Conjoint Professor Parker Magin

Conjoint Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health (General Practice)

Career Summary

Biography

I have worked as a GP since 1986, was awarded fellowship of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners in 1996, and have postgraduate qualifications (graduate diploma/coursework masters) in family medicine, dermatology, epidemiology, and psychiatry. I have been involved in general practice research since 2000, and was awarded a PhD in 2006 (University of Newcastle, topic: psychological sequelae of skin disease). I held an NHMRC Medical Postgraduate Scholarship 2003-2006 and am a member of the 2007 cohort of the Oxford International Primary Care Research Leadership Programme (formerly the Brisbane International Initiative in in Primary Care Research Leadership).

Research Expertise
Have experience in quantitative and qualitative research in general practice/primary health care. Qualitative research experience includes focus group studies and studies employing semi-structured interviews. Quantitative research experience includes cross-sectional, cohort, and RCTs and other trial designs. Research experience has included studies involving TIA and minor stroke, medicines in the elderly, the in-practice clinical and educational experience of GP trainees, occupational violence in general practice, and the psychological effects of skin disease.

Teaching Expertise
Teaching experience includes extensive undergraduate Problem Based Learning tutoring, and lectures and workshops on a range of topics in general practice, especially skin disease. Extensive experience in postgraduate (vocational General Practice training) teaching - especially in skin diseases, EBM and critical evaluation. Extensive experience teaching primary health care professionals on topics such as critical evaluation & literature searching, and research methodology. Completed the Essential Skills in Medical Education Certificate of the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) in 2014.

Administrative Expertise
Course co-ordinator of Year 3 courses in the University of Newcastle B Med. Designed, implemented and co-ordinated first year of both courses. 2004 Subspecialty Clinical Practice 2005 Professional Practice 4.

Director, Primary Health Care Research and Evaluation Development Program, Discipline of General Practice, University of Newcastle. 2006 - 2011.

Collaborations
Areas of research interest are vocational training in general practice, psychodermatology, cerebrovascular disease in general practice and medication use in the elderly.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Diploma of Clinical Epidemiology, University of Newcastle
  • Diploma of Practical Dermatology, University of Wales
  • Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery, University of New South Wales
  • Diploma in Paediatrics, Hunter Postgraduate Medical Institute - JHH
  • Master of Family Medicine (Clinical), Monash University
  • Graduate Certificate in GP Psychiatry, University of Melbourne
  • Master of General Practice Psychiatry (Clinical), Monash University

Keywords

  • General Practice
  • Occupational violence
  • Psychdermatology
  • Stroke
  • post-graduate general practice education

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
160599 Policy and Administration not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
13/01/2013 -  Conjoint Professor School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/01/2006 - 1/01/2012 Research Academic University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/01/1999 - 1/01/2006 Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/03/2016 -  Director GP Synergy
NSW & ACT Research Unit
Australia
1/04/2006 - 1/12/2015 Medical Educator Australian General Practice Training program (AGPT)
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Adams J, Magin P, Broom A, Primary Health Care and Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Imperial College Press, London, 256 (2013) [A3]
DOI 10.1142/9781848169784_fmatter
2013 Adams J, Magin P, Broom A, Primary Health Care and Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Imperial College Press, London, 256 (2013) [A3]
DOI 10.1142/9781848169784_fmatter
2012 Adams J, Andrews GJ, Barnes J, Broom A, Magin PJ, Traditional, Complementary and Integrative Medicine: An International Reader, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, Hampshire, 284 (2012) [A3]

Chapter (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Adams J, Magin PJ, Broom A, 'Introduction', Primary Health Care and Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Imperial College Press, London 1-7 (2013) [B2]
2013 Magin PJ, Adams J, 'Complementary and alternative medicine and skin disease in general practice', Primary Health Care and Complementary and Integrative Medicine: Practice and Research, Imperial College Press, New Jersey, NY 51-69 (2013) [B1]
DOI 10.1142/9781848169784_0004
2012 Magin PJ, Adams J, Pond CD, Smith WT, 'Topical and oral complementary and alternative medicine in acne: A consideration of context', Traditional, Complementary and Integrative Medicine: An International Reader, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, Hampshire 63-70 (2012) [B2]
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Wayne Smith
2006 Pond CD, Harris E, Magin PJ, Sutton A, Traynor V, D'Este CA, Goode S, 'Retrenchment and Health Parameters: A Short report', Unemployment and Health: international and interdisciplinary perspectives, Australian Academic Press, Bowen Hills, Queensland 99-108 (2006) [B1]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Dimity Pond
Show 1 more chapter

