Dr Melinda Hutchesson

Research Fellow

School of Health Sciences (Nutrition and Dietetics)

Career Summary

Biography

I am a National Heart Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition and the School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine. I was awarded my PhD in August 2011, and Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics with Honours in 2004. I am an Accredited Practicing Dietitian. My research focuses on the development and evaluation of weight management interventions delivered using innovative eHealth technologies such as the Internet and Smartphones.

Research Expertise
Weight management interventions delivered using innovative eHealth technologies (e.g. Internet, Smartphones). Dietary assessment using innovative technologies Systematic reviews of dietetic/weight management interventions

Teaching Expertise
Community Nutrition Practice, Public Health Nutrition and Honours supervison within the Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics

Administrative Expertise
Project management

Collaborations
I collaborate with researchers within the Faculty of Health and Medicine and Faculty of Education and Arts within the University of Newcastle, as well as researchers at Monash University.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Community Nutrition
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Nutritional Epidemiology
  • Obesity
  • Public Health Nutrition
  • eHealth

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
111199Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2015 - LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
1/07/2013 - 31/12/2013Project ManagerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
1/07/2013 - 31/12/2013LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
21/11/2012 - 5/12/2012Casual AcademicUniversity of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
16/03/2012 - 31/12/2012Post doctoral Research FellowUniversity of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
18/07/2011 - 12/11/2011LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
16/07/2009 - 29/10/2009LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2005 - 1/01/2008Public Health NutritionistHunter New England Area Health Service
Hunter New England Population Health
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (44 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Burrows TL, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Boggess MM, Guest M, Collins CE, 'Fruit and vegetable intake assessed by food frequency questionnaire and plasma carotenoids: a validation study in adults.', Nutrients, 7 3240-3251 (2015)
DOI10.3390/nu7053240Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsTracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2015Pezdirc K, Hutchesson M, Whitehead R, Ozakinci G, Perrett D, Collins CE, 'Can dietary intake influence perception of and measured appearance? A Systematic Review', NUTRITION RESEARCH, 35 175-197 (2015)
DOI10.1016/j.nutres.2014.12.002Author URL
Co-authorsClare Collins
2015Pezdirc K, Hutchesson M, Whitehead R, Ozakinci G, Perrett D, Collins CE, 'Can dietary intake influence perception of and measured appearance? A Systematic Review', Nutrition Research, 35 175-197 (2015)

Appearance-based interventions have had some success in reducing smoking and sun exposure. Appearance may also motivate dietary behavior change if it was established that dietary improvement had a positive impact on appearance. The aims of this review are to evaluate the current evidence examining the relationship between dietary intake and appearance and to determine the effectiveness of dietary interventions on perceived or actual appearance. An electronic search of English-language studies up to August 2012 was conducted using Cochrane, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, SCOPUS, and PsycINFO databases. Studies that included participants aged at least 18 years, that observed or altered dietary intake from actual food or dietary supplement use, and assessed appearance-related outcomes were considered eligible. Data from 27 studies were extracted and assessed for quality using standardized tools. Nineteen studies were assessed as being of "positive" and 4 of "neutral" quality. All observational studies (n = 4741 participants) indicated that there was a significant association between various aspects of dietary intake and skin coloration and skin aging. The majority (16 studies, 769 participants) evaluated the effect of dietary supplements on skin appearance among women. Only 1 study examined the effect of actual food intake on appearance. Significant improvements in at least 1 actual or perceived appearance-related outcome (facial wrinkling, skin elasticity, roughness, and skin color) following dietary intervention were shown as a result of supplementation. Further studies are needed in representative populations that examine actual food intake on appearance, using validated tools in well-designed high-quality randomized control trials.

DOI10.1016/j.nutres.2014.12.002
Co-authorsClare Collins
2015Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 16 376-392 (2015)

A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n=139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n=55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n=60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P<0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P<0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P<0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.

