Dr Myles Young

Dr Myles Young

Post Doctoral Researcher

School of Education

Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Young is a post-doctoral research fellow at the Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition and the School of Education. He was awarded his PhD from the University of Newcastle in May 2015. He also completed a Bachelor of Psychology (Hons 1A) at the University of Newcastle in 2009.

Dr. Young's research focuses on the development and testing of theory-based, gender-tailored weight loss and weight loss maintenance programs for men.

Research Expertise

  • Developing and testing gender-tailored, theory-based weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions for men.
  • Examining the utility of psychology theories (e.g., Social Cognitive Theory) to explain and predict behaviours and other health outcomes.
  • Conducting systematic reviews of weight loss, weight loss maintenance, physical activity and dietary interventions.
  • Conducting randomised controlled trials of public health interventions.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Behaviour change
  • Health behaviour change
  • Men's health
  • Social cognitive theory
  • Weight loss
  • Weight loss maintenance

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified 35
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 25
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Post Doctoral Researcher University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/03/2010 - 1/09/2014 Research Assistant University of Newcastle
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition
Australia

Awards

Recipient

Year Award
2013 Best RhD Student Publication (Faculty of Education and Arts)
University of Newcastle

Research Award

Year Award
2015 Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant
Hunter Medical Research Institute
2012 Barker Scholarship
Hunter Medical Research Institute
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (21 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Young MD, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Behavioral Mediators of Weight Loss in the SHED-IT Community Randomized Controlled Trial for Overweight and Obese Men', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 49 286-292 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s12160-014-9657-0
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Robin Callister
2015 Young MD, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Behavioral Mediators of Weight Loss in the SHED-IT Community Randomized Controlled Trial for Overweight and Obese Men', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 49 286-292 (2015)

Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpose: The aim of the current study was to ident... [more]

Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpose: The aim of the current study was to identify behavioral mediators of weight loss in the male-only Self-Help, Exercise, and Diet using Information Technology (SHED-IT) community weight loss study. Methods: A randomized controlled trial with 159 overweight/obese men [mean (SD) age = 47.5 (11.0) years; body mass index = 32.7 (3.5) kg/m2] assessed at baseline, 3¿months (post-test) and 6¿months (follow-up). Results: In an intention-to-treat, multiple-mediator model, the significant intervention effect on weight at 6¿months (-3.70¿kg; p < 0.001) was mediated by increases in physical activity (steps/day) and decreases in takeaway meals (kJ/day) and portion size at 3¿months. The largest mediation effect was for physical activity (-0.6¿kg; 95¿% confidence interval -1.4, -0.1). Overall, the targeted mediators accounted for 47.0¿% of the intervention¿s effect on weight. Conclusion: Step counts, takeaway food consumption, and portion sizes may be key areas to target in future weight loss programs for men (ACTRN12610000699066).

DOI 10.1007/s12160-014-9657-0
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2015 Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of a male-only weight loss maintenance programme on social-cognitive determinants of physical activity and healthy eating: A randomized controlled trial.', Br J Health Psychol, (2015)
DOI 10.1111/bjhp.12137
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2014 Blomfield RL, Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Young MD, Jensen ME, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of self-help weight loss resources with or without online support on the dietary intake of overweight and obese men: The SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 8 e476-e487 (2014) [C1]

Background: Obese men are more likely to have poor dietary patterns compared to women, increasing diet-related chronic disease risk. The impact of a male-only weight loss interven... [more]

Background: Obese men are more likely to have poor dietary patterns compared to women, increasing diet-related chronic disease risk. The impact of a male-only weight loss intervention on dietary intakes is under-evaluated. The aim was to deter-mine whether overweight/obese men randomised to self-help paper-based resources with or without online support, achieved greater improvements in diet compared with Wait-list controls at 3 and 6 months following a gender tailored weight-loss intervention.

DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.09.004
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2014 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows T, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community randomized controlled trial: A community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', Preventive Medicine, 61 90-99 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK)' program when delivered by trained facilitators in community settings. Method: A two-arm randomi... [more]