Journal article (137 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Turnock A, Morgan S, Henderson K, Tapley A, Van Driel M, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Prevalence and associations of general practice nurses' involvement in consultations of general practitioner registrars: A cross-sectional analysis', Australian Health Review, 40 92-99 (2016)

© AHHA 2016.Objective To establish prevalence and associations of general practice nurses' (GPNs) involvement in general practitioner (GP) registrars' consultations. Methods A cr... [more]

© AHHA 2016.Objective To establish prevalence and associations of general practice nurses' (GPNs) involvement in general practitioner (GP) registrars' consultations. Methods A cross-sectional analysis from an ongoing cohort study of registrars' clinical consultations in five Australian states. Registrars recorded detailed data from 60 consecutive consultations per 6-month training term. Problems and diagnoses encountered, including chronic disease classification, were coded using the International Classification of Primary Care, second edition duplication system (ICPC-2plus) classification system. The outcome factor in our analysis was GPN involvement in management of individual problems and diagnoses. Independent variables were a range of patient, registrar, practice, consultation and educational factors. Results We analysed 108759 consultations of 856 registrars including 169307 problems or diagnoses. Of the problems/diagnoses, 5.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) 5.0-5.2) involved a GPN. Follow-up with a GPN was organised for 1.5% (95% CI 1.4-1.5) of all problems/diagnoses. Significant associations of GPN involvement included patient age, male sex, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander status, non-English-speaking background (NESB) and the patient being new to the practice. Larger practice size, the particular training organisation, and the problem/diagnosis being new and not a chronic disease were other associations. Conclusions Associations with Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander status and NESB status suggest GPNs are addressing healthcare needs of these under-serviced groups. But GPNs may be underutilised in chronic disease care. What is known about this topic? GPNs are increasingly involved in team-based care in Australian general practice. The potential positive contribution of GPNs to general practice teams is acknowledged, but the role of the GPN is still being refined. What does this paper add? GPNs contribute to the care of a modest proportion of patients seen by GP registrars. Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander status and NESB of patients are positively associated with being seen by a GPN; chronic disease is negatively associated with being seen by a GPN. There is geographic variability in prevalence of GPN consultations, not explained by other factors. What are the implications for practitioners? Given the match of GPN skills and attributes to the needs of patients with chronic diseases, GPNs currently may be underutilised in chronic disease care in Australian general practice. The marked geographic variation in uptake of GPNs also suggests scope for greater utilisation of GPNs Australia-wide.

DOI 10.1071/AH15010
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Pearlman J, Morgan S, van Driel M, Henderson K, Tapley A, McElduff P, et al., 'Continuity of care in general practice vocational training: prevalence, associations and implications for training.', Educ Prim Care, 27 27-36 (2016)
DOI 10.1080/14739879.2015.1101871
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Magin PJ, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson KM, Holliday EG, Ball J, et al., 'Changes in early-career family physicians' antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infection and acute bronchitis: a multicentre longitudinal study.', Fam Pract, 33 360-367 (2016)
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmw025
Co-authors Liz Holliday
2016 Freed GL, Morgan S, Tapley A, Spike N, Magin P, 'Referral rates of general practice registrars for behavioural or mental health conditions in children', AUSTRALIAN FAMILY PHYSICIAN, 45 139-142 (2016)
2016 Thomson A, Morgan S, O'Mara P, Tapley A, Henderson K, van Driel M, et al., 'The recording of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status in general practice clinical records: a cross-sectional study.', Aust N Z J Public Health, 40 Suppl 1 S70-S74 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12400
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Parkinson L, Moorin R, Peeters G, Byles J, Blyth F, Caughey G, et al., 'Incident osteoarthritis associated with increased allied health services use in 'baby boomer' Australian women.', Aust N Z J Public Health, 40 356-361 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12533
Co-authors L Parkinson, Dimity Pond, Julie Byles
2016 Holliday SM, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson KM, Dunlop AJ, van Driel ML, et al., 'The pattern of anxiolytic and hypnotic management by Australian general practice trainees.', Drug Alcohol Rev, (2016)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12404
Co-authors Adrian Dunlop, Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Bajorek B, Lemay KS, Magin P, Roberts C, Krass I, 'Implementation and evaluation of a pharmacist-led hypertension management service in primary care: Outcomes and methodological challenges', Pharmacy Practice, 14 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Grupo de Investigacion en Atencion Farmaceutica. All rights reserved.Background: Suboptimal utilisation of pharmacotherapy, non-adherence to prescribed treatment, and a l... [more]