DOI10.1111/obr.12268
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan, Megan Rollo, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister
2015Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Self-Monitoring of Dietary Intake by Young Women: Online Food Records Completed on Computer or Smartphone Are as Accurate as Paper-Based Food Records but More Acceptable', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 115 87-94 (2015)

Adherence and accuracy of self-monitoring of dietary intake influences success in weight management interventions. Information technologies such as computers and smartphones have the potential to improve adherence and accuracy by reducing the burden associated with monitoring dietary intake using traditional paper-based food records. We evaluated the acceptability and accuracy of three different 7-day food record methods (online accessed via computer, online accessed via smartphone, and paper-based). Young women (N=18; aged 23.4±2.9 years; body mass index 24.0±2.2) completed the three 7-day food records in random order with 7-day washout periods between each method. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was derived from resting energy expenditure (REE) measured by indirect calorimetry and physical activity level (PAL) derived from accelerometers (TEE=REE×PAL). Accuracy of the three methods wasassessed by calculating absolute (energy intake [EI]-TEE) and percentage difference (EI/TEE×100) between self-reported EI and TEE. Acceptability was assessed via questionnaire. Mean±standard deviation TEE was 2,185±302 kcal/day and EI was 1,729±249 kcal/day, 1,675±287kcal/day, and 1,682±352 kcal/day for computer, smartphone, and paper records, respectively. There were no significant differences between absolute and percentage differences between EI and TEE for the three methods: computer, -510±389 kcal/day (78%); smartphone, -456±372 kcal/day (80%); and paper, -503±513 kcal/day (79%). Half of participants (n=9) preferred computer recording, 44.4% preferred smartphone, and 5.6% preferred paper-based records. Most participants (89%) least preferred the paper-based record. Because online food records completed on either computer or smartphone were as accurate as paper-based records but more acceptable to young women, they should be considered when self-monitoring of intake is recommended to young women.

DOI10.1016/j.jand.2014.07.036
Co-authorsMegan Rollo, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2015Collins CE, Burrows TL, Rollo ME, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, et al., 'The comparative validity and reproducibility of a diet quality index for adults: the Australian Recommended Food Score.', Nutrients, 7 785-798 (2015)
DOI10.3390/nu7020785Author URL
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsClare Collins, Tracy Burrows, Maya Guest, Megan Rollo
2015Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, (2015)

Summary: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n=139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n=55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n=60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P<0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P<0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P<0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.

DOI10.1111/obr.12268
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Robin Callister, Megan Rollo, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2015Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 16 376-392 (2015)

A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n=139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n=55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n=60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P<0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P<0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P<0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.

DOI10.1111/obr.12268
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Megan Rollo, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2015Holley TJ, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Hutchesson MJ, 'Weight expectations, motivations for weight change and perceived factors influencing weight management in young Australian women: a cross-sectional study', Public Health Nutrition, (2015)

Objective: To examine young Australian women¿s weight expectations, motivations for weight change and perceived factors influencing weight management, and to determine if these factors differ by age, BMI, marital status, education or income. Design: Cross-sectional study. An online survey captured respondents¿ weight, height, ideal weight, main reasons for wanting to change their weight and challenges to managing their weight. Setting: Online survey in Australia. Subjects: Six hundred and twenty women aged 18¿30 years currently living in Australia who completed the survey between 31 July and 30 September 2012. Results: Approximately half of participants (53·1 %) were a healthy weight, 25·2 % overweight and 19·0 % obese. Women unhappy at their current weight (78·1 %) reported a median ideal weight -12·3 % less than their current weight. The key motivators for weight change were to improve health (24·4 %, ranked 1), feel better in oneself (22·3 %) and improve self-confidence (21·5 %). Lack of motivation, time constraints because of job commitments and cost were the most commonly reported factors influencing weight management. Age, BMI, marital status, education and income were found to influence weight expectations, motivations for weight change and/or factors perceived to influence weight management. Conclusions: The findings suggest potential implications for weight management interventions and public health messaging targeting young women, to improve long-term health outcomes. Strategies that promote the health benefits of physical activity and healthy eating, feeling better about oneself and improved self-confidence, and address the main factors influencing weight management including lack of motivation, time constraints and cost, may be used to engage this target group.

DOI10.1017/S1368980015000993
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2015Rollo ME, Hutchesson MJ, Burrows TL, Krukowski RA, Harvey JR, Hoggle LB, Collins CE, 'Video Consultations and Virtual Nutrition Care for Weight Management', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, (2015)
DOI10.1016/j.jand.2015.03.016
Co-authorsTracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2015Plotnikoff RC, Costigan SA, Williams RL, Hutchesson MJ, Kennedy SG, Robards SL, et al., 'Effectiveness of interventions targeting physical activity, nutrition and healthy weight for university and college students: A systematic review and meta-analysis', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12 1-10 (2015)

To examine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving physical activity, diet, and/or weight-related behaviors amongst university/college students. Five online databases were searched (January 1970 to April 2014). Experimental study designs were eligible for inclusion. Data extraction was performed by one reviewer using a standardized form developed by the researchers and checked by a second reviewer. Data were described in a narrative synthesis and meta-analyses were conducted when appropriate. Study quality was also established. Forty-one studies were included; of these, 34 reported significant improvements in one of the key outcomes. Of the studies examining physical activity 18/29 yielded significant results, with meta-analysis demonstrating significant increases in moderate physical activity in intervention groups compared to control. Of the studies examining nutrition, 12/24 reported significantly improved outcomes; only 4/12 assessing weight loss outcomes found significant weight reduction. This appears to be the first systematic review of physical activity, diet and weight loss interventions targeting university and college students. Tertiary institutions are appropriate settings for implementing and evaluating lifestyle interventions, however more research is needed to improve such strategies.

