. Facilitating access for all children and preventing dropout from organised sports are important initiatives to improve current levels of sport participation. However, given that 80% of Australians aged 5-17 years are not sufficiently physically active to achieve the daily recommendation, participation in sport alone is not enough to ensure that children can accrue the health benefits associated with being physically active. As such, there is a pressing need to develop strategies that engage children in other forms of physical activity such as active transportation and active play.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.04.011
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2014 Mladenovic AB, Wozniak L, Plotnikoff RC, Johnson JA, Johnson ST, 'Social support, self-efficacy and motivation: A qualitative study of the journey through HEALD (Healthy Eating and Active Living for Diabetes)', Practical Diabetes, 31 370-374 (2014) [C1]

This study aimed to describe the influence of social support on participants' self-efficacy and motivation to perform physical activity before, during and after the Healthy Eating... [more]

This study aimed to describe the influence of social support on participants' self-efficacy and motivation to perform physical activity before, during and after the Healthy Eating and Active Living for Diabetes in primary care networks (HEALD) programme. HEALD was a controlled trial of a 24-week primary care-based walking programme for people with type 2 diabetes, proven effective in increasing physical activity. Data used in this qualitative sub-study were derived from semi-structured interviews with purposefully selected HEALD completers (n = 13) six months after the programme ended. Qualitative data were analysed using content analysis. Prior to HEALD, participants reported feeling a lack of social support for diabetes management and fear of diabetes consequences. During the programme, they reported feeling supported by exercise specialists and peers in general and specifically to do physical activity; they reported weakening social support after HEALD ended. Accordingly, participants reported having self-efficacy and motivation to increase their physical activity during HEALD, but these did not persist after HEALD ended; many relapsed into former behaviours. Participants recommended a longer programme, with more contacts. Our findings are congruent with Social Cognitive Theory. Participants' reported self-efficacy and motivation to adopt physical activity during HEALD were tied to feeling supported by the exercise specialists who led the programme and peers participating in the programme. However, these perceived improvements were compromised when social support was no longer available through HEALD. Periodic contacts with a health care provider post-programme may promote maintenance of positive behaviour changes following diabetes self-management programmes. Furthermore, an optimal mode of peer support requires study.

DOI 10.1002/pdi.1905
2014 Plotnikoff R, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Rhodes R, Costigan SA, 'The Intersect of Theory, Methods, and Translation in Guiding Interventions for the Promotion of Physical Activity: A Case Example of a Research Programme', AUSTRALIAN PSYCHOLOGIST, 49 110-126 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ap.12037
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2014 Schaefer L, Plotnikoff RC, Majumdar SR, Mollard R, Woo M, Sadman R, et al., 'Outdoor Time Is Associated with Physical Activity, Sedentary Time, and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Youth', JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS, 165 516-521 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.05.029
Citations Web of Science - 5
2014 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows T, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community randomized controlled trial: A community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', Preventive Medicine, 61 90-99 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK)' program when delivered by trained facilitators in community settings. Method: A two-arm randomi... [more]

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK)' program when delivered by trained facilitators in community settings. Method: A two-arm randomized controlled trial of 93 overweight/obese fathers (mean [SD] age=40.3 [5.3] years; BMI=32.5 [3.8] kg/m2) and their primary school-aged children (n=132) from the Hunter Region, Australia. In 2010-2011, families were randomized to either: (i) HDHK intervention (n=48 fathers, n=72 children) or (ii) wait-list control group. The 7-week intervention included seven sessions and resources (booklets, pedometers). Assessments were held at baseline and 14-weeks with fathers' weight (kg) as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes for fathers and children included waist, BMI, blood pressure, resting heart rate, physical activity (pedometry), and self-reported dietary intake and sedentary behaviors. Results: Linear mixed models (intention-to-treat) revealed significant between-group differences for fathers' weight (P < .001, d= 0.24), with HDHK fathers losing more weight (- 3.3. kg; 95%CI, - 4.3, - 2.4) than control fathers (0.1. kg; 95%CI, - 0.9,1.0). Significant treatment effects (P < .05) were also found for fathers' waist (d= 0.41), BMI (d= 0.26), resting heart rate (d= 0.59), energy intake (d= 0.49) and physical activity (d= 0.46) and for children's physical activity (d= 0.50) and adiposity (d= 0.07). Discussion: HDHK significantly improved health outcomes and behaviors in fathers and children, providing evidence for program effectiveness when delivered in a community setting. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.12.019
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Myles Young, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Andrew Miller, David Lubans, Richard Fletcher
2014 Smith JJ, Eather N, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Faigenbaum AD, Lubans DR, 'The health benefits of muscular fitness for children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.', Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.), 44 1209-1223 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0196-4
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Narelle Eather
2014 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Salmon J, Okely AD, et al., 'Smart-phone obesity prevention trial for adolescent boys in low-income communities: The ATLAS RCT', Pediatrics, 134 e723-e731 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1542/peds.2014-1012
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Kerry Dally
2014 Trinh L, Plotnikoff RC, Rhodes RE, North S, Courneya KS, 'Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of Adding Behavioral Counseling to Supervised Physical Activity in Kidney Cancer Survivors A Randomized Controlled Trial', CANCER NURSING, 37 E8-E22 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/NCC.0b013e3182a40fb6
2014 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'Characteristics of men classified at high-risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus using the AUSDRISK screening tool', Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, (2014)

Aims: The primary aim was to describe characteristics of men identified at high-risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using the Australian diabetes risk assessment (AUSDRISK) t... [more]

Aims: The primary aim was to describe characteristics of men identified at high-risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using the Australian diabetes risk assessment (AUSDRISK) tool. Secondary aims were to determine the prevalence of pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome in these men. Methods: Men (n = 209) completed the AUSDRISK tool, with 165 identified as high-risk for T2DM (score =. 12, maximum 38). Demographic, anthropometric, physiological and behavioural outcomes were assessed for 101 men. Comparisons (one-way ANOVA) among three AUSDRISK score groups (12-15, 16-19, =. 20) were performed (significance level, P <. 0.05). Results: Common risk factors (percentages) among high-risk men were waist circumference (>90cm; 93%), age (>44 years; 79%), physical activity level (<150minwk-1; 59%), family history of diabetes (39%) and previously high blood glucose levels (32%). Men with AUSDRISK scores =20 had higher (mean±SD) HbA1C (6.0±0.4% [42±4.4mmol.mol-1], P <0.001), FPG (5.3±0.6mmol.L-1, P =0.001) and waist circumference (113.2±9.8cm, P =0.026) than men with scores of 12-15. Mean FPG for the sample was 5.0±0.6mmol.L-1, whereas mean HbA1C was 5.8±0.5% [40±5.5mmol.mol-1]. Pre-diabetes prevalence was 70% and metabolic syndrome prevalence was 62%. Conclusions: The AUSDRISK tool identified men who were mostly older than 44, and had large waist circumferences and elevated HbA1C. These findings provide evidence supporting the usefulness of the AUSDRISK screening tool for T2DM screening in clinical and research settings.

DOI 10.1016/j.diabres.2015.01.017
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2014 Lloyd AB, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Maternal and paternal parenting practices and their influence on children's adiposity, screen-time, diet and physical activity', Appetite, 79 149-157 (2014) [C1]

The primary aim of this study was to examine a range of potential behavioral and maternal/paternal correlates of adiposity in children. Secondary aims were to examine (a) correlat... [more]

The primary aim of this study was to examine a range of potential behavioral and maternal/paternal correlates of adiposity in children. Secondary aims were to examine (a) correlates of screen-time, diet and physical activity and (b) if there were differences in maternal and paternal physical activity- and dietary-related parenting practices. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted using 70 families with children (59% boys (41/70), mean age 8.4 (±2.4) years). Parenting practices were measured using the Parenting Strategies for Eating and Activity Scale. Children's outcomes included: 7-day pedometry (physical activity), screen-time, percent energy from core foods (Food frequency questionnaire) and BMI z-score. Multiple regression models were generated to examine the associations between maternal and paternal parenting practices and children's variables. In the regression analyses, fathers' BMI (p < .01) and mothers' control (p < .001) were significantly associated with child weight status. Fathers' reinforcement (p < .01) was significantly associated with child physical activity. For screen-time, mothers' monitoring (p < .001) and child characteristics [age (p = .01), sex (p = .01), BMI z-score (p = .03)] were significant predictors. Mothers' parenting practices [limit setting (p = .01), reinforcement (p = .02)] and child screen-time (p = .02) were significantly associated with intake of core foods. Despite some similarities within families, three out of five parenting constructs were significantly different between mothers and fathers. Mothers and fathers have different parental influences on their children's weight status and lifestyle behaviors and both should be included in lifestyle interventions targeting children. A focus on maternal parenting specifically relating to screen-time and diet, and father's physical activity parenting and weight status may support their children in developing more healthy behaviors. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2014.04.010
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Clare Collins, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2014 Scott JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Trost SG, Lubans DR, 'Adolescent pedometer protocols: examining reactivity, tampering and participants' perceptions', Journal of Sports Sciences, 32 183-190 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2013.815361
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2014 Lippke S, Plotnikoff RC, 'Testing two principles of the health action process approach in individuals with type 2 diabetes', Health Psychology, 33 77-84 (2014) [C1]

Objective: The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) proposes principles that can be translated into testable hypotheses. This is one of the first studies to have explicitly teste... [more]

Objective: The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) proposes principles that can be translated into testable hypotheses. This is one of the first studies to have explicitly tested HAPA's first 2 principles, which are (1) health behavior change process can be subdivided into motivation and volition, and (2) volition can be grouped into intentional and action stages. The 3 stage groups are labeled preintenders, intenders, and actors. Method: The hypotheses of the HAPA model were investigated in a sample of 1,193 individuals with Type 2 diabetes. Study participants completed a questionnaire assessing the HAPA variables. The hypotheses were evaluated by examining mean differences of test variables and by the use of multigroup structural equation modeling (MSEM). Results: Findings support the HAPA's 2 principles and 3 distinct stages. The 3 HAPA stages were significantly different in several stage-specific variables, and discontinuity patterns were found in terms of nonlinear trends across means. In terms of predicting goals, action planning, and behavior, differences transpired between the 2 motivational stages (preintenders and intenders), and between the 2 volitional stages (intenders and actors). Conclusions: Results indicate implications for supporting behavior change processes, depending on in which stage a person is at: All individuals should be helped to increase self-efficacy. Preintenders and intenders require interventions targeting outcome expectancies. Actors benefit from an improvement in action planning to maintain and increase their previous behavior. Overall, the first 2 principles of the HAPA were supported and some evidence for the other principles was found. Future research should experimentally test these conclusions. © 2012 American Psychological Association.

DOI 10.1037/a0030182
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2014 Carson V, Rinaldi RL, Torrance B, Maximova K, Ball GDC, Majumdar SR, et al., 'Vigorous physical activity and longitudinal associations with cardiometabolic risk factors in youth', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBESITY, 38 16-21 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2013.135
Citations Web of Science - 9
2014 Short CE, James EL, Vandelanotte C, Courneya KS, Duncan MJ, Rebar A, Plotnikoff RC, 'Correlates of resistance training in post-treatment breast cancer survivors', SUPPORTIVE CARE IN CANCER, 22 2757-2766 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2273-5
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Erica James, Mitch Duncan
2014 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Penfold CM, Courneya KS, 'Testing the utility of three social-cognitive models for predicting objective and self-report physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes', British Journal of Health Psychology, 19 329-346 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/bjhp.12085
Co-authors David Lubans
2014 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Penfold CM, Courneya KS, 'Testing the utility of three social-cognitive models for predicting objective and self-report physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes', British Journal of Health Psychology, 19 329-346 (2014) [C1]

Objective Theory-based interventions to promote physical activity (PA) are more effective than atheoretical approaches; however, the comparative utility of theoretical models is r... [more]

Objective Theory-based interventions to promote physical activity (PA) are more effective than atheoretical approaches; however, the comparative utility of theoretical models is rarely tested in longitudinal designs with multiple time points. Further, there is limited research that has simultaneously tested social-cognitive models with self-report and objective PA measures. The primary aim of this study was to test the predictive ability of three theoretical models (social cognitive theory, theory of planned behaviour, and protection motivation theory) in explaining PA behaviour. Methods Participants were adults with type 2 diabetes (n = 287, 53.8% males, mean age = 61.6 ± 11.8 years). Theoretical constructs across the three theories were tested to prospectively predict PA behaviour (objective and self-report) across three 6-month time intervals (baseline-6, 6-12, 12-18 months) using structural equation modelling. PA outcomes were steps/3 days (objective) and minutes of MET-weighted PA/week (self-report). Results The mean proportion of variance in PA explained by these models was 6.5% for objective PA and 8.8% for self-report PA. Direct pathways to PA outcomes were stronger for self-report compared with objective PA. Conclusions These theories explained a small proportion of the variance in longitudinal PA studies. Theory development to guide interventions for increasing and maintaining PA in adults with type 2 diabetes requires further research with objective measures. Theory integration across social-cognitive models and the inclusion of ecological levels are recommended to further explain PA behaviour change in this population. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Social-cognitive theories are able to explain partial variance for physical activity (PA) behaviour. What does this study add? The testing of three theories in a longitudinal design over 3, 6-month time intervals. The parallel use and comparison of both objective and self-report PA measures in testing these theories. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

DOI 10.1111/bjhp.12085
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors David Lubans
2014 Dewar DL, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Okely AD, Batterham M, 'Exploring changes in physical activity, sedentary behaviors and hypothesized mediators in the NEAT girls group randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 17 39-46 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.02.003
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2014 Dewar DL, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, Batterham M, Lubans DR, 'Exploring changes in physical activity, sedentary behaviors and hypothesized mediators in the NEAT girls group randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 17 39-46 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a 12-month school-based multi-component program on adolescent girls' physical activity and sedentary behaviors, and hypothesized mediators of ... [more]

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a 12-month school-based multi-component program on adolescent girls' physical activity and sedentary behaviors, and hypothesized mediators of physical activity behavior change. Design: Group randomized controlled trial with 12-month follow-up. Methods: The intervention, guided by Social Cognitive Theory, involved 357 adolescent girls (13.2. ±. 0.5 years) from 12 secondary schools (6 intervention schools, 6 control schools) in low-income communities in the Hunter and Central Coast regions of New South Wales, Australia.The intervention included enhanced school sport, lunchtime physical activity sessions, interactive seminars, student handbooks, nutrition workshops, pedometers, parent newsletters and text messages to encourage physical activity and healthy eating, and a decrease in sedentary behavior. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and 12-months and included: physical activity (accelerometers), sedentary behaviors (questionnaire and accelerometers), and social-cognitive mediators of physical activity (questionnaire). Results: There were significant between group differences in favor of the intervention group for self-reported recreational computer use (-26.0. min; 95% CI, -46.9 to -5.1), and sedentary activities summed (-56.4. min; 95% CI, -110.1 to -2.7), however objective sedentary behavior showed no differences. There were no group-by-time effects for any of the physical activity outcomes or hypothesized mediators. Conclusions: A school-based intervention tailored for adolescent girls from schools located in low-income communities significantly reduced time spent in sedentary activities. However, improvements in physical activity and hypothesized mediators of physical activity behavior were not observed. Future studies are encouraged to explore alternative mechanisms of behavior change derived from integrated and socio-ecological theories. © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.02.003
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2014 Macdonald-Wicks LK, Gallagher LM, Snodgrass SJ, Guest M, Kable A, James C, et al., 'Difference in perceived knowledge, confidence and attitudes between dietitians and other health professionals in the provision of weight management advice', Nutrition and Dietetics, (2014)

Aim: The aim of this analysis is to establish if dietitians have the knowledge, skills and attitude to provide support to other health professional (HP) groups in the provision of... [more]

Aim: The aim of this analysis is to establish if dietitians have the knowledge, skills and attitude to provide support to other health professional (HP) groups in the provision of weight management advice to overweight/obese patients. Methods: A secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional survey of HPs was undertaken to perform a gap analysis with regard to practices, knowledge, confidence and attitudes in the provision of weight management advice. Survey responses and additional measures (practice, knowledge, confidence and attitude scores) were compared between dietitians and other HPs. Descriptive statistics were undertaken, and differences between group ¿2 tests were performed for nominal data and the Wilcoxon rank sum test for ordinal and non-parametric data. Results: About 100% of dietitians had received initial weight management training and 85% had participated in professional development training, compared with 18 and 19% of HPs, respectively, although 70% believed it was within their scope of practice to provide evidence-based advice. Dietitian respondents achieved a higher median score (maximum 10) in the following areas (practice = 6.5, knowledge = 8.0, confidence = 8.3) when compared with HP respondents (practice = 4.2, knowledge = 7.0, confidence = 5.4). The median attitude score for both groups was 6.0. Conclusions: HPs are receptive to providing evidence-based weight loss messages to overweight/obese clients in their current practice. However, weight management training is required to enhance HPs' knowledge and skills in order to increase confidence and improve practice skills. Dietitians can assist HPs to ensure that clear, consistent, evidence-based messages are delivered to overweight clients throughout the health-care system. © 2014 Dietitians Association of Australia.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12115
Co-authors Ashley Kable, Lesley Wicks, Samantha Ashby, Suzanne Snodgrass, Carole James, Clare Collins
2014 Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Social cognitive theory and physical activity: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 15 983-995 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/obr.12225
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Clare Collins
2014 Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Social cognitive theory and physical activity: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 15 983-995 (2014) [C1]

This review investigated three research questions (i) What is the utility of social cognitive theory (SCT) to explain physical activity (PA)?; (ii) Is the effectiveness of SCT mod... [more]