© 2016, Grupo de Investigacion en Atencion Farmaceutica. All rights reserved.Background: Suboptimal utilisation of pharmacotherapy, non-adherence to prescribed treatment, and a lack of monitoring all contribute to poor blood (BP) pressure control in patients with hypertension. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of a pharmacist-led hypertension management service in terms of processes, outcomes, and methodological challenges. Method: A prospective, controlled study was undertaken within the Australian primary care setting. Community pharmacists were recruited to one of three study groups: Group A (Control ¿ usual care), Group B (Intervention), or Group C (Short Intervention). Pharmacists in Groups B and C delivered a service comprising screening and monitoring of BP, as well as addressing poor BP control through therapeutic adjustment and adherence strategies. Pharmacists in Group C delivered the shortened version of the service. Results: Significant changes to key outcome measures were observed in Group C: reduction in systolic and diastolic BPs at the 3-month visit (P<0.01 and P<0.01, respectively), improvement in medication adherence scores (P=0.01), and a slight improvement in quality of life (EQ-5D-3L Index) scores (P=0.91). There were no significant changes in Group B (the full intervention), and no differences in comparison to Group A (usual care). Pharmacists fed-back that patient recruitment was a key barrier to service implementation, highlighting the methodological implications of screening. Conclusion: A collaborative, pharmacist-led hypertension management service can help monitor BP, improve medication adherence, and optimise therapy in a step-wise approach. However, blood pressure screening can effect behaviour change in patients, presenting methodological challenges in the evaluation of services in this context.

DOI 10.18549/PharmPract.2016.02.723
2016 Navaratna AF, Walsh A, Magin P, 'More than meets the (painful red) eye', Australian Family Physician, 45 383-384 (2016)
2016 Wearne SM, Morgan S, Magin P, Spike N, Tapley A, Regan C, McArthur L, 'Responding to registrars' in-consultation calls for assistance: Practical implications from the ReCeNT project', Australian Family Physician, 45 446-449 (2016)

© The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners 2016.Background General practice registrars in Australia are expected to identify and address their knowledge or skills ga... [more]

© The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners 2016.Background General practice registrars in Australia are expected to identify and address their knowledge or skills gaps during consultations. The content and frequency of registrars seeking assistance and the factors that influence this have been studied for 84,723 consultations. Term 1 registrars asked their supervisor for help in 11.0% of consultations, but by term 4 this reduced to 1.2% of consultations. Assistance was most often for skin or musculoskeletal conditions, and more often about management than diagnosis. Objective This article discusses the implications of this information for Australian general practice training. Discussion Registrars asked their supervisors for assistance despite having ready access to electronic information. Practices can anticipate supervisor interruptions approximately every tenth registrar consultation. The greater input required by registrars from supervisors earlier in training should be acknowledged by more flexible standards and payments to practices. A priority for general practice supervisor professional development is how to teach the management of complex patients, dermatology and musculoskeletal medicine.

2016 Whiting G, Magin P, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'General practice trainees' clinical experience of dermatology indicates a need for improved education: A cross-sectional analysis from the Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training Study.', Australas J Dermatol, (2016)
DOI 10.1111/ajd.12493
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Bajorek BV, Magin PJ, Hilmer SN, Krass I, 'Optimizing Stroke Prevention in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial of a Computerized Antithrombotic Risk Assessment Tool in Australian General Practice, 2012¿2013', Preventing Chronic Disease, 13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.5888/pcd13.160078
2016 Magin PJ, Morgan S, Tapley A, McCowan C, Parkinson L, Henderson KM, et al., 'Anticholinergic medicines in an older primary care population: a cross-sectional analysis of medicines' levels of anticholinergic activity and clinical indications.', J Clin Pharm Ther, (2016)
DOI 10.1111/jcpt.12413
Co-authors L Parkinson, Dimity Pond
2016 Mate KE, Magin PJ, Brodaty H, Stocks NP, Gunn J, Disler PB, et al., 'An evaluation of the additional benefit of population screening for dementia beyond a passive case-finding approach', International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, (2016)

