Profile Image

Dr Neil Spratt

Associate Professor

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy (Human Physiology)

Research in action

Delivering cutting-edge treatments to patients is a key motivation for neurology expert Dr Neil Spratt.

Neil Spratt in front of an office 

More than 60,000 Australians suffer strokes each year and one-third of first-time sufferers die within a year. Clinician and stroke researcher Dr Neil Spratt maintains that such grim statistics are all the motivation he and his colleagues in the University's translational research team need in their quest to develop urgently needed new treatments. 

Spratt likes to use the case of a particular patient to illustrate the effectiveness of practice-driven research, which combines the benefits of scientific discovery and clinical observation.

"Three of our key research programs came together to ensure this patient's successful treatment," explains Spratt, a neurologist who leads the stroke translation laboratory within the School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy at the University of Newcastle.

Thanks to a triage protocol instigated by the stroke research team that works across the University and the John Hunter Hospital (JHH), ambulance officers identified the 26-year-old patient as a candidate for time-critical treatment and expedited her transfer to the hospital, where Spratt was waiting in the emergency bay to assess her condition. The patient quickly underwent advanced CT perfusion imaging – a cutting-edge technique pioneered by the Newcastle research team to assess brain damage and determine a patient's suitability for clot-busting treatment. Then, she received the drug Tenecteplase (TPK) as part of a groundbreaking clinical trial – later published in the New England Journal of Medicine – that has shown it to be a more effective treatment than the standard medication, Alteplase (TPA).

From displaying poor speech and registering weakness down her whole right side on admittance, the woman was discharged three days later showing no obvious effects of the stroke. A happy ending for the patient but also, as Spratt points out, a great example of translational research in action.

"Combining clinical work with research allows us to more quickly move promising therapies from the laboratory into practice," he asserts. "We talk about the concept of 'bench to bedside' research but translational medicine is also 'bedside back to bench'. In this case we were able to see the direct results of those three research programs – the triage protocol, the CT imaging and the Tenecteplase trial – and that is very exciting and gratifying for a researcher."

Spratt, a neurology specialist at the JHH, is a key member of the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) Stroke Research Group. His team's current research into the use of body cooling to reduce the spread of brain injury in stroke victims has led to a breakthrough finding that could makethe treatment more viable for a much wider range of patients.

Cooling the body to 32-33 degrees Celsius for between 12 and 24 hours ­– effectively putting it into a state of hibernation  – can stall the progression of brain injury and buy time for a blood clot to break up. The procedure is potentially life-saving, but putting the body into a prolonged state of hypothermia can produce severe side effects, including pneumonia or disruption to heart rhythm. As well, pressure within the skull (intracranial pressure) tends to rise sharply in stroke victims within 72 hours of the incident, and while cooling will reduce this pressure, it may return or go even higher once the patient's body is warmed up again.

Spratt and colleagues Dr Damian McLeod and PhD student Lucy Murtha have discovered, through laboratory work with animal models, that if the body is cooled for just one to two hours before the pressure within the skull has risen, there is no subsequent rise in pressure after the treatment, and less likelihood of other side effects.

"There are other research groups around the world looking at body cooling as part of stroke treatment but we are the only team to have honed in on the possibility that short-period body cooling can effectively prevent intracranial pressure rising, so it is a novel and very important discovery," Spratt explains. "Elevated intracranial pressure is a problem in many other diseases, too, so our findings may well have application in medical fields outside of neurology."

Spratt's team has received more than $422,000 from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) to further its research, which he hopes will lead to full clinical trials within three years. He also holds a three-year NHMRC-funded fellowship to continue his work in the field.

Productive partnerships

Returning to Newcastle to pursue his research career gave Dr Neil Spratt the opportunity to link with leading researchers Professor Mike Calford, now the University's Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research), and Professor Chris Levi, director of its Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health.

"I have great respect for both of them," Spratt states. "Both Chris and I trained at the National Stroke Research Institute (NSRI), in Melbourne, which has a very strong focus on 'bench to bedside' research, and even before coming to Newcastle I was collaborating with researchers in Mike's team of neuroscientists."

Spratt completed undergraduate studies in medicine and medical science at the University of Newcastle and undertook a PhD at the NSRI and the University of Melbourne. He returned to Newcastle in late 2006 to take up a Senior Research Fellowship sponsored by HMRI and the Greater Building Society. Spratt believes he has been fortunate to have had "wonderful mentoring" in Newcastle, nominating Calford and Levi as major influences, as well as senior neurologist Associate Professor Mark Parsons and neuroscientist Professor John Rostas.

"What has been important to my career is being part of this translational research team that works across the University of Newcastle, the hospital and HMRI. The clinical research in the hospital is world-class and is matched by the standard of scientific research.

"It is critical in my field to have that capacity to think about new ideas and collaborate with people in other disciplines. There is a culture here of hard work and high expectations and the physical proximity of the hospital and the University really facilitates those vital collaborations."

Visit the Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health website

Visit the HMRI website

Neil Spratt in front of offices

Research in action

Delivering cutting-edge treatments to patients is a key motivation for neurology expert Dr Neil Spratt.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Spratt leads the stroke translation laboratory within the school of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, and also works as a clinical neurologist at John Hunter Hospital. He sees his role primarily as 'bridging the gap' in translational stroke research, with the aims of moving promising therapies from the laboratory into clinical use, and of answering those important clinical questions best addressed with laboratory research. His group is part of the Hunter Medical Research Institute Centre for Brain and Mental Health stroke stream and work closely with clinical, imaging and epidemiological researchers from this stream.

Research Expertise
- New stroke treatment: Hypothermia - Intracranial Pressure and CSF flow regulation after stroke - Leptomeningeal Collateral supply to the stroke ischaemic penumbra - potential therapeutics - Understanding basic mechanisms of brain injury in stroke role of CaMKII - Sonothrombolysis for acute stroke. - Acute stroke clinical trials - new thrombolytics, new therapies for intracranial haemorrhage - Improved patient selection for stroke therapy with advanced CT imaging - Evaluation and translation of effective stroke rehabilitation strategies from the laboratory into the rehabilitation hospital: - Environmental Enrichment - Improving cardiovascular fitness

Teaching Expertise
Neuroscience - Stroke Pharmacology of Stroke Medical Science - Physiology

Administrative Expertise
Course Co-ordinator Yr 1 Semester 2 Medical Science Co-chair - Stroke Stream - Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health


Qualifications

  • PhD (Medicine Denistry & Health Sciences), University of Melbourne
  • Bachelor of Medical Science (Honours), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Medicine (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Biomedical Sciences - Neuroscience
  • Clinical Science
  • Enriched Environment
  • Experimental Stroke
  • Hypothermia
  • Medical Physiology
  • Neurosciences
  • Pharmacy - Stroke
  • Stroke
  • intracranial pressure

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
060603Animal Physiology - Systems25
060805Animal Neurobiology35
110904Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2015 - Associate ProfessorUniversity of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2012 - 1/12/2015Fellow NHMRC
NHMRC - Early Career Fellowships (Formerly Postdoctoral Training Fellowships)
University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
1/01/2007 - 1/01/2011Health Professional Research Fellowship (Part-time)
NHMRC - Practitioner Fellowships (Formerly Practioner Fellowships Scheme)
University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (57 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Murtha LA, McLeod DD, Pepperall D, McCann SK, Beard DJ, Tomkins AJ, et al., 'Intracranial pressure elevation after ischemic stroke in rats: Cerebral edema is not the only cause, and short-duration mild hypothermia is a highly effective preventive therapy', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 35 592-600 (2015)

In both the human and animal literature, it has largely been assumed that edema is the primary cause of intracranial pressure (ICP) elevation after stroke and that more edema equates to higher ICP. We recently demonstrated a dramatic ICP elevation 24 hours after small ischemic strokes in rats, with minimal edema. This ICP elevation was completely prevented by short-duration moderate hypothermia soon after stroke. Here, our aims were to determine the importance of edema in ICP elevation after stroke and whether mild hypothermia could prevent the ICP rise. Experimental stroke was performed in rats. ICP was monitored and short-duration mild (35 °C) or moderate (32.5 °C) hypothermia, or normothermia (37 °C) was induced after stroke onset. Edema was measured in three studies, using wet-dry weight calculations, T 2 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging, or histology. ICP increased 24 hours after stroke onset in all normothermic animals. Short-duration mild or moderate hypothermia prevented this rise. No correlation was seen between ¿ICP and edema or infarct volumes. Calculated rates of edema growth were orders of magnitude less than normal cerebrospinal fluid production rates. These data challenge current concepts and suggest that factors other than cerebral edema are the primary cause of the ICP elevation 24 hours after stroke onset.

