Dr Natasha Weaver

Dr Natasha Weaver

Research Associate

School of Education

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise

Currently working as a Research Associate with the School of Education, performing statistical analysis for the Teachers and Teaching Research Program projects including Aspirations, a four-year longitudinal study of the educational and career aspirations of primary and secondary school students.

In a previous role as a Statistician for the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Newcastle I provided statistical support to researchers from Hunter Medical Research Institute working in various areas of public health research. Major projects included: Australian Rural Mental Health Study (5 year longitudinal study), GP diagnosis of dementia, Healthy Lifestyles (smoking intervention RCT for people with severe mental disorder), and a comparison study of ageing populations in the Western Pacific Region for the World Health Organisation. 

My background is in Pure Mathematics with minor studies in Statistics. My research explored a new connection between two different areas of pure mathematics: Dynamical Systems and Operator Algebras. There is an important connection between the study of dynamical systems called Markov shifts and the study of directed graphs. In my PhD thesis I introduced a family of higher-rank graphs (the higher-dimensional analogues of directed graphs) that arise from 2-dimensional Markov shifts with algebraic properties. I then explored the operator algebras known as C*-algebras, which are associated to this family of graphs. In particular, the C*-algebras were shown to have nice properties following from aperiodicity of the underlying graphs. 

Teaching Expertise

Assisting with teaching of Biostatistics A and Data Management and Computing postgraduate courses. 

Administrative Expertise


Two year's experience as a Data Analyst for Research Services (Research Performance and Systems team) in the Research and Innovation Division, reporting on research performance data and providing advice on government reporting procedures (HERDC) and block grant funding.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Mathematics, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Mathematics (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Biostatistics
  • C*-algebra
  • Functional Analysis
  • Operator Algebra
  • Pure Mathematics
  • SAS
  • Stata
  • Statistics

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
010199 Pure Mathematics not elsewhere classified 50
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/03/2012 - 1/02/2014 Statistician University of Newcastle
Hunter Medical Research Institute
Australia
1/08/2010 - 1/12/2012 Analyst

Operations Research

Defence Science and Technology Organisation
Land Operations Division
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.

Highlighted Publications

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2009 Pask D, Raeburn I, Weaver NA, 'A family of 2-graphs arising from two-dimensional subshifts', Ergodic Theory and Dynamical Systems, 29 1613-1639 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/s0143385708000795
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
2014 Inder KJ, Handley TE, Johnston A, Weaver N, Coleman C, Lewin TJ, et al., 'Determinants of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts: Parallel cross-sectional analyses examining geographical location', BMC Psychiatry, 14 (2014) [C1]

Background: Suicide death rates in Australia are higher in rural than urban communities however the contributors to this difference remain unclear. Geographical differences in sui... [more]

Background: Suicide death rates in Australia are higher in rural than urban communities however the contributors to this difference remain unclear. Geographical differences in suicidal ideation and attempts were explored using two datasets encompassing urban and rural community residents to examine associations between socioeconomic, demographic and mental health factors. Differing patterns of association between psychiatric disorder and suicidal ideation and attempts as geographical remoteness increased were investigated.Methods: Parallel cross-sectional analyses were undertaken using data from the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing (2007-NSMHWB, n = 8,463), under-representative of remote and very remote residents, and selected participants from the Australian Rural Mental Health Study (ARMHS, n = 634), over-representative of remote and very remote residents. Uniform measures of suicidal ideation and attempts and mental disorder using the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI-3.0) were used in both datasets. Geographic region was classified into major cities, inner regional and other. A series of logistic regressions were undertaken for the outcomes of 12-month and lifetime suicidal ideation and lifetime suicide attempts, adjusting for age, gender and psychological distress. A sub-analysis of the ARMHS sample was undertaken with additional variables not available in the 2007-NSMHWB dataset.Results: Rates and determinants of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts across geographical region were similar. Psychiatric disorder was the main determinant of 12-month and lifetime suicidal ideation and lifetime suicide attempts across all geographical regions. For lifetime suicidal ideation and attempts, marital status, employment status, perceived financial adversity and mental health service use were also important determinants. In the ARMHS sub-analysis, higher optimism and better perceived infrastructure and service accessibility tended to be associated with a lower likelihood of lifetime suicidal ideation, when age, gender, psychological distress, marital status and mental health service use were taken into account.Conclusions: Rates and determinants of suicidal ideation and attempts did not differ according to geographical location. Psychiatric disorder, current distress, employment and financial adversity remain important factors associated with suicidal ideation and attempts across all regions in Australia. Regional characteristics that influence availability of services and lower personal optimism may also be associated with suicidal ideation in rural communities. © 2014 Inder et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-244X-14-208
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Brian Kelly, Kerry Inder