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Objective: Depression is one of the most common mental health problems in later life. This study aims to identify and explore the variables associat... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Objective: Depression is one of the most common mental health problems in later life. This study aims to identify and explore the variables associated with the presence of depressive symptoms in non-institutionalised individuals aged 50 years and over. Method: A sample of 62 182 participants from Wave 5 (2013) of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe completed the study. Instruments EURO-D and CASP-12 were used. Factor and regression analyses were performed. Results: Symptoms of depression were more common in participants with poorer perception of quality of life (ß = -0.446), poor self-perceived physical health (ß = 0.204), in women (ß = 0.162) and among those who did not engage in social and/or physical activities (ß = -0.007). Conclusion: Poorer self-perceived physical health, female gender, poorer perceived quality of life and not engaging in social and physical activities were predictors of greater depressive symptomatology.

DOI 10.1002/gps.4466
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Karen Mate
2016 Magin PJ, Morgan S, Tapley A, Davis JS, McArthur L, Henderson KM, et al., 'Reducing general practice trainees' antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: an evaluation of a combined face-to-face workshop and online educational intervention.', Educ Prim Care, 27 98-105 (2016)
DOI 10.1080/14739879.2015.1106085
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 White J, Magin P, Attia J, Sturm J, McElduff P, Carter G, 'Predictors of health-related quality of life in community-dwelling stroke survivors: a cohort study.', Fam Pract, 33 382-387 (2016)
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmw011
Co-authors Gregory Carter, John Attia
2016 Dallas A, van Driel M, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson K, Ball J, et al., 'Antibiotic prescribing for sore throat: a cross-sectional analysis of the ReCEnT study exploring the habits of early-career doctors in family practice.', Fam Pract, 33 302-308 (2016)
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmw014
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Bajorek B, Magin PJ, Hilmer S, Krass I, 'Utilization of antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: a cross-sectional baseline analysis in general practice', Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics, 41 432-440 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons LtdWhat is known and objective: Antithrombotics for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) are reportedly underutilised. Since the burden of care ... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons LtdWhat is known and objective: Antithrombotics for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) are reportedly underutilised. Since the burden of care lies within general practice, attention must be paid to identifying and addressing practice gaps in this setting. The objective of this study was to determine the contemporary utilisation of antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in AF within Australian general practice (GP). Methods: Data pertaining to AF patients¿ (aged =65¿years) were collected from GP surgeries in New South Wales, Australia, using purpose-designed data collection forms; extracted data comprised patients¿ medical histories, current pharmacotherapy, and relevant characteristics. Results and Discussion: Data pertaining to 393 patients (mean age 78·0¿±¿7·0¿years) were reviewed. Overall, most (98·5%) patients received antithrombotic therapy. Among the 387 patients using antithrombotics, most (94·1%) received mono-therapy. ¿Warfarin¿±¿antiplatelet¿ was most frequently used (81·7%); 77·5% used ¿warfarin¿ as a monotherapy, followed by ¿dabigatran¿±¿clopidogrel¿ (11·6%), ¿aspirin¿ (5·9%) and ¿clopidogrel¿ alone (0·8%). High stroke risk and low bleeding risk were associated with increased use of ¿warfarin¿±¿antiplatelet¿ therapy. Older patients (=80¿years) were more likely to receive ¿nil therapy¿ (P¿=¿0·04), and less likely to receive dual and triple antithrombotic therapy. Conclusion: We found an encouraging improvement compared to previous studies in the utilisation of antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in AF within general practice. Warfarin is now utilised as the mainstay therapy, followed by aspirin, although the novel oral anticoagulants are entering the spectrum of therapies used. Consideration needs to be given to the potential impact of the newer agents and their scope of use.