This review investigated three research questions (i) What is the utility of social cognitive theory (SCT) to explain physical activity (PA)?; (ii) Is the effectiveness of SCT moderated by sample or methodological characteristics? and (iii) What is the frequency of significant associations between the core SCT constructs and PA? Ten electronic databases were searched with no date or sample restrictions. Forty-four studies were retrieved containing 55 SCT models of PA. Methodological quality was assessed using a standardized tool. A random-effects meta-analysis revealed that SCT accounted for 31% of the variance in PA. However, methodological quality was mostly poor for these models. Methodological quality and sample age moderated the PA effect size, with increases in both associated with greater variance explained. Although self-efficacy and goals were consistently associated with PA, outcome expectations and socio-structural factors were not. This review determined that SCT is a useful framework to explain PA behaviour. Higher quality models explained more PA variance, but overall methodological quality was poor. As such, high-quality studies examining the utility of SCT to explain PA are warranted.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12225
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Clare Collins
2014 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Penfold CM, Courneya KS, 'Testing mediator variables in a physical activity intervention for women with type 2 diabetes', PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT AND EXERCISE, 15 1-8 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.psychsport.2013.09.004
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors David Lubans
2014 Morgan PJ, Scott HA, Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, 'Associations between program outcomes and adherence to Social Cognitive Theory tasks: process evaluation of the SHED-IT community weight loss trial for men', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 11 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-014-0089-9
Citations Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Clare Collins, Hayley Scott, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Myles Young
2014 Schranz N, Olds T, Cliff D, Davern M, Engelen L, Giles-Corti B, et al., 'Results From Australia¿s 2014 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 11 S21-S25 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2014-0164
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2014 Young MD, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Doran CM, Morgan PJ, 'The SHED-IT Weight Loss Maintenance trial protocol: A randomised controlled trial of a weight loss maintenance program for overweight and obese men', CONTEMPORARY CLINICAL TRIALS, 37 84-97 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2013.11.004
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Myles Young, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2014 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Salmon J, Okely AD, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) group randomized controlled trial: An obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys from schools in low-income communities', Contemporary Clinical Trials, 37 106-119 (2014) [C3]

Introduction: The negative consequences of unhealthy weight gain and the high likelihood of pediatric obesity tracking into adulthood highlight the importance of targeting youth w... [more]

Introduction: The negative consequences of unhealthy weight gain and the high likelihood of pediatric obesity tracking into adulthood highlight the importance of targeting youth who are 'at risk' of obesity. The aim of this paper is to report the rationale and study protocol for the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys living in low-income communities. Methods/design: The ATLAS intervention will be evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial in 14 secondary schools in the state of New South Wales (NSW), Australia (2012 to 2014). ATLAS is an 8-month multi-component, school-based program informed by self-determination theory and social cognitive theory. The intervention consists of teacher professional development, enhanced school-sport sessions, researcher-led seminars, lunch-time physical activity mentoring sessions, pedometers for self-monitoring, provision of equipment to schools, parental newsletters, and a smartphone application and website. Assessments were conducted at baseline and will be completed again at 9- and 18-months from baseline. Primary outcomes are body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Secondary outcomes include BMI z-scores, body fat (bioelectrical impedance analysis), physical activity (accelerometers), muscular fitness (grip strength and push-ups), screen-time, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, resistance training skill competency, daytime sleepiness, subjective well-being, physical self-perception, pathological video gaming, and aggression. Hypothesized mediators of behavior change will also be explored. Discussion: ATLAS is an innovative school-based intervention designed to improve the health behaviors and related outcomes of adolescent males in low-income communities. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2013.11.008
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Geoff Skinner, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Kerry Dally
2014 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Callister R, 'The PULSE (Prevention Using LifeStyle Education) trial protocol: a randomised controlled trial of a Type 2 Diabetes Prevention programme for men.', Contemporary clinical trials, 39 132-144 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2014.07.008
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Clare Collins
2014 Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Miller A, Scott JJ, Thompson D, Tudor-Locke C, 'Using Pedometers for Measuring and Increasing Physical Activity in Children and Adolescents: The Next Step', American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, (2014)
DOI 10.1177/1559827614537774
Co-authors David Lubans, Andrew Miller
2014 Alley S, Jennings C, Persaud N, Plotnikoff RC, Horsley M, Vandelanotte C, 'Do personally tailored videos in a web-based physical activity intervention lead to higher attention and recall? - an eye-tracking study.', Frontiers in Public Health, 2 1-7 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fpubh.2014.00013
2014 Short CE, James EL, Girgis A, D'Souza MI, Plotnikoff RC, 'Main outcomes of the Move More for Life Trial: A randomised controlled trial examining the effects of tailored-print and targeted-print materials for promoting physical activity among post-treatment breast cancer survivors', Psycho-Oncology, (2014)

Background: Participation in physical activity can improve the health outcomes of breast cancer survivors. To impact public health, broad-reaching sustainable interventions that p... [more]

Background: Participation in physical activity can improve the health outcomes of breast cancer survivors. To impact public health, broad-reaching sustainable interventions that promote physical activity are needed. Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of two distance-based interventions for promoting physical activity among breast cancer survivors compared with a standard recommendation control. Methods: Breast cancer survivors who had finished 'active' cancer treatment were eligible to participate. Participants (n=330) were randomly assigned to receive one of the following mail-delivered interventions: three computer-tailored newsletters, a previously developed breast cancer-specific physical activity booklet or a pamphlet detailing the public health recommendations for physical activity (control). Primary outcomes were self-reported moderate to vigorous aerobic activity and participant's self-reported resistance training activity at 4months post-baseline. Secondary outcomes were pedometer step counts, whether or not participants were meeting the physical activity guidelines, time spent in sedentary behaviour, fatigue and health-related quality of life. Results: Participants randomised into the tailored-print intervention group were three times more likely to commence resistance training and meet the resistance-training guidelines immediately after the intervention than participants allocated to the control group. There were no other significant intervention effects. Conclusion: Computer-tailored newsletters may be an effective strategy for enhancing resistance-based physical activity among breast cancer survivors. The null findings relating to other outcomes may be due to ceiling effects (in the case of aerobic activity, fatigue and health-related quality of life) or the sensitivity of the measure used (in the case of sitting time). These issues require further exploration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3639
Co-authors Erica James
2014 Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Williams R, Germov J, Callister R, 'Effectiveness of interventions targeting health behaviors in University and College staff: A systematic review.', American Journal of Health Promotion, - (2014)
DOI 10.4278/ajhp.130619-LIT-313
2014 James EL, Ewald B, Johnson N, Brown W, Stacey FG, Mcelduff P, et al., 'Efficacy of GP referral of insufficiently active patients for expert physical activity counseling: protocol for a pragmatic randomized trial (The NewCOACH trial)', BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 15 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/s12875-014-0218-1
Co-authors Angela Booth, Patrick Mcelduff, Ben Ewald, Natalie Johnson, Erica James
2014 Alley S, Jennings C, Plotnikoff RC, Vandelanotte C, 'My Activity Coach - Using video-coaching to assist a web-based computer-tailored physical activity intervention: A randomised controlled trial protocol', BMC Public Health, 14 (2014) [C3]

Background: There is a need for effective population-based physical activity interventions. The internet provides a good platform to deliver physical activity interventions and re... [more]

Background: There is a need for effective population-based physical activity interventions. The internet provides a good platform to deliver physical activity interventions and reach large numbers of people at low cost. Personalised advice in web-based physical activity interventions has shown to improve engagement and behavioural outcomes, though it is unclear if the effectiveness of such interventions may further be improved when providing brief video-based coaching sessions with participants. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness, in terms of engagement, retention, satisfaction and physical activity changes, of a web-based and computer-tailored physical activity intervention with and without the addition of a brief video-based coaching session in comparison to a control group. Methods/Design. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups (tailoring + online video-coaching, tailoring-only and wait-list control). The tailoring + video-coaching participants will receive a computer-tailored web-based physical activity intervention ('My Activity Coach') with brief coaching sessions with a physical activity expert over an online video calling program (e.g. Skype). The tailoring-only participants will receive the intervention but not the counselling sessions. The primary time point's for outcome assessment will be immediately post intervention (week 9). The secondary time points will be at 6 and 12 months post-baseline. The primary outcome, physical activity change, will be assessed via the Active Australia Questionnaire (AAQ). Secondary outcome measures include correlates of physical activity (mediators and moderators), quality of life (measured via the SF-12v2), participant satisfaction, engagement (using web-site user statistics) and study retention. Discussion. Study findings will inform researchers and practitioners about the feasibility and effectiveness of brief online video-coaching sessions in combination with computer-tailored physical activity advice. This may increase intervention effectiveness at an acceptable cost and will inform the development of future web-based physical activity interventions. Trial registration. ACTRN12614000339651 Date: 31/03/2014.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-738
2014 Plotnikoff RC, Gebel K, Lubans DR, 'Self-efficacy, physical activity, and sedentary behavior in adolescent girls: Testing mediating effects of the perceived school and home environment', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 11 1579-1586 (2014) [C1]

Background: According to social-cognitive theory (SCT), self-efficacy affects health behavior both directly and indirectly by influencing how individuals perceive their environmen... [more]

Background: According to social-cognitive theory (SCT), self-efficacy affects health behavior both directly and indirectly by influencing how individuals perceive their environment. This study examines whether perceptions of home and school environment mediate the association between self-efficacy and physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior in adolescent girls. Methods: Baseline data from the Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT) was used for this study. Grade 8 female students (n = 357) were recruited from 12 secondary schools located in low-income communities in the Hunter Region, New South Wales, Australia. PA was assessed using accelerometers, and sedentary behavior by self-report and accelerometers. Self-reported measures were used for perceived home and school environment and self-efficacy. Multilevel regression models were calculated to determine if the perceived environment mediated the relationship between self-efficacy with both PA and sedentary behavior. Results: The perceptions of the school and home environment did not mediate the relationship between PA self-efficacy and PA behavior or sedentary behavior. Conclusion: The mediated models were not supported for PA or sedentary behavior. However, other results of this paper may be helpful for future theory development and practice. More research is needed to understand behaviors in unique populations such as this.

DOI 10.1123/jpah.2012-0414
Co-authors David Lubans
2014 Lloyd AB, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' lifestyle programme on the activity- and diet-related parenting practices of fathers and mothers', PEDIATRIC OBESITY, 9 e149-e155 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ijpo.248
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2014 Choi BCK, Decou M, Rasali D, Martens PJ, Mancuso M, Plotnikoff RC, et al., 'Enhancing capacity for risk factor surveillance at the regional/local level: a follow-up review of the findings of the Canadian Think Tank Forum after 4¿years', Archives of Public Health, 72 1-11 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/2049-3258-72-2
2014 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'Efficacy of interventions that include diet, aerobic and resistance training components for type 2 diabetes prevention: A systematic review with meta-analysis', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 11 (2014) [C1]

Current recommendations for the prevention of type 2 diabetes advise modification of diet and exercise behaviors including both aerobic and resistance training. However, the effic... [more]

Current recommendations for the prevention of type 2 diabetes advise modification of diet and exercise behaviors including both aerobic and resistance training. However, the efficacy of multi-component interventions involving a combination of these three components has not been established. The aims of this review were to systematically review and meta-analyze the evidence on multi-component (diet + aerobic exercise + resistance training) lifestyle interventions for type 2 diabetes prevention. Eight electronic databases (Medline, Embase, SportDiscus, Web of Science, CINAHL, Informit health collection, Cochrane library and Scopus) were searched up to June 2013. Eligible studies 1) recruited prediabetic adults or individuals at risk of type 2 diabetes; 2) conducted diet and exercise [including both physical activity/aerobic and resistance training] programs; and 3) reported weight and plasma glucose outcomes. In total, 23 articles from eight studies were eligible including five randomized controlled trials, one quasi-experimental, one two-group comparison and one single-group pre-post study. Four studies had a low risk of bias (score = 6/10). Median intervention length was 12 months (range 4-48 months) with a follow-up of 18 months (range 6.5 - 48 months). The diet and exercise interventions varied slightly in terms of their specific prescriptions. Meta-analysis favored interventions over controls for weight loss (-3.79 kg [-6.13, -1.46; 95% CI], Z = 3.19, P = 0.001) and fasting plasma glucose (-0.13 mmol.L-1 [-0.24, -0.02; 95% CI], Z = 2.42, P = 0.02). Diabetes incidence was only reported in two studies, with reductions of 58% and 56% versus control groups. In summary, multi-component lifestyle type 2 diabetes prevention interventions that include diet and both aerobic and resistance exercise training are modestly effective in inducing weight loss and improving impaired fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, dietary and exercise outcomes in at risk and prediabetic adult populations. These results support the current exercise guidelines for the inclusion of resistance training in type 2 diabetes prevention, however there remains a need for more rigorous studies, with long-term follow-up evaluating program efficacy, muscular fitness outcomes, diabetes incidence and risk reduction. © 2014 Aguiar et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-11-2
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2014 Cohen KE, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Lubans DR, 'Fundamental movement skills and physical activity among children living in low-income communities: A cross-sectional study', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 11 (2014) [C1]

Background: Although previous studies have demonstrated that children with high levels of fundamental movement skill competency are more active throughout the day, little is known... [more]

Background: Although previous studies have demonstrated that children with high levels of fundamental movement skill competency are more active throughout the day, little is known regarding children's fundamental movement skill competency and their physical activity during key time periods of the school day (i.e., lunchtime, recess and after-school). The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between fundamental movement skill competency and objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) throughout the school day among children attending primary schools in low-income communities.Methods: Eight primary schools from low-income communities and 460 children (8.5 ± 0.6 years, 54% girls) were involved in the study. Children's fundamental movement skill competency (TGMD-2; 6 locomotor and 6 object-control skills), objectively measured physical activity (ActiGraph GT3X and GT3X + accelerometers), height, weight and demographics were assessed. Multilevel linear mixed models were used to assess the cross-sectional associations between fundamental movement skills and MVPA.Results: After adjusting for age, sex, BMI and socio-economic status, locomotor skill competency was positively associated with total (P = 0.002, r = 0.15) and after-school (P = 0.014, r = 0.13) MVPA. Object-control skill competency was positively associated with total (P < 0.001, r = 0.20), lunchtime (P = 0.03, r = 0.10), recess (P = 0.006, r = 0.11) and after-school (P = 0.022, r = 0.13) MVPA.Conclusions: Object-control skill competency appears to be a better predictor of children's MVPA during school-based physical activity opportunities than locomotor skill competency. Improving fundamental movement skill competency, particularly object-control skills, may contribute to increased levels of children's MVPA throughout the day.Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry No: ACTRN12611001080910. © 2014 Cohen et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-11-49
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, David Lubans
2013 Plotnikoff RC, Costigan SA, Karunamuni ND, Lubans DR, 'Community-based physical activity interventions for treatment of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review with meta-analysis.', Frontiers in Endocrinology, 4 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fendo.2013.00003
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, David Lubans
2013 Short CE, James EL, Plotnikoff RC, 'Theory-and evidence-based development and process evaluation of the Move More for Life program: A tailored-print intervention designed to promote physical activity among post-treatment breast cancer survivors', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-124
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Erica James
2013 Lubans DR, Lonsdale C, Plotnikoff RC, Smith J, Dally K, Morgan PJ, 'Development and evaluation of the Motivation to Limit Screen-time Questionnaire (MLSQ) for adolescents.', Prev Med, 57 561-566 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.07.023
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Kerry Dally
2013 Forbes L, Fraser S, Downs S, Storey K, Plotnikoff RC, Raine K, et al., 'Changes in Dietary and Physical Activity Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes in Alberta Youth Between 2005 and 2008.', Canadian Journal of Public Health, 104 e490-e495 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3
2013 Lang J, James C, Ashby S, Plotnifkoff R, Guest M, Kable A, et al., 'The provision of weight management advice: An investigation into occupational therapy practice', Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 60 387-394 (2013) [C1]

Background/aim: Obesity affects more than half the Australian population and has become epidemic throughout the world. Little is known regarding occupational therapy interventions... [more]

Background/aim: Obesity affects more than half the Australian population and has become epidemic throughout the world. Little is known regarding occupational therapy interventions with clients who are overweight or obese. This study aimed to identify occupational therapy practice in relation to the provision of weight management. This was part of a larger study investigating health professional practice. Methods: A cross-sectional study design using a self-administered, purpose-designed survey was employed to identify the current practices of occupational therapists working in a regional area of New South Wales, Australia. Participants were recruited via email or mail as publically available. Results: Fifty-one occupational therapists anonymously completed the survey. Results revealed that 53% (n = 26) of respondents did not consider weight management to be within their scope of practice or their workplace role description. The most common intervention was the provision of physical activity advice (65.2%; n = 30). Dietary advice was provided by 20.8% (n = 10), while 77% (n = 32) referred onto dietitian services. During entry-level occupational therapy education, only 7.8% (n = 4) had received weight management advice education. Completion of postgraduate professional development training in this area was reported by 14% (n = 7) of respondents. Conclusion: This study provides insight into the current practices of Australian occupational therapists in relation to the provision of weight management advice. This research displays a need to acknowledge both a generic and a discipline-specific role for the provision of healthy lifestyle interventions. This may be achieved through better access to education during entry-level programmes and in the workplace. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12073
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ashley Kable, Suzanne Snodgrass, Samantha Ashby, Carole James
2013 Plotnikoff RC, Costigan SA, Karunamuni N, Lubans DR, 'Social cognitive theories used to explain physical activity behavior in adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 56 245-253 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.01.013
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 19
Co-authors David Lubans, Sarah Costigan
2013 Raine KD, Plotnikoff R, Schopflocher D, Lytvyak E, Nykiforuk CIJ, Storey K, et al., 'Healthy Alberta communities: Impact of a three-year community-based obesity and chronic disease prevention intervention', Preventive Medicine, 57 955-962 (2013) [C1]

Objective: To assess the impact of a 3. year (2006-2009) community-based intervention for obesity and chronic disease prevention in four diverse "Healthy Alberta Communities" (HAC... [more]

