Dr Sally Hunt

Dr Sally Hunt

Senior Lecturer

School of Psychology (Psychology)

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Sally Hunt is a Clinical Psychologist and post-doctoral researcher who holds appointments with the University of Newcastle and the University of New South Wales. Sally’s work in the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Mental Health and Substance Use (CREMS) translation stream focuses on e-Health interventions for co-occurring disorders and the wider dissemination of these evidence based treatments into practice. 

She has worked both clinically and in a research capacity in the field of mental health for over 10 years, focusing on comorbidly occurring conditions including affective disorders, psychosis, personality disorders, and alcohol/other drug use problems. Sally has experience in the use of neuropsychological assessment, cognitive behaviour therapy, motivational interviewing and mindfulness-based stress reduction techniques among this population.

Sally completed her PhD in 2015 under the supervision of Professor Amanda Baker and Emeritus Professor Pat Michie in the Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health at the University of Newcastle. Sally’s PhD examined the neuropsychological profiles of people presenting with comorbid depression and alcohol use disorders. She was awarded a NSW Department of Health, Project – Drug and Alcohol Council Research Grant to support this research in 2007.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Psychology) Honours, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Psychology (Clinical), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Alcohol & Other Drug Use
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
  • Counselling
  • Depression
  • Developmental Psychology
  • Mental Health
  • Psychosis

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/08/2013 -  Member - APS College of Clinical Psychologists Australian Psychological Society College of Clinical Psychologists
Australia
1/07/2006 -  Member - AACBT Australian Association for Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (AACBT)
Australia
1/12/2005 -  Member - Society for Mental Health Research (SMHR; formerly ASPR)

Member of the Early Career Researcher Committee 2016-2017

Society for Mental Health Research
Australia
1/08/2003 -  Member - Australian Psychological Society Australian Psychological Society
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/09/2014 - 1/06/2016 Clinical Supervisor The University of Newcastle
Psychology
Australia
1/01/2013 -  Project Manager The University of New South Wales
National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre
Australia
1/07/2005 - 1/04/2014 Clinical Psychologist & Clinical Research Manager Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience & Mental Health
Australia
1/01/2003 - 1/06/2005 Clinical Psychologist Hunter New England Health
Australia
1/01/2001 - 1/12/2002 Psychologist Hunter Area Health Service
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (11 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Thornton L, Lappin JM, Hanstock T, Sylvia L, Jacka F, et al., 'Study protocol for a systematic review of evidence for lifestyle interventions targeting smoking, sleep, alcohol/other drug use, physical activity, and healthy diet in people with bipolar disorder', Systematic Reviews, 5 (2016)

© 2016 Kay-Lambkin et al.Background: People with bipolar disorder (BD) have a mortality gap of up to 20 years compared to the general population. Physical conditions, such as car... [more]

© 2016 Kay-Lambkin et al.Background: People with bipolar disorder (BD) have a mortality gap of up to 20 years compared to the general population. Physical conditions, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer, cause the majority of excess deaths in psychiatric populations and are the leading causes of mortality in people with BD. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to reducing the risk of physical conditions in psychiatric populations. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors are among the potentially modifiable risk factors for a range of commonly comorbid chronic medical conditions, including CVD, diabetes, and obesity. This systematic review will identify and evaluate the available evidence for effective interventions to reduce risk and promote healthy lifestyle behaviors in BD. Methods/design: We will search MEDLINE, Embase, PsychINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and CINAHL for published research studies (with at least an abstract published in English) that evaluate behavioral or psychosocial interventions to address the following lifestyle factors in people with BD: tobacco use, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, overweight or obesity, sleep-wake disturbance, and alcohol/other drug use. Primary outcomes for the review will be changes in tobacco use, level of physical activity, diet quality, sleep quality, alcohol use, and illicit drug use. Data on each primary outcome will be synthesized across available studies in that lifestyle area (e.g., tobacco abstinence, cigarettes smoked per day), and panel of research and clinical experts in each of the target lifestyle behaviors and those experienced with clinical and research with individuals with BD will determine how best to represent data related to that primary outcome. Seven members of the systematic review team will extract data, synthesize the evidence, and rate it for quality. Evidence will be synthesized via a narrative description of the behavioral interventions and their effectiveness in improving the healthy lifestyle behaviors in people with BD. Discussion: The planned review will synthesize and evaluate the available evidence regarding the behavioral or psychosocial treatment of lifestyle-related behaviors in people with BD. From this review, we will identify gaps in our existing knowledge and research evidence about the management of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors in people with BD. We will also identify potential opportunities to address lifestyle behaviors in BD, with a view to reducing the burden of physical ill-health in this population. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42015019993