DOI10.1186/s12966-015-0203-7
Co-authorsRobin Callister, John Germov, Sarah Costigan, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2014Burrows TL, Collins K, Watson J, Guest M, Boggess MM, Neve M, et al., 'Validity of the Australian Recommended Food Score as a diet quality index for Pre-schoolers', Nutrition Journal, 13 (2014) [C1]

Background: Diet quality tools provide researchers with brief methods to assess the nutrient adequacy of usual dietary intake. This study describes the development and validation of a pediatric diet quality index, the Australian Recommended Food Scores for Pre-schoolers (ARFS-P), for use with children aged two to five years. Methods. The ARFS-P was derived from a 120-item food frequency questionnaire, with eight sub-scales, and was scored from zero to 73. Linear regressions were used to estimate the relationship between diet quality score and nutrient intakes, in 142 children (mean age 4 years) in rural localities in New South Wales, Australia. Results: Total ARFS-P and component scores were highly related to dietary intake of the majority of macronutrients and micronutrients including protein, ß-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin A. Total ARFS-P was also positively related to total consumption of nutrient dense foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and negatively related to total consumption of discretionary choices, such as sugar sweetened drinks and packaged snacks. Conclusion: ARFS-P is a valid measure that can be used to characterise nutrient intakes for children aged two to five years. Further research could assess the utility of the ARFS-P for monitoring of usual dietary intake over time or as part of clinical management.

DOI10.1186/1475-2891-13-87
Co-authorsTracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Maya Guest, Megan Rollo
2014O'Brien KM, Hutchesson MJ, Jensen M, Morgan P, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Participants in an online weight loss program can improve diet quality during weight loss: a randomized controlled trial.', Nutrition journal, 13 82 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1475-2891-13-82
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2014Blomfield RL, Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Young MD, Jensen ME, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of self-help weight loss resources with or without online support on the dietary intake of overweight and obese men: The SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 8 e476-e487 (2014) [C1]

Background: Obese men are more likely to have poor dietary patterns compared to women, increasing diet-related chronic disease risk. The impact of a male-only weight loss intervention on dietary intakes is under-evaluated. The aim was to deter-mine whether overweight/obese men randomised to self-help paper-based resources with or without online support, achieved greater improvements in diet compared with Wait-list controls at 3 and 6 months following a gender tailored weight-loss intervention.

DOI10.1016/j.orcp.2013.09.004
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Clare Collins, Myles Young, Philip Morgan
2014Gow ML, Ho M, Burrows TL, Baur LA, Stewart L, Hutchesson MJ, et al., 'Impact of dietary macronutrient distribution on BMI and cardiometabolic outcomes in overweight and obese children and adolescents: A systematic review', Nutrition Reviews, 72 453-470 (2014)
DOI10.1111/nure.12111
CitationsScopus - 2
Co-authorsTracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2014Gow ML, Ho M, Burrows TL, Baur LA, Stewart L, Hutchesson MJ, et al., 'Impact of dietary macronutrient distribution on BMI and cardiometabolic outcomes in overweight and obese children and adolescents: A systematic review', Nutrition Reviews, 72 453-470 (2014) [C1]

The present systematic review examined the effectiveness of weight management interventions comparing diets with varying macronutrient distributions on BMI and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight or obese children and adolescents. A systematic search of seven databases for the period 1975-2013 identified 14 eligible randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials conducted with 6-18-year-old subjects. Seven trials compared a low-fat (=33% energy or <40g/day) to an isocaloric (n=2) or ad libitum (n=5) low-carbohydrate diet (<20% energy or <60g/day). Meta-analysis indicated a greater reduction in BMI in the low-carbohydrate group immediately after dietary intervention; however, the quality of the studies was limited and cardiometabolic benefits were inconsistent. Six trials compared increased-protein diets (19-30% energy) to isocaloric standard-protein diets (15-20% energy) and one compared an increased-fat diet (40% energy) to an isocaloric standard-fat diet (27% energy); there were no differences in outcomes in these studies. Current evidence suggests that improved weight status can be achieved in overweight or obese children and adolescents irrespective of the macronutrient distribution of a reduced-energy diet. Tailoring the macronutrient content to target specific cardiometabolic risk factors, such as a low-carbohydrate diet to treat insulin resistance, may be possible, but further research is needed before specific recommendations can be made. © 2014 International Life Sciences Institute.

