Dr Myles Young

Dr Myles Young

Post Doctoral Researcher

School of Education

Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Young is a post-doctoral research fellow at the Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition and the School of Education. He was awarded his PhD from the University of Newcastle in May 2015. He also completed a Bachelor of Psychology (Hons 1A) at the University of Newcastle in 2009.

Dr. Young's research focuses on the development and testing of theory-based, gender-tailored weight loss and weight loss maintenance programs for men.

Research Expertise

  • Developing and testing gender-tailored, theory-based weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions for men.
  • Examining the utility of psychology theories (e.g., Social Cognitive Theory) to explain and predict behaviours and other health outcomes.
  • Conducting systematic reviews of weight loss, weight loss maintenance, physical activity and dietary interventions.
  • Conducting randomised controlled trials of public health interventions.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Behaviour change
  • Health behaviour change
  • Men's health
  • Social cognitive theory
  • Weight loss
  • Weight loss maintenance

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified 35
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 25
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Post Doctoral Researcher University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/03/2010 - 1/09/2014 Research Assistant University of Newcastle
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition
Australia

Awards

Recipient

Year Award
2013 Best RhD Student Publication (Faculty of Education and Arts)
University of Newcastle

Research Award

Year Award
2015 Greaves Family Early Career Support Grant
Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
2015 Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant
Hunter Medical Research Institute
2012 Barker Scholarship
Hunter Medical Research Institute
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (25 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Young MD, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, 'Efficacy of a gender-tailored intervention to prevent weight regain in men over 3 years: A weight loss maintenance RCT.', Obesity (Silver Spring), 25 56-65 (2017)
DOI 10.1002/oby.21696
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff
2016 Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'A Test of Social Cognitive Theory to Explain Men's Physical Activity During a Gender-Tailored Weight Loss Program.', Am J Mens Health, 10 NP176-NP187 (2016)
DOI 10.1177/1557988315600063
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2016 Morgan PJ, Hollis JL, Young MD, Collins CE, Teixeira PJ, 'Workday Sitting Time and Marital Status: Novel Pretreatment Predictors of Weight Loss in Overweight and Obese Men.', Am J Mens Health, (2016)
DOI 10.1177/1557988316654866
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Jenna Hollis
2016 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Callister R, 'Reductions In Diabetes And Cardiovascular Risk Following An Exercise And Diet Intervention For Diabetes Prevention: 2120 Board #272 June 2, 3: 30 PM - 5: 00 PM.', Med Sci Sports Exerc, 48 597 (2016)
DOI 10.1249/01.mss.0000486793.56343.5f
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister
2016 Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Collins CE, Hesketh KD, Young MD, Burrows TL, et al., 'Practicalities and Research Considerations for Conducting Childhood Obesity Prevention Interventions with Families', CHILDREN-BASEL, 3 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/children3040024
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2016 Morgan PJ, Young MD, Smith JJ, Lubans DR, 'Targeted Health Behavior Interventions Promoting Physical Activity: A Conceptual Model', Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, 44 71-80 (2016) [C1]

This article presents a conceptual model illustrating a targeted approach to the design and delivery of health behavior interventions that focus on physical activity promotion. We... [more]

This article presents a conceptual model illustrating a targeted approach to the design and delivery of health behavior interventions that focus on physical activity promotion. We hypothesize that researchers who i) enhance the sociocultural relevance of their core intervention components and ii) recognize the unique contributions of both intervention design and delivery will experience greater intervention engagement and improved outcomes.