DOI10.1038/jcbfm.2014.230
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod
2015White JH, Bartley E, Janssen H, Jordan L-A, Spratt N, 'Exploring stroke survivor experience of participation in an enriched environment: A qualitative study', Disability and Rehabilitation, 37 593-600 (2015)

Background: Data highlight the importance of undertaking intense and frequent repetition of activities within stroke rehabilitation to maximise recovery. An enriched environment (EE) provides a medium in which these activities can be performed and enhanced recovery achieved. An EE has been shown to promote neuroplasticity in animal models of stroke, facilitating enhanced recovery of motor and cognitive function. However, the benefit of enriching the environment of stroke survivors remains unknown. Aim: To qualitatively explore stroke survivors' experience of implementation of exposure to an EE within a typical stroke rehabilitation setting, in order to identify facilitators and barriers to participation. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 10 stroke survivors (7 females and 3 males, mean age of 70.5 years) exposed to an EE for a 2-week period following exposure to routine rehabilitation within a stroke rehabilitation ward. An inductive thematic approach was utilised to collect and analyse data. Results: Qualitative themes emerged concerning the environmental enrichment paradigm including: (1) "It got me moving"-perceived benefits of participation in an EE; (2) "You can be bored or you can be busy."-Attenuating factors influencing participation in an EE; (3) "I don't like to make the staff busier"-limitations to use of the EE. Conclusions: This study provides preliminary support for the implementation of an EE within a typical stroke rehabilitation setting from a patient perspective. Reported benefits included (1) increased motor, cognitive and sensory stimulation, (2) increased social interaction, (3) alleviation of degree of boredom and (4) increased feelings of personal control. However, participants also identified a number of barriers affecting implementation of the EE. We have previously published findings on perceptions of nursing staff working with stroke survivors in this enriched rehabilitation environment who identified that patients benefited from having better access to physical, cognitive and social activities. Together, results contribute to valuable evidence for future implementation of an EE in stroke rehabilitation settings.Implications for RehabilitationStroke survivor access to an enriched environment (EE):Results identified that participation in both individual and communal forms of environment enrichment within the stroke rehabilitation ward resulted in increased access to activities providing increased opportunities for enhanced motor, cognitive and sensory stimulation.Increased access to and participation in activities of the environmental enrichment (individual and communal) interrupted the ongoing cycle of boredom and inactivity experienced by many participants.This study provides preliminary support for the implementation of an EE within a typical stroke rehabilitation setting from a patient perspective.

DOI10.3109/09638288.2014.935876
2015Tomkins AJ, Schleicher N, Murtha L, Kaps M, Levi CR, Nedelmann M, Spratt NJ, 'Platelet rich clots are resistant to lysis by thrombolytic therapy in a rat model of embolic stroke.', Exp Transl Stroke Med, 7 2 (2015)
DOI10.1186/s13231-014-0014-yAuthor URL
Co-authorsChris Levi
2015Beard DJ, McLeod DD, Logan CL, Murtha LA, Imtiaz MS, van Helden DF, Spratt NJ, 'Intracranial pressure elevation reduces flow through collateral vessels and the penetrating arterioles they supply. A possible explanation for 'collateral failure' and infarct expansion after ischemic stroke.', J Cereb Blood Flow Metab, 35 861-872 (2015)
DOI10.1038/jcbfm.2015.2Author URL
Co-authorsDirk Vanhelden, Damian Mcleod
2015Dunn A, Marsden DL, Nugent E, Van Vliet P, Spratt NJ, Attia J, Callister R, 'Protocol variations and six-minute walk test performance in stroke survivors: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Stroke Research and Treatment, 2015 (2015)

Objective. To investigate the use of the six-minute walk test (6MWT) for stroke survivors, including adherence to 6MWT protocol guidelines and distances achieved. Methods. A systematic search was conducted from inception to March 2014. Included studies reported a baseline (intervention studies) or first instance (observational studies) measure for the 6MWT performed by stroke survivors regardless of time after stroke. Results. Of 127 studies (participants n = 6,012) that met the inclusion criteria, 64 were also suitable for meta-analysis. Only 25 studies made reference to the American Thoracic Society (ATS) standards for the 6MWT, and 28 reported using the protocol standard 30 m walkway. Thirty-nine studies modified the protocol walkway, while 60 studies did not specify the walkway used. On average, stroke survivors walked 284 ± 107 m during the 6MWT, which is substantially less than healthy age-matched individuals. The meta-analysis identified that changes to the ATS protocol walkway are associated with reductions in walking distances achieved. Conclusion. The 6MWT is now widely used in stroke studies. The distances achieved by stroke patients indicate substantially compromised walking ability. Variations to the standard 30 m walkway for the 6MWT are common and caution should be used when comparing the values achieved from studies using different walkway lengths.

DOI10.1155/2015/484813
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsRobin Callister, John Attia, Paulette Vanvliet
2015Beard DJ, Mcleod DD, Logan CL, Murtha LA, Imtiaz MS, Van Helden DF, Spratt NJ, 'Intracranial pressure elevation reduces flow through collateral vessels and the penetrating arterioles they supply. A possible explanation for 'collateral failure' and infarct expansion after ischemic stroke', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 35 861-872 (2015)

Recent human imaging studies indicate that reduced blood flow through pial collateral vessels ('collateral failure') is associated with late infarct expansion despite stable arterial occlusion. The cause for 'collateral failure' is unknown. We recently showed that intracranial pressure (ICP) rises dramatically but transiently 24 hours after even minor experimental stroke. We hypothesized that ICP elevation would reduce collateral blood flow. First, we investigated the regulation of flow through collateral vessels and the penetrating arterioles arising from them during stroke reperfusion. Wistar rats were subjected to intraluminal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion (MCAo). Individual pial collateral and associated penetrating arteriole blood flow was quantified using fluorescent microspheres. Baseline bidirectional flow changed to MCA-directed flow and increased by >450% immediately after MCAo. Collateral diameter changed minimally. Second, we determined the effect of ICP elevation on collateral and watershed penetrating arteriole flow. Intracranial pressure was artificially raised in stepwise increments during MCAo. The ICP increase was strongly correlated with collateral and penetrating arteriole flow reductions. Changes in collateral flow post-stroke appear to be primarily driven by the pressure drop across the collateral vessel, not vessel diameter. The ICP elevation reduces cerebral perfusion pressure and collateral flow, and is the possible explanation for 'collateral failure' in stroke-in-progression.

DOI10.1038/jcbfm.2015.2
Co-authorsDirk Vanhelden, Damian Mcleod
2015Beard DJ, Mcleod DD, Logan CL, Murtha LA, Imtiaz MS, Van Helden DF, Spratt NJ, 'Intracranial pressure elevation reduces flow through collateral vessels and the penetrating arterioles they supply. A possible explanation for 'collateral failure' and infarct expansion after ischemic stroke', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 35 861-872 (2015)

Recent human imaging studies indicate that reduced blood flow through pial collateral vessels ('collateral failure') is associated with late infarct expansion despite stable arterial occlusion. The cause for 'collateral failure' is unknown. We recently showed that intracranial pressure (ICP) rises dramatically but transiently 24 hours after even minor experimental stroke. We hypothesized that ICP elevation would reduce collateral blood flow. First, we investigated the regulation of flow through collateral vessels and the penetrating arterioles arising from them during stroke reperfusion. Wistar rats were subjected to intraluminal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion (MCAo). Individual pial collateral and associated penetrating arteriole blood flow was quantified using fluorescent microspheres. Baseline bidirectional flow changed to MCA-directed flow and increased by >450% immediately after MCAo. Collateral diameter changed minimally. Second, we determined the effect of ICP elevation on collateral and watershed penetrating arteriole flow. Intracranial pressure was artificially raised in stepwise increments during MCAo. The ICP increase was strongly correlated with collateral and penetrating arteriole flow reductions. Changes in collateral flow post-stroke appear to be primarily driven by the pressure drop across the collateral vessel, not vessel diameter. The ICP elevation reduces cerebral perfusion pressure and collateral flow, and is the possible explanation for 'collateral failure' in stroke-in-progression.

DOI10.1038/jcbfm.2015.2
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod, Dirk Vanhelden
2015Mcleod DD, Parsons MW, Hood R, Hiles B, Allen J, Mccann SK, et al., 'Perfusion computed tomography thresholds defining ischemic penumbra and infarct core: Studies in a rat stroke model', International Journal of Stroke, 10 553-559 (2015)

Background: Perfusion computed tomography is becoming more widely used as a clinical imaging tool to predict potentially salvageable tissue (ischemic penumbra) after ischemic stroke and guide reperfusion therapies. Aims: The study aims to determine whether there are important changes in perfusion computed tomography thresholds defining ischemic penumbra and infarct core over time following stroke. Methods: Permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was performed in adult outbred Wistar rats (n=6) and serial perfusion computed tomography scans were taken every 30 mins for 2h. To define infarction thresholds at 1h and 2h post-stroke, separate groups of rats underwent 1h (n=6) and 2h (n=6) of middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Infarct volumes were defined by histology at 24h. Co-registration with perfusion computed tomography maps (cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and mean transit time) permitted pixel-based analysis of thresholds defining infarction, using receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: Relative cerebral blood flow was the perfusion computed tomography parameter that most accurately predicted penumbra (area under the curve=0·698) and also infarct core (area under the curve=0·750). A relative cerebral blood flow threshold of <75% of mean contralateral cerebral blood flow most accurately predicted penumbral tissue at 0·5h (area under the curve=0·660), 1h (area under the curve=0·659), 1·5h (area under the curve=0·636), and 2h (area under the curve=0·664) after stroke onset. A relative cerebral blood flow threshold of <55% of mean contralateral most accurately predicted infarct core at 1h (area under the curve=0·765) and at 2h (area under the curve=0·689) after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Conclusions: The data provide perfusion computed tomography defined relative cerebral blood flow thresholds for infarct core and ischemic penumbra within the first two hours after experimental stroke in rats. These thresholds were shown to be stable to define the volume of infarct core and penumbra within this time window.