DOI10.1111/nure.12111
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsTracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2014Collins CE, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, Duncanson K, Pezdirc K, et al., 'Reproducibility and comparative validity of a food frequency questionnaire for Australian adults', Clinical Nutrition, 33 906-914 (2014)
DOI10.1016/j.clnu.2013.09.015
CitationsScopus - 4
Co-authorsTracy Burrows, Megan Rollo, Maya Guest, Clare Collins
2014Collins CE, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, Duncanson K, Pezdirc K, et al., 'Reproducibility and comparative validity of a food frequency questionnaire for Australian adults', Clinical Nutrition, 33 906-914 (2014) [C1]

Background: Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) are used in epidemiological studies to investigate the relationship between diet and disease. There is a need for a valid and reliable adult FFQ with a contemporary food list in Australia. Aims: To evaluate the reproducibility and comparative validity of the Australian Eating Survey (AES) FFQ in adults compared to weighed food records (WFRs). Methods: Two rounds of AES and three-day WFRs were conducted in 97 adults (31 males, median age and BMI for males of 44.9 years, 26.2 kg/m2, females 41.3 years, 24.0 kg/m2. Reproducibility was assessed over six months using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and comparative validity was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) estimated by fitting a mixed effects model for each nutrient to account for age, sex and BMI to allow estimation of between and within person variance. Results: Reproducibility was found to be good for both WFR and FFQ since there were no significant differences between round 1 and 2 administrations. For comparative validity, FFQ ICCs were at least as large as those for WFR. The ICC of the WFR-FFQ difference for total energy intake was 0.6 (95% CI 0.43, 0.77) and the median ICC for all nutrients was 0.47, with all ICCs between 0.15 (%E from saturated fat) and 0.7 (g/day sugars). Conclusions: Compared to WFR the AES FFQ is suitable for reliably estimating the dietary intakes of Australian adults across a wide range of nutrients. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.

DOI10.1016/j.clnu.2013.09.015
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authorsMegan Rollo, Maya Guest, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2014Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Watson JF, Guest M, Callister R, 'Changes to dietary intake during a 12-week commercial web-based weight loss program: a randomized controlled trial.', European journal of clinical nutrition, 68 64-70 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1038/ejcn.2013.194
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsMaya Guest, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2014Kypri K, Wolfenden L, Langley J, Hutchesson M, Voas R, 'Public, official, and industry submissions on a Bill to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age: A critical analysis', International Journal of Drug Policy, (2014) [C1]

Background: In 2005 a Bill was introduced to the New Zealand parliament to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age (MPA) from 18 to 20 years and submissions were invited from interested parties. We sought to characterise and critique the arguments tendered for and against the proposal. Methods: We used template analysis to study written submissions on the Bill from 178 people and organisations in New Zealand. Independent raters coded submissions according to the source, whether for or opposed, and the arguments employed. Results: The most common sources of submissions were members of the public (28%), the alcohol industry (20%), and NGOs (20%). Overall, 40% opposed increasing the MPA, 40% were in favour, 4% supported a split MPA (18 years for on-premise, 20 years for off-premise), 7% were equivocal, and 8% offered no comment. The most common proponents of increasing the MPA were NGOs (36%) and members of the public (30%) and their arguments concerned the expected positive effects on public health (36%) and public disorder/property damage (16%), while 24% argued that other strategies should be used as well. The most common sources of opposition to increasing the MPA were the alcohol industry (50%) and the public (20%). It was commonly claimed that the proposed law change would be ineffective in reducing harm (22%), that other strategies should be used instead (16%), that it would infringe adult rights (15%), and that licensed premises are safe environments for young people (14%). There were noteworthy examples of NGOs and government agencies opposing the law change. The alcohol industry maximised its impact via multiple submissions appealing to individual rights while neglecting to report or accurately characterise the scientific evidence. Several health and welfare agencies presented confused logic and/or were selective in their use of scientific evidence. Conclusion: In contrast to the fragmented and inconsistent response from government and NGOs, the alcohol industry was organised and united, with multiple submissions from the sector with most at stake, namely the hospitality industry, and supporting submissions from the manufacturing, import, and wholesale sectors. Systematic reviews of research evidence should be routinely undertaken to guide the legislature and submissions should be categorised on the basis of pecuniary interest. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI10.1016/j.drugpo.2014.05.001
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsLuke Wolfenden, Kypros Kypri
2014Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, McCoy P, Collins CE, 'Response to: Self-directed interventions to promote weight loss: a systematic review of reviews.', Journal of medical Internet research, 16 e178 (2014) [C3]
DOI10.2196/jmir.3476
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2014Blomfield RL, Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Young MD, Jensen ME, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of self-help weight loss resources with or without online support on the dietary intake of overweight and obese men: The SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 8 e476-e487 (2014) [C1]