Objective: To assess the impact of a 3. year (2006-2009) community-based intervention for obesity and chronic disease prevention in four diverse "Healthy Alberta Communities" (HAC). Methods: Targeted intervention development incorporated the ANGELO conceptual framework to help community stakeholders identify environmental determinants of obesity amenable to intervention. Several inter-related initiatives were implemented. To evaluate, we surveyed separate samples of adults in HAC communities before and after the interventions and compared responses to identical survey questions asked of adults living in Alberta in two waves of the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). Results: The HAC sample included 4761 (2006) and 4733 (2009) people. The comparison sample included 9775 and 9784 respondents in 2005 and 2009-10 respectively. Self-reported body mass index showed no change, and neither were there significant changes in behaviors relative to secular trends. Most significant outcomes were relevant to social conditions, specifically sense of belonging to community in the intervention communities. Conclusion: Health outcome indicators at the community level may not be sufficiently sensitive to capture changes which, over a relatively short term, would only be expected to be incremental, given that interventions were directed primarily to creating environmental conditions supportive of changes in behavioral outcomes rather than toward health outcome change directly. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.08.024
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Dewar DL, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Costigan SA, Lubans DR, 'Testing Social-Cognitive Theory to Explain Physical Activity Change in Adolescent Girls From Low-Income Communities', RESEARCH QUARTERLY FOR EXERCISE AND SPORT, 84 483-491 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02701367.2013.842454
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Sarah Costigan
2013 Dewar DL, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, Collins CE, Batterham M, et al., 'The nutrition and enjoyable activity for teen girls study: A cluster randomized controlled trial', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 45 313-317 (2013) [C1]

Background Obesity prevention among youth of low SES is a public health priority given the higher prevalence of youth obesity in this population subgroup. Purpose To evaluate the ... [more]

Background Obesity prevention among youth of low SES is a public health priority given the higher prevalence of youth obesity in this population subgroup. Purpose To evaluate the 24-month impact of a school-based obesity prevention program among adolescent girls living in low-income communities. Design The study was a school-based group RCT, the Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT Girls) intervention. Setting/participants The study involved 12 secondary schools located in low-income communities in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were 357 adolescent girls (aged 13.2±0.5 years). Intervention The 12-month multicomponent intervention was guided by social cognitive theory and involved strategies to promote physical activity, reduce sedentary behaviors, and improve dietary outcomes. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was BMI, and secondary outcomes were BMI z-score; percentage body fat (bioelectrical impedance analysis); physical activity (accelerometers); dietary intake; and recreational screen-time (self-report). Data were collected in 2010-2012 and analyzed in 2012. Results After 24 months, there were no intervention effects on BMI (adjusted mean difference -0.33, 95% CI= -0.97, 0.28, p=0.353) and BMI z-score (-0.12, 95% CI= -0.27, 0.04, p=0.178). However, there was a group-by-time interaction for percentage body fat (-1.96%, 95% CI= -3.02, -0.89, p=0.006). Intervention effects for physical activity, screen time, and dietary intake were not significant. Conclusions The NEAT Girls intervention did not result in effects on the primary outcome. Further study of youth who are "at risk" of obesity should focus on strategies to improve retention and adherence in prevention programs. Trial registration This study is registered at Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials ACTRN1261000033004. © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2013.04.014
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2013 Plotnikoff RC, Karunamuni N, Courneya KS, Sigal RJ, Johnson JA, Johnson ST, 'The Alberta Diabetes and Physical Activity Trial (ADAPT): A Randomized Trial Evaluating Theory-Based Interventions to Increase Physical Activity in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 45 45-56 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12160-012-9405-2
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
2013 Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry N, et al., 'The SHED-IT Community Trial: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet- and Paper-Based Weight Loss Programs Tailored for Overweight and Obese Men', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 45 139-152 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12160-012-9424-z
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2013 Nykiforuk CIJ, Schopflocher D, Vallianatos H, Spence JC, Raine KD, Plotnikoff RC, et al., 'Community Health and the Built Environment: examining place in a Canadian chronic disease prevention project', HEALTH PROMOTION INTERNATIONAL, 28 257-268 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/heapro/dar093
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2013 Costigan SA, Barnett L, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, 'The Health Indicators Associated With Screen-Based Sedentary Behavior Among Adolescent Girls: A Systematic Review', JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENT HEALTH, 52 382-392 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2012.07.018
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, David Lubans
2013 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Costigan SA, McCargar L, 'A Test of the Theory of Planned Behavior to Predict Physical Activity in an Overweight/Obese Population Sample of Adolescents From Alberta, Canada', HEALTH EDUCATION & BEHAVIOR, 40 415-425 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1090198112455642
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, David Lubans
2013 Plotnikoff R, 'Behavioural interventions targeting physical activity to increase activity and improve glucose control in adults with type 2 diabetes', Evidence-Based Medicine, 18 213-214 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/eb-2013-101224
2013 Short CE, James EL, Plotnikoff RC, 'How Social Cognitive Theory can help oncology-based health professionals promote physical activity among breast cancer survivors', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ONCOLOGY NURSING, 17 482-489 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ejon.2012.10.009
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Erica James
2013 Belanger LJ, Plotnikoff RC, Clark AM, Courneya KS, 'Prevalence, correlates, and psychosocial outcomes of sport participation in young adult cancer survivors', Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 14 298-304 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.psychsport.2012.10.010
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Duncan MJ, Rashid M, Vandelanotte C, Cutumisu N, Plotnikoff RC, 'Development and reliability testing of a self-report instrument to measure the office layout as a correlate of occupational sitting', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-16
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2013 Sigal RJ, Armstrong MJ, Colby P, Kenny GP, Plotnikoff RC, Reichert SM, Riddell MC, 'Physical Activity and Diabetes', Canadian Journal of Diabetes, 37 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcjd.2013.01.018
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 11
2013 Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'Development and evaluation of social cognitive measures related to adolescent physical activity', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 10 544-555 (2013) [C1]

Background: This study aimed to develop and evaluate the construct validity and reliability of modernized social cognitive measures relating to physical activity behaviors in adol... [more]

Background: This study aimed to develop and evaluate the construct validity and reliability of modernized social cognitive measures relating to physical activity behaviors in adolescents. Methods: An instrument was developed based on constructs from Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory and included the following scales: self-efficacy, situation (perceived physical environment), social support, behavioral strategies, and outcome expectations and expectancies. The questionnaire was administered in a sample of 171 adolescents (age = 13.6 ± 1.2 years, females = 61%). Confirmatory factor analysis was employed to examine model-fit for each scale using multiple indices, including chi-square index, comparative-fit index (CFI), goodness-of-fit index (GFI), and the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA). Reliability properties were also examined (ICC and Cronbach's alpha). Results: Each scale represented a statistically sound measure: fit indices indicated each model to be an adequate-to-exact fit to the data; internal consistency was acceptable to good (a = 0.63-0.79); rank order repeatability was strong (ICC = 0.82-0.91). Conclusions: Results support the validity and reliability of social cognitive scales relating to physical activity among adolescents. As such, the developed scales have utility for the identification of potential social cognitive correlates of youth physical activity, mediators of physical activity behavior changes and the testing of theoretical models based on Social Cognitive Theory. © 2013 Human Kinetics, Inc..

Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2013 Pigford AE, Fehderau DD, Ball GDC, Holt NL, Plotnikoff RC, Veugelers PJ, et al., 'Community-based Participatory Research to Address Childhood Obesity: Experiences from Alexander First Nation in Canada.', Pimatisiwin, 11 171-185 (2013) [C1]
2013 Forbes LE, Downs SM, Fraser SN, Majumdar SR, Ball GDC, Plotnikoff RC, et al., 'Anthropometric and dietary predictors of insulin sensitivity in 10-to 14-year-old boys and girls', APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY NUTRITION AND METABOLISM-PHYSIOLOGIE APPLIQUEE NUTRITION ET METABOLISME, 38 320-325 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1139/apnm-2012-0232
2013 Comte M, Hobin E, Majumdar SR, Plotnikoff RC, Ball GDC, McGavock J, 'Patterns of weekday and weekend physical activity in youth in 2 Canadian provinces', Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 38 115-119 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1139/apnm-2012-0100
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
2013 Trinh L, Plotnikoff RC, Rhodes RE, North S, Courneya KS, 'Associations between sitting time and quality of life in a population-based sample of kidney cancer survivors', Mental Health and Physical Activity, 6 16-23 (2013) [C1]

Background: Adverse health effects of sedentary behaviour on cancer risk and health outcomes in cancer survivors have been reported but few studies have examined quality of life (... [more]

Background: Adverse health effects of sedentary behaviour on cancer risk and health outcomes in cancer survivors have been reported but few studies have examined quality of life (QoL) and no study has focused on kidney cancer survivors (KCS). The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of sitting time among KCS and to determine any associations with QoL. Methods: All 1985 KCS diagnosed between 1996 and 2010 identified through a Canadian provincial Registry were mailed a survey that consisted of the modified domain-specific sitting time questionnaire, the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire and several Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT) QoL scales. Standard demographic and medical variables were also reported. Results: Completed surveys were received from 540 KCS. The mean hours of sitting time were 8.0 ± 4.7 for a work-day and 6.5 ± 3.8 for a non-work day. After adjustment for key covariates, analyses of covariance indicated that the only significant relationship was an unexpected positive association between sitting time on a work day and emotional well-being (p = 0.019). Moreover, the only variable to moderate these associations was age, with younger KCS under age 60 showing the expected negative associations between sitting time and physical and functional aspects of QoL. Conclusion: KCS sit for a significant amount of time on work days and non-work days, however, there were few associations with QoL. Future observational studies and randomized controlled trials are warranted to examine sitting time and health outcomes among KCS. Crown Copyright © 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2012.09.001
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2013 Nihill GFJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, 'Associations between sedentary behavior and self-esteem in adolescent girls from schools in low-income communities', Mental Health and Physical Activity, 6 30-35 (2013) [C1]

Background: Excessive time spent in sedentary behavior is associated with a range of physiological, psychosocial and behavioral health concerns in youth. Objective: The primary ai... [more]