DOI 10.1249/JES.0000000000000075
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors David Lubans, Jordan Smith, Philip Morgan
2016 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Callister R, 'Efficacy of the Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Using LifeStyle Education Program RCT', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 50 353-364 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Introduction Self-administered lifestyle interventions have been suggested as an alternative to face-to-face delivery modes, althou... [more]

© 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Introduction Self-administered lifestyle interventions have been suggested as an alternative to face-to-face delivery modes, although their efficacy remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Type 2 diabetes mellitus Prevention Using LifeStyle Education (PULSE) Program, a self-administered and gender-tailored lifestyle intervention for men at high risk for developing Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Design/setting A 6-month, assessor-blinded, parallel-group RCT was conducted at the University of Newcastle, Australia in 2012-2013. Participants Men (aged 18-65 years, BMI 25-40 kg/m2, high risk for developing Type 2 diabetes mellitus) were stratified by age (<50 and >50 years) and BMI category (25.0-29.9, 30.0-35.9, and 35.0-40 kg/m2) and individually randomized (1:1 ratio) to the intervention (n=53) or waitlist control groups (n=48). Intervention The intervention group received the PULSE Program, which contained print and video resources on weight loss (Self-Help, Exercise and Diet using Internet Technology [SHED-IT] Weight Loss Program), diet modification, and exercise for Type 2 diabetes mellitus prevention. The waitlist control group received no information until 6 months. Main outcome measures Data were collected from September 2012 to September 2013 and analyzed in 2014-2015. Linear mixed models (intention-to-treat) were used to determine group X time interactions (differences between groups in changes over time) at 6 months for the primary outcome (weight), glycated hemoglobin, and several secondary outcomes (significance level, p<0.05). Results Differences between groups in mean changes from baseline to 6 months (group × time interaction) favored the intervention over control group for weight loss (-5.50 kg, 95% CI=-7.40 kg, -3.61 kg, p<0.001, Cohen's d=1.15), glycated hemoglobin (-0.2%, 95% CI=-0.3%, -0.1%, p=0.002, d=0.64), and BMI, waist circumference, body fat percentage, aerobic fitness, and lower body muscular fitness (all p<0.05). No group × time effects were observed for fasting plasma glucose, upper body muscular fitness, physical activity, or energy intake. Conclusions The PULSE Program improved several Type 2 diabetes mellitus risk factors in men, including weight and glycated hemoglobin. These findings provide evidence for a self-administered and gender-tailored lifestyle intervention, which has potential for dissemination in community settings.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.08.020
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2015 Young MD, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Behavioral Mediators of Weight Loss in the SHED-IT Community Randomized Controlled Trial for Overweight and Obese Men', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 49 286-292 (2015) [C1]

© 2014, The Society of Behavioral Medicine.Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpos... [more]

© 2014, The Society of Behavioral Medicine.Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpose: The aim of the current study was to identify behavioral mediators of weight loss in the male-only Self-Help, Exercise, and Diet using Information Technology (SHED-IT) community weight loss study. Methods: A randomized controlled trial with 159 overweight/obese men [mean (SD) age = 47.5 (11.0) years; body mass index = 32.7 (3.5) kg/m2] assessed at baseline, 3¿months (post-test) and 6¿months (follow-up). Results: In an intention-to-treat, multiple-mediator model, the significant intervention effect on weight at 6¿months (-3.70¿kg; p < 0.001) was mediated by increases in physical activity (steps/day) and decreases in takeaway meals (kJ/day) and portion size at 3¿months. The largest mediation effect was for physical activity (-0.6¿kg; 95¿% confidence interval -1.4, -0.1). Overall, the targeted mediators accounted for 47.0¿% of the intervention¿s effect on weight. Conclusion: Step counts, takeaway food consumption, and portion sizes may be key areas to target in future weight loss programs for men (ACTRN12610000699066).