DOI 10.1186/s13643-016-0282-9
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Amanda Baker, Simon Dennis, Christopher Oldmeadow, Robin Callister
2016 Thornton L, Batterham PJ, Fassnacht DB, Kay-Lambkin F, Calear AL, Hunt S, 'Recruiting for health, medical or psychosocial research using Facebook: Systematic review', Internet Interventions, 4 72-81 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V.Recruiting participants is a challenge for many health, medical and psychosocial research projects. One tool more frequently being used to improv... [more]

© 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V.Recruiting participants is a challenge for many health, medical and psychosocial research projects. One tool more frequently being used to improve recruitment is the social networking website Facebook. A systematic review was conducted to identify studies that have used Facebook to recruit participants of all ages, to any psychosocial, health or medical research. 110 unique studies that used Facebook as a recruitment source were included in the review. The majority of studies used a cross-sectional design (80%) and addressed a physical health or disease issue (57%). Half (49%) of the included studies reported specific details of the Facebook recruitment process. Researchers paid between $1.36 and $110 per completing participants (Mean = $17.48, SD = $23.06). Among studies that examined the representativeness of their sample, the majority concluded (86%) their Facebook-recruited samples were similarly representative of samples recruited via traditional methods. These results indicate that Facebook is an effective and cost-efficient recruitment method. Researchers should consider their target group, advertisement wording, offering incentives and no-cost methods of recruitment when considering Facebook as a recruitment source. It is hoped this review will assist researchers to make decisions regarding the use of Facebook as a recruitment tool in future research.

DOI 10.1016/j.invent.2016.02.001
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin
2015 Hunt SA, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Michie PT, 'Systematic review of neurocognition in people with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression', Journal of Affective Disorders, 179 51-64 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.Background Alcohol misuse and depression represent two major social and health problems globally. These conditions commonly co-occur and both are associated w... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.Background Alcohol misuse and depression represent two major social and health problems globally. These conditions commonly co-occur and both are associated with significant cognitive impairment. Despite this, few studies have examined the impact on cognitive functioning of co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. This study aims to critically review findings from peer-reviewed published articles examining neuropsychological test performance among samples of people with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. Method A comprehensive literature search was conducted, yielding six studies reporting neuropsychological profiles of people with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. Results comparing cognitive functioning of people with this comorbidity to those with alcohol misuse alone, depression alone, healthy controls and published norms were examined as well as those describing the correlation between depressive symptoms and cognitive functioning in people with alcohol use disorders. Results In the majority of instances, the comorbid groups did not differ significantly from those with depression only or alcohol misuse only, nor from healthy controls or published norms. In the cases where a difference in neuropsychological test scores between groups was found, it was not consistently identified across studies. However, visual memory was identified in two studies as being impaired in comorbid samples and is worthy of inclusion in future studies. Limitations Due to the small number of included studies and the large variation in inclusion criteria as well as differing assessment tools and methodologies between studies, the review did not include a quantitative synthesis. Conclusions Research into cognitive deficits among people with singly occurring versus co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression is accumulating. Evidence suggests that the neuropsychological performance among samples with this comorbidity is generally not severely impaired and is unlikely to preclude benefit from treatment.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2015.03.024
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Amanda Baker, Pat Michie
2015 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Geddes J, Hunt SA, Woodcock KL, Teesson M, et al., 'The iTreAD project: A study protocol for a randomised controlled clinical trial of online treatment and social networking for binge drinking and depression in young people Health behavior, health promotion and society', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Kay-Lambkin et al.Background: Depression and binge drinking behaviours are common clinical problems, which cause substantial functional, economic and health impacts. These... [more]