Journal article (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Baker AL, Richmond R, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Filia SL, Castle D, Williams JM, et al., 'Randomized controlled trial of a healthy lifestyle intervention among smokers with psychotic disorders', Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 17 946-954 (2015) [C1]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved.Introduction: People with severe mental... [more]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved.Introduction: People with severe mental disorders typically experience a range of health problems; consequently, interventions addressing multiple health behaviors may provide an efficient way to tackle this major public health issue. This two-arm randomized controlled trial among people with psychotic disorders examined the efficacy of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) plus either a faceto- face or predominantly telephone delivered intervention for smoking cessation and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduction. Methods: Following baseline assessment and completion of a common, individually delivered 90-minute face-to-face intervention, participants (n = 235) were randomized to receive NRT plus: (1) a "Healthy Lifestyles" intervention for smoking cessation and CVD risk behaviors or (2) a predominantly telephone-based intervention (designed to control for NRT provision, session frequency, and other monitoring activities). Research assistants blind to treatment allocation performed assessments at 15 weeks (mid-intervention) and 12 months after baseline. Results: There were no significant differences between intervention conditions in CVD risk or smoking outcomes at 15 weeks or 12 months, with improvements in both conditions (eg, 12 months: 6.4% confirmed point prevalence abstinence rate; 17% experiencing a 50% or greater smoking reduction; mean reduction of 8.6 cigarettes per day; mean improvement in functioning of 9.8 points). Conclusions: The health disparity experienced by people with psychotic disorders is high. Faceto- face Healthy Lifestyle interventions appear to be feasible and somewhat effective. However, given the accessibility of telephone delivered interventions, potentially combined with lower cost, further studies are needed to evaluate telephone delivered smoking cessation and lifestyle interventions for people with psychotic disorders.

DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntv039
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin, Frances Kaylambkin, Robin Callister
2015 Handley TE, Kelly BJ, Lewin TJ, Coleman C, Stain HJ, Weaver N, Inder KJ, 'Long-term effects of lifetime trauma exposure in a rural community sample Health behavior, health promotion and society', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Handley et al.Background: This study examines the long-term outcomes of lifetime trauma exposure, including factors that contribute to the development of PTSD, in a sample... [more]

© 2015 Handley et al.Background: This study examines the long-term outcomes of lifetime trauma exposure, including factors that contribute to the development of PTSD, in a sample of rural adults. Methods: In 623 rural community residents, lifetime trauma exposure, PTSD, other psychiatric disorders and lifetime suicidal ideation were assessed using the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Logistic regressions were used to examine relationships between potentially traumatic events (PTEs) and lifetime PTSD and other diagnoses. Results: 78.2 % of participants reported at least on PTE. Rates were broadly comparable with Australian national data: the most commonly endorsed events were unexpected death of a loved one (43.7 %); witnessing injury or death (26.3 %); and life-threatening accident (19.3 %). While the mean age of the sample was 55 years, the mean age of first trauma exposure was 19 years. The estimated lifetime rate of PTSD was 16.0 %. Events with the strongest association with PTSD were physical assault and unexpected death of a loved one. Current functioning was lowest among those with current PTSD, with this group reporting elevated psychological distress, higher mental health service use, a greater number of comorbidities, and lower perceived social support. Respondents with a past PTE but no PTSD history were generally similar in terms of their current wellbeing to those with no lifetime PTE. Conclusions: PTEs may have diverse psychological and social consequences beyond the development of PTSD. Ensuring that adequate support services are available in rural areas, particularly in the period immediately following a PTE, may reduce the long-term impact of traumatic events.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2490-y
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Kerry Inder, Helen Stain, Brian Kelly
2015 Wolfenden L, Finch M, Nathan N, Weaver N, Wiggers J, Yoong SL, et al., 'Factors associated with early childhood education and care service implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in Australia: a cross-sectional study', Translational Behavioral Medicine, 5 327-334 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Society of Behavioral Medicine.Many early childhood education and care (ECEC) services fail to implement recommended policies and practices supportive of healthy eating a... [more]