Background: Excessive time spent in sedentary behavior is associated with a range of physiological, psychosocial and behavioral health concerns in youth. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to examine the association between sedentary behavior and self-esteem among adolescent girls living in low-income communities. Methods: Participants were 357 girls [mean age (standard deviation) = 13.2 (0.5) years] from 12 secondary schools located in low-income communities in New South Wales, Australia. Height, weight, body fat (bio-electrical impedance analysis) and physical activity (accelerometers), self-esteem were assessed. Results: Significant inverse associations were found between self-esteem and time spent watching DVDs and using the computer for non-school purposes, but no relationship was found between TV viewing and self-esteem. The relationship between sedentary time (%) from accelerometers and self-esteem was not significant. Conclusions: Sedentary behavior is a pervasive public health concern and time spent in specific screen-based recreation was associated with self-esteem in adolescent girls living in low-income communities. Our findings are indicative of the complex nature of these relationships and reveal a need for further longitudinal and intervention-based research in the field. Copyright © 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2012.02.003
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors David Lubans
2013 Collins CE, Jensen ME, Young MD, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Improvement in erectile function following weight loss in obese men: The SHED-IT randomized controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 7 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.07.004
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Myles Young
2013 Short CE, James EL, Stacey F, Plotnikoff RC, 'A qualitative synthesis of trials promoting physical activity behaviour change among post-treatment breast cancer survivors', JOURNAL OF CANCER SURVIVORSHIP, 7 570-581 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11764-013-0296-4
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Erica James
2013 Sagna ML, Schopflocher D, Raine K, Nykiforuk C, Plotnikoff R, 'Adjusting Divergences between Self-reported and Measured Height and Weight in an Adult Canadian Population', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH BEHAVIOR, 37 841-850 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.5993/AJHB.37.6.13
2012 Schopflocher D, Vanspronsen E, Spence JC, Vallianatos H, Raine KD, Plotnikoff RC, Nykiforuk CIJ, 'Creating neighbourhood groupings based on built environment features to facilitate health promotion activities', Canadian Journal of Public Health, 103 S61-S66 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Belanger LJ, Plotnikoff RC, Clark A, Courneya KS, 'A survey of physical activity programming and counseling preferences in young-adult cancer survivors', Cancer Nursing, 35 48-54 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
2012 Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, Dewar DL, Costigan SA, Collins CE, 'Explaining dietary intake in adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools. A test of Social Cognitive Theory', Appetite, 58 517-524 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors David Lubans, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Sarah Costigan
2012 Trinh L, Plotnikoff RC, Rhodes RE, North S, Courneya KS, 'Physical activity preferences in a population-based sample of kidney cancer survivors', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 1709-1717 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Dewar DL, Collins CE, Batterham M, et al., 'Preventing obesity among adolescent girls: One-year outcomes of the nutrition and enjoyable activity for teen girls (NEAT Girls) cluster randomized controlled trial', Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 166 821-827 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2012 Hay J, Maximova K, Durksen A, Carson V, Rinaldi RL, Torrance B, et al., 'Physical activity intensity and cardiometabolic risk in youth', Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 166 1022-1029 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
2012 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Cook AT, Berthon B, Mitchell S, Callister R, 'The impact of a workplace-based weight loss program on work-related outcomes in overweight male shift workers', Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 54 122-127 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2012 Plotnikoff RC, Todosijczuk I, Johnson ST, Karunamuni N, 'Canada's Physical Activity Guide: Examining print-based material for motivating physical activity in the workplace', Journal of Health Communication, 17 432-442 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2012 Pakpour AH, Hidarnia A, Hajizadeh E, Plotnikoff RC, 'Action and coping planning with regard to dental brushing among Iranian adolescents', Psychology Health & Medicine, 17 176-187 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
2012 Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Plotnikoff RC, Mummery WK, 'Do participants' preferences for mode of delivery (text, video, or both) influence the effectiveness of a web-based physical activity intervention?', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 14 e37 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2012 Ashby SE, James CL, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Guest M, Kable AK, Snodgrass SJ, 'Survey of Australian practitioners' provision of healthy lifestyle advice to clients who are obese', Nursing & Health Sciences, 14 189-196 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Samantha Ashby, Suzanne Snodgrass, Carole James, Clare Collins, Ashley Kable
2012 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of male-only weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 13 393-408 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Myles Young, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2012 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Trinh L, Craig CL, 'A 15-year longitudinal test of the theory of planned behaviour to predict physical activity in a randomized national sample of Canadian adults', Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 13 521-527 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors David Lubans
2012 Short CE, James EL, Girgis A, McElduff P, Plotnikoff RC, 'Move more for life: The protocol for a randomised efficacy trial of a tailored-print physical activity intervention for post-treatment breast cancer survivors', BMC Cancer, 12 172 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Erica James, Patrick Mcelduff
2012 Johnson ST, Mundt C, Soprovich A, Wozniak L, Plotnikoff RC, Johnson JA, 'Healthy eating and active living for diabetes in primary care networks (HEALD-PCN): Rationale, design, and evaluation of a pragmatic controlled trial for adults with type 2 diabetes', BMC Public Health, 12 455 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 3
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Weaver KE, Callister R, Dewar DL, Costigan SA, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for the Supporting Children's Outcomes Using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) group randomized controlled trial: A physical activity and fundamental movement skills intervention for primary schools in low-income communities', BMC Public Health, 12 1-11 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Robin Callister, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Sarah Costigan
2012 Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans NJ, 'Review: A systematic review of the impact of physical activity programmes on social and emotional well-being in at-risk youth', Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 17 2-13 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 11
Co-authors David Lubans
2012 Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Jung M, Eves N, Sigal R, 'Testing mediator variables in a resistance training intervention for obese adults with type 2 diabetes', Psychology and Health, 27 1388-1404 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors David Lubans
2012 Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Development and evaluation of social cognitive measures related to adolescent dietary behaviours', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 9 1-10 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2012 Trinh L, Plotnikoff RC, Rhodes RE, North S, Courneya KS, 'Correlates of physical activity in a population-based sample of kidney cancer survivors: An application of the theory of planned behavior', The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activit, 9 1-12 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 8
2012 Aparicio-Ting FE, Friedenreich CM, Kopciuk KA, Plotnikoff RC, Bryant HE, 'Prevalence of meeting physical activity guidelines for cancer prevention in Alberta', Chronic Diseases and Injuries in Canada, 32 216-226 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2012 Plotnikoff RC, Karunamuni N, 'Reducing sitting time: The new workplace health priority', Archives of Environmental & Occupational Health, 67 125-127 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2012 Belanger LJ, Plotnikoff RC, Clark AM, Courneya KS, 'Determinants of physical activity in young adult cancer survivors', American Journal of Health Behavior, 36 483-494 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
2012 Storey KE, Forbes LE, Fraser SN, Spence JC, Plotnikoff RC, Raine KD, McCargar LJ, 'Adolescent weight status and related behavioural factors: Web survey of physical activity and nutrition', Journal of Obesity, 2012 1-8 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
2012 Downs SM, Fraser SN, Storey KE, Forbes LE, Spence JC, Plotnikoff RC, et al., 'Geography influences dietary intake, physical activity and weight status of adolescents', Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism, 2012 1-6 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
2011 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community effectiveness trial: Study protocol of a community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', BMC Public Health, 11 876 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-876
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Myles Young, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, David Lubans, Andrew Miller, Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher
2011 Imayama I, Plotnikoff RC, Courneya KS, Johnson JA, 'Determinants of quality of life in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes', Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 9 1-9 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1477-7525-9-115
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 10
2011 Short CE, James EL, Plotnikoff RC, Girgis A, 'Efficacy of tailored-print interventions to promote physical activity: A systematic review of randomised trials', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 8 113 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Erica James
2011 Faulkner G, McCloy C, Plotnikoff RC, Tremblay MS, 'Relaunching a national social marketing campaign: Expectations and challenges for the 'new' ParticipACTION', Health Promotion Practice, 12 569-576 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1524839909349180
Citations Scopus - 2
2011 Flaman LM, Plotnikoff RC, Nykiforuk CIJ, Raine K, 'Mechanisms for understanding the facilitators and barriers to capacity building for chronic disease prevention activities', Health Promotion Practice, 12 858-866 (2011) [C1]
2011 Plotnikoff RC, Pickering MA, Glenn N, Doze SL, Reinbold-Matthews ML, McLeod LJ, et al., 'The effects of a supplemental, theory-based physical activity counseling intervention for adults with type 2 diabetes', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 8 944-954 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
2011 Belanger LJ, Plotnikoff RC, Clark A, Courneya KS, 'Physical activity and health-related quality of life in young adult cancer survivors: a Canadian provincial survey', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 5 44-53 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11764-010-0146-6
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 24
2011 Plotnikoff RC, Johnson ST, Loucaides CA, Bauman AE, Karunamuni ND, Pickering MA, 'Population-based estimates of physical activity for adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A cautionary tale of potential confounding by weight status', Journal of Obesity, 2011 1-5 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1155/2011/561432
Citations Scopus - 6
2011 Taylor LM, Spence JC, Raine K, Sharma AM, Plotnikoff RC, 'Self-reported physical activity preferences in individuals with prediabetes', The Physician and Sports Medicine, 39 41-49 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.3810/psm.2011.05.1894
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2011 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Cook AT, Berthon B, Mitchell S, Callister R, 'Efficacy of a workplace-based weight loss program for overweight male shift workers: The Workplace POWER (Preventing Obesity Without Eating like a Rabbit) randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 52 317-325 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.01.031
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 40
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2011 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Eather N, Riley N, Smith CJ, 'Test-retest reliability of a battery of field-based health-related fitness measures for adolescents', Journal of Sports Sciences, 29 685-693 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2010.551215
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Nicholas Riley, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Narelle Eather
2011 Plotnikoff RC, Lippke S, Johnson ST, Hugo K, Rodgers W, Spence JC, 'Awareness of Canada's Physical Activity Guide to Healthy Active Living in a large community sample', American Journal of Health Promotion, 25 294-297 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.4278/ajhp.090211-arb-60
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2011 Plotnikoff RC, Karunamuni N, 'Steps towards permanently increasing physical activity in the population', Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 24 162-167 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1097/yco.0b013e3283438107
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2011 Imayama I, Plotnikoff RC, Courneya KS, Johnson JA, 'Determinants of quality of life in type 2 diabetes population: the inclusion of personality', Quality of Life Research, 20 551-558 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11136-010-9772-8
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2011 Berry TR, Spence JC, Plotnikoff RC, Bauman A, 'Physical activity information seeking and advertising recall', Health Communication, 26 246-254 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/10410236.2010.549810
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2011 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Costigan SA, Trinh L, Spence JC, Downs S, McCargar L, 'A test of the theory of planned behavior to explain physical activity in a large population sample of adolescents from Alberta, Canada', Journal of Adolescent Health, 49 547-549 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2011.03.006
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors David Lubans, Sarah Costigan
2011 Trinh L, Plotnikoff RC, Rhodes RE, North S, Courneya KS, 'Associations between physical activity and quality of life in a population-based sample of kidney cancer survivors', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 20 859-868 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-10-1319
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
2011 Plotnikoff RC, Trinh L, Courneya KS, Karunamuni N, Sigal RJ, 'Predictors of physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes', American Journal of Health Behavior, 35 359-370 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
2011 Ball GDC, Mackenzie-Rife KA, Newton MS, Alloway CA, Slack JM, Plotnikoff RC, Goran MI, 'One-on-one lifestyle coaching for managing adolescent obesity: Findings from a pilot, randomized controlled trial in a real-world, clinical setting', Paediatrics & Child Health, 16 345-350 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
2011 Minaker LM, Storey KE, Raine KD, Spence JC, Forbes LE, Plotnikoff RC, McCargar LJ, 'Associations between the perceived presence of vending machines and food and beverage logos in schools and adolescents' diet and weight status', Public Health Nutrition, 14 1350-1356 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/s1368980011000449
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
2011 Pakpour AH, Zeidi IM, Chatzisarantis N, Molsted S, Harrison AP, Plotnikoff RC, 'Effects of action planning and coping planning within the theory of planned behaviour: A physical activity study of patients undergoing haemodialysis', Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 12 609-614 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.psychsport.2011.06.008
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
2010 Plotnikoff RC, Pickering MA, Rhodes RE, Courneya KS, Spence JC, 'A test of cognitive mediation in a 12-month physical activity workplace intervention: Does it explain behaviour change in women?', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 7 14 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-7-32
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 8
2010 Berry TR, Witcher C, Holt NL, Plotnikoff RC, 'A Qualitative Examination of Perceptions of Physical Activity Guidelines and Preferences for Format', Health Promotion Practice, 11 908-916 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7
2010 Spence JC, Blanchard CM, Clark M, Plotnikoff RC, Storey KE, McCargar L, 'The role of self-efficacy in explaining gender differences in physical activity among adolescents: A multilevel analysis', Journal of Physical Activity & Health, 7 176-183 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
2010 Raine KD, Plotnikoff RC, Nykiforuk C, Deegan H, Hemphill E, Storey K, et al., 'Reflections on community-based population health intervention and evaluation for obesity and chronic disease prevention: The Healthy Alberta Communities Project', International Journal of Public Health, 55 679-686 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00038-010-0187-7
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
2010 Plotnikoff RC, Courneya KS, Sigal RJ, Johnson JA, Birkett N, Lau D, et al., 'Alberta Diabetes and Physical Activity Trial (ADAPT): A randomized theory-based efficacy trial for adults with type 2 diabetes - rationale, design, recruitment, evaluation, and dissemination', Trials, 11 1-10 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-11-4
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2010 Flaman LM, Nykiforuk CIJ, Plotnikoff RC, Raine K, 'Exploring facilitators and barriers to individual and organizational level capacity building: Outcomes of participation in a community priority setting workshop', Global Health Promotion, 17 34-43 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1757975910365225
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2010 Plotnikoff RC, Trinh L, 'Protection motivation theory: Is this a worthwhile theory for physical activity promotion?', Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, 38 91-98 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/JES.0b013e3181d49612
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 10
2010 Zhang X, Geiss LS, Caspersen CJ, Cheng YJ, Engelgau MM, Johnson JA, et al., 'Physical activity levels and differences in the prevalence of diabetes between the United States and Canada', Preventive Medicine, 50 241-245 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2010.02.015
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2010 Forbes CC, Plotnikoff RC, Courneya KS, Boule NG, 'Physical activity preferences and type 2 diabetes: Exploring demographic, cognitive, and behavioral differences', Diabetes Educator, 36 801-815 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0145721710378538
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2010 Plotnikoff RC, Johnson ST, Luchak M, Pollock C, Holt NL, Leahy A, et al., 'Peer telephone counseling for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A case-study approach to inform the design, development, and evaluation of programs targeting physical activity', Diabetes Educator, 36 717-729 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0145721710376327
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
2010 Taylor LM, Spence JC, Raine K, Plotnikoff RC, Vallance JK, Sharma AM, 'Physical activity and health-related quality of life in individuals with prediabetes', Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 90 15-21 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.diabres.2010.04.011
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2010 Plotnikoff RC, Lightfoot P, McFall S, Spinola C, Johnson ST, Prodaniuk T, et al., 'Child Health Ecological Surveillance System (CHESS) for childhood obesity: A feasibility study', Chronic Diseases in Canada, 30 95-106 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2010 Plotnikoff RC, Eves N, Jung M, Sigal RJ, Padwal R, Karunamuni N, 'Multicomponent, home-based resistance training for obese adults with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial', International Journal of Obesity, 34 1733-1741 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2010.109
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2010 Plotnikoff RC, Lippke S, Johnson ST, Courneya KS, 'Physical activity and stages of change: A longitudinal test in types 1 and 2 diabetes samples', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 40 138-149 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12160-010-9193-5
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
2010 Plotnikoff RC, Lippke S, Courneya K, Birkett N, Sigal R, 'Physical activity and diabetes: An application of the theory of planned behaviour to explain physical activity for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in an adult population sample', Psychology & Health, 25 7-23 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/08870440802160984
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 17
2010 Plotnikoff RC, Pickering MA, McCargar LJ, Loucaides CA, Hugo K, 'Six-month follow-up and participant use and satisfaction of an electronic mail intervention promoting physical activity and nutrition', American Journal of Health Promotion, 24 255-259 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.4278/ajhp.08032830
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2010 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, 'Exploring the mechanisms of physical activity and dietary behavior change in the Program X intervention for adolescents', Journal of Adolescent Health, 47 83-91 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2009.12.015
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Robin Callister, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2010 Plotnikoff RC, Johnson ST, Karunamuni N, Boule NG, 'Physical activity related information sources predict physical activity behaviors in adults with Type 2 Diabetes', Journal of Health Communication, 15 846-858 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/10810730.2010.522224
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2010 Plotnikoff RC, 'Understanding Physical Activity Maintenance in Breast Cancer Survivors', American Journal of Health Behavior, 34 225-236 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
2010 Plotnikoff RC, Pickering MA, Flaman LM, Spence JC, 'The Role of Self-Efficacy on the Relationship Between the Workplace Environment and Physical Activity: A Longitudinal Mediation Analysis', Health Education and Behavior, 37 170-185 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2010 Plotnikoff RC, Lippke S, Trinh L, Courneya KS, Birkett N, Sigal RJ, 'Protection motivation theory and the prediction of physical activity among adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes in a large population sample', British Journal of Health Psychology, 15 643-661 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1348/135910709X478826
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
2010 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, McElduff P, Burrows TL, Warren JM, et al., 'The SHED-IT community trial study protocol: A randomised controlled trial of weight loss programs for overweight and obese men', BMC Public Health, 10 1-11 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-701
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Robin Callister, Patrick Mcelduff, Philip Morgan, Myles Young, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2010 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Dewar DL, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, et al., 'The Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT girls) randomized controlled trial for adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools: Rationale, study protocol, and baseline results', BMC Public Health, 10 652 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-652
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2009 Plotnikoff RC, 'Predictors of aerobic physical activity and resistance training among Canadian adults with type 2 diabetes: An application of the Protection Motivation Theory.', Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 10 320-328 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
2009 Plotnikoff RC, Todosijczuk I, Faulkner G, Pickering MA, Cragg S, Chad K, et al., 'ParticipACTION: Baseline assessment of the 'new ParticipACTION': A quantitative survey of Canadian organizational awareness and capacity', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 6 Article no. 86 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-6-86
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2009 Faulkner G, McCloy C, Plotnikoff RC, Bauman A, Brawley L, Chad K, et al., 'ParticipACTION: Baseline assessment of the capacity available to the 'New ParticipACTION': A qualitative study of Canadian organizations', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 6 87 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-6-87
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2009 Spence J, Brawley L, Craig C, Plotnikoff RC, Tremblay M, Bauman A, et al., 'ParticipACTION: Awareness of the participACTION campaign among Canadian adults - Examining the knowledge gap hypothesis and a hierarchy-of-effects model', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 6 85 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-6-85
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2009 Liebreich T, Plotnikoff RC, Courneya KS, Boule N, 'Diabetes NetPLAY: A physical activity website and linked email counselling randomized intervention for individuals with type 2 diabetes', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 6 1-15 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 24
2009 Plotnikoff RC, Karunamuni N, Taylor L, Schmidt C, 'An examination of the relationships between dietary behaviours with physical activity and obesity in adults with type2 diabetes', Canadian Journal of Diabetes, 33 27-37 (2009) [C1]
2009 Forbes LE, Storey KE, Fraser SN, Spence JC, Plotnikoff RC, Raine KD, 'Dietary patterns associated with glycemic index and glycemic load among Alberta adolescents', Applied Physiology, Nutrition & Metabolism, 34 648-658 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1139/H09-051
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
2009 Plotnikoff RC, Hotz SB, Johnson ST, Hansen JS, Birkett NJ, Leonard LE, Flaman LM, 'Readiness to shop for low-fat foods: A population study', Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 109 1392-1397 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jada.2009.05.010
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2009 Bize R, Plotnikoff RC, Scott SD, Karunamuni N, Rodgers W, 'Adoption of the Healthy Heart Kit by Alberta Family Physicians', CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH-REVUE CANADIENNE DE SANTE PUBLIQUE, 100 140-144 (2009) [C1]
2009 Berry T, Spence J, Plotnikoff RC, Bauman A, McCargar L, Witcher C, et al., 'A mixed methods evaluation of televised health promotion advertisements targeted at older adults', Evaluation and Program Planning, 32 278-288 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2009 Plotnikoff RC, Lippke S, Johnson ST, Hotz SB, Birkett NJ, Rossi SR, 'Applying the stages of change to multiple low-fat dietary behavioral contexts. An examination of stage occupation and discontinuity', Appetite, 53 345-353 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2009.07.016
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2009 Tulloch H, Reida R, D¿Angeloa M, Plotnikoff RC, Morrina L, Beatona L, et al., 'Predicting short and long-term exercise intentions and behaviour in patients with coronary artery disease: A test of protection motivation theory', Psychology and Health: an international journal, 24 255-269 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
2009 Karvinen KH, Courneya KS, Plotnikoff RC, Spence J, Venner PM, North S, 'A prospective study of the determinants of exercise in bladder cancer survivors using the Theory of Planned Behavior', Supportive Care in Cancer, 17 171-179 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 18
2009 Plotnikoff RC, Karunamuni N, Spence J, 'Chronic disease-related lifestyle risk factors in a sample of Canadian adolescents.', Journal of Adolescent Health, 44 606-609 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 20
2009 Rhodes RE, Blanchard CM, Courneya KS, Plotnikoff RC, 'Identifying Belief-Based Targets for the Promotion of Leisure-Time Walking', Health Education and Behavior, 36 381-393 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
2009 Pickering MA, Plotnikoff RC, 'Factor Structure and Measurement Invariance of a 10-Item Decisional Balance Scale: Longitudinal and Subgroup Examination Within an Adult Diabetic Sample', Measurement in Physical Education & Exercise Science, 13 206-226 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/10913670903260086
Citations Scopus - 1
2009 Tavares LS, Plotnikoff RC, Loucaides C, 'Social-cognitive theories for predicting physical activity behaviours of employed women with and without young children', Psychology Health and Medicine, 14 129-142 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
2009 Bize R, Plotnikoff RC, 'The relationship between a short measure of health status and physical activity in a workplace population', Psychology Health and Medicine, 14 53-61 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2009 Plotnikoff RC, Karunamuni N, Brunet S, 'A comparison of physical activity-related social-cognitive factors between those with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and diabetes free adults', Psychology, Health & Medicine, 14 536-544 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13548500903012863
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2009 Plotnikoff RC, Rhodes RE, Trinh L, 'Protection motivation theory and physical activity: A longitudinal test among a representative population sample of Canadian adults', Journal of Health Psychology, 14 1119-1134 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1359105309342301
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 10
2009 Lippke S, Plotnikoff RC, 'The protection motivation theory within the stages of the transtheoretical model - Stagespecific interplay of variables and prediction of exercise stage transitions', British Journal of Health Psychology, 14 211-229 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
2009 Storey K, Forbes L, Fraser SN, Spence J, Plotnikoff RC, Raine KD, et al., 'Diet quality, nutrition and physical activity among adolescents: The Web-SPAN (Web-Survey of Physical Activity and Nutrition) project.', Public Health Nutrition, 12 2009-2017 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 27
2008 Ball GD, Lenk JM, Barbarich BN, Plotnikoff RC, Fishburne GJ, Mackenzie KA, Willows ND, 'Overweight children and adolescents referred for weight management: Are they meeting lifestyle behaviour recommendations?', Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism, 33 936-945 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1139/H08-088
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
2008 Vallance J, Courneya K, Plotnikoff R, Dinu I, Mackey J, 'Development and evaluation of a theory-based physical activity guidebook for breast cancer survivors', Health Education and Behavior, 35 174-189 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1090198106287693
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 15
2008 Anderson D, Raine K, Plotnikoff R, Cook K, Barrett L, Smith C, 'Baseline assessment of organizational capacity for health promotion within regional health authorities in Alberta, Canada', International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 15 6-14 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1025382308090339
Citations Scopus - 6
2008 Plotnikoff R, Courneya K, Trinh L, Karunamuni N, Sigal R, 'Aerobic physical activity and resistance training: An application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour among adults with type 2 diabetes in a random, national sample of Canadians', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 5 0-0 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-5-61
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 11
2008 Sigal R, Kenny G, Oh P, Perkins B, Plotnikoff R, Prud'Homme D, Riddell M, 'Canadian Diabetes Association Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada: Physical Activity and Diabetes', Canadian Journal of Diabetes, 32 37-39 (2008) [C1]
2008 Plotnikoff RC, Lightfoot P, Spinola C, Predy G, Barrett L, 'A Framework for addressing the global obesity epidemic locally: The Child Health Ecological Surveillance System (CHESS)', Preventing Chronic Diseases: Public health research practice and policy, 5 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12
2008 Scott SD, Plotnikoff RC, Karunamuni N, Bize R, Rodgers W, 'Factors influencing the adoption of an innovation: An examination of the uptake of the Canadian Heart Health Kit (HKK)', Implementation Science, 3 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1748-5908-3-41
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 21
2008 Gladwin C, Church J, Plotnikoff R, 'Policy processes and getting physical activity into Alberta's urban schools', Canadian Journal of Public Health, 99 332-338 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2008 Plotnikoff R, Karunamuni N, Johnson J, Kotovych M, Svenson L, 'Health-related behaviours in adults with diabetes: Associations with health care utilization and costs', Canadian Journal of Public Health, 99 227-231 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 11
2008 Vallance J, Courneya K, Plotnikoff R, Dinu I, Mackey J, 'Maintenance of physical activity in breast cancer survivors after a randomized trial', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 40 173-180 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/mss.0b013e3181586b41
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 21
2008 Plotnikoff RC, Lippke S, Courneya KS, Birkett N, Sigal RJ, 'Physical activity and social-cognitive theory: A test in a population sample of adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes', Applied Psychology: an international review, 57 628-643 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1464-0597.2008.00344.x
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 36
2008 Tavares LS, Plotnikoff RC, 'Not Enough Time? Individual and Environmental Implications for Workplace Physical Activity Programming Among Women with and without Young Children', Health Care for Women International, 29 244-281 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/07399330701880911
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 14
2008 Rhodes RE, Plotnikoff RC, Courneya KS, 'Predicting the physical activity intention-behaviour profiles of adopters and maintainers using three social cognition models', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 36 244-252 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12160-008-9071-6
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 37
2008 Vallance J, Courneya K, Plotnikoff R, Mackey J, 'Analyzing theoretical mechanisms of physical activity behaviour change in breast cancer survivors: Results from the activity promotion (ACTION) trial', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 35 150-158 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12160-008-9019-x
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 40
2008 Taylor L, Leslie E, Plotnikoff R, Owen N, Spence J, 'Associations of perceived community environmental attributes with walking in a population-based sample of adults with type 2 diabetes', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 35 170-178 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12160-008-9021-3
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
2008 Peddle C, Plotnikoff R, Wild C, Au H, Courneya K, 'Medical, demographic, and psychosocial correlates of exercise in colorectal cancer survivors: An application of self-determination theory', Supportive Care in Cancer, 16 9-17 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-007-0272-5
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 21
2007 Vallance JKH, Courneya KS, Plotnikoff RC, Yasui Y, Mackey JR, 'Randomized controlled trial of the effects of print materials and step pedometers on physical activity and quality of life in breast cancer survivors', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 25 2352-2359 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2006.07.9988
Citations Scopus - 129Web of Science - 113
2007 Plotnikoff RC, Brunet S, Courneya KS, Spence JC, Birkett NJ, Marcus B, Whiteley J, 'The efficacy of stage-matched and standard public health materials for promoting physical activity in the workplace: The Physical Activity Workplace Study (PAWS)', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH PROMOTION, 21 501-509 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 31
2007 Plotnikoff RC, Lippke S, Reinbold-Matthews M, Courneya KS, Karunamuni N, Sigal RJ, Birkett N, 'Assessing the validity of a stage measure on physical activity in a population-based sample of individuals with type 1 or type 2 diabetes', Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 11 73-91 (2007) [C1]