DOI 10.1111/jcpt.12409
2016 Thomson A, Morgan S, O'Mara P, Tapley A, Henderson K, Van Driel M, et al., 'Clinical encounters of Australian general practice registrars with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40 S75-S80 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 The Authors.Objective: General practice is central to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care, and this area is a core element of Australian general practice (GP... [more]

© 2015 The Authors.Objective: General practice is central to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care, and this area is a core element of Australian general practice (GP) training. We aimed to describe the prevalence, nature and associations of GP registrar encounters with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis from a cohort study of GP registrars' clinical consultations 2010-2013. Registrars record demographic, clinical and educational details of consecutive patient encounters. Multivariable associations were tested with logistic regression. Results: A total of 592 registrars contributed data from 69,188 consultations. Encounters with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients comprised 1.0% of consultations. Significant positive associations included younger patient age; new patient to the registrar; lower socioeconomic status of practice location; non-urban practice setting; more problems managed; and follow-up arranged. A greater proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients' problems were psychological/social and a lesser proportion were cardiovascular. Consultation duration did not differ between the two groups Conclusions: GP registrars encounter Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients less than do established GPs. Our results suggest possible variability in registrar experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. Implications: Our findings will inform training of a culturally and clinically competent workforce in this area.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12412
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 van Driel ML, Morgan S, Tapley A, McArthur L, McElduff P, Yardley L, et al., 'Changing the Antibiotic Prescribing of general practice registrars: the ChAP study protocol for a prospective controlled study of a multimodal educational intervention.', BMC Fam Pract, 17 67 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12875-016-0470-7
2015 Morgan S, Henderson K, Tapley A, Scott J, van Driel M, Thomson A, et al., 'How we use patient encounter data for reflective learning in family medicine training.', Med Teach, 37 897-900 (2015) [C2]
DOI 10.3109/0142159X.2014.970626
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Thomson A, Morgan S, Tapley A, van Driel M, Henderson K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Prevalence and associations of gender concordance in general practice consultations: a cross-sectional analysis', European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, 3 470-477 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.5750/ejpch.v3i4.1016
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Morgan S, Wearne S, Tapley A, Henderson K, Oldmeadow C, Ball J, et al., 'In-consultation information and advice-seeking by Australian GP trainees from GP trainers - a cross-sectional analysis.', Education for primary care : an official publication of the Association of Course Organisers, National Association of GP Tutors, World Organisation of Family Doctors, 26 155-165 (2015) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Morgan S, Henderson KM, Tapley A, Scott J, Van Driel ML, Spike NA, et al., 'Pathology test-ordering behaviour of Australian general practice trainees: a cross-sectional analysis.', International journal for quality in health care : journal of the International Society for Quality in Health Care / ISQua, 27 528-535 (2015) [C1]
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Bajorek B, Magin P, Hilmer S, Krass I, 'Contemporary approaches to managing Atrial fibrillation: A survey of Australian general practitioners', Australasian Medical Journal, 8 357-367 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Australasian Medical Journal Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.Background Recent attention to the management of atrial fibrillation (AF) and stroke prevention has emphasised t... [more]

© 2015, Australasian Medical Journal Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.Background Recent attention to the management of atrial fibrillation (AF) and stroke prevention has emphasised the need to support the use of existing pharmacotherapy through available services and resources, in preference to using the new, more expensive, novel oral anticoagulants. In this regard, general practitioners (GPs) are at the core of care. Aims To survey Australian GPs regarding their approach to managing AF, particularly in relation to stroke prevention therapy, and to identify the range of services to support patient care. Methods A structured questionnaire, comprising quantitative and qualitative responses, was administered to participating GPs within four geographical regions of NSW (metropolitan, regional, rural areas). Results Fifty GPs (mean age 53.74±9.94 years) participated. Most (98 per cent) GPs regarded themselves as primarily responsible for the management of AF, only referring patients to specialists when needed. However, only 10 per cent of GPs specialised in ¿heart/vascular health¿. Most (76 per cent) GPs offered point-of-care international normalised ratio (INR) testing, with 90 per cent also offering patient support via practice nurses and home visits. Overall, key determinants influencing GPs¿ initiation of antithrombotic therapy were: ¿stroke risk¿/¿CHADS2 score¿, followed by ¿patients¿ adherence/compliance¿. GPs focused more on medication safety considerations and the day-to-day management of therapy than on the risk of bleeding. Conclusion Australian GPs are actively engaged in managing AF, and appear to be well resourced. Importantly, there is a greater focus on the benefits of therapy during decision-making, rather than on the risks. However, medication safety considerations affecting routine management of therapy remain key concerns, with patients¿ adherence to therapy a major determinant in decision-making.

