Dr Lee Ashton

Dr Lee Ashton

Casual Lecturer

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy

Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Ashton is a post-doctoral researcher at the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition and the School of Health Sciences. He was awarded his PhD from the University of Newcastle in March 2017. He also completed a Master of Science in Nutrition, Obesity & Health at the University of Leeds (UK) in 2011 and a Bachelor of Science (Hons) in Sport and Exercise Science at Leeds Beckett University (UK) in 2010.

Dr. Ashton's research focuses on the development and evaluation of user-driven, gender-tailored healthy lifestyle programs using innovative technologies to improve physical activity, eating habits and well-being in young adult men. Dr Ashton is creating a research profile in chronic disease prevention, masculinities and men’s health (particularly young men), eHealth, participatory research and health behaviour change interventions.

Research Expertise

  • Developing and testing participatory based healthy lifestyle interventions for young men (aged 18-25).
  • Conducting randomised controlled trials of public health interventions.
  • Designing and testing eHealth interventions in young adults
  • Examining the utility of Behaviour Change Techniques to explain and predict behaviours and other health outcomes.
  • Conducting systematic reviews of the effectiveness of health behaviour change interventions in young men
  • Undertaking Qualitative (i.e.,focus groups) and quantitative research (i.e., surveys) to inform intervention design.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Leeds - UK
  • Master of Science, University of Leeds - UK

Keywords

  • Men's Health
  • Nutrition
  • Obesity Prevention
  • Participatory research
  • Physical activity
  • Systematic review

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Casual Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2017 International Award for Best Student Oral Presentation
International Society for Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity
2015 Student Travel Grant
Nutrition Society Australia
2015 Best RHD publication (Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition)
The University of Newcastle
2014 Runner-up in the University of Newcastle 3-Minute Thesis competition ($1000 prize) [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-mO9z8x6mRI]
The University of Newcastle
2014 Best RhD Confirmation (School of Health Sciences)
The University of Newcastle
2011 National Alpro Foundation Award for best MSc Thesis in the UK
Alpro Foundation

Scholarship

Year Award
2014 Greaves Family Postgraduate Scholarship in Medical Research
Hunter Medical Resarch Institute (HMRI) Public Health Program
2013 Felicity Thompson Rainbow Foundation top-up scholarship
Hunter Medical Research Institute
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Oosterveen E, Tzelepis F, Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, 'A systematic review of eHealth behavioral interventions targeting smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity and/or obesity for young adults.', Prev Med, 99 197-206 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.01.009
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Flora Tzelepis
2017 Ashton LM, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Collins CE, 'Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the 'HEYMAN' healthy lifestyle program for young men: a pilot randomised controlled trial.', Nutr J, 16 2 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s12937-017-0227-8
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Megan Rollo, Melinda Hutchesson
2017 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Motivators and Barriers to Engaging in Healthy Eating and Physical Activity: A Cross-Sectional Survey in Young Adult Men', American Journal of Men's Health, 11 330-343 (2017)

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016.Many Australian young men (18-25 years) fail to meet recommendations in national dietary or physical activity (PA) guidelines. However, there is a l... [more]

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016.Many Australian young men (18-25 years) fail to meet recommendations in national dietary or physical activity (PA) guidelines. However, there is a lack of understanding of their perspectives on PA and diet to inform intervention design. This study examined young men¿s motivators and barriers to healthy eating and PA, along with differences by demographic and behavioral factors. A cross-sectional online survey was completed by 282 men aged 18 to 25 years in Australia. Results identified the most common motivators for healthy eating included improving health (63.5%), body image (52.3%), and increasing energy (32.1%). Motivators for PA included improving body image (44.6%), fitness (44.2%), and health (41.0%). Common barriers to healthy eating were access to unhealthy foods (61.1%), time to cook/prepare healthy foods (55.0%), and motivation to cook healthy foods (50.7%). Barriers for PA included motivation (66.3%), time (57.8%), and cost of equipment/facilities (33.3%). Significant differences (p <.01) in motivators to healthy eating and/or PA were identified for BMI category, marital status, PA level, alcohol intake, and stress levels. Significant differences were identified for barriers to healthy eating and/or PA by BMI, PA level, stress, and fruit and vegetable intake, assessed using Pearson¿s chi-square test. Findings suggest that promotion of benefits related to health, appearance/body image, increased energy and fitness, and addressing key barriers including motivation, time, financial restraints, and accessibility of unhealthy foods, could engage young men in improving lifestyle behaviors. Differences by demographic and behavioral factors suggest development of tailored programs to address diversity among young men may be required.