This study was designed to test the validity of a transtheoretical model's physical activity (PA) stage measure with intention and different intensities of behavior in a large pop... [more]

This study was designed to test the validity of a transtheoretical model's physical activity (PA) stage measure with intention and different intensities of behavior in a large population-based sample of adults living with diabetes (Type 1 diabetes, n=697; Type 2 diabetes, n=1,614) and examine different age groups. The overall specificity (classified correctly as inactive) for Type 1 diabetes was 69.3% based on the percentage of individuals in precontemplation, contemplation, and preparation not meeting Canada's PA guidelines. Sensitivity (classified correctly as active) was 82.5% based on the proportion of active participants in action and maintenance. In the Type 2 diabetes group, the overall specificity and sensitivity was 63.9% and 88.2%, respectively. No significant differences were found between the diabetes groups for stage distribution patterns, and sensitivity and specificity values. The majority of the study hypotheses related to intention and behaviors were confirmed, providing further supportive evidence for the utility of this PA staging measure for the diabetes population. Copyright © 2007, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

Citations Scopus - 20
2007 Plotnikoff RC, Lippke S, Prodaniuk T, Wild TC, Barrett JE, 'Demographic, health, and behavioral factors associated with smoking in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH BEHAVIOR, 31 13-23 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2007 Berry TR, Plotnikoff RC, Raine K, Anderson D, Naylor PJ, 'An examination of the stages of change construct for health promotion within organizations', Journal of Health, Organisation and Management, 21 121-135 (2007) [C1]

Purpose: The purpose of this research is to examine the organizational stages of change construct of the transtheoretical model of behavior change. Design/methodology/approach: Da... [more]

Purpose: The purpose of this research is to examine the organizational stages of change construct of the transtheoretical model of behavior change. Design/methodology/approach: Data on organizational and individual stages of change for tobacco reduction, physical activity promotion, and heart healthy eating promotion were collected from service provider, senior management, and board level members of provincial health authorities across three data collection periods. Findings: Results revealed significant correlations between individual and organizational stages of change for management level respondents, but inconsistent relationships for service providers and no significant correlations for board level respondents. There were no significant differences between respondent levels for organizational stage of change for any of the promotion behaviors. In general, changes in stage failed to predict whether there was a belief in an organization's capability of addressing any of the health promotion activities. There was also a large amount of variance between individual respondents for most health authorities in their reported organizational stages of change for physical activity and healthy eating. Practical implications: Based on the results of the present study it is concluded that there is little evidence that the organizational stages of change construct is valid. The evidence indicates that assessing individual readiness within an organization may be as effective as asking individuals to report on organizational stages of readiness. Originality/value: This paper reports on the validity of the organizational stages of change construct in a health promotion context and provides information for those who are considering using it. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

DOI 10.1108/14777260710736822
Citations Scopus - 9
2007 Barrett LL, Plotnikoff RC, Raine K, 'Organizational leadership and its relationship to regional health authority actions to promote health', Journal of Health, Organisation and Management, 21 259-282 (2007) [C1]

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine organizational leadership and its relationship to regional health authority actions to promote health. Design/methodology/approac... [more]

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine organizational leadership and its relationship to regional health authority actions to promote health. Design/methodology/approach - Through use of four previously developed measures of Perceived Organizational Leadership for Health Promotion, this paper focused on leadership as a distributed entity within regional health authority (RHA) jurisdictions mandated to address the health of the population in the province of Alberta, Canada. Findings - First, examination of differentials between organizational levels (i.e. board members, n=30; middle/senior management, n=58; and service providers, n=56) on ratings of the four leadership measures revealed significant differences. That is, board members tended to rate leadership components significantly higher than service providers and middle/senior managers: from across all 17 RHAs; and in low health promotion capacity and high health promotion capacity RHAs. Second, regression analyses identified that the leadership measures "Practices for Organizational Learning" and "Wellness Planning" were positively associated with health authority actions on improving population heart health (heart health promotion). The presence of a "Champion for Heart Health Promotion" and the leadership measures "Workplace Milieu" and "Organization Member Development" were also positively associated with health authority actions for health promotion. A subsidiary aim revealed low to moderate positive relationships of the dimensions of Leadership, Infrastructure and Will to Act with one another, as proposed by the Alberta Model on "Organizational Capacity Building for Health Promotion." Originality/value - This paper, conducted on the baseline dataset (n=144) of the "Alberta Heart Health Project's Dissemination Phase", represents a rare effort to examine leadership at a collective organizational level. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

DOI 10.1108/14777260710751735
Citations Scopus - 1
2007 Plotnikoff RC, 'Biases against obesity among healthcare professionals', Canadian Journal of Diabetes, 31 355-356 (2007)
2007 Rhodes RE, Courneya KS, Blanchard CM, Plotnikoff RC, 'Prediction of leisure-time walking: an integration of social cognitive, perceived environmental, and personality factors.', Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 4 51 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-4-51
2007 Minke SW, Raine KD, Plotnikoff RC, Anderson D, Khalema E, Smith C, 'Resources for health promotion - Rhetoric, research and reality', CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH-REVUE CANADIENNE DE SANTE PUBLIQUE, 98 489-494 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2007 Loucaides CA, Plotnikoff RC, Bercovitz K, 'Differences in the correlates of physical activity between urban and rural Canadian youth', JOURNAL OF SCHOOL HEALTH, 77 164-170 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1746-1561.2007.00187.x
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 23
2007 Blanchard CM, Reid RD, Morrin LI, Beaton LJ, Pipe A, Courneya KS, Plotnikoff RC, 'Barrier self-efficacy and physical activity over a 12-month period in men and women who do and do not attend cardiac rehabilitation', REHABILITATION PSYCHOLOGY, 52 65-73 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1037/0090-5550.52.1.65
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
2007 Bize R, Johnson JA, Plotnikoff RC, 'Physical activity level and health-related quality of life in the general adult population: A systematic review', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 45 401-415 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2007.07.017
Citations Scopus - 200Web of Science - 166
2007 Barrett JE, Plotnikoff RC, Courneya KS, Raine KD, 'Physical activity and type 2 diabetes - Exploring the role of gender and income', DIABETES EDUCATOR, 33 128-143 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0145721706297453
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
2007 Plotnikoff RC, Lippke S, Karunamuni N, Eves N, Courneya KS, Sigal R, Birkett NJ, 'Co-morbidity, functionality and time since diagnosis as predictors of physical activity in individuals with type 1 or type 2 diabetes', DIABETES RESEARCH AND CLINICAL PRACTICE, 78 115-122 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.diabres.2007.02.016
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2007 Plotnikoff RC, Bercovitz K, Rhodes RE, Loucaides CA, Karunamuni N, 'Testing a conceptual model related to weight perceptions, physical activity and smoking in adolescents', HEALTH EDUCATION RESEARCH, 22 192-202 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyl065
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
2006 Eves ND, Plotnikoff RC, 'Resistance training and type 2 diabetes - Considerations for implementation at the population level', DIABETES CARE, 29 1933-1941 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.2337/dc05-1981
Citations Scopus - 80Web of Science - 69
2006 Plotnikoff RC, Taylor LM, Wilson PM, Courneya KS, Sigal RJ, Birkett N, et al., 'Factors associated with physical activity in Canadian adults with diabetes', MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE, 38 1526-1534 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/01.mss.0000228937.86539.95
Citations Scopus - 80Web of Science - 70
2006 Rhodes RE, Plotnikoff RC, 'Understanding action control: Predicting physical activity intention-behavior profiles across 6 months in a Canadian sample', HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY, 25 292-299 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1037/0278-6133.25.3.292
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 50
2006 Blanchard CM, Reid RD, Morrin LI, Beaton LJ, Pipe A, Courneya KS, Plotnikoff RC, 'Correlates of physical activity change in patients not attending cardiac rehabilitation', Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, 26 377-383 (2006) [C1]

OBJECTIVE: Limited research has identified theoretical correlates of physical activity (PA) change in patients not receiving cardiac rehabilitation. The purpose of the present stu... [more]

OBJECTIVE: Limited research has identified theoretical correlates of physical activity (PA) change in patients not receiving cardiac rehabilitation. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether changes in self-efficacy, PA intention, perceived severity and susceptibility, and PA benefits/barriers were associated with changes in PA over a 12-month period in these patients. METHODS: Patients (N = 555) not attending cardiac rehabilitation completed a psychosocial questionnaire in hospital and 6 and 12 months after hospitalization for a cardiac event. RESULTS: Hierarchical regression analyses showed that the increase in PA from baseline to 6 months was significantly related to an increase in self-efficacy and PA intentions and a decrease in the impact of health-related barriers. Furthermore, the decrease in PA from 6 to 12 months was significantly related to a decrease in health-related benefits and PA intentions and an increase in time and health-related barriers. Finally, the increase in PA from baseline to 12 months was significantly related to an increase in health-related benefits and intentions and a decrease in health-related barriers. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in PA levels over a 12-month period were associated with changes in various theoretical variables. Interestingly, the associations among these variables with PA varied as a function of time after hospitalization. © 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

DOI 10.1097/00008483-200611000-00007
Citations Scopus - 12
2006 Plotnikoff RC, 'Physical activity in the management of diabetes: Population-based perspectives and strategies', Canadian Journal of Diabetes, 30 52-62 (2006) [C1]

This paper offers an overview of population-based perspectives and strategies related to the role of physical activity in the management of diabetes. Topics include the importance... [more]

This paper offers an overview of population-based perspectives and strategies related to the role of physical activity in the management of diabetes. Topics include the importance of physical activity promotion, need for theoretically driven approaches, individual-level population-based strategies and resistance training. Studies undertaken in the Physical Activity and Population Health Research Laboratory at the University of Alberta are presented as illustrative examples throughout. Recommendations and implications for research and practice are discussed, with a call for ecological approaches that recognize the inter-relationships between individuals and the multiple levels of their environments.

Citations Scopus - 31
2006 Reid RD, Morrin LI, Pipe AL, Dafoe WA, Higginson LAJ, Wielgosz AT, et al., 'Determinants of physical activity after hospitalization for coronary artery disease: the Tracking Exercise After Cardiac Hospitalization (TEACH) Study', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR PREVENTION & REHABILITATION, 13 529-537 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/01.hjr.0000201513.13343.97
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 49
2006 Wolbeck Minke S, Smith C, Plotnikoff RC, Khalema E, Raine K, 'The evolution of integrated chronic disease prevention in Alberta, Canada.', Preventing chronic disease [electronic resource]., 3 (2006) [C1]

BACKGROUND: Recognition of the common risk factors for leading chronic diseases in Canada has contributed to the development of integrated chronic disease prevention and health pr... [more]

BACKGROUND: Recognition of the common risk factors for leading chronic diseases in Canada has contributed to the development of integrated chronic disease prevention and health promotion approaches. The Alberta Heart Health Project studied the capacity of health organizations in Alberta, Canada, to engage in heart health promotion. This article describes how the Alberta Heart Health Project acted on emerging research findings describing the preliminary stages of integrated chronic disease prevention in Alberta to provide leadership to encourage provincial chronic disease prevention efforts. CONTEXT: Political support for integrated chronic disease prevention was evident at the provincial and federal levels in Canada. As a result of organizational restructuring, loss of key health promotion champions, and decreased funding allocations, Alberta's regional health authorities sought increased efficiency in their chronic disease prevention efforts. METHODS: Descriptive data were derived from a brief questionnaire on regional health authorities' chronic disease prevention priorities and activities, an inventory of regional health authority health promotion programs and services, content analysis of key regional health authority documents, and focus groups with regional health authority staff, management, and policymakers. CONSEQUENCES: In 2002, the Alberta Heart Health Project data revealed that many regional health authorities were beginning to engage in integrated chronic disease prevention. However, little collaboration occurred across the health organizations; provincial leadership to facilitate collaboration and networking for integrated chronic disease prevention was needed. INTERPRETATION: Results supported the growing momentum for provincial leadership to enhance collaboration for integrated chronic disease prevention, which contributed to the development of the Alberta Healthy Living Network. The government's assistance is also needed to support the intersectoral collaborations essential for integrated chronic disease prevention.

Citations Scopus - 4
2006 Lippke S, Plotnikoff RC, 'Stages of change in physical exercise: A test of stage discrimination and nonlinearity', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH BEHAVIOR, 30 290-301 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 22
2006 Tudor-Locke C, Sisson SB, Lee SM, Craig CL, Plotnikoff RC, Bauman A, 'Evaluation of quality of commercial pedometers', CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH-REVUE CANADIENNE DE SANTE PUBLIQUE, 97 S10-S15 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 35
2006 Plotnikoff RC, Spence JC, Tavares LS, Rovniak LS, Bauman A, Lear SA, McCargar L, 'Characteristics of participants visiting the Canada on the Move website', CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH-REVUE CANADIENNE DE SANTE PUBLIQUE, 97 S28-S35 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
2006 Spence JC, Plotnikoff RC, Rovniak LS, Ginis KAM, Rodgers W, Lear SA, 'Perceived neighbourhood correlates of walking among participants visiting the Canada on the Move website', CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH-REVUE CANADIENNE DE SANTE PUBLIQUE, 97 S36-S40 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 12
2005 Rhodes RE, Plotnikoff RC, 'Can current physical activity act as a reasonable proxy measure of future physical activity? Evaluating cross-sectional and passive prospective designs with the use of social cognition models', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 40 547-555 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2004.07.016
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 39
2005 Plotnikoff RC, Anderson D, Raine K, Cook K, Barrett L, Prodaniuk TR, 'Scale development of individual and organisation infrastructure for heart health promotion in Regional Health Authorities', Health Education Journal, 64 256-270 (2005) [C1]

Objective: The purpose of this study was to validate measures of individual and organisational infrastructure for health promotion within Alberta's (Canada) 17 Regional Health Aut... [more]

Objective: The purpose of this study was to validate measures of individual and organisational infrastructure for health promotion within Alberta's (Canada) 17 Regional Health Authorities (RHAs). Design: A series of phases were conducted to develop individual and organisational scales to measure health promotion infrastructure. Instruments were designed with focus groups and then pre-tested prior to the validation study. Setting: In 1993 all hospitals and Public Health Units in the province of Alberta were regionalised into 17 RHAs, with responsibility for public health, community health, and acute and long-term care. While regionalisation may offer more opportunity for community participation, reorganisation of the public health system may have fragmented and diluted resources and skills for heart health promotion in some RHAs. Infrastructure (for example, human and financial resources), amongst other items, is believed to contribute to the capacity to promote health. Method: All 17 RHAs participated in the study, yielding a total of 144 individuals (that is board members, senior/middle management, and front line staff). These representative employees completed a self-administered questionnaire on individual- and organisational-level infrastructure measures. Results: Psychometric analyses of survey data provided empirical evidence for the robustness of the measures. Principal component analyses verified the construct validity of the scales, with alpha coefficients ranging from 0.75 to 0.95. Conclusion: The scales can be used by health professionals and researchers to assess individual- and organisational-level infrastructure, and tailor interventions to increase infrastructure for health promotion in health organisations.

DOI 10.1177/001789690506400306
Citations Scopus - 8
2005 Plotnikoff RC, McCargar LJ, Wilson PM, Loucaides CA, 'Efficacy of an e-mail intervention for the promotion of physical activity and nutrition behavior in the workplace context', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH PROMOTION, 19 422-429 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 70Web of Science - 59
2005 Brunet S, Plotnikoff RC, Raine K, Courneya K, 'Physical activity of aboriginals with type 2 diabetes: An exploratory study', ETHNICITY & DISEASE, 15 256-266 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2005 Barrett L, Plotnikoff RC, Raine K, Anderson D, 'Development of measures of organizational leadership for health promotion', HEALTH EDUCATION & BEHAVIOR, 32 195-207 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1090198104271970
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 19
2005 Anderson D, Plotnikoff RC, Raine K, Barrett L, 'Development of measures of individual leadership for health promotion.', International journal of health care quality assurance incorporating Leadership in health services, 18 (2005) [C1]

PURPOSE: This purpose of this research was to develop and establish psychometric properties of scales measuring individual leadership for health promotion. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPR... [more]

PURPOSE: This purpose of this research was to develop and establish psychometric properties of scales measuring individual leadership for health promotion. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Scales to measure leadership in health promotion were drafted based on capacity assessment instruments developed by other provinces involved in the Canadian Heart Health Initiative (CHHI), and on the literature. Content validity was established through a series of focus groups and expert opinion appraisals and pilot testing. Psychometric analyses provided empirical evidence of the construct validity and reliability of the leadership scales in the baseline survey (n = 144) of the Alberta Heart Health Project. FINDINGS: Principal component analysis verified the construct of the leadership scales of personal work-related practices and satisfaction with work-related practices. Each of the theoretically a prior determined scales factored into two scales each for a total of four final scales. Scale alpha coefficients (Cronbach's alpha) ranged between 0.71 and 0.78, thus establishing good scale internal consistencies. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: Limitations include the relatively small sample size used in determining psychometric properties. In addition, further qualitative work would enhance understanding of the complexity of leadership in health organizations. These measures can be used by both researchers and practitioners for the assessment leadership for health promotion and to tailor interventions to increase leadership for health promotion in health organizations. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Establishing the psychometric properties and quality of leadership measures is an innovative step toward achieving capacity assessment instruments which facilitate evaluation of key relationships in developing health sector capacity for health promotion.