© 2015 Kay-Lambkin et al.Background: Depression and binge drinking behaviours are common clinical problems, which cause substantial functional, economic and health impacts. These conditions peak in young adulthood, and commonly co-occur. Comorbid depression and binge drinking are undertreated in young people, who are reluctant to seek help via traditional pathways to care. The iTreAD project (internet Treatment for Alcohol and Depression) aims to provide and evaluate internet-delivered monitoring and treatment programs for young people with depression and binge drinking concerns. Methods: Three hundred sixty nine participants will be recruited to the trial, and will be aged 18-30 years will be eligible for the study if they report current symptoms of depression (score 5 or more on the depression subscale of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale) and concurrent binge drinking practices (5 or more standard drinks at least twice in the prior month). Following screening and online baseline assessment, participants are randomised to: (a) online monthly self-assessments, (b) online monthly self-assessments¿+¿12-months of access to a 4 week online automated cognitive behaviour therapy program for binge drinking and depression (DEAL); or (c) online monthly assessment¿+¿DEAL¿+¿12-months of access to a social networking site (Breathing Space). Independent, blind follow-up assessments occur at 26, 39, 52 and 64-weeks post-baseline. Discussion: The iTreAD project is the first randomised controlled trial combining online cognitive behaviour therapy, social networking and online monitoring for young people reporting concerns with depression and binge drinking. These treatments represent low-cost, wide-reach youth-appropriate treatment, which will have significantly public health implications for service design, delivery and health policy for this important age group. Trial registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000310662. Date registered 24 March 2014.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2365-2
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker, Frances Kaylambkin, Christopher Oldmeadow
2014 Hunt SA, Baker AL, Michie PT, Kay-Lambkin F, 'Change in neurocognition in people with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression: 12-month follow-up', Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy, S10:004 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/2155-6105.S10-004
Co-authors Pat Michie, Frances Kaylambkin, Amanda Baker
2014 Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Hunt SA, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, McElduff P, 'Randomized controlled trial of MICBT for co-existing alcohol misuse and depression: Outcomes to 36-months', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 46 281-290 (2014) [C1]

Integrated psychological treatment addressing co-existing alcohol misuse and depression has not been compared with single-focused treatment. This trial evaluates changes over 36. ... [more]

Integrated psychological treatment addressing co-existing alcohol misuse and depression has not been compared with single-focused treatment. This trial evaluates changes over 36. months following randomization of 284 outpatients to one of four motivational interviewing and cognitive-behavior therapy (MICBT) based interventions: (1) brief integrated intervention (BI); or BI plus 9 further sessions with (2) an integrated-, (3) alcohol-, or (4) depression-focus. Outcome measures included changes in alcohol consumption, depression (BDI-II: Beck Depression Inventory) and functioning (GAF: Global Assessment of Functioning), with average improvements from baseline of 21.8 drinks per week, 12.6 BDI-II units and 8.2 GAF units. Longer interventions tended to be more effective in reducing depression and improving functioning in the long-term, and in improving alcohol consumption in the short-term. Integrated treatment was at least as good as single-focused MICBT. Alcohol-focused treatment was as effective as depression-focused treatment at reducing depression and more effective in reducing alcohol misuse. The best approach seems to be an initial focus on both conditions followed by additional integrated- or alcohol-focused sessions. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2013.10.001
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2013 Killackey E, Allott K, Cotton SM, Jackson H, Scutella R, Tseng Y, et al., 'A randomized controlled trial of vocational intervention for young people with first-episode psychosis: method', Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 7 329-337 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/eip.12066
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin
2010 Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Hunt SA, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, Connolly J, 'Randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioural therapy for coexisting depression and alcohol problems: Short-term outcome', Addiction, 105 87-99 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02757.x
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 46
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2009 Hunt SA, Baker AL, Michie PT, Kavanagh DJ, 'Neurocognitive profiles of people with comorbid depression and alcohol use: Implications for psychological interventions', Addictive Behaviors, 34 878-886 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2009.03.036
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Pat Michie
2006 Hunt SA, 'Neuroscience of psychoactive substance use and dependence (Book review)', Drug and Alcohol Review, 25 656-657 (2006) [C3]
2005 Hunt S, 'ABC of alcohol', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 24 570-571 (2005)
Show 8 more journal articles