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK)' program when delivered by trained facilitators in community settings. Method: A two-arm randomized controlled trial of 93 overweight/obese fathers (mean [SD] age=40.3 [5.3] years; BMI=32.5 [3.8] kg/m2) and their primary school-aged children (n=132) from the Hunter Region, Australia. In 2010-2011, families were randomized to either: (i) HDHK intervention (n=48 fathers, n=72 children) or (ii) wait-list control group. The 7-week intervention included seven sessions and resources (booklets, pedometers). Assessments were held at baseline and 14-weeks with fathers' weight (kg) as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes for fathers and children included waist, BMI, blood pressure, resting heart rate, physical activity (pedometry), and self-reported dietary intake and sedentary behaviors. Results: Linear mixed models (intention-to-treat) revealed significant between-group differences for fathers' weight (P < .001, d= 0.24), with HDHK fathers losing more weight (- 3.3. kg; 95%CI, - 4.3, - 2.4) than control fathers (0.1. kg; 95%CI, - 0.9,1.0). Significant treatment effects (P < .05) were also found for fathers' waist (d= 0.41), BMI (d= 0.26), resting heart rate (d= 0.59), energy intake (d= 0.49) and physical activity (d= 0.46) and for children's physical activity (d= 0.50) and adiposity (d= 0.07). Discussion: HDHK significantly improved health outcomes and behaviors in fathers and children, providing evidence for program effectiveness when delivered in a community setting. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.12.019
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, David Lubans, Andrew Miller, Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher
2014 Hollis JL, Williams LT, Young MD, Pollard KT, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Compliance to step count and vegetable serve recommendations mediates weight gain prevention in mid-age, premenopausal women. Findings of the 40-Something RCT.', Appetite, 83 33-41 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2014.07.020
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Lauren Williams, Philip Morgan
2014 Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Social cognitive theory and physical activity: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 15 983-995 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/obr.12225
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2014 Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Social cognitive theory and physical activity: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 15 983-995 (2014) [C1]

This review investigated three research questions (i) What is the utility of social cognitive theory (SCT) to explain physical activity (PA)?; (ii) Is the effectiveness of SCT mod... [more]

This review investigated three research questions (i) What is the utility of social cognitive theory (SCT) to explain physical activity (PA)?; (ii) Is the effectiveness of SCT moderated by sample or methodological characteristics? and (iii) What is the frequency of significant associations between the core SCT constructs and PA? Ten electronic databases were searched with no date or sample restrictions. Forty-four studies were retrieved containing 55 SCT models of PA. Methodological quality was assessed using a standardized tool. A random-effects meta-analysis revealed that SCT accounted for 31% of the variance in PA. However, methodological quality was mostly poor for these models. Methodological quality and sample age moderated the PA effect size, with increases in both associated with greater variance explained. Although self-efficacy and goals were consistently associated with PA, outcome expectations and socio-structural factors were not. This review determined that SCT is a useful framework to explain PA behaviour. Higher quality models explained more PA variance, but overall methodological quality was poor. As such, high-quality studies examining the utility of SCT to explain PA are warranted.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12225
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2014 Morgan PJ, Scott HA, Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, 'Associations between program outcomes and adherence to Social Cognitive Theory tasks: process evaluation of the SHED-IT community weight loss trial for men', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 11 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-014-0089-9
Citations Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Hayley Scott, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2014 Young MD, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Doran CM, Morgan PJ, 'The SHED-IT Weight Loss Maintenance trial protocol: A randomised controlled trial of a weight loss maintenance program for overweight and obese men', CONTEMPORARY CLINICAL TRIALS, 37 84-97 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2013.11.004
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2014 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Callister R, 'The PULSE (Prevention Using LifeStyle Education) trial protocol: a randomised controlled trial of a Type 2 Diabetes Prevention programme for men.', Contemporary clinical trials, 39 132-144 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2014.07.008
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2014 Blomfield RL, Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Young MD, Jensen ME, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of self-help weight loss resources with or without online support on the dietary intake of overweight and obese men: The SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 8 e476-e487 (2014) [C1]

Background: Obese men are more likely to have poor dietary patterns compared to women, increasing diet-related chronic disease risk. The impact of a male-only weight loss interven... [more]

Background: Obese men are more likely to have poor dietary patterns compared to women, increasing diet-related chronic disease risk. The impact of a male-only weight loss intervention on dietary intakes is under-evaluated. The aim was to deter-mine whether overweight/obese men randomised to self-help paper-based resources with or without online support, achieved greater improvements in diet compared with Wait-list controls at 3 and 6 months following a gender tailored weight-loss intervention.

DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.09.004
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2014 Blomfield RL, Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Young MD, Jensen ME, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of self-help weight loss resources with or without online support on the dietary intake of overweight and obese men: the SHED-IT randomised controlled trial.', Obesity research & clinical practice, 8 e476-e487 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.09.004
Co-authors Robin Callister, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2014 Riley N, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Young M, 'Outcomes and process evaluation of a programme integrating physical activity into the primary school mathematics curriculum: The EASY Minds pilot randomised controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, (2014)

Objectives: This study evaluated the feasibility of the 'Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young (EASY) Minds' programme, a school-based intervention for integrating physical acti... [more]