DOI10.1111/ijs.12147
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsChris Levi, Damian Mcleod
2015Bivard A, Levi C, Krishnamurthy V, McElduff P, Miteff F, Spratt NJ, et al., 'Perfusion computed tomography to assist decision making for stroke thrombolysis.', Brain, 138 1919-1931 (2015)
DOI10.1093/brain/awv071Author URL
2015Jones KA, Zouikr I, Patience M, Clarkson AN, Isgaard J, Johnson SJ, et al., 'Chronic stress exacerbates neuronal loss associated with secondary neurodegeneration and suppresses microglial-like cells following focal motor cortex ischemia in the mouse.', Brain Behav Immun, (2015)
DOI10.1016/j.bbi.2015.02.014Author URL
Co-authorsRohan Walker, Sarah Johnson
2014Spratt NJ, Tomkins AJ, Pepperall D, McLeod DD, Calford MB, 'Allopregnanolone and its precursor progesterone do not reduce injury after experimental stroke in hypertensive rats - role of postoperative temperature regulation?', PLoS One, 9 e107752 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0107752Author URL
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod
2014Bivard A, Krishnamurthy V, Stanwell P, Levi C, Spratt NJ, Davis S, Parsons M, 'Arterial Spin Labeling Versus Bolus-Tracking Perfusion in Hyperacute Stroke', Stroke, 45 127-133 (2014)
DOI10.1161/STROKEAHA.113.003218Author URL
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2014Bivard A, Krishnamurthy V, Stanwell P, Levi C, Spratt NJ, Davis S, Parsons M, 'Arterial Spin Labeling Versus Bolus-Tracking Perfusion in Hyperacute Stroke', Stroke, 45 127-133 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1161/STROKEAHA.113.003218Author URL
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2014Janssen H, Ada L, Bernhardt J, McElduff P, Pollack M, Nilsson M, Spratt N, 'Physical, cognitive and social activity levels of stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation within a mixed rehabilitation unit', Clinical Rehabilitation, 28 91-101 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To determine physical, cognitive and social activity levels of stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation, and whether these changed over time. Design: Observational study using behavioural mapping techniques to record patient activity over 12 hours on one weekday and one weekend day at baseline (week 1) and again two weeks later (week 2). Setting: A 20-bed mixed rehabilitation unit. Subjects: Fourteen stroke patients. Interventions: None. Main measures: Percentage of day spent in any activity or physical, cognitive and social activities. Level of independence using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and mood using the Patient Health Questionniare-9 (PHQ-9). Results: The stroke patients performed any activity for 49%, social activity for 32%, physical activity for 23% and cognitive activity for 4% of the day. Two weeks later, physical activity levels had increased by 4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 1 to 8), but levels of any activity or social and cognitive activities had not changed significantly. There was a significant: (i) positive correlation between change in physical activity and change in FIM score (r = 0.80), and (ii) negative correlation between change in social activity and change in PHQ-9 score (r = -0.72). The majority of activity was performed by the bedside (37%), and most physical (47%) and cognitive (54%) activities performed when alone. Patients undertook 5% (95% CI 2 to 9) less physical activity on the weekends compared with the weekdays. Conclusions: Levels of physical, cognitive and social activity of stroke patients were low and remained so even though level of independence and mood improved. These findings suggest the need to explore strategies to stimulate activity within rehabilitation environments. © The Author(s) 2013.

DOI10.1177/0269215512466252
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 7
2014Bivard A, Krishnamurthy V, Stanwell P, Yassi N, Spratt NJ, Nilsson M, et al., 'Spectroscopy of reperfused tissue after stroke reveals heightened metabolism in patients with good clinical outcomes', JOURNAL OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM, 34 1944-1950 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1038/jcbfm.2014.166Author URL
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2014Janssen H, Ada L, Bernhardt J, McElduff P, Pollack M, Nilsson M, Spratt NJ, 'An enriched environment increases activity in stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation in a mixed rehabilitation unit: a pilot non-randomized controlled trial', DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, 36 255-262 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.3109/09638288.2013.788218Author URL
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2014Egan KJ, Janssen H, Sena ES, Longley L, Speare S, Howells DW, et al., 'Exercise reduces infarct volume and facilitates neurobehavioral recovery: Results from a systematic review and meta-analysis of exercise in experimental models of focal ischemia', Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 28 800-812 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1177/1545968314521694
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2014Murtha LA, Mcleod DD, Mccann SK, Pepperall D, Chung S, Levi CR, et al., 'Short-duration hypothermia after ischemic stroke prevents delayed intracranial pressure rise', International Journal of Stroke, 9 553-559 (2014)
DOI10.1111/ijs.12181
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod, Chris Levi
2014Murtha LA, Mcleod DD, Mccann SK, Pepperall D, Chung S, Levi CR, et al., 'Short-duration hypothermia after ischemic stroke prevents delayed intracranial pressure rise', International Journal of Stroke, 9 553-559 (2014) [C1]

Background: Intracranial pressure elevation, peaking three to seven post-stroke is well recognized following large strokes. Data following small-moderate stroke are limited. Therapeutic hypothermia improves outcome after cardiac arrest, is strongly neuroprotective in experimental stroke, and is under clinical trial in stroke. Hypothermia lowers elevated intracranial pressure; however, rebound intracranial pressure elevation and neurological deterioration may occur during rewarming. Hypotheses: (1) Intracranial pressure increases 24h after moderate and small strokes. (2) Short-duration hypothermia-rewarming, instituted before intracranial pressure elevation, prevents this 24h intracranial pressure elevation. Methods: Long-Evans rats with two hour middle cerebral artery occlusion or outbred Wistar rats with three hour middle cerebral artery occlusion had intracranial pressure measured at baseline and 24h. Wistars were randomized to 2·5h hypothermia (32·5°C) or normothermia, commencing 1h after stroke. Results: In Long-Evans rats (n=5), intracranial pressure increased from 10·9±4·6mmHg at baseline to 32·4±11·4mmHg at 24h, infarct volume was 84·3±15·9mm3. In normothermic Wistars (n=10), intracranial pressure increased from 6·7±2·3mmHg to 31·6±9·3mmHg, infarct volume was 31·3±18·4mm3. In hypothermia-treated Wistars (n=10), 24h intracranial pressure did not increase (7·0±2·8mmHg, P<0·001 vs. normothermia), and infarct volume was smaller (15·4±11·8mm3, P<0·05). Conclusions: We saw major intracranial pressure elevation 24h after stroke in two rat strains, even after small strokes. Short-duration hypothermia prevented the intracranial pressure rise, an effect sustained for at least 18h after rewarming. The findings have potentially important implications for design of future clinical trials. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

DOI10.1111/ijs.12181
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsChris Levi, Damian Mcleod
2014Murtha LA, McLeod DD, Pepperall D, McCann SK, Beard DJ, Tomkins AJ, et al., 'Intracranial pressure elevation after ischemic stroke in rats: cerebral edema is not the only cause, and short-duration mild hypothermia is a highly effective preventive therapy', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, (2014)

In both the human and animal literature, it has largely been assumed that edema is the primary cause of intracranial pressure (ICP) elevation after stroke and that more edema equates to higher ICP. We recently demonstrated a dramatic ICP elevation 24 hours after small ischemic strokes in rats, with minimal edema. This ICP elevation was completely prevented by short-duration moderate hypothermia soon after stroke. Here, our aims were to determine the importance of edema in ICP elevation after stroke and whether mild hypothermia could prevent the ICP rise. Experimental stroke was performed in rats. ICP was monitored and short-duration mild (35¿°C) or moderate (32.5¿°C) hypothermia, or normothermia (37¿°C) was induced after stroke onset. Edema was measured in three studies, using wet¿dry weight calculations, T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, or histology. ICP increased 24 hours after stroke onset in all normothermic animals. Short-duration mild or moderate hypothermia prevented this rise. No correlation was seen between ¿ICP and edema or infarct volumes. Calculated rates of edema growth were orders of magnitude less than normal cerebrospinal fluid production rates. These data challenge current concepts and suggest that factors other than cerebral edema are the primary cause of the ICP elevation 24 hours after stroke onset.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 17 December 2014; doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2014.230.

DOI10.1038/jcbfm.2014.230
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod
2014White JH, Alborough K, Janssen H, Spratt N, Jordan L, Pollack M, 'Exploring staff experience of an "enriched environment" within stroke rehabilitation: a qualitative sub-study.', Disabil Rehabil, 36 1783-1789 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.3109/09638288.2013.872200Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014Murtha LA, Yang Q, Parsons MW, Levi CR, Beard DJ, Spratt NJ, McLeod DD, 'Cerebrospinal fluid is drained primarily via the spinal canal and olfactory route in young and aged spontaneously hypertensive rats', Fluids and Barriers of the CNS, 11 (2014) [C1]