DOI 10.4066/AMJ.2015.2526
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Mate KE, Kerr KP, Pond D, Williams EJ, Marley J, Disler P, et al., 'Impact of Multiple Low-Level Anticholinergic Medications on Anticholinergic Load of Community-Dwelling Elderly With and Without Dementia', Drugs and Aging, 32 159-167 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s40266-014-0230-0
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Karen Kerr, Karen Mate, Dimity Pond
2015 Magin P, Morgan S, Wearne S, Tapley A, Henderson K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'GP trainees' in-consultation information-seeking: associations with human, paper and electronic sources.', Family Practice, 32 525-532 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmv047
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Morgan S, Van Driel M, Coleman J, Magin P, 'Rational test ordering in family medicine', Canadian Family Physician, 61 535-537 (2015) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Morgan S, Henderson KM, Tapley A, Thomson A, Wilson J, Scott J, et al., 'Investigation of fatigue by australian general practice registrars: A cross-sectional study', Journal of Primary Health Care, 7 109-116 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners. All Rights Reserved.INTRODUCTION: Fatigue is the most common undifferentiated problem presenting in general practice. ... [more]

© 2015, Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners. All Rights Reserved.INTRODUCTION: Fatigue is the most common undifferentiated problem presenting in general practice. Previous studies have shown that this presentation leads to multiple investigations. There is no published literature describing the management of patients with fatigue by general practice (GP) registrars. AIM: To document the investigation-ordering behaviour of GP registrars in managing patients with a new diagnosis of unexplained fatigue. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional analysis of data from Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT), an ongoing cohort study of GP registrars¿ consultations. We established the prevalence of new diagnoses of unexplained fatigue and associations with that diagnosis, the rate of test ordering and the number and types of investigations ordered. RESULTS: 644 registrars contributed data from 68 986 encounters. In 0.78% of patient encounters, a new diagnosis of unexplained fatigue was made. Pathology was ordered in 78.4% of these problems (versus 18.1% in non-fatigue problems), at a rate of 488 tests per 100 new fatigue problems. DISCUSSION: Our study suggests that unexplained fatigue elicits a non-rational approach to test ordering by registrars. These findings contribute to the understanding of GP registrar management of fatigue, and undifferentiated presentations more broadly, and suggest educational approaches to improve practice, including dealing with uncertainty.

Citations Scopus - 2
2015 Sales M, Quain D, Lasserson D, Levi C, Oldmeadow C, Jiwa M, et al., 'Quality of referrals and guideline compliance for time to consultation at an acute neurovascular clinic', Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, 24 874-880 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 by National Stroke Association.Background: The Age, Blood pressure, Clinical features, Duration of symptoms, Diabetes (ABCD2) score can be used to predict early recurrent ... [more]

© 2015 by National Stroke Association.Background: The Age, Blood pressure, Clinical features, Duration of symptoms, Diabetes (ABCD2) score can be used to predict early recurrent stroke risk following Transient ischemic attack (TIA). Given that recurrent stroke risk can be as high as 20% in the first week, international guidelines recommend ''high-risk'' TIAs (ABCD2 .3) be seen by specialist services such as dedicated acute neurovascular clinics within 24 hours. The goal of this study was to examine the associations of both quality of referrals to a specialist acute clinic and of "guideline congruence" of time-to-clinic consultation after TIA/minor stroke. We hypothesized highquality referrals containing key clinical elements would be associated with greater guideline congruence. Methods: A retrospective analysis of referrals to an acute neurovascular clinic within a tertiary care hospital of consecutive patients with TIA/minor stroke. Quality of general practitioner and emergency department referrals was defined on the basis of information content enabling ABCD2-based risk stratification by the clinic triage service. Time-to-clinic consultation was used to define "guideline congruence." Results: Referrals of 148 consecutive eligible patients were reviewed. Sixty-six percent of cases were subsequently neurologist-diagnosed as TIA or minor stroke. Seventy-nine percent were referred by general practitioners. Fifty-three percent of referrals were of high quality, but quality was not associated with guideline congruence. Of the high-risk patients, only 3.6% were seen at the clinic within 24 hours of index event and 31.3% within 24 hours of referral. Conclusions: Current guidelines are pathophysiologically logical and evidence based, but are difficult to implement. Improving quality of primary-secondary communication by improved referral quality is unlikely to improve guideline compliance. Alternative strategies are needed to reduce recurrent stroke risk after TIA/minor stroke.