Objectives: This study evaluated the feasibility of the 'Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young (EASY) Minds' programme, a school-based intervention for integrating physical activity (PA) into mathematics lessons. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Methods: Two classes from a single school (n = 54) were randomised to receive either the 6-week EASY Minds intervention (n = 27) or follow their usual school programme (n = 27). The intervention involved the embedding of PA across the pre-existing mathematics programme for 3. ×. 60. min sessions per week. Changes in PA were measured using accelerometers and 'on task' behaviour was measured using momentary time sampling observation. Results: Using intention-to-treat analysis, significant intervention effects were found for MVPA (9.7%, 95%CI = 7.6, 11.8, p =. 0.001) and sedentary time (-22.4%, CI = -24.9, -12.2, p =. 0.001) for the intervention group during Mathematics lessons (9.30am-10.30am). Significant intervention effects were also shown for MVPA 8.7% (95% CI = 5.8, 11.6, p =. 0.001 and sedentary time -18.6% (95% CI = -24.9, -12.2, p =. 0.001) across the whole school day. Furthermore, children displayed significantly greater 'on-task' behaviour across the intervention period with a 19.9% (95%CI = 2.4, 37.4, p =. 0.03) mean difference between groups. Conclusions: The EASY Minds programme demonstrated that integrating movement across the primary mathematics syllabus is feasible and efficacious in enhancing school based-PA and improving on-task behaviour in mathematics lessons.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.09.005
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Nicholas Riley, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2013 Collins CE, Burrows TL, Bray J, Asher R, Young MD, Morgan PJ, 'Effectiveness of parent-centred interventions for the prevention and treatment of childhood overweight and obesity in community settings: a systematic review', The JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 11 180-257 (2013) [C1]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2013 Collins CE, Neve MJ, Morgan PJ, Fletcher K, Williams R, Young M, Callister R, 'Effectiveness of interventions with a dietary component on weight loss maintenance: A systematic review', The JBI Database of Systematic Reviews & Implementation Reports, 11 317-414 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.11124/jbisrir-2013-708
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2013 Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry N, et al., 'The SHED-IT Community Trial: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet- and Paper-Based Weight Loss Programs Tailored for Overweight and Obese Men', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 45 139-152 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12160-012-9424-z
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Collins CE, Jensen ME, Young MD, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Improvement in erectile function following weight loss in obese men: The SHED-IT randomized controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 7 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.07.004
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2012 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of male-only weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 13 393-408 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2011 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community effectiveness trial: Study protocol of a community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', BMC Public Health, 11 876 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-876
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher, Philip Morgan, Andrew Miller, David Lubans
2010 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, McElduff P, Burrows TL, Warren JM, et al., 'The SHED-IT community trial study protocol: A randomised controlled trial of weight loss programs for overweight and obese men', BMC Public Health, 10 1-11 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-701
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
Show 18 more journal articles

Conference (11 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Ashton L, Rollo M, Hutchesson M, Young MD, Morgan P, Callister R, et al., 'A comparison of outcomes of young and old adult males in the SHED-IT weight loss program for men', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Megan Rollo
2013 Collins CE, Jensen MJ, Young MD, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Erectile function improves in obese men following weight loss during the SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2012 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, 'Relationship between physical activity outcomes and adherence to paper-based social cognitive tasks in a weight loss program for men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2012 Saunders KL, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, et al., 'Insights into engaging men in weight loss: Process evaluation of the SHED-IT RCT of gender-sensitised weight loss programs for overweight men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2012 Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry NJ, et al., 'Physical activity outcomes from the SHED-IT RCT: An evaluation of theoretically-based, gender-sensitised weight loss programs for men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry NJ, et al., 'The SHED-IT Community Trial: A randomised controlled trial of Internet- and paper-based weight loss programs tailored for overweight and obese men', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, New Zealand (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2012 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of male-only weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, New Zealand (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff
2011 Miller AD, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Okely AD, et al., 'Effective strategies for the recruitment of overweight men and their children into a community trial: The Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids recruitment story', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Andrew Miller, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff
2011 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'Development of a male-only weight loss maintenance program: Evaluating the SHED-IT Weight Loss Maintenance program materials for quality, suitability and theoretical merit', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2011 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'The SHED-IT Weight Loss Maintenance study: Development of a theory-based weight loss maintenance intervention exclusively targeting men', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2010 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Fletcher R, Burrows TL, Collins CE, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community program: Promoting family health through sustainable school and community partnerships', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher, Robin Callister, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
Show 8 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $337,813

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $10,000

Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Myles Young, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500657
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20141 grants / $327,813

Engaging dads and daughters to increase physical activity and social and emotional well-being in pre-adolescent girls: The DADEE (Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered) program$327,813

Funding body: Port Waratah Coal Services Limited

Funding body Port Waratah Coal Services Limited
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Alyce Barnes, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Myles Young
Scheme Community Investment and Partnership Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401411
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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News

SHED-IT

Obese men SHED-IT

October 17, 2013

An internationally-recognised University of Newcastle weight loss program tailored specifically for men has produced a benefit that is likely to be a powerful motivator to shed the excess kilos – improved erectile function.

Dr Myles Young

Position

Post Doctoral Researcher
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email myles.young@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6096

Office

Room ATC301
Building Advanced Technology Centre
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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