Background: Obese men are more likely to have poor dietary patterns compared to women, increasing diet-related chronic disease risk. The impact of a male-only weight loss intervention on dietary intakes is under-evaluated. The aim was to deter-mine whether overweight/obese men randomised to self-help paper-based resources with or without online support, achieved greater improvements in diet compared with Wait-list controls at 3 and 6 months following a gender tailored weight-loss intervention.

DOI10.1016/j.orcp.2013.09.004
Co-authorsClare Collins, Myles Young, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2014Blomfield RL, Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Young MD, Jensen ME, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of self-help weight loss resources with or without online support on the dietary intake of overweight and obese men: the SHED-IT randomised controlled trial.', Obesity research & clinical practice, 8 e476-e487 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.orcp.2013.09.004
Co-authorsClare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Myles Young
2014Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'A scoping review of risk behaviour interventions in young men.', BMC public health, 14 957 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1471-2458-14-957
Co-authorsMegan Rollo, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2014Leonard A, Hutchesson M, Patterson A, Chalmers K, Collins C, 'Recruitment and retention of young women into nutrition research studies: practical considerations', TRIALS, 15 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1745-6215-15-23Author URL
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authorsClare Collins, Amanda Patterson, Kerry Chalmers
2013Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Callister R, 'Efficacy of standard versus enhanced features in a Web-based commercial weight-loss program for obese adults, part 2: Randomized controlled trial', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 15 84-105 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.2196/jmir.2626
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2013Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Callister R, 'An 8-week Web-based weight loss challenge with celebrity endorsement and enhanced social support: Observational study', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 15 25-32 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.2196/jmir.2540
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2013Burrows TL, Pursey KM, Hutchesson MJ, Stanwell PT, 'What are the health implications associated with the consumption of energy drinks? A systematic review', Nutrition Reviews, 71 135-148 (2013) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 14Web of Science - 15
Co-authorsTracy Burrows
2013Hutchesson MJ, Truby H, Callister R, Morgan PJ, Davies PSW, Collins CE, 'Can a web-based food record accurately assess energy intake in overweight and obese women? A pilot study', JOURNAL OF HUMAN NUTRITION AND DIETETICS, 26 140-144 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1111/jhn.12094Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2013Al-jadani HM, Patterson A, Sibbritt D, Hutchesson MJ, Jensen ME, Collins CE, 'Diet quality, measured by fruit and vegetable intake, predicts weight change in young women.', Journal of Obesity, 2013 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1155/2013/525161Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2
Co-authorsClare Collins, Amanda Patterson
2013Ho M, Garnett SP, Baur LA, Burrows T, Stewart L, Neve M, Collins C, 'Impact of Dietary and Exercise Interventions on Weight Change and Metabolic Outcomes in Obese Children and Adolescents A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Trials', JAMA PEDIATRICS, 167 759-768 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.1453Author URL
CitationsScopus - 23Web of Science - 20
Co-authorsClare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2013Hutchesson MJ, Hulst J, Collins CE, 'Weight Management Interventions Targeting Young Women: A Systematic Review', JOURNAL OF THE ACADEMY OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS, 113 795-802 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.jand.2013.01.015Author URL
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authorsClare Collins
2012Ho M, Garnett SP, Baur L, Burrows TL, Stewart L, Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of lifestyle interventions in child obesity: Systematic review with meta-analysis', Pediatrics, 130 e1647-e1671 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 65Web of Science - 58
Co-authorsClare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2012Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Behavioural factors related with successful weight loss 15 months post-enrolment in a commercial web-based weight-loss programme', Public Health Nutrition, 15 1299-1309 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2012Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones P, Fletcher K, Martin JE, Aguiar EJ, et al., 'A 12-week commercial web-based weight-loss program for overweight and obese adults: Randomized controlled trial comparing basic versus enhanced features', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 14 e57 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 20Web of Science - 14
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2011Wolfenden L, Neve M, Farrell L, Lecathelinais C, Bell C, Milat A, et al., 'Physical activity policies and practices of childcare centres in Australia', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 47 73-76 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1440-1754.2010.01738.x
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 6
Co-authorsLuke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2011Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Weight change in a commercial web-based weight loss program and its association with website use: Cohort study', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 13 e83 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 18Web of Science - 15
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2010Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Dropout, nonusage attrition, and pretreatment predictors of nonusage attrition in a commercial web-based weight loss program', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 12 81-96 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.2196/jmir.1640
CitationsScopus - 25Web of Science - 23
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2010Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Participant characteristics and reach of a commercial web-based weight loss program', Nutrition & Dietetics, 67 267-274 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1747-0080.2010.01474.x
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2010Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Jones PR, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of web-based interventions in achieving weight loss and weight loss maintenance in overweight and obese adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 11 306-321 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1467-789x.2009.00646.x
CitationsScopus - 129Web of Science - 106
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2010Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones P, Fletcher K, Martin JE, Aguiar EJ, et al., 'Evaluation of a commercial web-based weight loss and weight loss maintenance program in overweight and obese adults: A randomized controlled trial', BMC Public Health, 10 669 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1471-2458-10-669
CitationsScopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2007Vanderkroft D, Collins CE, Fitzgerald M, Lewis S, Hutchesson MJ, Capra SM, 'Minimising undernutrition in the older inpatient', International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare, 5 110-181 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1479-6988.2007.00060.x
Co-authorsClare Collins
2007Collins CE, Warren JM, Hutchesson MJ, McCoy P, Stokes BJ, 'Systematic review of interventions in the management of overweight and obese children which include a dietary component', International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare, 5 2-53 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1479-6988.2007.00061.x
Co-authorsClare Collins, Barrie Stokes
2006Collins CE, Warren JM, Hutchesson MJ, McCoy P, Stokes BJ, 'Measuring effectiveness of dietetic interventions in child obesity - A systematic review of randomized trials', Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 160 906-922 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1001/archpedi.160.9.906
CitationsScopus - 84Web of Science - 76
Co-authorsClare Collins, Barrie Stokes
Show 41 more journal articles