© 2015, Society of Behavioral Medicine.Many early childhood education and care (ECEC) services fail to implement recommended policies and practices supportive of healthy eating and physical activity. The purpose of this study was to assess whether certain theoretically-based factors are associated with implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in a sample of ECEC services. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with Service Managers of ECEC services. The survey assessed the operational characteristics, policy, and practice implementation, and 13 factors were suggested by Damschroder¿s Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to impede or promote implementation. Logistic regression analyses found a significant association between implementation factor score and full implementation (OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.18¿1.61; p = <0.01), indicating that for every one point increase in implementation score, ECEC services were 38¿% more likely to be fully implementing the policies and practices. The findings highlight the opportunities for improving implementation of obesity prevention interventions in this setting by developing interventions that address such factors.

DOI 10.1007/s13142-015-0319-y
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2014 Handley TE, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Inder KJ, Lewin TJ, Attia JR, Fuller J, et al., 'Self-reported contacts for mental health problems by rural residents: Predicted service needs, facilitators and barriers', BMC Psychiatry, 14 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Handley et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.Background: Rural and remote Australians face a range of barriers to mental health care, potentially limiting the extent to whi... [more]

© 2014 Handley et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.Background: Rural and remote Australians face a range of barriers to mental health care, potentially limiting the extent to which current services and support networks may provide assistance. This paper examines self-reported mental health problems and contacts during the last 12¿months, and explores cross-sectional associations between potential facilitators/barriers and professional and non-professional help-seeking, while taking into account expected associations with socio-demographic and health-related factors. Methods: During the 3-year follow-up of the Australian Rural Mental Health Study (ARMHS) a self-report survey was completed by adult rural residents (N = 1,231; 61% female 77% married; 22% remote location; mean age = 59¿years), which examined socio-demographic characteristics, current health status factors, predicted service needs, self-reported professional and non-professional contacts for mental health problems in the last 12¿months, other aspects of help-seeking, and perceived barriers. Results: Professional contacts for mental health problems were reported by 18% of the sample (including 14% reporting General Practitioner contacts), while non-professional contacts were reported by 16% (including 14% reporting discussions with family/friends). Perceived barriers to health care fell under the domains of structural (e.g., costs, distance), attitudinal (e.g., stigma concerns, confidentiality), and time commitments. Participants with 12-month mental health problems who reported their needs as met had the highest levels of service use. Hierarchical logistic regressions revealed a dose-response relationship between the level of predicted need and the likelihood of reporting professional and non-professional contacts, together with associations with socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., gender, relationships, and financial circumstances), suicidal ideation, and attitudinal factors, but not geographical remoteness. Conclusions: Rates of self-reported mental health problems were consistent with baseline findings, including higher rural contact rates with General Practitioners. Structural barriers displayed mixed associations with help-seeking, while attitudinal barriers were consistently associated with lower service contacts. Developing appropriate interventions that address perceptions of mental illness and attitudes towards help-seeking is likely to be vital in optimising treatment access and mental health outcomes in rural areas.