Citations Scopus - 10
2005 Dressendorfer RH, Raine K, Dyck RJ, Plotnikoff RC, Collins-Nakai RL, McLaughlin WK, Ness K, 'A conceptual model of community capacity development for health promotion in the Alberta Heart Health Project.', Health promotion practice, 6 31-36 (2005) [C1]

PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to derive a conceptual model of community capacity development for health promotion based on the 5-year demonstration phase of the Alberta... [more]

PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to derive a conceptual model of community capacity development for health promotion based on the 5-year demonstration phase of the Alberta Heart Health Project. METHOD: Community actions associated with successful implementation and uptake of initiatives in four diverse target sites were identified by case study evaluation. RESULTS: Thirteen common elements of capacity development were found across the projects and categorized to define three primary dimensions of the process: (a) leadership that provided a driving force for implementation, (b) policy making that ensured diffusion and sustainability, and (c) use of local community resources and infrastructure. A conceptual model was constructed using these 3 dimensions and their interactions. CONCLUSION: Effective implementation of community health initiatives to promote heart health can be conceptualized as the involvement of local leadership, policy advocacy, and enhancement of existing infrastructure. The model highlights building these dimensions of community capacity development for health promotion.

Citations Scopus - 22
2005 Plotnikoff RC, Prodaniuk TR, Fein AJ, Milton L, 'Development of an ecological assessment tool for a workplace physical activity program standard.', Health promotion practice, 6 453-463 (2005) [C1]

This project was undertaken to develop a Workplace Physical Activity Assessment Tool to evaluate workplace physical activity programs based on a standard of best practices indicat... [more]

This project was undertaken to develop a Workplace Physical Activity Assessment Tool to evaluate workplace physical activity programs based on a standard of best practices indicated in the literature and by key stakeholders. The development of the Assessment Tool was structured on an ecological model for health and physical activity promotion and an occupational health and safety audit instrument. The project included a review and synthesis of pertinent literature, expert and stakeholder reviews, interrater reliability appraisals, and workplace consultations over three distinct study phases. The Assessment Tool was received positively by the expert reviewers (i.e., academics, policy makers, and practitioners) and revealed generally high interrater reliability. The Workplace Physical Activity Assessment Tool can be used to plan, implement, and evaluate physical activity programs in the workplace. Recommendations for future research are identified.

Citations Scopus - 17
2005 Fein AJ, Plotnikoff RC, Wild TC, Spence JC, 'An examination of adolescents' perceptions of the school physical environment related to physical activity', International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 3 179-195 (2005) [C1]
2004 Plotnikoff RC, Bercovitz M, Loucaides CA, 'Physical activity, smoking, and obesity among Canadian school youth - Comparison between urban and rural schools', CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH-REVUE CANADIENNE DE SANTE PUBLIQUE, 95 413-418 (2004) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 39
2004 Plotnikoff RC, Mayhew A, Birkett N, Loucaides CA, Fodor G, 'Age, gender, and urban-rural differences in the correlates of physical activity', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 39 1115-1125 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2004.04.024
Citations Scopus - 67Web of Science - 56
2004 Rhodes RE, Plotnikoff RC, Spence JC, 'Creating parsimony at the expense of precision? Conceptual and applied issues of aggregating belief-based constructs in physical activity research', HEALTH EDUCATION RESEARCH, 19 392-405 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyg043
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 28
2004 Anderson D, Plotnikoff RC, Raine K, Cook K, Smith C, Barrett L, 'Towards the development of scales to measure 'will' to promote heart health within health organizations in Canada', HEALTH PROMOTION INTERNATIONAL, 19 471-481 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/heapro/dah409
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 10
2004 Plotnikoff RC, Wright MF, Karunamuni N, 'Knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to climate change in Alberta, Canada: Implications for public health policy and practice', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH, 14 223-229 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/0960312042000218633
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 7
2004 Fein AJ, Plotnikoff RC, Wild TC, Spence JC, 'Perceived environment and physical activity in youth', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 11 135-142 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1207/s15327558ijbm1103_2
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 53
2004 Plotnikoff RC, Poon PPL, McGannon KR, Prodaniuk T, 'Can workplace active living work? Perspectives from the workplace', Avante, 10 57-70 (2004) [C1]
2004 Prodaniuk TR, Plotnikoff RC, Spence JC, Wilson PM, 'The influence of self-efficacy and outcome expectations on the relationship between perceived environment and physical activity in the workplace', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 1 (2004) [C1]

Background: Recent research and commentary contends that ecological approaches may be particularly useful for understanding and promoting physical activity participation in variou... [more]

Background: Recent research and commentary contends that ecological approaches may be particularly useful for understanding and promoting physical activity participation in various settings including the workplace. Yet within the physical activity domain there is a lack of understanding of how ecological environment factors influence behaviour. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between perceived environment, social-cognitive variables, and physical activity behaviour. Methods: Participants (N = 897) were employees from three large worksites who completed self-report inventories containing measures of self-efficacy, outcome expectations, perceptions of the workplace environment (PWES), and physical activity behaviour during both leisure-time and incorporated throughout the workday. Results: Results of both bivariate and multiple regression analyses indicated the global PWES scores had a limited association with leisure-time physical activity (R2adj =.01). Sequential regression analyses supported a weak association between physical activity incorporated in the workplace and PWES (R2adj = .04) and the partial mediation of self-efficacy on the relationship between PWES and workplace physical activity (variance accounted for reduced to R2adj = .02 when self-efficacy was controlled). Conclusion: Overall, the results of the present investigation indicate that self-efficacy acted as a partial mediator of the relationship between perceived environment and workplace physical activity participation. Implications of the findings for physical activity promotion using ecological-based approaches, and future directions for research from this perspective in worksite settings are discussed. © 2004 Prodaniuk et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-1-7
Citations Scopus - 38
2003 Plotnikoff RC, Brez S, Brunet S, 'Are exercise social-cognitive factors and behaviours different for adults with diabetes? A randomized community sample', Psychology, Health and Medicine, 8 465-471 (2003) [C1]

Exercise plays a key role in the prevention and delay of the onset of Type 2 diabetes and in the management of this disorder. To determine if there are differences in key social-c... [more]

Exercise plays a key role in the prevention and delay of the onset of Type 2 diabetes and in the management of this disorder. To determine if there are differences in key social-cognitive determinants of exercise and self-reported physical activity levels between adults with diabetes and those without the condition, a random selected sample of adults was surveyed. A telephone interview assessed physical activity behaviour and key social-cognitive constructs from major health behaviour change theories/models. The mean energy expenditure was not significantly different between the diabetes (n = 46) and the non-diabetes (n = 1556) groups. The diabetes group reported significantly lower scores for self-efficacy and perceived behavioural control, but higher for fear of, and vulnerability to, general health and cardiovascular disease threat. The data suggest that it may not be necessary to promote health threat messages, as threat is already high for this diabetes population and studies have shown that excess threat does not promote recommended exercise and health behaviours. Instead, the low levels of self-efficacy and perceived behavioural control among those with diabetes emphasize the importance of designing specific strategies (e.g., skills, incremental success) to increase their self-confidence in undertaking physical activity.

DOI 10.1080/1354850310001604577
Citations Scopus - 20
2002 Spence JC, Plotnikoff RC, Mummery WK, 'The awareness and use of Canada's Physical Activity Guide to Healthy Active Living', CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH-REVUE CANADIENNE DE SANTE PUBLIQUE, 93 394-396 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 21
2002 Plotnikoff R, Higginbotham HN, 'Protection Motivation Theory and exercise behaviour change for the prevention of coronary heart disease in a high-risk, Australian representative community sample of adults', Psychology, Health & Medicine, 7(1) 87-98 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 36
Co-authors Nick Higginbotham
2002 Plotnikoff RC, 'The development of social-cognitive measures in the exercise domain: Issues and challenges', Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 6 255-261 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6
2001 Plotnikoff RC, Hugo K, Cousineau N, 'Heart disease risk factor prevalence and profiles in a randomized community sample of Canadian women', CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH-REVUE CANADIENNE DE SANTE PUBLIQUE, 92 121-126 (2001)
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2001 Plotnikoff RC, Hotz SB, Birkett NJ, Courneya KS, 'Exercise and the transtheoretical model: A longitudinal test of a population sample', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 33 441-452 (2001)
DOI 10.1006/pmed.2001.0914
Citations Scopus - 104Web of Science - 90
2001 Cragg CE, Plotnikoff RC, Hugo K, Casey A, 'Perspective transformation in RN-to-BSN distance education', JOURNAL OF NURSING EDUCATION, 40 317-322 (2001)
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 13
2001 Plotnikoff RC, Blanchard C, Hotz SB, Rhodes R, 'Validation of the decisional balance scales in the exercise domain from the transtheoretical model: A longitudinal test', Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 5 191-206 (2001)

This study examined the validity and reliability of decisional balance scales for exercise (i.e., pros and cons) in a large longitudinal population-based randomized sample of Cana... [more]

This study examined the validity and reliability of decisional balance scales for exercise (i.e., pros and cons) in a large longitudinal population-based randomized sample of Canadian adults ages 18 to 65 years (N= 703). Assessments were taken over 3 time points with 6-month intervals between testing. Content, factorial, concurrent, and construct validity along with internal consistency and test-retest reliability were established for the decisional balance scales. The developed measures have utility for researchers and practitioners who test and apply the exercise decisional balance constructs of the Transtheoretical Model.

Citations Scopus - 61
2001 Courneya KS, Plotnikoff RC, Hotz SB, Birkett NJ, 'Predicting exercise stage transitions over two consecutive 6-month periods: A test of the theory of planned behaviour in a population-based sample', BRITISH JOURNAL OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY, 6 135-150 (2001)
DOI 10.1348/135910701169115
Citations Scopus - 69Web of Science - 59
2001 Smith C, Raine K, Anderson D, Dyck R, Plotnikoff RC, Ness K, McLaughlin K, 'A preliminary examination of organizational capacity for heart health promotion in Alberta¿s Regional Health Authorities.', International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 40-43 (2001)
2000 Breithaupt K, Plotnikoff RC, Edwards N, Hotz S, 'Psychometric quality of a Processes of Change (POC) scale in a maternal smoking sample', CANADIAN JOURNAL OF BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE-REVUE CANADIENNE DES SCIENCES DU COMPORTEMENT, 32 158-162 (2000)
DOI 10.1037/h0087111
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
2000 Plotnikoff RC, Hugo K, Wielgosz A, Wilson E, MacQuarrie D, 'Heart disease and stroke in Canadian women: Policy development', CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH-REVUE CANADIENNE DE SANTE PUBLIQUE, 91 58-59 (2000)
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
2000 Plotnikoff RC, Brez S, Hotz SB, 'Exercise behavior in a community sample with diabetes: Understanding the determinants of exercise behavioral change', DIABETES EDUCATOR, 26 450-459 (2000)
DOI 10.1177/014572170002600312
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 43
2000 Wilson D, Glassford RG, Krupa E, Masuda J, Wild C, Plotnikoff R, et al., 'Health promotion practice, research and policy: Building capacity through the development of an interdisciplinary study centre and graduate programme in Alberta, Canada', Promotion & Education, 7 44-47 (2000)
DOI 10.1177/102538230000700115
2000 Courneya KS, Plotnikoff RC, Hotz SB, Birkett NJ, 'Social support and the theory of planned behavior in the exercise domain', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH BEHAVIOR, 24 300-308 (2000)
Citations Scopus - 108Web of Science - 92
2000 Maclean LM, Plotnikoff RC, Moyer A, 'Transdisciplinary work with psychology from a population health perspective: An illustration', Journal of Health Psychology, 5 173-181 (2000)

One of the important implications of a population health perspective in public health is an increase in the need for transdisciplinary ways of working. The Community Health Resear... [more]

One of the important implications of a population health perspective in public health is an increase in the need for transdisciplinary ways of working. The Community Health Research Unit (CHRU) is presented as an example of an environment where psychology and psychologists work with other disciplines to conduct applied research in population health. Research activities were examined to identify how the disciplines collaborate and to provide evidence of successful interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches which incorporate health psychology. The strengths and challenges of multi-, inter-, and transdisciplinary approaches were examined through a poll of CHRU members. Further, members' views about the contributions of psychology to their work were gathered. Issues of working with different disciplines in a transdisciplinary approach are highlighted and future directions are suggested.

Citations Scopus - 6
1999 Plotnikoff R, Williams P, Fein A, 'Effects of a school capacity-building intervention on children's heart health: Evaluation of the Coalfields Healthy Heartbeat School Project in New South Wales, Australia', Health Education Journal, 58 389-400 (1999)

The authors evaluated the effects of a school capacity-building intervention, The Australian Coalfields Healthy Heartbeat Project, on heart-health outcomes of 11- and 12-year-old ... [more]

The authors evaluated the effects of a school capacity-building intervention, The Australian Coalfields Healthy Heartbeat Project, on heart-health outcomes of 11- and 12-year-old children. The 15 primary schools involved in the project are situated in a socio-economically disadvantaged area with rates of cardiovascular disease significantly higher than the regional, state and national averages. Each school received a capacity-building intervention which consisted of: provision of curriculum materials and training of teachers; advice for schools regarding structural change; ongoing support and follow-up; and, community involvement and public relations. The evaluation consisted of pre- and post-school-year measures of heart-health knowledge, attitudes, self-reported behaviour and health-related fitness. In comparison with students from the control-school district, the capacity-building intervention reported significant gains in fitness; however, there were no significant effects on knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. The implications of these findings, along with future research directions and practice, are discussed.

Citations Scopus - 4
1999 Aminzadeh F, Plotnikoff RC, Edwards N, 'Development and evaluation of the cane use cognitive mediator instrument.', Nursing Research, 48 1-7 (1999)
1998 Plotnikoff R, Higginbotham HN, 'Protection motivation theory and the prediction of exercise and low-fat diet behaviours among Australian cardiac patients', Psychology and Health, 13 411-429 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 42
Co-authors Nick Higginbotham
1997 Plotnikoff RC, 'Heart disease and stroke in Canada: Issues and options.', Canadian Journal of Cardiology, 13 1013 (1997)
1997 De Grasse CE, Hugo K, Plotnikoff RC, 'Supporting women during breast diagnostics.', The Canadian nurse, 93 24-30 (1997)
Citations Scopus - 4
1996 Plotnikoff RC, Williams P, Higginbottom N, 'An evaluation of the Kurri Kurri Public School Healthy Heartbeat Project.', ACHPER Healthy Lifestyle Journal, 43 21-25 (1996)
1995 PLOTNIKOFF RC, HIGGINBOTHAM N, 'Predicting low-fat diet intentions and behaviors for the prevention of coronary heart disease: An application of protection motivation theory among an Australian population.', PSYCHOLOGY & HEALTH, 10 397-408 (1995)
DOI 10.1080/08870449508401959
Citations Web of Science - 28
1995 Lovat T, Davies M, Plotnikoff RC, 'Integrating research skills in teacher education.', Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 20 30-35 (1995)
1995 Williams P, Plotnikoff RC, 'Kurri Kurri Public School Healthy Heartbeat Project.', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 5 35-39 (1995)
1993 LIM LLY, VALENTI LA, KNAPP JC, DOBSON AJ, PLOTNIKOFF R, HIGGINBOTHAM N, HELLER RF, 'A self-administered quality-of-life questionnaire after acute myocardial infarction', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, 46 1249-1256 (1993)
DOI 10.1016/0895-4356(93)90089-J
Citations Scopus - 88Web of Science - 67
1993 DOBSON AJ, BLIJLEVENS R, ALEXANDER HM, CROCE N, HELLER RF, HIGGINBOTHAM N, et al., 'SHORT FAT QUESTIONNAIRE - A SELF-ADMINISTERED MEASURE OF FAT-INTAKE BEHAVIOR', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 17 144-149 (1993) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 45
1993 HIGGINBOTHAM N, HEADING G, PONT J, PLOTNIKOFF R, DOBSON AJ, SMITH E, et al., 'COMMUNITY WORRY ABOUT HEART-DISEASE - A NEEDS SURVEY IN THE COALFIELDS AND NEWCASTLE AREAS OF THE HUNTER REGION', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 17 314-321 (1993) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
1992 Moore PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Preston GD, 'A study of school students'' long term retention of expired air resuscitation knowledge and skills', Resuscitation, Vol 24 17-25 (1992) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Greg Preston
1992 Lovat T, Plotnikoff RC, 'Towards autonomous learning: Evaluating the integrated research component in teacher education.', South Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, 20 57-62 (1992)
1989 PLOTNIKOFF R, MOORE PJ, 'RETENTION OF CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS BY 11-YEAR-OLD AND 12-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 150 296-& (1989)
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 12
1989 Lovat T, Plotnikoff RC, 'Evaluating the curriculum theory component in teacher education.', Action in Teacher Education, 11 16-22 (1989)
1989 Plotnikoff RC, 'An evaluation of the effectiveness and importance of supervision in the practicum', The Australian Journal of Teaching Practice, 9 7 (1989)
1986 Plotnikoff RC, 'Retention of expired air resuscitation skills of sixth class students.', Environmental Health Review of Australia, 18 38-49 (1986)
Show 286 more journal articles