Conference (34 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2013Hutchesson M, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Is a web, smartphone or paper based food record more accurate or acceptable?', 2013 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Ghent, Belgium (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Robin Callister
2013Burrows T, Collins CE, Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Guest M, Boggess M, 'Validation of fruit and vegetable intakes assessed by food frequency questionnaire using plasma carotenoids in adults', Australasian Medical Journal, Brisbane, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsMaya Guest, Megan Rollo, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2013Pezdirc K, Hutchesson M, Collins CE, Whitehead R, Perrett D, Ozakinci G, 'Does dietary intake influence self-perception of and actual appearance? A systematic review', Australasian Medical Journal, Brisbane, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2013Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, 'An examination of young women¿s weight loss expectations', Nutrition and Dietetics, Canberra, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2013O'Brien K, Neve M, Morgan P, Callister R, Collins C, 'Participants in a commercial online weight loss program can improve diet quality during weight loss: A randomized controlled trial', Obesity Facts: the European journal of obesity, Liverpool, UK (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2013Ashton L, Rollo M, Hutchesson M, Young MD, Morgan P, Callister R, et al., 'A comparison of outcomes of young and old adult males in the SHED-IT weight loss program for men', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Megan Rollo, Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2013Gow M, Ho M, Burrows T, Baur LA, Stewart L, Hutchesson M, et al., 'Macronutrient distribution of the diet-impact on weight and cardio-metabolic outcomes in overweight and obese children and adolescents: A systematic review', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2013Pezdirc K, Hutchesson M, Collins CE, 'Fruit and vegetable intakes, BMI and skin colour in women: A cross-sectional study', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2012Baines SK, Hutchesson MJ, Palmer MA, Hure AJ, Burrows TL, MacDonald-Wicks LK, et al., 'Systematic review updating the evidence of the effect of low GI/GL diets in the treatment of overweight and obesity in adults', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsLauren Williams, Tracy Burrows, Surinder Baines, Alexis Hure, Lesley Wicks, Clare Collins
2012Ho M, Garnett SP, Burrows TL, Stewart L, Hutchesson MJ, Baur LA, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of lifestyle interventions incorporating a dietary component in overweight and obese children and adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012MacDonald-Wicks LK, Hutchesson MJ, Palmer MA, Williams LT, Hure AJ, Burrows TL, et al., 'Systematic review updating the evidence of the effect of omega 3 fatty acids in the treatment of overweight and obesity in adults', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsAlexis Hure, Lesley Wicks, Lauren Williams, Surinder Baines, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012Hutchesson MJ, Palmer MA, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Williams LT, Burrows TL, Hure AJ, et al., 'Are best practice guidelines enough? A survey of dietitians to inform the revision of the Best Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsAlexis Hure, Lauren Williams, Lesley Wicks, Surinder Baines, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012Williams LT, Palmer MA, Hollis JL, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Baines SK, Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, 'Systematic review updating the evidence of the effect of diet therapy combined with behavioural and/or psychological therapies compared to diet therapy alone for the treatment of overweight and obesity in adults', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsLauren Williams, Lesley Wicks, Surinder Baines, Clare Collins
2012Burrows TL, Pursey KM, Hutchesson MJ, Stanwell PT, 'What are the health implications associated with the consumption of energy drinks? A systematic review', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Burrows