Background: Many aspects of CSF dynamics are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved in quantification and visualization. In particular, there is debate surrounding the route of CSF drainage. Our aim was to quantify CSF flow, volume, and drainage route dynamics in vivo in young and aged spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) using a novel contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) method.Methods: ICP was recorded in young (2-5 months) and aged (16 months) SHR. Contrast was administered into the lateral ventricles bilaterally and sequential CT imaging was used to visualize the entire intracranial CSF system and CSF drainage routes. A customized contrast decay software module was used to quantify CSF flow at multiple locations.Results: ICP was significantly higher in aged rats than in young rats (11.52 ± 2.36 mmHg, versus 7.04 ± 2.89 mmHg, p = 0.03). Contrast was observed throughout the entire intracranial CSF system and was seen to enter the spinal canal and cross the cribriform plate into the olfactory mucosa within 9.1 ± 6.1 and 22.2 ± 7.1 minutes, respectively. No contrast was observed adjacent to the sagittal sinus. There were no significant differences between young and aged rats in either contrast distribution times or CSF flow rates. Mean flow rates (combined young and aged) were 3.0 ± 1.5 µL/min at the cerebral aqueduct; 3.5 ± 1.4 µL/min at the 3rd ventric= and 2.8 ± 0.9 µL/min at the 4th ventricle. Intracranial CSF volumes (and as percentage total brain volume) were 204 ± 97 µL (8.8 ± 4.3%) in the young and 275 ± 35 µL (10.8 ± 1.9%) in the aged animals (NS).Conclusions: We have demonstrated a contrast-enhanced CT technique for measuring and visualising CSF dynamics in vivo. These results indicate substantial drainage of CSF via spinal and olfactory routes, but there was little evidence of drainage via sagittal sinus arachnoid granulations in either young or aged animals. The data suggests that spinal and olfactory routes are the primary routes of CSF drainage and that sagittal sinus arachnoid granulations play a minor role, even in aged rats with higher ICP. © 2014 Murtha et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI10.1186/2045-8118-11-12
CitationsScopus - 4
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod, Mark Parsons, Chris Levi
2013Bivard A, Levi C, Spratt N, Parsons M, 'Perfusion CT in Acute Stroke: A Comprehensive Analysis of Infarct and Penumbra', RADIOLOGY, 267 543-550 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1148/radiol.12120971Author URL
CitationsScopus - 25Web of Science - 22
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2013Menon BK, O'Brien B, Bivard A, Spratt NJ, Demchuk AM, Miteff F, et al., 'Assessment of leptomeningeal collaterals using dynamic CT angiography in patients with acute ischemic stroke', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 33 365-371 (2013) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 29Web of Science - 28
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2013Janssen H, Speare S, Spratt NJ, Sena ES, Ada L, Hannan AJ, et al., 'Exploring the Efficacy of Constraint in Animal Models of Stroke: Meta-analysis and Systematic Review of the Current Evidence', NEUROREHABILITATION AND NEURAL REPAIR, 27 3-12 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1177/1545968312449696Author URL
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2013Marsden DL, Dunn A, Callister R, Levi CR, Spratt NJ, 'Characteristics of Exercise Training Interventions to Improve Cardiorespiratory Fitness After Stroke: A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis', NEUROREHABILITATION AND NEURAL REPAIR, 27 775-788 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1177/1545968313496329Author URL
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Chris Levi
2013Zareie H, Quain DA, Parsons M, Inder KJ, McElduff P, Miteff F, et al., 'The influence of anterior cerebral artery flow diversion measured by transcranial Doppler on acute infarct volume and clinical outcome in anterior circulation stroke', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE, 8 228-234 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1747-4949.2012.00801.xAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi, Kerry Inder
2013Meretoja A, Davis SM, Campbell BCV, Yassi N, Yan B, Churilov L, et al., 'The Spot sign and Tranexamic acid On Preventing ICH growth - AUStralasia Trial (STOP-AUST): Protocol of a phase II randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter trial', International Journal of Stroke, (2013) [C3]

Rationale: No evidence-based acute therapies exist for intracerebral hemorrhage. Intracerebral hemorrhage growth is an important determinant of patient outcome. Tranexamic acid is known to reduce hemorrhage in other conditions. Aim: The study aims to test the hypothesis that intracerebral hemorrhage patients selected with computed tomography angiography contrast extravasation 'spot sign' will have lower rates of hematoma growth when treated with intravenous tranexamic acid within 4·5-hours of stroke onset compared with placebo. Design: The Spot sign and Tranexamic acid On Preventing ICH growth - AUStralasia Trial is a multicenter, prospective, 1:1 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, investigator-initiated, academic Phase II trial. Intracerebral hemorrhage patients fulfilling clinical criteria (e.g. Glasgow Coma Scale >7, intracerebral hemorrhage volume <70ml, no identified secondary cause of intracerebral hemorrhage, no thrombotic events within the previous 12 months, no planned surgery) and demonstrating contrast extravasation on computed tomography angiography will receive either intravenous tranexamic acid 1g 10-min bolus followed by 1g eight-hour infusion or placebo. A second computed tomography will be performed at 24 ± 3 hours to evaluate intracerebral hemorrhage growth and patients followed up for three-months. Study outcomes: The primary outcome measure is presence of intracerebral hemorrhage growth by 24 ± 3 hours, defined as either >33% or >6ml increase from baseline, and will be adjusted for baseline intracerebral hemorrhage volume. Secondary outcome measures include growth as a continuous measure, thromboembolic events, and the three-month modified Rankin Scale score. Discussion: This is the first trial to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid in intracerebral hemorrhage patients selected based on an imaging biomarker of high likelihood of hematoma growth. The trial is registered as NCT01702636. © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

DOI10.1111/ijs.12132
CitationsWeb of Science - 3
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2013Mcleod DD, Parsons MW, Hood R, Hiles B, Allen J, Mccann SK, et al., 'Perfusion computed tomography thresholds defining ischemic penumbra and infarct core: Studies in a rat stroke model', International Journal of Stroke, (2013)

Background: Perfusion computed tomography is becoming more widely used as a clinical imaging tool to predict potentially salvageable tissue (ischemic penumbra) after ischemic stroke and guide reperfusion therapies. Aims: The study aims to determine whether there are important changes in perfusion computed tomography thresholds defining ischemic penumbra and infarct core over time following stroke. Methods: Permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was performed in adult outbred Wistar rats (n=6) and serial perfusion computed tomography scans were taken every 30 mins for 2h. To define infarction thresholds at 1h and 2h post-stroke, separate groups of rats underwent 1h (n=6) and 2h (n=6) of middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Infarct volumes were defined by histology at 24h. Co-registration with perfusion computed tomography maps (cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and mean transit time) permitted pixel-based analysis of thresholds defining infarction, using receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: Relative cerebral blood flow was the perfusion computed tomography parameter that most accurately predicted penumbra (area under the curve=0·698) and also infarct core (area under the curve=0·750). A relative cerebral blood flow threshold of <75% of mean contralateral cerebral blood flow most accurately predicted penumbral tissue at 0·5h (area under the curve=0·660), 1h (area under the curve=0·659), 1·5h (area under the curve=0·636), and 2h (area under the curve=0·664) after stroke onset. A relative cerebral blood flow threshold of <55% of mean contralateral most accurately predicted infarct core at 1h (area under the curve=0·765) and at 2h (area under the curve=0·689) after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Conclusions: The data provide perfusion computed tomography defined relative cerebral blood flow thresholds for infarct core and ischemic penumbra within the first two hours after experimental stroke in rats. These thresholds were shown to be stable to define the volume of infarct core and penumbra within this time window. © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

DOI10.1111/ijs.12147
CitationsScopus - 3
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod, Mark Parsons, Chris Levi
2013Magin P, Lasserson D, Parsons M, Spratt N, Evans M, Russell M, et al., 'Referral and triage of patients with transient ischemic attacks to an acute access clinic: Risk stratification in an Australian setting', International Journal of Stroke, 8 81-89 (2013) [C1]

Background: Transient ischemic attacks and minor stroke entail considerable risk of completed stroke but this risk is reduced by prompt assessment and treatment. Risk can be stratified according to the ABCD2 prediction score. Current guidelines suggest specialist assessment and treatment within 24h for high-risk event (ABCD2 score 4-7) and seven-days for low-risk event (ABCD2 score =3). Aims: The study aims to establish paths to care and outcomes for patients referred by general practitioners and emergency departments to an Australian acute access transient ischemic attack service. Methods: This is a prospective audit. Primary outcomes were time from event to referral, from referral to clinic appointment, and from event to appointment. ABCD2 score was calculated for each event. Time from event was modeled using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: There were 231 clinic attendees (general practitioner: 127; emergency department: 104). Mean time from event to referral was 9·2 days (SD 23·7, median 2), from referral to being seen in the clinic was 13·6 days (SD 19·0, median 7), and from event to being seen in the clinic was 17·2 days (SD 27·1, median 10). Of low-risk patients, 38·5% were seen within seven-days of event. Of high-risk patients, 36·7% were seen within one-day. ABCD2 score was not a significant predictor of any time interval from event to clinic attendance. There were no completed strokes prior to clinic attendance. Conclusions: Times from event to clinic assessment were in excess of current recommendations and risk stratification was suboptimal, though short-term outcomes were good. Improvements in referral mechanisms may enhance risk-stratification and triage. © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