Conference (87 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'Improvements in weight, HbA1C and fitness following lifestyle intervention: the PULSE trial for type 2 diabetes prevention in men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2014, 18(S1): e68, Canberra, Australia (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.11.298
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2014 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'Improvements in biomarkers of type 2 diabetes risk following a home-based lifestyle intervention: the PULSE randomised controlled trial ¿ a multi-component type 2 diabetes prevention program for men', Obesity Reviews, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/obr.12151
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2014 Trinh L, Plotnikoff RC, Rhodes RE, North S, Courneya KS, 'EFFECTS OF SUPERVISED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PLUS BEHAVIORAL COUNSELING ON MOTIVATIONAL OUTCOMES IN KIDNEY CANCER SURVIVORS: A PILOT STUDY', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014) [E3]
2014 Johnson ST, Mundt C, Soprovich A, Wozniak L, Qiu W, Plotnikoff RC, Johnson JA, 'Increase in daily steps after an exercise specialist led lifestyle intervention for adults with type 2 diabetes in primary care: a controlled implementation trial.', Canadian Journal of Diabetes, 38(35), Melbourne, Australia (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcjd.2014.07.071
2014 Short CE, Coysh C, Vandelanotte C, James E, Plotnikoff R, 'PROMOTING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AMONG BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS USING COMPUTER-TAILORED ONLINE INTERVENTIONS: IMOVE MORE FOR LIFE RCT', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Erica James
2013 Blanchard C, Reid RD, Morrin L, Pipe A, Plotnikoff RC, 'Distinct physical activity trajectories in heart disease patients: the importance of gender from an intensity perspective.', Abstracts ISBNPA 2013, Gent (2013) [E3]
2013 Short CE, James E, dSouza M, Plotnikoff RC, 'Main outcomes of the Move More for Life Trial: a randomised controlled trial of the effects of computer-tailored and targeted-print materials on physical activity behaviour among post-treatment breast cancer survivors.', Abstracts ISBNPA 2013, Gent, Belgium (2013) [E3]
2013 Wozniak L, Mladenovic A, Pederson J, Mundt S, Soprovich AL, Plotnikoff RC, et al., 'Participant experiences of HEALD-PCN: A qualitative study on perceived effectiveness and maintenance of self-management behaviours related to diabetes', Accelerating Primary Care Conference, Edmonton (2013) [E3]
2013 McCargar L, Forbes L, Fraser S, Downs S, Storey K, Plotnikoff RC, et al., 'Diet and activity risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes in Alberta youth: Comparison between 2005 and 2008.', Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism: European journal of nutrition, metabolic diseases and dietetics, Granada (2013) [E3]
2013 Lang J, James C, Ashby S, Kable A, Guest M, Snodgrass S, et al., 'An Investigation into Current Occupational Therapy Practice in the Provision of Weight Management Advice', Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, Adelaide (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Ashley Kable, Suzanne Snodgrass, Carole James, Clare Collins, Samantha Ashby
2013 Woo M, Schaefer L, Ball GD, Majumdar SR, Plotnikoff RC, Wozny P, et al., 'Outdoor Time Associated with Physical Activity Levels in Children and Adolescents: Healthy Hearts Prospective Cohort Study.', Canadian Journal of Diabetes, Montreal (2013) [E3]
2013 Wozniak L, Pederson J, Mundt C, Soprovich A, Plotnikoff RC, Johnson JA, Johnson ST, '6-Month Follow-Up Among Participants from the Healthy Eating and Active Living for Diabetes in Primary Care Networks Trial: A Qualitative Study', Canadian Journal of Diabetes, Montreal (2013) [E3]
2013 Aguiar E, Morgan P, Collins C, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'Characteristics of men evaluated as at high risk of type 2 diabetes based on the Australian diabetes risk assessment tool', IDF 2013 World Diabetes Congress Abstracts, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2013 Lloyd A, Lubans D, Plotnikoff R, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'A comparison of maternal and paternal parenting practices and their influence on children¿s physical activity, screen-time, diet and adiposity', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2013 Aguiar E, Morgan P, Collins CE, Plotnikoff R, Callister R, 'Preliminary outcomes from the PULSE randomised controlled trial ¿ A multi-component type 2 diabetes prevention program for men', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2013 Ashton L, Rollo M, Hutchesson M, Young MD, Morgan P, Callister R, et al., 'A comparison of outcomes of young and old adult males in the SHED-IT weight loss program for men', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Megan Rollo, Myles Young, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2013 Lubans DR, Dewar D, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, Collins CE, Batterham M, et al., 'Two Year Outcomes and Moderators of Intervention Effects from the NEAT Girls Obesity Prevention Group Randomised Controlled Trial.', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2013 Collins CE, Jensen MJ, Young MD, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Erectile function improves in obese men following weight loss during the SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Myles Young, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2013 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'Preliminary outcomes from the PULSE randomised controlled trial ¿ a multi-component type 2 diabetes prevention program for men', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2013 Raine KD, Plotnikoff RC, Schopflocher D, Lytvyak E, Nykiforuk CIJ, Storey K, et al., 'Healthy Alberta Communities: Impact of a three-year community-based obesity and chronic disease prevention intervention', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
2013 Lubans D, Dewar D, Plotnikoff R, Okely AD, Collins CE, Batterham M, Morgan PJ, 'Two year outcomes and moderators of intervention effects from the NEAT Girls obesity prevention group randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Clare Collins
2013 Morgan PJ, Smith J, Plotnikoff R, Dally K, Finn T, Okley A, et al., 'Group randomised controlled trial of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-Time (ATLAS) obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys living in low-income communities', The Proceedings of The Australasian Society of Behavioural Health and Medicine 10th Annual Scientific Conference, Newcastle, NSW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2013 Lubans D, Lonsdale C, Morgan PJ, Smith J, Dally K, Plotnikoff R, 'Instrument development and initial validity for a scale to measure adolescents¿ motivation to limit their screen time', The Proceedings of The Australasian Society of Behavioural Health and Medicine 10th Annual Scientific Conference, Newcastle, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2013 Plotnikoff RC, Karunamuni N, Courneya KS, Sigal R, Johnson JA, Johnson ST, 'The Alberta Diabetes and Physical Activity Trial: a RCT evaluating theory-based interventions to increase physical activity in T2D adults.', World Diabetes Congress 2013 Abstracts, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
2013 McGavock J, MacIntosh A, Sadman R, Torrance B, Ball G, Plotnikoff R, et al., 'Determinants of Remission of Overweight Status in Youth', CIRCULATION, New Orleans, LA (2013) [E3]
2012 Dewar D, Lubans D, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan P, Okely A, Costigan S, 'The Coca-Cola Company Sponsored Session.', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney (2012) [E3]
2012 Belanger LJ, Plotnikoff RC, Clark AM, Courneya KS, 'Sports participation in young adult cancer survivors', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, San Francisco, CA (2012) [E3]
2012 Trinh L, Plotnikoff RC, Rhodes RE, North SA, Courneya KS, 'Understanding physical activity in kidney cancer survivors using the theory of planned behavior', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, San Francisco, CA (2012) [E3]
2012 Dewar D, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Costigan SA, 'Explaining physical activity behaviour in adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools: A test of social cognitive theory', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Sarah Costigan
2012 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, 'Relationship between physical activity outcomes and adherence to paper-based social cognitive tasks in a weight loss program for men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Myles Young, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2012 Short CE, James EL, Plotnikoff RC, 'Case study: Exploring the 'black box' of intervention development', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Erica James
2012 Saunders KL, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, et al., 'Insights into engaging men in weight loss: Process evaluation of the SHED-IT RCT of gender-sensitised weight loss programs for overweight men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Patrick Mcelduff, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 Cook AT, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, 'An examination of the association between a mother's parenting practices relating to physical activity and their daughter's physical activity levels', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2012 Lloyd AB, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, 'The impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community RCT on fathers' physical activity-related parenting practices and children's physical activity', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2012 Duncan M, Vandelanotte C, Rashid M, Cutumisu N, Plotnikoff RC, 'Individual, psychological and environmental correlates of office based occupational sitting in the 10,000 Steps cohort', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
2012 Weaver K, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Dewar DL, Finn TL, et al., 'Rationale and intervention description of the Supporting Children's Outcomes using Rewards, Exercise and Skills physical activity intervention', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, David Lubans
2012 Stacey FG, James EL, Lubans DR, Chapman K, Boyes AW, Courneya K, et al., 'Acceptability of home-based resistance training for cancer survivors', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Erica James, Allison Boyes
2012 Short CE, James EL, Girgis A, McElduff P, Plotnikoff RC, 'The efficacy of two theoretically-based print interventions for promoting PA behaviour among post-treatment breast cancer survivors: A nationally-based 3-arm RCT', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Erica James
2012 Short CE, James EL, Plotnikoff RC, 'What factors are associated with physical activity participation and sedentary behaviour among post-treatment breast cancer survivors?', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Erica James
2012 James EL, Ewald BD, Johnson NA, Brown W, Stacey FG, Plotnikoff RC, 'Efficacy of referral for physical activity counseling: Protocol for an RCT to compare face-to-face and telephone counselling', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Natalie Johnson, Erica James, Ben Ewald
2012 Cutumisu N, Blanchard C, Plotnikoff RC, Berry T, Spence J, 'Effect of neighbourhood space syntax on the frequency of walking in Edmonton, Canada', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
2012 Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, 'Effectiveness of lifestyle interventions including resistance training for type 2 diabetes prevention: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2012 Scott J, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Trost S, Plotnikoff RC, 'Pedometer protocols for measuring physical activity: An examination of reactivity, tampering and perceptions among adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2012 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Penfold C, Courneya K, 'Testing mediator variables in a physical activity intervention for women with Type 2 Diabetes', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans
2012 Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry NJ, et al., 'Physical activity outcomes from the SHED-IT RCT: An evaluation of theoretically-based, gender-sensitised weight loss programs for men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Philip Morgan, Patrick Mcelduff
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely A, Dewar DL, Collins CE, Batterham M, et al., 'Preventing obesity among adolescent girls: Outcomes of the nutrition and enjoyable activity for teen girls cluster randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2012 James EL, Boyes AW, Courbeya K, Lubans DR, Stacey FG, Morgan PJ, et al., 'A home-based resistance training program for survivors of prostate cancer: A pilot randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Erica James, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2012 Vandelanotte C, Duncan M, Plotnikoff RC, Mummery K, 'Do participants' preferences for mode of delivery (text, video or both) influence the effectiveness of an online physical activity intervention', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Abstracts from the ICBM 2012 Meeting, Budapest, Hungary (2012) [E3]
2012 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'The effectiveness of multi-component Type 2 Diabetes prevention programs including diet, aerobic exercise and resistance training: a systematic review and meta-analyses', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, NZ (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2012 Collins CE, Cook AT, Morgan PJ, Schumacher T, Plotnikoff RC, 'Associations between mother and daughter dietary intakes', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, New Zealand (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2012 Finn TL, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely A, Dewar DL, et al., 'Preventing obesity among adolescent girls in low-income secondary schools: One year outcomes of the NEAT girls randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, New Zealand (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2012 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of male-only weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, New Zealand (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Myles Young, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2012 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Penfold C, Courneya K, 'Testing the utility of three social-cognitive models for predicting physical activity in overweight adults with Type 2 diabetes', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, NZ (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans
2011 Miller AD, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Okely AD, et al., 'Effective strategies for the recruitment of overweight men and their children into a community trial: The Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids recruitment story', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Myles Young, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Andrew Miller, Richard Fletcher, Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Robin Callister
2011 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'Development of a male-only weight loss maintenance program: Evaluating the SHED-IT Weight Loss Maintenance program materials for quality, suitability and theoretical merit', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Myles Young, Philip Morgan
2011 Lloyd AB, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, 'Investigating the measurement and operationalisation of obesity-related parenting variables of overweight fathers in the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community program', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2011 Callister R, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Cook AT, Berthon B, Mitchell S, Plotnikoff RC, 'Dietary and physical activity behaviours of overweight and obese male shift workers', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2011 Collins CE, Snodgrass SN, Kable AK, James CL, Ashby SE, Plotnikoff RC, 'The Community Healthy Adults Project: A survey of health professionals knowledge and practice in client weight management', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Suzanne Snodgrass, Samantha Ashby, Ashley Kable, Carole James
2011 Cook AT, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, 'The M.A.D.E (Mothers and Daughters Exercising) 4 LIFE feasibility study: Description of a theory-based physical activity intervention targeting mothers and their daughters', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2011 Lloyd AB, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, 'A description of the operationalisation and measurement of key parenting variables in the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community program for overweight fathers and their children', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2011 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Costigan SA, Trinh L, Spence J, Downs S, McCargar L, 'A test of the theory of planned behavior to explain physical activity in a large population sample of Canadian adolescents', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, David Lubans
2011 Short CE, James EL, Plotnikoff RC, Girgis A, 'Efficacy of tailored-print interventions in the physical activity domain: A systematic review of randomised trials', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Erica James
2011 Short CE, James EL, Plotnikoff RC, Girgis A, 'How theory-directed questions can help us understand physical activity behaviour in female breast cancer survivors', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Erica James
2011 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'The SHED-IT Weight Loss Maintenance study: Development of a theory-based weight loss maintenance intervention exclusively targeting men', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Myles Young, Philip Morgan
2011 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Cook AT, Berthon B, Mitchell S, Callister R, 'Efficacy of a workplace-based weight loss program for overweight male shift workers: the Workplace POWER (Preventing Obesity Without Eating like a Rabbit) randomized controlled trial', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.01.031
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2011 Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Okely T, 'The Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT Girls) randomized controlled trial for adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools: Rationale, study protocol, and baseline results', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-652
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Robin Callister
2011 Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Jung M, Eves N, Sigal R, 'Mediators of change in a resistance training intervention for adults with Type 2 Diabetes', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans
2011 Nykiforuk CIJ, Schopflocher D, VanSpronsen EP, Spence J, Plotnikoff RC, Raine K, et al., 'Quantifying the association between measured feature of the built environment and individual health outcomes: A cross-community comparison', Canadian Journal of Diabetes, Montreal (2011) [E3]
2011 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Cook AT, Berthon B, Mitchell S, Callister R, 'The impact of a workplace-based weight loss program on work-related outcomes in overweight male shift workers', Proceedings of the 47th Annual Conference of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia, Sydney (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1097/JOM.0b013e31824329ab
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2011 Aparicio-Ting FE, Friedenreich CM, Kopciuk KA, Plotnikoff RC, Bryant HE, 'CORRELATES OF MEETING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY GUIDELINES FOR CANCER PREVENTION', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, Montreal, CANADA (2011) [E3]
2010 Callister R, Morgan PJ, Cook AT, Berthon B, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, 'Characteristics of male shift workers as a target for a workplace-based weight loss program', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2010 Berthon B, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Callister R, Cook AT, Plotnikoff RC, 'Dietary habits of male shift workers enrolled in the workplace power program', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2010 Cook AT, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, 'Rationale and intervention description of the M.A.D.E. (Mothers and Daughters Eating/Exercising) 4 Fun feasibility study: An obesity prevention program for mothers and their daughters', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2010 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Fletcher R, Burrows TL, Collins CE, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community program: Promoting family health through sustainable school and community partnerships', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Myles Young, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher
2010 Plotnikoff RC, Pickering MA, Glenn N, Doze S, Reinhold-Matthews M, McLeod L, et al., 'The effects of supplemental, theory-based physical activity counselling intervention for adults with type 2 diabetes', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. Program and Abstracts, Port Douglas, QLD (2010) [E3]
2010 Dewar D, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'The development of scales for assessing social cognitive constructs relating to physical activity participation in adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. Program and Abstracts, Port Douglas, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2010 Plotnikoff RC, McCargar LJ, Fraser SN, Downs SM, Storey KE, Forbes LE, et al., 'Urban and rural differences in nutrient intakes of Alberta (Canada) adolescents in 2005 and 2008.', Obesity Reviews, Stockholm International Fairs, Stockholm, Sweden (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2010.00763_6.x
2010 Raines KD, Plotnikoff RC, Storey KE, Schopflocher DP, Nykiforuk CIJ, Purdy LE, et al., 'Healthy Alberta communities: Impact of a three-year community-based obesity prevention intervention', Obesity Reviews, Stockholm, Sweden (2010) [E3]
2010 Nykiforuk CIJ, Schopflocher DP, Vallianatos H, Raine K, Plotnikoff RC, Spence JC, et al., 'The role of built and social environments in obesity reduction', Obesity Reviews, Stockholm, Sweden (2010) [E3]
2009 Plotnikoff RC, Karunamuni N, Spence J, Storey K, Forbes L, Raine K, et al., 'Physical inactivity and other chronic disease-related lifestyle factors in a sample of Canadian youth', Supplement to Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport: be active '09 Program and Abstracts, Brisbane (2009) [E3]
2009 Spence J, Plotnikoff RC, Storey K, Forbes L, McCargar L, 'Examining sedentary behaviour in youth in Alberta, Canada', Supplement to Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport: be active '09 Program and Abstracts, Brisbane (2009) [E3]
2009 Plotnikoff RC, Karunamuni N, Courneya K, Sigal R, Johnson J, Birkett M, et al., 'Alberta diabetes and physical activity trial [ADAPT]', Supplement to Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport: be active '09 Program and Abstracts, Brisbane (2009) [E3]
2008 Rhodes RE, Courneya K, Blanchard C, Plotnikoff R, 'Prediction of leisure-time walking: An integration of social cognitive, perceived environmental, and personality factors', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, San Diego, CA (2008) [E3]
2007 Bize R, Johnson JA, Plotnikoff RC, 'The association between physical activity level and health-related quality of life in the general adult population: A systematic review', JOURNAL OF GENERAL INTERNAL MEDICINE, Toronto, CANADA (2007)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2007 Plotnikoff RC, Eves N, Jung M, Padwal R, Sigal RJ, 'A home-based resistance training program for obese adults with type 2 diabetes', DIABETES, Chicago, IL (2007)
2005 Lippke S, Plotnikoff R, Courneya K, Birkett N, Sigal R, 'A test of the HAPA model to predict physical activity in individuals with type 2 diabetes', Selbststeauerung im Sport, Freiburg, Germany (2005) [E1]
2004 Lippke S, Plotnikoff R, 'Are the TTM stages qualitatively different in terms of PMT and SCT variables and POC measures?', Research on the Transtheoretical Model: Where are we now, where are we going?, - (2004) [E1]
Show 84 more conferences