DOI 10.1007/s12160-014-9657-0
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister
2015 Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of a male-only weight loss maintenance programme on social-cognitive determinants of physical activity and healthy eating: A randomized controlled trial.', Br J Health Psychol, 20 724-744 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/bjhp.12137
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Ashton LM, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Young MD, Collins CE, 'A systematic review of SNAPO (Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity) randomized controlled trials in young adult men', Preventive Medicine, 81 221-231 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity (SNAPO) interventions in young men exclusively. The... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity (SNAPO) interventions in young men exclusively. The secondary aim was to evaluate the recruitment, retention and engagement strategies. Methods: A search with no date restrictions was conducted across seven databases. Randomized controlled trials recruiting young men only (aged 18-35. years) into interventions targeting any SNAPO risk factors were included. Results: Ten studies were included (two nutrition, six alcohol use, two targeting multiple SNAPO risk factors). Six studies (two nutrition, three alcohol use and one targeting multiple SNAPO risk factors) demonstrated significant positive short-term intervention effects, but impact was either not assessed beyond the intervention (n = 3), had short-term follow-up (= 6 months) (n = 2) or not sustained beyond six months (n = 1). Overall, a high risk of bias was identified across studies. Only one study undertook a power calculation and recruited the required sample size. Adequate retention was achieved in three studies. Effectiveness of engagement strategies was not reported in any studies. Conclusions: Despite preliminary evidence of short-term effectiveness of SNAPO interventions in young men, few studies characterized by a high risk of bias were identified. High quality SNAPO interventions for young men are warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.09.005
Co-authors Lee Ashton, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Riley N, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Young M, 'Outcomes and process evaluation of a programme integrating physical activity into the primary school mathematics curriculum: The EASY Minds pilot randomised controlled trial', JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT, 18 656-661 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.09.005
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Nicholas Riley, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2014 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows T, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community randomized controlled trial: A community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', Preventive Medicine, 61 90-99 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK)' program when delivered by trained facilitators in community settings. Method: A two-arm randomi... [more]

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK)' program when delivered by trained facilitators in community settings. Method: A two-arm randomized controlled trial of 93 overweight/obese fathers (mean [SD] age=40.3 [5.3] years; BMI=32.5 [3.8] kg/m2) and their primary school-aged children (n=132) from the Hunter Region, Australia. In 2010-2011, families were randomized to either: (i) HDHK intervention (n=48 fathers, n=72 children) or (ii) wait-list control group. The 7-week intervention included seven sessions and resources (booklets, pedometers). Assessments were held at baseline and 14-weeks with fathers' weight (kg) as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes for fathers and children included waist, BMI, blood pressure, resting heart rate, physical activity (pedometry), and self-reported dietary intake and sedentary behaviors. Results: Linear mixed models (intention-to-treat) revealed significant between-group differences for fathers' weight (P < .001, d= 0.24), with HDHK fathers losing more weight (- 3.3. kg; 95%CI, - 4.3, - 2.4) than control fathers (0.1. kg; 95%CI, - 0.9,1.0). Significant treatment effects (P < .05) were also found for fathers' waist (d= 0.41), BMI (d= 0.26), resting heart rate (d= 0.59), energy intake (d= 0.49) and physical activity (d= 0.46) and for children's physical activity (d= 0.50) and adiposity (d= 0.07). Discussion: HDHK significantly improved health outcomes and behaviors in fathers and children, providing evidence for program effectiveness when delivered in a community setting. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.12.019
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Alyce Barnes, Tracy Burrows, Adam Lloyd, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher, Philip Morgan, Andrew Miller, David Lubans
2014 Hollis JL, Williams LT, Young MD, Pollard KT, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Compliance to step count and vegetable serve recommendations mediates weight gain prevention in mid-age, premenopausal women. Findings of the 40-Something RCT.', Appetite, 83 33-41 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Jenna Hollis, Lauren Williams, Clare Collins
2014 Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Social cognitive theory and physical activity: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 15 983-995 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 International Association for the Study of Obesity (IASO).This review investigated three research questions (i) What is the utility of social cognitive theory (SCT) to exp... [more]