DOI10.1111/ijs.12014
CitationsWeb of Science - 2
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons, Parker Magin
2013McLeod DD, Beard DJ, Parsons MW, Levi CR, Calford MB, Spratt NJ, 'Inadvertent Occlusion of the Anterior Choroidal Artery Explains Infarct Variability in the Middle Cerebral Artery Thread Occlusion Stroke Model', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0075779Author URL
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Damian Mcleod, Chris Levi
2012Murtha L, McLeod D, Spratt N, 'Epidural intracranial pressure measurement in rats using a fiber-optic pressure transducer.', Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE, (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 1
2012Parsons MW, Spratt NJ, Bivard A, Campbell B, Chung K, Miteff F, et al., 'A randomized trial of tenecteplase versus alteplase for acute ischemic stroke', New England Journal of Medicine, 366 1099-1107 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 130Web of Science - 113
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2012Skelding KA, Spratt NJ, Fluechter L, Dickson PW, Rostas JA, 'alpha CaMKII is differentially regulated in brain regions that exhibit differing sensitivities to ischemia and excitotoxicity', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 32 2181-2192 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authorsKathryn Skelding, John Rostas, Phil Dickson
2012Janssen H, Ada L, Karayanidis F, Drysdale K, McElduff P, Pollack MR, et al., 'Translating the use of an enriched environment poststroke from bench to bedside: study design and protocol used to test the feasibility of environmental enrichment on stroke patients in rehabilitation', International Journal of Stroke, 7 521-526 (2012) [C3]
CitationsScopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authorsFrini Karayanidis, Karen Drysdale
2011Bivard A, Spratt NJ, Levi CR, Parsons MW, 'Acute stroke thrombolysis: Time to dispense with the clock and move to tissue-based decision making?', Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy, 9 451-461 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 5
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2011McLeod DD, Parsons MW, Levi CR, Beautement S, Buxton D, Roworth B, Spratt NJ, 'Establishing a rodent stroke perfusion computed tomography model', International Journal of Stroke, 6 284-289 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1747-4949.2010.00564.x
CitationsScopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Damian Mcleod, Chris Levi
2011Bivard A, Spratt NJ, Levi CR, Parsons MW, 'Perfusion computer tomography: Imaging and clinical validation in acute ischaemic stroke', Brain, 134 3408-3416 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 33Web of Science - 35
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2011Spratt NJ, Donnan GA, McLeod DD, Howells DW, ''Salvaged' stroke ischaemic penumbra shows significant injury: Studies with the hypoxia tracer FMISO', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 31 934-943 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1038/jcbfm.2010.174
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod
2011Parsons MW, Bivard A, McElduff P, Spratt NJ, Levi CR, 'Defining the extent of irreversible brain ischemia using perfusion computed tomography', Cerebrovascular Diseases, 31 238-245 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1159/000321897
CitationsScopus - 42Web of Science - 38
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2010Janssen H, Bernhardt J, Collier JM, Sena ES, McElduff P, Attia JR, et al., 'An enriched environment improves sensorimotor function post-ischemic stroke', Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 24 802-813 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1177/1545968310372092
CitationsScopus - 36Web of Science - 29
Co-authorsJohn Attia
2010Garnett AR, Marsden DL, Parsons MW, Quain DA, Spratt NJ, Loudfoot AR, et al., 'The rural Prehospital Acute Stroke Triage (PAST) trial protocol: A controlled trial for rapid facilitated transport of rural acute stroke patients to a regional stroke centre', International Journal of Stroke, 5 506-513 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1747-4949.2010.00522.x
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2010Rewell SSJ, Fernandez JA, Cox SF, Spratt NJ, Hogan L, Aleksoska E, et al., 'Inducing stroke in aged, hypertensive, diabetic rats', JOURNAL OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM, 30 729-733 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1038/jcbfm.2009.273Author URL
CitationsScopus - 19Web of Science - 17
2010Marsden DL, Spratt NJ, Walker R, Barker DJ, Attia JR, Pollack MR, et al., 'Trends in stroke attack rates and case fatality in the Hunter Region, Australia 1996-2008', Cerebrovascular Diseases, 30 500-507 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1159/000319022
CitationsScopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authorsJohn Attia, Mark Parsons, Chris Levi
2010Abed H, Barlow MA, Wellings TP, Spratt NJ, Collins N, 'Cardiogenic shock complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage diagnosed as Tako Tsubo Cardiomyopathy: A cautionary tale', Heart Lung and Circulation, 19 476-479 (2010) [C3]
DOI10.1016/j.hlc.2010.03.007
CitationsScopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2009Levi CR, Bateman GA, Spratt NJ, McElduff P, Parsons MW, Miteff F, 'The independent predictive utility of computed tomography angiographic collateral status in acute ischaemic stroke', Brain, 132 2231-2238 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1093/brain/awp155
CitationsScopus - 105Web of Science - 101
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2009Spratt NJ, Donnan GA, Howells DW, 'Characterisation of the timing of binding of the hypoxia tracer FMISO after stroke', Brain Research, 1288 135-142 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.brainres.2009.06.102
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 9
2009Levi C, Parsons M, Spratt N, Evans M, Royan A, 'Predicting Outcome in hyper-acute stroke: validation of a prognostic model in the Thir', Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 79 397-400 (2009) [C3]
2009Parsons MW, Miteff F, Bateman GA, Spratt NJ, Loiselle A, Attia JR, Levi CR, 'Acute ischemic stroke imaging-guided tenecteplase treatment in an extended time window', Neurology, 72 915-921 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1212/01.wnl.0000344168.05315.9d
CitationsScopus - 62Web of Science - 48
Co-authorsJohn Attia, Mark Parsons, Chris Levi
2008Scope Collaborations SCAOPE, Ist, Levi C, Parsons M, Spratt N, Evans M, Royan A, 'Predicting outcome in hyper-acute stroke: validation of a prognostic model in the Third International Stroke Trial (IST3)', Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 79 397-400 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1136/jnnp.2007.126045
CitationsScopus - 20
2008Quain DA, Parsons MW, Loudfoot AR, Spratt NJ, Evans MK, Russell ML, et al., 'Improving access to acute stroke therapies: A controlled trial of organised pre-hospital and emergency care', Medical Journal of Australia, 189 429-433 (2008) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 59Web of Science - 50
Co-authorsJohn Attia, Mark Parsons, Chris Levi
2006Spratt N, Ackerman U, Tochon-Danguy HJ, Donnan GA, Howells DW, 'Characterization of fluoromisonidazole binding in stroke', Stroke, 37 1862-1867 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1161/01.STR.0000226908.93295.9d
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 12
2006Spratt N, Fernandez J, Chen M, Rewell S, Cox S, Van Raay L, et al., 'Modification of the method of thread manufacture improves stroke induction rate and reduces mortality after thread-occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in young or aged rats', Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 155 285-290 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.jneumeth.2006.01.020
CitationsScopus - 61Web of Science - 57
2006Falzon CL, Ackermann U, Spratt N, Tochon-Danguy HJ, White J, Howells D, Scott AM, 'F-18 labelled N, N-bis-haloethylamino-phenylsulfoxides - a new class of compounds for the imaging of hypoxic tissue', Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals, 49 1089-1103 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1002/jlcr.1129
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2004Saita K, Chen M, Spratt NJ, Porritt MJ, Liberatore GT, Read SJ, et al., 'Imaging the Ischemic Penumbra with F-Fluoromisonidazole in a Rat Model of Ischemic Stroke', Stroke: a journal of cerebral circulation, 35 975-980 (2004) [C1]
DOI10.1161/01.STR.0000121647.01941.ba
CitationsScopus - 33Web of Science - 30
Co-authorsChris Levi
2003Wang Y, Levi CR, Attia JR, D'Este CA, Spratt N, Fisher JD, 'Seasonal Variation in Stroke in the Hunter Region, Australia: A 5-Year Hospital-Based Study, 1995-2000', Stroke: a journal of cerebral circulation, 34 1144-1150 (2003) [C1]
DOI10.1161/01.STR.0000067703.71251.B6
CitationsScopus - 58Web of Science - 54
Co-authorsCatherine Deste, Chris Levi, John Attia
2003Spratt N, Wang Y, Levi CR, Ng K, Evans M, Fisher JD, 'A prospective study of predictors of prolonged hospital stay and disability after stroke', Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, 10 665-669 (2003) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.jocn.2002.12.001
CitationsWeb of Science - 24
Co-authorsChris Levi
Show 54 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2003Spratt N, Howells DW, 'Ischaemic tolerance and mitochondrial uncoupling - can we learn from the cell', Cerebrovascular Diseases (2003) [C1]
DOI10.1159/000083878