Other (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Stacey F, James E, Lubans D, Chapman K, Courneya K, Plotnikoff RC, 'Acceptability of home-based resistance training for cancer.', ( pp.-): - (2013)
2013 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Penfold CM, Courneya KS, 'A test of three social cognitive models in predicting physical activity over 18-months.', ( pp.-): - (2013)
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 52
Total funding $34,277,283

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20152 grants / $11,020

2015 International Visitor from University of Ottawa, Canada$9,020

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Nancy Edwards
Scheme International Research Visiting Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401300
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA), Edinburgh Scotland, 3-6 June 2015$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500664
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20146 grants / $130,775

the Effectiveness of Feasible Physical Activity Population-based Approaches for Inactive Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study Assessing Tailored and Preference Modes of Delivery$40,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor David Lubans, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran, Professor Ronald Sigal, Professor Kerry Coumeya
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400674
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Evaluation of a multi-component intervention to reduce screen-time in adolescents: The ‘Stand Up for Healthy Minds’ study$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301432
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Long-term follow up of the PULSE Type 2 Diabetes prevention program for men$24,775

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Robin Callister, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301374
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Efficacy of a Home-based Resistance Training Intervention for Men with Prostate Cancer$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Erica James, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Doctor Allison Boyes, Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Dennis Taaffe, Miss Fiona Stacey
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301395
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

The impact of high intensity interval training on physical and psycho-social outcomes in low-active adolescents: A randomised controlled trial$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1500311
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

2014 World Cancer Congress, Melbourne, Australia, 3-6 December 2014$1,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401376
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20134 grants / $330,713

HMRI MRSP Infrastructure (12-16) – CARDIOVASCULAR$255,777

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Dirk Van Helden, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme NSW MRSP Infrastructure Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300589
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Translation of the Healthy Dads Healthy Kids program in local communities: Transitioning for sustainability$73,436

Funding body: Coal & Allied Trust

Funding body Coal & Allied Trust
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301006
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

ANZOS (Australian & New Zealand Obesity Society) Annual Scientific Meeting 2013, Melbourne Australia, 17-19 October 2013$750

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301090
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

World Diabetes Congress Melbourne 2013, Melbourne Australia, 2 - 6 December 2013$750

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301217
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20128 grants / $1,215,538

Physical Activity and Population Health$580,910

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Research Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100138
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour to improve health and wellbeing in adolescent boys from disadvantaged schools$261,837

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Kerry Dally, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100085
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

HMRI MRSP Infrastructure (11-12)- CARDIOVASCULAR$118,434

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Dirk Van Helden, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme NSW MRSP Infrastructure Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1101118
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Physical Activity and Health Scholarship$93,067

Funding body: The Wests Group Australia

Funding body The Wests Group Australia
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Postgraduate Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1201152
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Investigating the effects and maximising the benefits of increased physical activity and reduced sedentary behaviour on health and well-being in youth.$88,150

Funding body: The Wests Group Australia

Funding body The Wests Group Australia
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Postgraduate Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200998
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Feasibility and efficacy of a diet and exercise prevention program for men at high risk of Type 2 Diabetes$51,960

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Robin Callister, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200815
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Reducing mid-aged men’s risk of Type 2 Diabetes$19,680

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Robin Callister, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200853
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Australian and new Zealand Obesity Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Rendezvous Hotel, Auckland, 18 - 20 October 2012$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200881
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20116 grants / $1,478,850

Efficacy of exercise physiologist counselling in primary care patients: a RCT of two pragmatic approaches$896,589

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Erica James, Doctor Benjamin Ewald, Doctor Natalie Johnson, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0190295
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Physical Activity and Nutrition: The University of Newcastle's Approach Toward Better Population Health and Education$321,711

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Benjamin Ewald, Professor Manohar Garg, Associate Professor Erica James, Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Priority Research Centre
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100058
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

The Supporting Children's Outcomes using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) study$220,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Robin Callister
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100880
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Adult lifestyle incentives for vitality and energy (ALIVE): Supporting health professionals to assist clients with weight management through lifestyle changes$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Professor Clare Collins, Associate Professor Carole James, Associate Professor Ashley Kable, Doctor Maya Guest, Doctor Samantha Ashby, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1001025
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Engaging men to maintain weight loss using innovative and cost-effective interventions: The SHED-IT weight loss maintenance pilot study$19,800

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Mr Chris Doran
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1101216
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Australian Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, Fremantle, 19 - 22 October 2011$750

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100852
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20109 grants / $1,319,509

The Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community program: Promoting family health through sustainable school and community partnerships$524,453

Funding body: Coal & Allied Trust

Funding body Coal & Allied Trust
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Victoria Clay, Professor Clare Collins, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Richard Fletcher, Professor Robin Callister, Doctor Tracy Burrows, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Anthony Okely
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000001
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Assessing Community Environments for Physical Activity and Healthy Eating: Development of Innovative Mixed-Methods Approaches for Utilizing Objective and Subjective Data.$199,978

Funding body: Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Operating Grant

Funding body Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Operating Grant
Project Team
Scheme Innovations in Health Research
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Engaging economically disadvantaged adolescent girls in physical activity and healthy eating to improve health and prevent obesity$155,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Anthony Okely, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190012
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Healthy Eating & Active Living for Diabetes in Primary Care Networks$150,000

Funding body: The Lawson Foundation, Canada

Funding body The Lawson Foundation, Canada
Project Team
Scheme Philanthropic
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Evaluation of innovative and cost effective community approaches to reduce obesity in men: The SHED-IT study$128,729

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Grant-In-Aid
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190315
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Physical Activity and Population Health Education$100,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team
Scheme Discovery Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Move More for Life: A tailored physical activity program for Australian breast cancer survivors$49,849

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Ms Camille Short, Conjoint Professor Afaf Girgis, Associate Professor Erica James, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Research Scholars Award
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000475
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Community Healthy Adults Project: Survey of Health Professionals$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team
Scheme Faculty Research Strategic Initiatives Fund
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

ASICS Conference of Science & Medicine in Sport, Sheraton Mirage Port Douglas, 4 - 6 November 2010$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000765
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20095 grants / $7,852,345

Improving the Efficient and Equitable Care for Patients with Chronic Medical Conditions$5,854,920

Funding body: Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR)

Funding body Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR)
Project Team
Scheme Interdisciplinary Team grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Pan Canadian Strategic Training in Population Intervention Research for Chronic Disease Prevention$1,950,000

Funding body: Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

Funding body Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Project Team
Scheme Strategic Training Initiative in Health Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Evaluation of a workplace based weight-loss program for men: The Workplace POWER trial at Tomago$35,000

Funding body: Tomago Aluminium

Funding body Tomago Aluminium
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190642
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

Visiting Distinguished Professorship $12,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team
Scheme International Research Visiting Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Be Active 09- Australian conference of Science & Medicine in Sport/National Physical Activity Conference, Brisbane, 14-17 October 2009$425

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0900072
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20086 grants / $11,474,121

Creating Bone and Joint Health from the Bedside to the Bench and Back Again$5,067,103

Funding body: Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research

Funding body Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research
Project Team
Scheme Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research Interdisciplinary Team Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

The Alliance for Canadian Health Outcomes Research in Diabetes (ACHORD)$2,503,509

Research in Diabetes

Funding body: Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Funding body Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Project Team
Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

The Alliance for Canadian Health Outcomes Research in Diabetes (ACHORD)$2,503,509

Obesity and Related Diseases Emerging Team

Funding body: Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Funding body Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Project Team
Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Alberta Policy Coalition for Cancer Prevention$1,000,000

Funding body: Alberta Cancer Board

Funding body Alberta Cancer Board
Project Team
Scheme Population Health -Innovative Intervention
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Practical Behavioural Modifications for Type 2 Diabetes Treatment: Physical Activity and Nutrition for Diabetes in Alberta (PANDA).$300,000

Funding body: Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta and Capital Health

Funding body Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta and Capital Health
Project Team
Scheme Emerging Research Team Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

The Alliance for Canadian Health Outcomes Research in Diabetes (ACHORD)Healthy Hearts Alberta: A Prospective Cohort Study of Physical Activity and Weight Gain in Youth. $100,000

Funding body: Alberta Centre for Child, Family, and Community Research (ACCFC)

Funding body Alberta Centre for Child, Family, and Community Research (ACCFC)
Project Team
Scheme Alberta Centre for Child, Family, and Community Research (ACCFC)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

20075 grants / $7,464,412

APPLE Schools Making the Healthy Choice the Easy Choice$5,000,000

Funding body: Donor sponsored school health intervention

Funding body Donor sponsored school health intervention
Project Team
Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Chair in Applied Public Health: Physical Activity and Public Health$1,000,000

Funding body: Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

Funding body Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Project Team
Scheme Health Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

An Evaluation of New Provincial Programs to Promote Healthy Weights for Children and Youth. $600,000

 

Funding body: Alberta Government

Funding body Alberta Government
Project Team
Scheme Alberta Health and Wellness
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Obesity Prevention and the Built Environment: Examining Opportunities and Barriers in Four Alberta Communities$567,397

Funding body: Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada

Funding body Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada
Project Team
Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Healthy Hearts Alberta: A School-based Prospective Cohort Study of Physical Activity and Insulin Sensitivity in Youth$297,015

Funding body: Canadian Diabetes Association

Funding body Canadian Diabetes Association
Project Team
Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

20041 grants / $3,000,000

Promoting the Health of Alberta Communities: Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes and Other Chronic Diseases Project$3,000,000

Funding body: Alberta Health and Wellness

Funding body Alberta Health and Wellness
Project Team
Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed39
Current9

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD2.3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD The Efficacy of Physical Activity and Sleep Behaviour Interventions to Treat Type 2 Diabetes in Adults
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Using Technology-Based Interventions to Improve Physical Activity and Sleep Behaviours of Shift Workers
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Evaluation of a Multi-Component Screen-Time Reduction Intervention in Adolescents: The 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' Study
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD The Impact of High Intensity Interval Training on Physical and Psycho-Social Outcomes in Low-Active Adolescents
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Integrating Smartphone Technology and the Physical Environment to Promote Physical Activity in an "At Risk" Population. Randomised Controlled Trial of the Park Fit Intervention
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD The Supporting Children's Outcomes Using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) Group Randomised Controlled Trial: A Physical Activity and Fundamental Movement Skills Intervention for Primary Schools in Low-Income Communities
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD The Measurement of Physical Activity: An Examination of the Adolescent Population
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Evaluating specific website components to improve the effectiveness of web-based physical activity interventions
Health Not Elswhere Classified, University of Central Queensland
Co-Supervisor
2004 PhD Innovative Ways of Treating co-Morbid Diabetes Type II and Depression: Development of the "MADE-IT" Program.
Psychiatry, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD The Feasibility and Efficacy of the Type 2 Diabetes PULSE (Prevention Using LifeStyle Education) Randomised Controlled Trial: a Self-Administered, Gender-Tailored, Multi-Component Lifestyle Intervention for Men at High-risk for Type 2 Diabetes
Human Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD The M.A.D.E (Mothers and Daughters Exercising) 4 Life Pilot Randomised Control Trial: A Theory-Based, Physical Activity Intervention Targeting Mothers and Their Daughters
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Evaluation of a School-Based Intervention Designed to Improve Health-Related Fitness in Adolescent Boys from Schools in Low-Income Communities: The 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD The Impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' Program for Overweight Fathers and Their Children on Lifestyle-related Parenting
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Physical Activity During Weight Loss and Weight Loss Maintenance in Men: An Experimental Application of Social Cognitive Theory
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT Girls) Group Randomised Controlled Trial: Evaluation of a School-based Obesity Prevention Program for Adolescent Girls from Low-income Communities
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Move More for Life: The Development and Evaluation of a Computer Tailored-Print Intervention for Promoting Physical Activity Among Post-Treatment Breast Cancer Survivors
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Physical Activity for Health in Kidney Cancer Survivors
Other Health, Unknown
Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD An Examination of the New South Wales Electronic Gaming Machine Industry 1995 to 2005 and its Historical, Regulatory, Political and Economic Contexts
Political Science, Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 Post-Doctoral Fellowship Social cognitive and environmental mediators of PA in youth
Public Health, Unknown
Sole Supervisor
2011 PhD Movement-Attractors and Generic Neighbourhood Environment Traits (MAGNET): The Association between Urban Form and Physical Activity
Philosophy, Unknown
Co-Supervisor
2011 Post-Doctoral Fellowship Tests of social cognitive models to predict PA
Health, Unknown
Sole Supervisor
2009 Post-Doctoral Fellowship Physical Activity & Population Health
Health Promotion, University of Alberta
Sole Supervisor
2009 Masters An exploration of families’ perceptions of the accessibility of recreational facilities in low-income communities.
Health Promotion, Unknown
Co-Supervisor
2009 Masters Physical Activity and Quality of Life in Young Adult Cancer Survivors: A Preliminary Survey
Health Promotion, Unknown
Co-Supervisor
2009 Masters Physical Activity Preferences and Type 2 Diabetes: Exploring Demographic, Cognitive and Behavioural Differences
Health Promotion, Unknown
Principal Supervisor
2008 Post-Doctoral Fellowship Physical Activity & Population Health
Education Not Elswr Classified, University of Alberta
Sole Supervisor
2008 Masters Exploring the Facilitators and Barriers to the Process of Change Towards Capacity Building for Chronic Disease Prevention
Health Promotion, Unknown
Principal Supervisor
2007 Masters Diabetes NetPLAY: A Physical Activity Website and Linked E-mail Counselling Intervention for Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes
Health Promotion, Unknown
Principal Supervisor
2007 Post-Doctoral Fellowship Knowledge translation of physician based Heart Health materials
Health Promotion, Unknown
Co-Supervisor
2007 Masters Public Policy Proceses and Getting Physical Activity into Alberta's Urban Schools
Education Not Elswr Classified, Unknown
Co-Supervisor
2007 PhD Exercise Prevalence, Associations with Quality of Life, Determinants and Preferences in Endometrial and Bladder Cancer Survivors
Philosophy, Unknown
Co-Supervisor
2006 Post-Doctoral Fellowship Healthy Alberta Communities Project
Health Promotion, University of Alberta
Co-Supervisor
2005 Post-Doctoral Fellowship Physical Activity & Population Health - CIHR New Emerging Team Grant
Health Promotion, Unknown
Sole Supervisor
2005 Masters Self Determination Theory and Exercise in Colorectal Cancer Survivors.
Health Promotion, Unknown
Co-Supervisor
2005 Masters Normative Feedback and Student Drinking: Controlled Study of an Online Intervention
Health Promotion, Unknown
Co-Supervisor
2005 Post-Doctoral Fellowship Physical Activity & Population Health
Health Promotion, University of Alberta
Sole Supervisor
2005 Masters Physical Activity and Type 2 Diabetes: Exploring the Role of Gender and Socioeconomic Status
Other Health, Unknown
Principal Supervisor
2004 Masters Physical Activity and Working Women: Implications Towards Program Development in the Workplace
Other Health, Unknown
Principal Supervisor
2004 Post-Doctoral Fellowship Physical activity, smoking, and obesity among Canadian school youth: Comparison between urban and rural schools
Education Not Elswr Classified, Unknown
Sole Supervisor
2003 Masters Perceived Environment and the Physical Activity of Workplace Employees
Other Health, Unknown
Principal Supervisor
2003 Masters Physical Activity of Aboriginals with Type 2 Diabetes: An Exploratory Study
Health Promotion, Unknown
Sole Supervisor
2002 Masters Moving Activity into Primary Care Prevention
Health Promotion, Unknown
Co-Supervisor
2002 Masters Organizational Leadership for Health Promotion by Health Authorities
Health Promotion, Unknown
Sole Supervisor
2001 Masters The Examination of the Effects of Long Duration, Acute Exercise on Attitudes, Self-Efficacy, and Outcome Expectations in Overweight Women
Health Not Elswhere Classified, University of Alberta
Co-Supervisor
2000 Masters Development and Initial Psychometric Evaluation of a Scale Measuring Factors Related to Motivation for Exercise
Epidemiology, Unknown
Co-Supervisor
1999 Masters Physical Activity Levels Across Canada: An Analysis of the Canadian Heart Health Surveys
Epidemiology, University of Ottawa
Co-Supervisor
1999 Masters Physical Environments and Physical Activity of Youth
Other Health, Unknown
Sole Supervisor
1997 Masters Perceptions, Attitudes and Subjective Norms Influencing Seniors’ Decisions to Accept or Reject Mobility Aids in Fall Prevention: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior
Health, Unknown
Co-Supervisor
Edit

Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Canada 183
Australia 165
United States 18
Germany 12
Switzerland 5
More...
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News

Park Fit

Study to build fitness in the great outdoors

May 4, 2015

Getting taut and trim can be a walk in the park, according to University of Newcastle researchers who have developed an innovative, multicomponent physical activity study.

SHED-IT

Obese men SHED-IT

October 17, 2013

An internationally-recognised University of Newcastle weight loss program tailored specifically for men has produced a benefit that is likely to be a powerful motivator to shed the excess kilos – improved erectile function.

Professor Ronald Plotnikoff

Position

Professor & Chair PA & PHE
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Focus area

Education

Contact Details

Email ron.plotnikoff@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4985 4465
Fax (02) 4921 2084

Office

Room ATC 314
Building Advanced Technology Centre
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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