© 2014 International Association for the Study of Obesity (IASO).This review investigated three research questions (i) What is the utility of social cognitive theory (SCT) to explain physical activity (PA)?; (ii) Is the effectiveness of SCT moderated by sample or methodological characteristics? and (iii) What is the frequency of significant associations between the core SCT constructs and PA? Ten electronic databases were searched with no date or sample restrictions. Forty-four studies were retrieved containing 55 SCT models of PA. Methodological quality was assessed using a standardized tool. A random-effects meta-analysis revealed that SCT accounted for 31% of the variance in PA. However, methodological quality was mostly poor for these models. Methodological quality and sample age moderated the PA effect size, with increases in both associated with greater variance explained. Although self-efficacy and goals were consistently associated with PA, outcome expectations and socio-structural factors were not. This review determined that SCT is a useful framework to explain PA behaviour. Higher quality models explained more PA variance, but overall methodological quality was poor. As such, high-quality studies examining the utility of SCT to explain PA are warranted.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12225
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2014 Morgan PJ, Scott HA, Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, 'Associations between program outcomes and adherence to Social Cognitive Theory tasks: process evaluation of the SHED-IT community weight loss trial for men', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 11 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-014-0089-9
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Hayley Scott
2014 Young MD, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Doran CM, Morgan PJ, 'The SHED-IT Weight Loss Maintenance trial protocol: A randomised controlled trial of a weight loss maintenance program for overweight and obese men', CONTEMPORARY CLINICAL TRIALS, 37 84-97 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2013.11.004
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2014 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Callister R, 'The PULSE (Prevention Using LifeStyle Education) trial protocol: a randomised controlled trial of a Type 2 Diabetes Prevention programme for men.', Contemporary clinical trials, 39 132-144 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2014 Blomfield RL, Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Young MD, Jensen ME, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of self-help weight loss resources with or without online support on the dietary intake of overweight and obese men: The SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 8 e476-e487 (2014) [C1]

©2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.Background: Obese men are more likely to have poor dietary patterns comp... [more]

©2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.Background: Obese men are more likely to have poor dietary patterns compared to women, increasing diet-related chronic disease risk. The impact of a male-only weight loss intervention on dietary intakes is under-evaluated. The aim was to deter-mine whether overweight/obese men randomised to self-help paper-based resources with or without online support, achieved greater improvements in diet compared with Wait-list controls at 3 and 6 months following a gender tailored weight-loss intervention.Methods: Dietary intake was assessed using a 120-item semi-quantitative food fre-quency questionnaire (FFQ), in a secondary analysis of a three-arm weight lossRCT grounded in Social Cognitive Theory; (1) Resources: gender-tailored weight lossresources (DVD, handbooks, pedometer, tape measure); (2) Online: resources pluswebsite and efeedback, (3) Wait-list control.Results: Energy, total fat, saturated fat, and carbohydrate intakes decreased in theonline group, which differed significantly from controls at 3- and 6-month follow-up(P <0.05). There was a significant reduction in energy, fat and carbohydrate intakesin the Resource group at 3 and 6 months, but no difference from controls (P>0.05).In the online group there was an increase in %energy from core foods and decreasein %energy from energy-dense nutrient-poor foods (P<0.05) that was significantlydifferent compared to controls at 3 and 6 months (P<0.05).Conclusion: Results suggest that men randomised to the SHED-IT intervention armswere able to implement key dietary messages up to 6 months compared to con-trols. Future interventions should include targeted and gender-tailored messages asa strategy to improve mens dietary intake within weight loss interventions.© 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity.

DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.09.004
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2013 Collins CE, Burrows TL, Bray J, Asher R, Young MD, Morgan PJ, 'Effectiveness of parent-centred interventions for the prevention and treatment of childhood overweight and obesity in community settings: a systematic review', The JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 11 180-257 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2013 Collins CE, Neve MJ, Morgan PJ, Fletcher K, Williams R, Young M, Callister R, 'Effectiveness of interventions with a dietary component on weight loss maintenance: A systematic review', The JBI Database of Systematic Reviews & Implementation Reports, 11 317-414 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.11124/jbisrir-2013-708
Co-authors Robin Callister, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2013 Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry N, et al., 'The SHED-IT Community Trial: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet- and Paper-Based Weight Loss Programs Tailored for Overweight and Obese Men', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 45 139-152 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12160-012-9424-z
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 39
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2013 Collins CE, Jensen ME, Young MD, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Improvement in erectile function following weight loss in obese men: The SHED-IT randomized controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 7 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.07.004
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2012 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of male-only weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 13 393-408 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 39
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2011 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community effectiveness trial: Study protocol of a community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', BMC Public Health, 11 876 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-876
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Richard Fletcher, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Tracy Burrows, David Lubans, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Andrew Miller, Adam Lloyd
2010 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, McElduff P, Burrows TL, Warren JM, et al., 'The SHED-IT community trial study protocol: A randomised controlled trial of weight loss programs for overweight and obese men', BMC Public Health, 10 1-11 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-701
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Patrick Mcelduff, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
Show 22 more journal articles

Conference (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Young MD, Plotnikoff R, Collins C, Callister R, Morgan P, 'A test of social cognitive theory to explain physical activity changes in a weight loss program for men' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2015 Morgan PJ, Lloyd A, Barnes A, Young M, Miller A, Lubans D, et al., 'Engaging fathers to improve family physical and mental health: the impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community program' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Alyce Barnes, Andrew Miller, Adam Lloyd, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2015 Collins, Aguiar E, Morgan P, Plotnikoff R, Young M, Callister R, 'Improvements in diet, fitness and weight in men following the PULSE type 2 diabetes mellitus prevention program; arandomised controlled trial' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2013 Ashton L, Rollo M, Hutchesson M, Young MD, Morgan P, Callister R, et al., 'A comparison of outcomes of young and old adult males in the SHED-IT weight loss program for men', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Lee Ashton, Robin Callister, Megan Rollo, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2013 Collins CE, Jensen MJ, Young MD, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Erectile function improves in obese men following weight loss during the SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2012 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, 'Relationship between physical activity outcomes and adherence to paper-based social cognitive tasks in a weight loss program for men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Saunders KL, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, et al., 'Insights into engaging men in weight loss: Process evaluation of the SHED-IT RCT of gender-sensitised weight loss programs for overweight men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Tracy Burrows, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Patrick Mcelduff
2012 Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry NJ, et al., 'Physical activity outcomes from the SHED-IT RCT: An evaluation of theoretically-based, gender-sensitised weight loss programs for men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Patrick Mcelduff, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry NJ, et al., 'The SHED-IT Community Trial: A randomised controlled trial of Internet- and paper-based weight loss programs tailored for overweight and obese men', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Patrick Mcelduff, Philip Morgan, Tracy Burrows
2012 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of male-only weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister
2011 Miller AD, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Okely AD, et al., 'Effective strategies for the recruitment of overweight men and their children into a community trial: The Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids recruitment story', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Andrew Miller, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Alyce Barnes, Tracy Burrows, Adam Lloyd
2011 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'Development of a male-only weight loss maintenance program: Evaluating the SHED-IT Weight Loss Maintenance program materials for quality, suitability and theoretical merit', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2011 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'The SHED-IT Weight Loss Maintenance study: Development of a theory-based weight loss maintenance intervention exclusively targeting men', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2010 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Fletcher R, Burrows TL, Collins CE, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community program: Promoting family health through sustainable school and community partnerships', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
Show 11 more conferences
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News

SHED-IT

Obese men SHED-IT

October 17, 2013

An internationally-recognised University of Newcastle weight loss program tailored specifically for men has produced a benefit that is likely to be a powerful motivator to shed the excess kilos – improved erectile function.

Dr Myles Young

Position

Post Doctoral Researcher
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email myles.young@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6096

Office

Room ATC301
Building Advanced Technology Centre
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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