DOI 10.1186/s12888-014-0249-0
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Attia, Kerry Inder, Frances Kaylambkin, Brian Kelly, Terry Lewin
2014 Inder KJ, Handley TE, Johnston A, Weaver N, Coleman C, Lewin TJ, et al., 'Determinants of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts: Parallel cross-sectional analyses examining geographical location', BMC Psychiatry, 14 (2014) [C1]

Background: Suicide death rates in Australia are higher in rural than urban communities however the contributors to this difference remain unclear. Geographical differences in sui... [more]

Background: Suicide death rates in Australia are higher in rural than urban communities however the contributors to this difference remain unclear. Geographical differences in suicidal ideation and attempts were explored using two datasets encompassing urban and rural community residents to examine associations between socioeconomic, demographic and mental health factors. Differing patterns of association between psychiatric disorder and suicidal ideation and attempts as geographical remoteness increased were investigated.Methods: Parallel cross-sectional analyses were undertaken using data from the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing (2007-NSMHWB, n = 8,463), under-representative of remote and very remote residents, and selected participants from the Australian Rural Mental Health Study (ARMHS, n = 634), over-representative of remote and very remote residents. Uniform measures of suicidal ideation and attempts and mental disorder using the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI-3.0) were used in both datasets. Geographic region was classified into major cities, inner regional and other. A series of logistic regressions were undertaken for the outcomes of 12-month and lifetime suicidal ideation and lifetime suicide attempts, adjusting for age, gender and psychological distress. A sub-analysis of the ARMHS sample was undertaken with additional variables not available in the 2007-NSMHWB dataset.Results: Rates and determinants of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts across geographical region were similar. Psychiatric disorder was the main determinant of 12-month and lifetime suicidal ideation and lifetime suicide attempts across all geographical regions. For lifetime suicidal ideation and attempts, marital status, employment status, perceived financial adversity and mental health service use were also important determinants. In the ARMHS sub-analysis, higher optimism and better perceived infrastructure and service accessibility tended to be associated with a lower likelihood of lifetime suicidal ideation, when age, gender, psychological distress, marital status and mental health service use were taken into account.Conclusions: Rates and determinants of suicidal ideation and attempts did not differ according to geographical location. Psychiatric disorder, current distress, employment and financial adversity remain important factors associated with suicidal ideation and attempts across all regions in Australia. Regional characteristics that influence availability of services and lower personal optimism may also be associated with suicidal ideation in rural communities. © 2014 Inder et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-244X-14-208
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Brian Kelly, Kerry Inder
2013 Pond CD, Mate KE, Phillips J, Stocks NP, Magin PJ, Weaver N, Brodaty H, 'Predictors of agreement between general practitioner detection of dementia and the revised Cambridge Cognitive Assessment (CAMCOG-R)', INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOGERIATRICS, 25 1639-1647 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1041610213000884
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Parker Magin, Dimity Pond, Karen Mate
2010 Pask D, Raeburn I, Weaver NA, 'Periodic-2-graphs arising from subshifts', Bulletin of the Australian Mathematical Society, 82 120-138 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2009 Pask D, Raeburn I, Weaver NA, 'A family of 2-graphs arising from two-dimensional subshifts', Ergodic Theory and Dynamical Systems, 29 1613-1639 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/s0143385708000795
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Show 5 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Pond CD, Brodaty H, Stocks NP, Gunn J, Disler P, Paterson NE, et al., 'Improving general practitioner identification rates of dementia: The effectiveness of medical detailing plus audit', IPA 2012: International Psychigeriatric Association International Meeting Abstracts (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Karen Mate, Parker Magin

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Byles JE, Curryer CA, Edwards N, Weaver N, D'Este C, Hall J, Kowal P, 'The health of older people in selected countries of the Western Pacific Region.', World Health Organisation, 54 (2014) [R1]
Co-authors Cassie Curryer Uon, John Hall, Julie Byles, Catherine Deste
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Dr Natasha Weaver

Positions

Research Associate
School of Education
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Casual Academic
School of Education
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Research Assistant
School of Education
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email natasha.weaver@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49217188

Office

Room HA-101
Building Hunter building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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