Conference (18 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Hunt SA, Baker A, Michie PT, 'How does change in alcohol misuse and depression comorbidity impact on neuropsychological test performance after 12 months?', Drug and Alcohol Dependence (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Pat Michie, Amanda Baker
2011 Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Hunt SA, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, McElduff P, 'Randomised controlled trial of CBT for co-existing depression and alcohol problems: 6-, 12-, 24-and 36-month outcomes', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2010 Atkinson RJ, Schall UA, Stojanov WM, Inkpen RM, Hunt SA, Helmbold K, et al., 'Impairment of duration mismatch negativity in the schizophrenia prodrome', Clinical EEG and Neuroscience (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Juanita Todd, Ulrich Schall, Pat Michie
2010 Baker AL, 'Randomised controlled trial of CBT for co-existing depression and alcohol problems: 6-12 month outcomes', Proceedings of the Australasian Society for Psychiatric Research (ASPR) 2010 Conference (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Frances Kaylambkin, Amanda Baker
2010 Atkinson RJ, Michie PT, Hunt SA, Inkpen RM, Stojanov WM, Halpin SA, Schall UA, 'Mismatch negativity to duration deviants in first episode psychosis and individuals at ultra-high risk of psychosis', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Pat Michie, Ulrich Schall
2010 Michie PT, Atkinson RJ, Hunt SA, Inkpen RM, Stojanov WM, Halpin SA, Schall UA, 'Mismatch negativity to duration deviants in first episode psychosis and in the prodome', Schizophrenia Research (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Ulrich Schall, Pat Michie
2008 Creek R, Killackey E, Cotton S, Hunt S, 'The relationship of unstable accommodation to readmission and functional recovery in young people with first episode psychosis', EARLY INTERVENTION IN PSYCHIATRY (2008) [E3]
2008 Atkinson RJ, Schall UA, Stojanov WM, Inkpen R, Hunt S, Helmbold K, et al., 'Auditory sensory memory deficit in prodromal schizophrenia', Early Intervention in Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Juanita Todd, Sean Halpin, Ulrich Schall, Pat Michie
2008 Atkinson RJ, Schall UA, Stojanov WM, Inkpen R, Hunt SA, Helmbold K, et al., 'Impaired mismatch negativity in the schizophrenia prodrome', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Ulrich Schall, Pat Michie, Juanita Todd
2008 Hunt SA, Baker AL, Kavanagh D, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, 'A randomised controlled trial of integrated and single focused interventions for co-morbid depression and alcohol use disorders', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Frances Kaylambkin, Amanda Baker
2008 Schall UA, Atkinson RJ, Hunt SA, Inkpen R, Stojanov WM, Helmbold K, et al., 'Mismatch negativity and prepulse inhibition in the prodrome', Schizophrenia Research (2008) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/s0920-9964(08)70072-0
Co-authors Ulrich Schall, Pat Michie
2006 Hanstock T, Clayton EH, Hunt SA, Hazell P, 'The tripartite mood rating scale (TMRS): a new self-report mood instrument for children and adolescents with bipolar', Proceedings of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Pediatric Bipolar Conference (2006) [E3]
2006 Beckmann CJ, Lewin TJ, Halpin SA, Hunt SA, Schall UA, Chenoweth B, Carr VJ, 'Dissociative experiences and transition to psychosis', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Ulrich Schall, Sean Halpin
2005 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lewin (Ext) T, Kelly BJ, Carr VJ, Hunt SA, Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, 'Combined versus single focused interventions for comorbid depression and alcohol problems: introduction to the daisi project', Abstracts for The Royal Australian & NZ College of Psychiatrists Joint CINP/ASPR Scientific Meeting (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Frances Kaylambkin, Brian Kelly
2005 Hunt SA, Schall U, Halpin SA, Beckmann CJ, Carr V, 'Neurocognitive profiles of prodromal psychosis', SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN (2005)
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Ulrich Schall
2004 Beckmann C, Lewin T, Halpin S, Hunt S, Schall U, Chenoweth B, Carr V, 'Dissociative experiences and transition to psychosis', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH (2004)
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Ulrich Schall, Terry Lewin
2003 Schall UA, Halpin SA, Hunt SA, Beckmann J, Chenoweth B, Mah BL, et al., 'Neurocognitive profiles of young people at high-risk versus first episode psychosis: A follow-up study', Schizophrenia Research (2003) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Ulrich Schall, Terry Lewin
1999 Hunt SA, Hayes BK, 'Context reinstatement procedures and suggestibility in children's eyewitness reports', Australian Journal of Psychology Supplement (1999) [E3]
Show 15 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $70,775

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20091 grants / $20,775

LDX analyser (fingerprick unit) x4, piCo Smokerlyzer (Carboxymeter)x4, Universal cardboard disposable mouthpieces for piCo smokerlyzer x4 and Universal d pieces for piCo Smokerlyzer x4$20,775

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Doctor Alyna Turner, Associate Professor Juanita Todd, Professor Robin Callister, Doctor Sally Hunt, Professor Brian Kelly, Professor John Attia, Associate Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Paula Wye
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189849
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20062 grants / $50,000

Neurocognitive profiles of people receiving cognitive behaviour therapy$25,000

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Doctor Sally Hunt, Professor Amanda Baker, Emeritus Professor Patricia Michie, Conjoint Professor Vaughan Carr, Professor David Kavanagh, Mr Terry Lewin, Doctor Frances Kay-Lambkin
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Council Research Grants Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186724
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

NSW Health Drug and Alcohol Council Research Grants Program$25,000

Funding body: NSW Department of Health

Funding body NSW Department of Health
Project Team

Sally Hunt

Scheme Drug and Alcohol Council Research Grants Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 20
United Kingdom 2
United States 2
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Dr Sally Hunt

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Focus area

Psychology

Contact Details

Email sally.hunt@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49854305

Office

Room W253
Building Behavioural Sciences Building
Location Behavioural Sciences Building

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