Conference (81 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Bivard A, Krishnamurthy V, Levi C, Mcelduff P, Miteff F, Spratt N, et al., 'Stroke Thrombolysis: Tissue Is More Important Than Time', CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2014Bivard A, Krishnamurthy V, Levi C, Mcelduff P, Miteff F, Spratt N, et al., 'Does the Presence of CTP Mismatch Predict Better Outcomes in Thrombolysis-Treated Patients?', CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2014Bivard A, Krishnamurthy V, Levi C, Mcelduff P, Miteff F, Spratt N, et al., 'Better Stroke Outcomes Despite Worse Baseline Stroke Severity with Combined Clinical and CTP Assessment', CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2014Bhaskar S, Evans M, Kitsos G, Russel M, Stanwell P, Walker R, et al., 'The influence of initial stroke severity on the likelihood of death at 90 days following acute stroke: A tertiary hospital stroke register study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2014Marsden D, Dunn A, Callister R, McElduff P, Levi C, Spratt N, 'Cardiorespiratory fitness testing and training in stroke survivors: A comparison of peak oxygen consumption results from the upright cycle test, six minute walk test and circuit exercise stations', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Chris Levi
2014Bivard A, Krishnamurthy V, Levi C, McElduff P, Miteff F, Spratt N, et al., 'Stroke thrombolysis: Tissue is more important than time', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2014Bivard A, Krishnamurthy V, Levi C, McElduff P, Miteff F, Spratt N, et al., 'Does the presence of CTP mismatch predict better outcomes in thrombolysis-treated patients?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2014Zareie H, Selmes C, Kawano H, Parsons M, Spratt N, Miteff F, et al., 'Feasibility and accuracy of fusion TCCD in monitoring acute stroke treatment', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2014Bivard A, Krishnamurthy V, Levi C, McElduff P, Miteff F, Spratt N, et al., 'Better stroke outcomes despite worse baseline stroke severity - The value of a combined clinical and advanced CT selection approach to thrombolysis', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2014Dunn A, Marsden D, Van Vliet P, Spratt NJ, Callister R, 'How do the shuttle walk test and 6-minute walk test compare as measures of cardiorespiratory fitness in stroke survivors?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsPaulette Vanvliet, Robin Callister
2014Marsden D, Dunn A, Callister R, McElduff P, Levi CR, Spratt NJ, 'Can independently ambulant stroke survivors exercise for thirty minutes at a moderate intensity? An observational study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Chris Levi
2014Zareie H, Selmes C, Kawano H, Parsons M, Spratt N, Miteff F, et al., 'Feasibility and accuracy of fusion TCCD in acute stroke treatment', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2014Bhaskar S, Evans MK, Kitsos G, Russell M, Stanswell P, Walker R, et al., 'The influence of initial stroke severity on the likelihood of death at 90 days following acute stroke: A tertiary hospital stroke registry study.', International Journal of Stroke, Hamilton Island, Queensland (2014)
DOI10.1111/ijs.12297
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2013Callister R, Dunn A, Marsden DL, Spratt NJ, Van Vliet P, 'How has the 6 minute walk test been used in the stroke population? A Systematic Review with meta-analysis', International Journal of Stroke, Brisbane (2013) [E3]
DOI10.1111/ijs.12172
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Paulette Vanvliet
2013Callister R, Dunn A, Marsden DL, Spratt NJ, Van Vliet P, 'How has the 6 minute walk test been used in the stroke population? A Systematic Review with meta-analysis', International Journal of Stroke, Brisbane (2013) [E3]
DOI10.1111/ijs.12172
Co-authorsPaulette Vanvliet, Robin Callister
2013Schleicher N, Tomkins AJ, Kampschulte M, Yan F, Hyvelin J-M, Juenemann M, et al., 'Efficacy of the novel therapeutic microbubble preparation BR38 in sonothrombolysis (ST) of acute cerebral small artery occlusion', CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES (2013) [E3]
Author URL
2013Tomkins AJ, Schleicher N, Nedelmann M, Spratt NJ, 'PLATELET RICH CLOTS ARE RESISTANT TO LYSIS BY THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY IN A RAT MODEL OF EMBOLIC STROKE', CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsChris Levi
2013Bivard A, Stanwell P, Spratt N, Levi C, Krishnamurthy V, Davis S, Parsons M, 'Arterial spin labelling versus bolus-tracking CT and MR in hyper-acute ischemic stroke', CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2013Marsden DL, Dunn A, Callister R, Levi CR, Spratt NJ, 'Exercise training interventions that are aerobic or include an aerobic component can improve cardiorespiratory fitness after stroke: a systematic review with meta-analysis', CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Chris Levi
2013Beard D, McLeod D, Spratt N, 'The collateral circulation: key to outcome in mice and men', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod
2013Lillicrap T, Stanwell P, Neeman T, Parsons M, Spratt N, Levi CR, Lueck C, 'Variation in regional brain temperature as measured by MR thermography in healthy volunteers', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2013Egan KJ, Janssen H, Sena ES, Bernhardt J, Longley L, Speare S, et al., 'Exercise reduces infarct volume and facilitates neurobehavioural recovery: systematic review and meta-analysis of exercise in animal models of stroke', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Author URL
2013Marsden DL, Dunn A, Callister R, Levi CR, Spratt NJ, 'Interventions to improve cardiorespiratory fitness after stroke: a systematic review with meta-analysis', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsChris Levi, Robin Callister
2013Marsden DL, Dunn A, Callister R, Levi CR, Spratt NJ, 'Improving cardiorespiratory fitness after stroke by using exercise interventions that are aerobic or include an aerobic component: A systematic review with meta-analysis', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsChris Levi, Robin Callister
2013Janssen H, Speare S, Spratt NJ, Sena ES, Ada L, Hannan AJ, et al., 'Exploring the efficacy of constraint in animal models of stroke: meta-analysis and systematic review of the current evidence', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Author URL
2013Dunn A, Marsden DL, Spratt NJ, Van Vliet P, Callister R, 'How has the 6 minute walk test been used in the stroke population? A Systematic Review with meta-analysis', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Paulette Vanvliet
2012Marsden DL, Callister R, Dunn A, Levi CR, Spratt NJ, 'How fit is the stroke survivor? Assessing the fitness levels of stroke survivors by comparing four methods available in the clinical setting. The 'HowFITSS' Trial', Abstract E-book. 2012 European Stroke Conference, Lisbon, Portugal (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsChris Levi, Robin Callister
2012Marsden DL, Garnett AR, Parsons MW, Spratt NJ, Watson T, Loudfoot A, et al., 'No thrombolysis service? No worries. A controlled trial of facilitated access for rural stroke patients to a regional thrombolysis centre - The Hunter Rural PAST Protocol', Abstract E-book. 2012 European Stroke Conference, Lisbon, Portugal (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2012Skelding KA, Abdul Majeed ABB, Dickson PW, Spratt NJ, Rostas JA, 'CAMKII is regulated differently in brains regions with differing sensitivities to ischaemia/excitotoxicity', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting, Gold Coast, Queensland (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsKathryn Skelding, John Rostas, Phil Dickson
2012Murtha LA, McLeod DD, Spratt NJ, 'The effects of therapeutic hypothermia on intracranial pressure after experimental ischemic stroke', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting, Gold Coast, Queensland (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod
2012Arulampalam A, McLeod DD, Spratt NJ, 'Fluid shifts in the rat brain after ischaemic stroke', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting, Gold Coast, Queensland (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod
2012Janssen H, Ada L, Bernhardt J, Karayanidis F, Drysdale K, McElduff P, et al., 'The use of an enriched environment post stroke: Translating from bench to bedside', Neurorehabilitation & Neural Repair: WCNR 2012 Oral Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsFrini Karayanidis, Karen Drysdale
2012Rostas JA, Skelding KA, Fluechter L, Dickson PW, Spratt NJ, 'CaMKII is Differentially Regulated in Striatum and Cortex', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2012) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsJohn Rostas, Phil Dickson, Kathryn Skelding
2012Rostas JA, Skelding KA, Fluechter L, Dickson PW, Spratt NJ, 'CaMKII is differentially regulated in striatum and cortex', Journal of Molecular Neuroscience: Abstracts The 21st Annual Meeting of the Israel Society for Neuroscience & The First Binational Australian-Israeli Meeting in Neuroscience, Eilat, Israel (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsPhil Dickson, John Rostas, Kathryn Skelding
2012Janssen H, Ada L, Bernhardt J, Karayanidis F, Drysdale K, McElduff P, et al., 'Exposure to an enriched environment increases post stroke activity and decreases time spent alone', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2012) [E3]
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
Co-authorsFrini Karayanidis
2012Marsden DL, Dunn A, Callister R, Levi CR, Spratt NJ, 'Measuring cardiorespiratory fitness and oxygen consumption after stroke - A Systematic Review', International Journal of Stroke, Darling Harbour, Sydney (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Chris Levi
2012Marsden DL, Dunn A, Callister R, Levi CR, Spratt NJ, 'Assessing stroke survivors' cardiorespiratory fitness - A comparison of four methods available in the clinical setting: Preliminary results from the 'How Fit is the Stroke Survivor?' (HowFITSS?) trial', International Journal of Stroke, Darling Harbour, Sydney (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsChris Levi, Robin Callister
2012Dunn A, Marsden DL, Spratt NJ, Levi CR, Callister R, 'Does knee strength affect walking speed, distance and fitness levels following stroke? Preliminary results from the 'How Fit is the Stroke Survivor?' (HowFITSS?) trial', International Journal of Stroke, Darling Harbour, Sydney (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Chris Levi
2012Bartley E, White JH, Janssen H, Spratt NJ, Pollack M, 'Exploring the experience of stroke rehabilitation following exposure to an enriched environment', International Journal of Stroke, Darling Harbour, Sydney (2012) [E3]
2012Alborough K, White JH, Janssen H, Spratt NJ, Jordan L, Pollack MR, 'Exploring staff experience of an 'Enriched Environment' within stroke rehabilitation: A qualitative sub-study', International Journal of Stroke, Darling Harbour, Sydney (2012) [E3]
2012Garnett AR, Marsden DL, Parsons MW, Spratt NJ, Watson T, Loudfoot AR, et al., 'The Hunter Rural PAST Protocol: An innovative and effective partnership between ambulance and a regional thrombolysis centre to facilitate access for rural stroke patient to thrombolysis', International Journal of Stroke, Darling Harbour, Sydney (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2012Beard DJ, McLeod DD, Imtiaz MS, Spratt NJ, 'Quantitative assessment of leptomeningeal collateral flow in experimental stroke', The Stroke Interventionalist, Los Angeles, CA (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod
2012McLeod DD, Beard DJ, Imtiaz MS, Spratt NJ, 'Validating a novel method for measuring leptomeningeal collateral flow in experimental stroke', The Stroke Interventionalist, Los Angeles, CA (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod
2012Bernhardt J, Janssen H, Ada L, McElduff P, Pollack M, Spratt NJ, 'Exposure to an enriched environment increases post stroke activity and decreases time spent alone', Abstract E-book. 2012 European Stroke Conference, Lisbon, Portugal (2012) [E3]
2011Bivard A, Spratt NJ, Levi CR, Parsons MW, 'CTP thresholds to detect acute ischeamic stroke tissue pathophysiology', International Journal of Stroke, Adelaide, SA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2011Russell ML, Evans MK, Royan AT, Magin PJ, Lasserson D, Attia JR, et al., 'Referral and triage of patients with TIAs to an acute access clinic: Risk-stratification performance in an Australian setting', International Journal of Stroke, Adelaide, SA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsParker Magin, John Attia, Chris Levi, Mark Parsons
2011O'Brien W, Chung K, Levi CR, Spratt NJ, Parsons MW, 'Comparative study of Multimodal Computed Tomography (MdCT) and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Transient ischaemic attack and minor stroke patient', International Journal of Stroke, Adelaide, SA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2011Murtha LA, McLeod DD, McCann S, Pepperall D-G, Spratt NJ, 'Short duration hypothermia results in sustained prevention of intracranial pressure elevation following experimental stroke', International Journal of Stroke, Adelaide, SA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod
2011Menon B, O'Brien W, Bivard A, Levi CR, Spratt NJ, Parsons MW, 'Detailed anatomic and physiologic assessment of leptomeningeal collaterals in acute ischemic stroke patients using dynamic time resolved 320 slice CT angiography', International Journal of Stroke, Adelaide, SA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2011Lillicrap T, Jyoti R, Levi CR, Parsons MW, Spratt NJ, Stanwell P, Lueck C, 'Temperature measurements using MR spectroscopy: Validation and calibration in healthy volunteers', International Journal of Stroke, Adelaide, SA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2011Janssen H, Ada L, Bernhardt J, McElduff P, Pollack MR, Spratt NJ, 'Levels of physical, cognitive and social activity are low and stable during a two week period of stroke rehabilitation', APA Physiotherapy Conference 2011 Abstract Presentations, Brisbane (2011) [E3]
2011Tomkins AJ, Chung S, Pepperall D-G, Beard D, Calford MB, Spratt NJ, 'Distribution and quantification of the neurosteroid allopregnanolone in response to stroke', Oral abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting, Auckland, NZ (2011) [E3]
2011Skelding KA, Chung S, Pepperall D-G, Tomkins AJ, Spratt NJ, Rostas JA, 'The role of CaMKII in neuronal sensitivity to ischaemia', Oral abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting, Auckland, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsKathryn Skelding, John Rostas
2011Menon BK, O'Brien W, Bivard A, Levi CR, Spratt NJ, Parsons MW, 'Anatomic and physiologic assessment of leptomeningeal collaterals in acute ischemic stroke patients using dynamic time resolved 320 slice CT angiography', Stroke, Ottawa, Canada (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2011Bivard A, Levi CR, Spratt NJ, Parsons MW, 'Delayed perfusion predicts the volume of the perfusion lesion', Stroke, Los Angeles, CA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2011Bivard A, Spratt NJ, Levi CR, Parsons MW, 'Perfusion CT predicts subsequent tissue and clinical outcome in hyperacute ischemic stroke', Cerebrovascular Diseases, Hamburg, Germany (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2011Shiue I, Marsden DL, Spratt NJ, Matzarakis A, McElduff P, Anderson CS, Levi CR, 'Psychologically equivalent temperature and stroke attack rates', Cerebrovascular Diseases, Hamburg, Germany (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsChris Levi
2010Bivard A, McElduff P, Spratt NJ, Levi CR, Parsons MW, 'Validating perfusion-computed tomography in defining extent of irreversible brain ischemia', Circulation, Beijing (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2010Lillicrap T, Stanwell P, Parsons MW, Spratt NJ, Hudson S, Levi CR, 'MR spectroscopy in brain temperature measurement and application to induced hypothermia therapy', Circulation, Beijing (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi
2010Bivard A, McElduff P, Levi CR, Spratt NJ, Parsons MW, 'Defining the extent of irreversible brain ischemia using perfusion computed tomography', Stroke, San Antonio, Texas (2010) [E3]
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2010Lillicrap TP, Hudson S, Stanwell P, Parsons MW, Spratt NJ, Levi CR, 'MR spectroscopy and diffusion-weighted MRI can accurately measure both reduced and increased brain temperature', Stroke, San Antonio, Texas (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2010Skelding KA, Tomkins AJ, Fluechter L, Pepperall D-G, Spratt NJ, Rostas JA, 'Ischaemia-induced CaMKII phosphorylation in hypertensive and normotensive rats', Proceding of the Australian Neuroscience Society, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsKathryn Skelding, John Rostas
2009McLeod DD, Spratt NJ, Levi CR, Beautement S, Roworth B, Buxton D, et al., 'Experimental validation of perfusion computed tomography in acute middle cerebral artery occlusion', ACBRC 2009 Abstracts, Tianjin, China (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Chris Levi, Damian Mcleod
2009McLeod DD, Parsons MW, Levi CR, Beautement S, Roworth B, Buxton D, et al., 'An experimental model to investigate CT brain perfusion after stroke', ANS 2009 Abstracts: Posters, Canberra, ACT (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod, Chris Levi, Mark Parsons
2009Tomkins AJ, Rostas JA, Pepperall D-G, Calford MB, Spratt NJ, 'Infarction occurs more rapidly in hypertensive rats', ANS 2009 Abstracts: Posters, Canberra, ACT (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsJohn Rostas
2009McLeod DD, Spratt NJ, Levi CR, Beautement S, Roworth B, Buxton D, et al., 'Perfusion computed tomography for acute stroke: A model for experimental validation', Cerebrovascular Diseases, Stockholm, Sweden (2009) [E3]
DOI10.1159/000221776
Co-authorsDamian Mcleod, Chris Levi, Mark Parsons
2008Miteff F, Parsons MW, Bateman GA, Spratt NJ, Levi CR, 'Does collateral vessel status on CT angiography add to perfusion CT in the prediction of outcome after acute ischaemc stroke?', Internal Medicine Journal, Sydney, NSW (2008) [E3]
DOI10.1111/j.1445-5994.2008.01755_7.x
Co-authorsChris Levi, Mark Parsons
2008Janssen H, Collier J, Bernhardt J, Pollack MR, Sena E, Spratt NJ, 'Gathering the evidence: The use of an enriched environment post stroke', Internal Medicine Journal, Sydney, NSW (2008) [E3]
DOI10.1111/j.1445-5994.2008.01755_7.x
2008Pepperall D-G, Tomkins AJ, Calford MB, Spratt NJ, 'The effectiveness of neurological tests of somatosensory function following stroke in rats', Internal Medicine Journal, Sydney, NSW (2008) [E3]
2008Tomkins AJ, Pepperall D-G, Calford MB, Spratt NJ, 'Investigation of the putative neuroprotectant effect of the neurosteroid allopregnanolone after stroke', Internal Medicine Journal, Sydney, NSW (2008) [E3]
2008Spratt NJ, 'Locating the target, and identifying mechanisms and therapies for neuroprotection in stroke', Journal of Neurochemistry, Shanghai, China (2008) [E3]
2008Spratt N, Donnan G, Howells D, 'Specificity of fluoromisonidazole for hypoxia in stroke', Journal of Neurological Sciences, Sydney Australia (2008) [E3]
2007Falzon CL, Ackermann U, Tochon-Danguy H, Scott A, Spratt N, Howells D, et al., 'Evaluation of novel PET imaging agents for the identification of the ischemic penumbra in stroke', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING, Copenhagen, DENMARK (2007)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
2006Spratt N, 'How can we detect the ischaemic penumbra in animals?', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, Singapore, SINGAPORE (2006)
Author URL
2005Spratt N, Donnan G, Howells D, 'Specificity of fluoromisonidazole for hypoxia in stroke', JOURNAL OF THE NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES, Sydney, AUSTRALIA (2005)
Author URL
2005Spratt N, Saita K, Chen M, Howells DW, Donnan GA, Ackermann U, et al., 'FMISO for investigating the ischaemic penumbra in stroke', Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, Miami Beach, Florida, USA (2005) [E3]
2005Falzon CF, Spratt N, Ackermann U, White JM, Tochon-Danguy HJ, Howlells D, O'Keefe GJ, 'A New Method for Thread Occlusion of the Middle Cerebral Artery Permits Induction of Stroke in Old Hypertensive and Diabetic Rats with Improved Reproducibility and Reduced Mortality', Internal Medicine Journal, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2005) [E1]
2005Spratt NJ, Fernandez JA, Chen M, Rewell SS, Cox SF, Raay LV, et al., 'An Improved Technique for Silicone-Coating the Suture Used in Rat MCA Occlusion Increases Stroke Induction Rate, Reduces Mortality, and Is Effective across a Wide Weight and Age Range', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism, - (2005) [E3]
2004Saita K, Chen M, Spratt NJ, Porritt MJ, Liberatore GT, Ackermann U, et al., 'Modelling the ischaemic penumbra in a rat model of stroke', Internal Medicine Journal, Sydney Australia (2004) [E3]
2003Wang Y, Levi CR, D'Este CA, Attia JR, Spratt N, Fisher J, 'Seasonal variation in stroke in the Hunter Region, Australia a five-year hospital-based study, 1995-2000', STROKE, PHOENIX, ARIZONA (2003)
Author URL
Co-authorsChris Levi, Catherine Deste, John Attia
2003Spratt NJ, Blackie JD, Ruddell T, 'An unusual case of "optic neuritis"', Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, Honolulu, Hawaii (2003) [E3]
Show 78 more conferences