DOI 10.1177/1557988316680936
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Melinda Hutchesson, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2017 Ashton LM, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Collins CE, 'Young Men's Preferences for Design and Delivery of Physical Activity and Nutrition Interventions: A Mixed-Methods Study.', Am J Mens Health, 1557988317714141 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1557988317714141
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Ashton LM, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Young MD, Collins CE, 'A systematic review of SNAPO (Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity) randomized controlled trials in young adult men', Preventive Medicine, 81 221-231 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity (SNAPO) interventions in young men exclusively. The... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity (SNAPO) interventions in young men exclusively. The secondary aim was to evaluate the recruitment, retention and engagement strategies. Methods: A search with no date restrictions was conducted across seven databases. Randomized controlled trials recruiting young men only (aged 18-35. years) into interventions targeting any SNAPO risk factors were included. Results: Ten studies were included (two nutrition, six alcohol use, two targeting multiple SNAPO risk factors). Six studies (two nutrition, three alcohol use and one targeting multiple SNAPO risk factors) demonstrated significant positive short-term intervention effects, but impact was either not assessed beyond the intervention (n = 3), had short-term follow-up (= 6 months) (n = 2) or not sustained beyond six months (n = 1). Overall, a high risk of bias was identified across studies. Only one study undertook a power calculation and recruited the required sample size. Adequate retention was achieved in three studies. Effectiveness of engagement strategies was not reported in any studies. Conclusions: Despite preliminary evidence of short-term effectiveness of SNAPO interventions in young men, few studies characterized by a high risk of bias were identified. High quality SNAPO interventions for young men are warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.09.005
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Myles Young, Megan Rollo
2015 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Thompson DI, Collins CE, 'Young adult males' motivators and perceived barriers towards eating healthily and being active: A qualitative study', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0257-6
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Clare Collins, Megan Rollo, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson
2014 Bryant M, Ashton L, Brown J, Jebb S, Wright J, Roberts K, Nixon J, 'Systematic review to identify and appraise outcome measures used to evaluate childhood obesity treatment interventions (CoOR): evidence of purpose, application, validity, reliability and sensitivity.', Health Technol Assess, 18 1-380 (2014)
DOI 10.3310/hta18510
2014 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'A scoping review of risk behaviour interventions in young men.', BMC public health, 14 957 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Megan Rollo
2014 Bryant M, Ashton L, Nixon J, Jebb S, Wright J, Roberts K, Brown J, 'Framework of outcome measures recommended for use in the evaluation of childhood obesity treatment interventions: the CoOR framework', PEDIATRIC OBESITY, 9 e116-e131 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/j.2047-6310.2014.220.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 6
2014 Bryant M, Ashton L, Nixon J, Jebb S, Wright J, Roberts K, Brown J, 'The use and reporting of primary and secondary outcome measures in trials evaluating childhood obesity treatment interventions', BMC Obesity, 1 (2014)
DOI 10.1186/s40608-014-0025-1
Show 7 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, Morgan P, Thompson D, Collins CE, 'Motivators and barriers to engaging in healthy eating and physical activity in young adult men' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Oosterveen E, Tzelepis F, Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, 'eHealth behavioural interventions targeting smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity and/or obesity (SNAPO) in young adults: A systematic review', http://www.anzos2015.org/program-page/ (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Flora Tzelepis
2015 Ashton L, Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Morgan P, Collins C, 'Motivators and barriers to engaging in healthy eating and physical activity in young adult men: a cross-sectional study.' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Megan Rollo
2015 Ashton L, Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Morgan P, Collins C, 'Young men's motivators and barriers to healthy eating and their preferences for a healthy eating intervention' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson, Megan Rollo
2014 Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, Morgan P, Collins CE, 'Have young men been targeted to change risk behaviours? A scoping review of the literature.', Obesity Reviews (2014)
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Philip Morgan, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins
2013 Ashton L, Rollo M, Hutchesson M, Young MD, Morgan P, Callister R, et al., 'A comparison of outcomes of young and old adult males in the SHED-IT weight loss program for men', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Myles Young, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Megan Rollo, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff
Show 3 more conferences
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News

HEYMAN

HEYMAN, it’s a tailored lifestyle study for young men

March 17, 2016

They asked for it, they informed the program design, and now a group of men aged 18-25 are about to receive a University of Newcastle (UON) intervention firmly focused on improving eating habits, exercise and mental health.

Dr Lee Ashton

Positions

Casual Lecturer
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Research Assistant
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email lee.ashton@newcastle.edu.au
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