2012Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Evaluating weight loss, website use, and attrition in commercial web-based weight loss programs', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, New Zealand (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2012Hutchesson MJ, Hulst J, Collins CE, 'Weight management interventions targeting young women: A systematic review', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, NZ (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2012Martin L, Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Guest M, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Characteristics and dietary intakes of adult mis-reporters entering a weight loss study', 8th International Conference on Diet and Activity Methods (ICDAM 8). Abstract Book, Rome, Italy (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Maya Guest, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2011Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, McElduff P, Callister R, '6-Month outcomes in a randomised controlled trial comparing basic and enhanced versions of a commercial web-based weight loss program', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2011Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Changes in dietary intake after 12-week commercial web-based weight loss program', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2011Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Behavioural factors associated with long-term weight loss success in a commercial web-based weight loss program', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA), Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2011Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Truby H, Morgan PJ, Davies P, Callister R, 'Accuracy of self-reported energy intake using a web-based food diary', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2010Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, McElduff P, Morgan PJ, 'Weight change among participants who subscribe to a commerical-web based weight loss program for 1-year', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2010Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, McElduff P, Collins CE, 'Is website use associated with weight loss in a commercial web-based weight loss program?', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2010Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Web-based weight loss: How can the internet support dietitians to treat overweight and obese clients?', Nutrition & Dietetics, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2009Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Weight loss in the real world: Outcomes of a commercial web-based weight loss program', 17th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australia/New Zealand Obesity Society: Meeting Proceedings & Abstract Book, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2009Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Callister RJ, Morgan PJ, 'Validity of self-reported energy intake from a web-based food diary before and after a web-based weight loss program', 7th International Conference on Diet and Activity Methods (ICDAM7): Program and Abstracts, Washington, DC (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Robert Callister, Clare Collins
2009Hutchesson MJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Under-reporting of energy intake among overweight women using a web-based food diary', Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, Bangkok, Thailand (2009) [E3]
DOI10.1159/000248277
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2009Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Predictors of retention rates in a 12-week commerical web-based weight loss program', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2009Wolfenden L, Hutchesson MJ, Farrell L, Lecathelinais LC, Sutherland RL, Bell C, et al., 'Physical activity policies and practices in childcare centres: A population based study', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsJohn Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2008Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Jones PR, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of web-based interventions in achieving weight loss and weight maintenance', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Adelaide, SA (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2008Davies LJ, Sutherland R, Hutchesson MJ, Duncanson K, Bell AC, Finch M, 'Mid-intervention impact of strategies to improve nutrition in children's services', Proceedings of the Australian Health and Medical Research Congress 2008, Brisbane, QLD (2008) [E3]
2008Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Who enrols in a commercially available web-based weight loss program?', Proceedings of the Australian Health and Medical Research Congress 2008, Brisbane, QLD (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2006Collins CE, Warren JM, Stokes BJ, McCoy P, Hutchesson MJ, 'What do children in obesity interventions eat? - A systematic review to improve practice', Nutrition & Dietetics, Sydney, Australia (2006) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Barrie Stokes
2005Capra SM, Hutchesson MJ, Reeve L, Roberts N, 'The Coles 7 a-day Program: An evaluation', Dietitians Association of Australia 23rd National Conference, Intercontinental Burswood Resort, Perth WA (2005) [E3]
Show 31 more conferences