Other (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2010Spratt NJ, 'Where next for stroke?', ( issue.7 pp.660): The Lancet Publishing Group (2010) [C3]
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants41
Total funding$4,395,001

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20153 grants / $534,622

Characterising a newly identified mechanism causing elevation of intracranial pressure after acute neurological injury$494,400

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt, Doctor Mark Baker
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1400231
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Stroke In Progression: a new understanding of pathophysiology opening the door to effective therapy$25,222

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust Fund

Funding bodyJohn Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust Fund
Project TeamDoctor Ferdinand Miteff, Doctor Damian McLeod, Mr Daniel Beard, Miss Lucy Murtha, Doctor Neil Spratt
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1500830
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

A better understanding of intracranial pressure changes after brain injury$15,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt, Doctor Damian McLeod, Miss Lucy Murtha, Mr Daniel Beard
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1500709
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20148 grants / $373,441

Altering the Rehabililtation Environment to Improve Stroke Survivor Activity (AREISSA): A Phase II Trial.$264,242

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding bodyNational Heart Foundation of Australia
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt, Associate Professor Louise Ada, Professor Michael Nilsson, Professor Sandy Middleton, Associate Professor Julie Bernhardt, Professor Leonid Churilov, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Conjoint Associate Professor Michael Pollack, Associate Professor Steven Faux, Professor Lin Perry, Dr Annie McCluskey
SchemeNSW Cardiovascular Research Network Research Development Project Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1301044
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Determining factors within cerebrospinal fluid that influence intracranial pressure post-stroke$35,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamMiss Rebecca Hood, Doctor Neil Spratt
SchemePostgraduate Research Scholarship
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1401409
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Improving Fitness, Function, Fatigue and Feelings through physcial Fun: a pilot trial for stroke survivors $20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt, Professor Robin Callister
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400143
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Tablets and Technology During Stroke Recovery (TNT)$19,924

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding bodyNational Stroke Foundation
Project TeamMs Heidi Janssen, Doctor Neil Spratt, Ms Louise-Anne Jordan, Doctor Patrick McElduff
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1301138
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Cooling the brain via the skin to prevent intracranial pressure elevation after stroke$19,275

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding bodyNational Stroke Foundation
Project TeamDoctor Damian McLeod, Doctor Neil Spratt
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1301145
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Effects of intracranial pressure on collateral blood flow after stroke: a new pathophysiological mechanism and potential therapy $10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt
SchemeNear Miss Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1301407
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Quantifying Physical, Cognitive and Social Activity Early After Stroke$3,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding bodyNational Stroke Foundation
Project TeamMrs Jodie Marquez, Ms Heidi Janssen, Miss Hannah Smith, Doctor Neil Spratt, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Associate Professor Louise Ada
SchemeHonours Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1301144
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

2013 Vice Chancellor's Award for Supervision Excellence$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt
SchemeAward for Supervision Excellence
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400151
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20134 grants / $192,000

Greater Charitable Foundation Fellows in Stroke Research$100,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt, Professor Mark Parsons, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi
SchemeStroke Research Project Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300508
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Enriched Environment in Rehabilitation - A Phase II Trial$70,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamMs Heidi Janssen, Doctor Neil Spratt, Professor Michael Nilsson
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300569
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Novel mechanisms of ‘Stroke-in-Progression’: Intracranial pressure elevation and collateral blood vessel failure after minor stroke$20,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding bodyNational Stroke Foundation
Project TeamDoctor Damian McLeod, Doctor Neil Spratt
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1201084
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Introduction to research and scientific methods$2,000

Funding body: University of Gothenburg

Funding bodyUniversity of Gothenburg
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt
SchemeMasters Thesis Project
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1201262
Type Of FundingInternational - Non Competitive
Category3IFB
UONY

20126 grants / $2,025,122

An international comparison of systems of care, risk stratification and outcomes in TIA and minor stroke$1,149,593

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamConjoint Professor Chris Levi, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin, Dr Daniel Lasserson, Dr Jose Valderas, Associate Professor Helen Dewey, Professor Peter Barber, Professor Peter Rothwell, Doctor Neil Spratt, Dr Dominique Cadilhac, Professor Valery Feigin
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1100258
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Short duration hypothermia to prevent subsequent intracranial pressure rise.$429,453

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1100422
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

A new paradigm to prevent intracranial hypertension$391,076

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt
SchemeCareer Development Fellowships
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1100407
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Experimental brain imaging to investigate novel protective mechanisms of short duration body cooling after stroke$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Damian McLeod, Doctor Neil Spratt, Professor Mark Parsons, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1101116
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Role of CaMKII targeting in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic cell death$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamEmeritus Professor John Rostas, Doctor Neil Spratt, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Doctor Nikki Verrills
SchemeNear Miss Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200673
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Telemetry measurement of Intracranial Pressure in Stroke and Hypothermia$15,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1201131
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

20115 grants / $131,400

Fitness Training In Stroke Trial (FiTIST): a randomised controlled assessor blind multicentre cross-over trial$85,600

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding bodyNational Heart Foundation of Australia
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Professor Robin Callister
SchemePostgraduate Biomedical Research Scholarship
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1000862
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Role of CaMKII targeting in stroke susceptibility and outcome$18,200

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamEmeritus Professor John Rostas, Doctor Neil Spratt, Doctor Kathryn Skelding
SchemeStroke Research Project Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1001013
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Role of CaMKII targeting in stroke susceptibility and outcome$15,000

Funding body: Brain Foundation (NSW Branch)

Funding bodyBrain Foundation (NSW Branch)
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt, Emeritus Professor John Rostas
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1000716
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

HMRI PhD Scholarship Travel Grant, Sponsored by Jennie Thomas$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100898
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

The effect of stroke on cranial compartment volumes and intracranial pressure$2,600

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding bodyNational Stroke Foundation
Project TeamDoctor Damian McLeod, Doctor Neil Spratt
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100727
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20105 grants / $200,298

Testing stroke sonothrombolysis using an improved experimental model of thromboembolic stroke$81,386

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding bodyNational Stroke Foundation
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi
SchemePostgraduate Biomedical Scholarship
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG0190597
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Improving patient selection for acute stroke therapies - an experimental model of CT brain perfusion after stroke$50,000

Funding body: BellBerry Limited

Funding bodyBellBerry Limited
Project TeamProfessor Mark Parsons, Doctor Neil Spratt, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Doctor Damian McLeod, Dr Peter Stanwell
SchemeNear Miss
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG0900222
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Environmental enrichment post stroke$46,848

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding bodyNational Stroke Foundation
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000541
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

The use of an enriched environment to improve recovery after stroke$20,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding bodyNational Stroke Foundation
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000381
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Effects of therapeutic hypothermia and rewarming on intracranial pressure in experimental stroke$2,064

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding bodyNational Stroke Foundation
Project TeamDoctor Damian McLeod, Doctor Neil Spratt, Professor Mike Calford
SchemeHonours Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000608
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20094 grants / $503,275

Improving Patient Slection of rHighley Effective Stroke Therapy$240,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0190535
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

China-Australia therapeutic hypothermia in stroke (CATHS) research program: identification of diagnostic molecular markers and therapeutic targets involved in re-warming related brain injury$230,275

Funding body: NSW Office for Science & Medical Research

Funding bodyNSW Office for Science & Medical Research
Project TeamConjoint Professor Chris Levi, Doctor Mark Baker, Doctor Neil Spratt, Emeritus Professor John Rostas
SchemeChina-NSW Collaborative Research Program
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0190392
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

Establishing Computed Tomography Perfusion (CTP) imaging in an animal stroke model$20,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding bodyNational Stroke Foundation
Project TeamDoctor Damian McLeod, Doctor Neil Spratt, Professor Mike Calford, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Professor Mark Parsons
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189942
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Towards better early imaging in stroke: Use of an experimental model to investigate CT brain perfusion$13,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt, Professor Mark Parsons, Doctor Damian McLeod, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi
SchemeStroke Research Project Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189810
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

20083 grants / $143,093

A randomised controlled trial of mild hypothermia in acute ischaemic stroke$117,176

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding bodyNational Heart Foundation of Australia
Project TeamConjoint Professor Chris Levi, Professor Mark Parsons, Professor Christopher Bladin, Doctor Neil Spratt
SchemeGrant-In-Aid
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0187644
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category1NS
UONY

Is CaMKII autophosphorylation a mechanism of endogenous neuroprotection after stroke?$14,417

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamEmeritus Professor John Rostas, Doctor Neil Spratt
SchemePilot Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0189110
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Hypoxic culture chamber and low-pressure gas regulators$11,500

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Professor Mike Calford
SchemeEquipment Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188544
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

20072 grants / $231,750

Translation of novel neuroprotection and stroke recovery strategies from the laboratory to the clinic$171,750

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt
SchemeTraining (Postdoctoral) Fellowships - Health Professional Research Fellowship (Part-time)
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0186772
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Translation of novel neuroprotection and stroke recovery strategies from laboratory to the clinic$60,000

Funding body: Sylvia & Charles Viertel Charitable Foundation

Funding bodySylvia & Charles Viertel Charitable Foundation
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt
SchemeMedical Program - Viertel Clinical Investigators
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0187573
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category1NS
UONY

20061 grants / $60,000

Foundation for High Blood Pressure award.$60,000

Funding body: Royal Australasian College of Physicians

Funding bodyRoyal Australasian College of Physicians
Project TeamDoctor Neil Spratt
SchemeResearch and Education Foundation
RoleLead
Funding Start2006
Funding Finish2006
GNoG0187214
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY
Edit

Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015Chronic Stress-Induced Glial Disturbances
Human Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2015Cooling the Skin while Maintaining Normal Core Temperature to Prevent Intracranial Pressure Elevation and Improve Outcome after Stroke
Human Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2014Determining Factors within Cerebrospinal Fluid that Cause Intracranial Pressure to Rise Post-Stroke
Human Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2014Cooling the Skin While Maintaining Normal Core Temperature to Prevent Intracranial Pressure Elevation and Improve Outcome after Stroke
Human Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2012Prevention of Stroke Through Improving Fitness
Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2011Fitness Training in Stroke Trial
General Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2011A New Understanding of Factors Regulating Collateral Blood Flow during Ischaemic Stroke: Elevated Intracranial Pressure is a Potential Cause of Collateral Failure in Patients with Stroke-in-Progression
Human Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2010Making Clots and Breaking Clots: Modelling Arterial Occlusion to Test Stroke Sonothrombolysis
Human Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015The Effects and Mechanisms of Therapeutic Hypothermia on Intracranial Pressure Regulation Following Ischaemic Stroke in Rats
Human Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2013Use of an Enriched Environment Post-Stroke: Translating from Bench to Bedside
Human Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
Edit

News

Love Your Heart

Love Your Heart

October 15, 2013

University of Newcastle researchers are helping families with a history of cardiovascular disease to become 'heart smart' in a bid to lower their risk factors for heart attack or stroke.

Dr Neil Spratt

Position

Associate Professor
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Human Physiology

Contact Details

Emailneil.spratt@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 4921 6171
Mobile0403363981
Fax(02) 4921 7406

Office

RoomMS502a
BuildingMedical Sciences
LocationCallaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
Edit