Report (2 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2012Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Palmer MA, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Williams LT, Baines SK, et al., 'DAA Best Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults; Report to inform the 2011 revision of the 2005 guidelines', Dieticians Association of Australia, 173 (2012) [R1]
Co-authorsLesley Wicks, Lauren Williams, Tracy Burrows, Alexis Hure, Clare Collins, Surinder Baines
2011Probst Y, Ralston R, Riley M, Sutherland RL, Truby H, Walker K, et al., 'A review of the evidence to address targeted questions to inform the revision of the Australian Dietary Guidelines', National Health and Medical Research Council, 1078 (2011) [R1]
Co-authorsLauren Williams, Alexis Hure, Lesley Wicks, Amanda Patterson, Surinder Baines, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants11
Total funding$290,649

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20153 grants / $32,000

Emlyn and Jennie Thomas Postgraduate Medical Research Scholarship$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamProfessor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Miss Lisa Spencer
SchemePostgraduate Research Scholarship
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1500649
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Providing one-on-one virtual exercise care via video consultations: a feasibility study in pregnancy.$10,000

Funding body: Exercise and Sports Science Australia

Funding bodyExercise and Sports Science Australia
Project TeamDoctor Megan Rollo, Miss Lisa Spencer, Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson
SchemeTom Penrose Research and Community Service Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1401192
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

ISBNPA 2015 Annual Meeting (International Society of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity), Edinburgh Scotland, 3-6 June 2015$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Melinda Hutchesson
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2016
GNoG1500524
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20144 grants / $198,326

A randomised controlled trial to determine the efficacy of a translatable eHealth weight loss intervention for young women. Does it reduce Cardiovscular disease risk?$150,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding bodyNational Heart Foundation of Australia
Project TeamDoctor Melinda Hutchesson
SchemePostdoctoral Research Fellowship
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1300667
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category1NS
UONY

What studies have been undertaken examining vegetable juice and health welbeing$28,326

Funding body: Campbell Arnott's

Funding bodyCampbell Arnott's
Project TeamProfessor Clare Collins, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400556
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Using focus groups to understand young adult males motivators and barriers to participating in a Healthy Lifestyle Program$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamProfessor Clare Collins, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Doctor Megan Rollo, Professor Philip Morgan
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1301360
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Helping pregnant women achieve a healthy lifestyle and good outcomes for themselves and their baby in terms of health and well-being$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamProfessor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Miss Lisa Spencer
SchemePostgraduate Research Scholarship
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1401512
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20131 grants / $1,232

Dietitians Association of Australia 30th National Conference, National Convention Centre, Canberra, 23 - 25 May 2013$1,232

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Melinda Hutchesson
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300540
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20121 grants / $25,000

Development and evaluation of an eHealth weight loss intervention for young overweight women$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamProfessor Clare Collins, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson
SchemeResearch Higher Degree Support Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200013
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

20111 grants / $25,000

NL11009 Updated literature review on nuts: The Newcastle Report$25,000

Funding body: Horticulture Australia Limited

Funding bodyHorticulture Australia Limited
Project TeamProfessor Clare Collins, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson
SchemeResearch Consultancy
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1101124
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

20101 grants / $9,091

Preliminary work to revise the DAA Best Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults$9,091

Funding body: Dietitians Association of Australia

Funding bodyDietitians Association of Australia
Project TeamProfessor Clare Collins, Conjoint Professor Lauren Williams, Associate Professor Surinder Baines, Doctor Lesley MacDonald-Wicks, Doctor Tracy Burrows, Doctor Alexis Hure, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson
SchemeProject Consultancy
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1001022
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY
Edit

Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014Weight Management During Pregnancy and Following Childbirth
Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2013Can young men change their lifestyle? A novel way to improve health.
Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2012A Novel Approach that Focuses on the Health and Appearance of Young Women
Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
Edit

News

Be healthe Be positive

‘Healthe’ approach to weight loss

March 19, 2015

Young women looking for inspiration to achieve a healthy weight have the opportunity to enrol in a targeted program soon to be trialled by nutrition researchers at the University of Newcastle.

Young men exercising

Healthy lifestyle study targets young men

March 19, 2014

Young men are the target of a new University of Newcastle study aiming to tailor a healthy lifestyle program that meets their specific needs.

Fruit and Vegies

The power of fruit and vegies

October 16, 2013

Can increasing your fruit and vegetable intake improve your skin colour and appearance? A University of Newcastle study is searching for the answer with the hope it could be a powerful motivator to encourage people to eat healthier.

Dr Melinda Hutchesson

Position

Research Fellow
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Nutrition and Dietetics

Contact Details

Emailmelinda.hutchesson@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 4921 5405

Office

RoomAdvanced Technology Centre (ATC) Level 3
BuildingAdvanced Technology Centre
Edit