DOI 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2014.12.004
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Chris Levi, Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Magin P, Juratowitch L, Dunbabin J, Mcelduff P, Goode S, Tapley A, Pond D, 'Attitudes to Alzheimer's disease testing of Australian general practice patients: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study', International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, (2015) [C1]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Objective: In view of proposed screening for presymptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD) with advanced imaging, and blood and cerebral spinal fluid ana... [more]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Objective: In view of proposed screening for presymptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD) with advanced imaging, and blood and cerebral spinal fluid analysis, we aimed to establish levels, and associations, of acceptance of AD testing modalities by general practice patients. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of consecutive patients (aged 50years and over) of general practices of an Australian practice-based research network was used. The questionnaire elicited demographic data and attitudes to screening for other diseases and included the screening acceptance domain of the Perceptions Regarding Investigational Screening for Memory in Primary Care (PRISM-PC) instrument. This assesses receptivity to modalities of testing for AD: short questionnaire, blood test, cerebral imaging, and annual physician examination. Reflecting speculation of possible future AD diagnostic methods, an item regarding testing cerebral spinal fluid was also included. Associations of PRISM-PC scores were analyzed with multiple linear regression. Results: Of 489 participants (response rate 87%), 66.2% would like to know if they had AD. Participants were more accepting of testing modalities that were noninvasive or familiar (questionnaire, physician's examination, and blood test) as opposed to cerebral imaging or lumbar puncture. Attitudes to AD testing are influenced by a positive attitude to disease screening in general. Patients with a self-perceived higher risk of AD were less accepting of testing, as were participants with an educational level of junior high school (10 school years) or less. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a majority of patients would like to know if they have AD. Acceptability of testing modalities, however, varies. Noninvasive, familiar methods are more acceptable.

DOI 10.1002/gps.4335
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2015 Magin P, Morgan S, Henderson K, Tapley A, Scott J, Spike N, et al., 'The Registrars' Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) project: Educational and research aspects of documenting general practice trainees' clinical experience', Australian Family Physician, 44 681-684 (2015) [C1]

© The Royal Australian College of General practitioners 2015.Background General practice training in Australia is based on an apprenticeship-like model where most of the learning... [more]

© The Royal Australian College of General practitioners 2015.Background General practice training in Australia is based on an apprenticeship-like model where most of the learning and training occurs in the practice rather than the classroom. However, there is little systematic knowledge of registrars' clinical consultation experiences. Objective The aim of this article is to describe the Registrars' Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) project, an ongoing cohort study of registrars in five of Australia's 17 regional training providers (RTPs), and the educational and research aims and objectives of the project. Discussion In the ReCEnT project, registrar and practice demographics are documented. Once in each of their three general practice terms, registrars then record the patient, consultation and educational aspects of 60 consecutive office-based consultations. From these data, detailed individual feedback reports are produced and are used to prompt registrar reflection on their practice and training program. The collected data are also used for research into registrars' training and practice and as a resource for registrar research training.

Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Tapley A, Magin P, Morgan S, Henderson K, Scott J, Thomson A, et al., 'Test ordering in an evidence free zone: Rates and associations of Australian general practice trainees' Vitamin D test ordering', Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 21 1151-1156 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Rationale, aims and objectives Indiscriminate health screening is increasingly seen as being problematic. In particular, Vitamin D testing rates are... [more]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Rationale, aims and objectives Indiscriminate health screening is increasingly seen as being problematic. In particular, Vitamin D testing rates are increasing rapidly despite recommendations against population screening. The purpose of this study was to determine the level of Vitamin D testing among family practice/general practitioner (GP) trainees and to establish associations of this testing. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of data from the ReCEnT (Registrars Clinical Encounters in Training) cohort study. The setting was GP practices in four Australian states. Data from 60 consecutive consultations per trainee were recorded each 6-month training term (up to four terms). Results Vitamin D tests were ordered in 726 (1.0%) of encounters (n = 69 412). Vitamin D test ordering was significantly associated with patients being older, female and non-English speaking. Trainees were more likely to test if they worked in a completely bulk-billing practice (i.e. a practice without any patient payment), if more problems were dealt with, more pathology tests were ordered in the consultation and if a lipid profile was ordered. They were less likely to test if they sought in-consultation advice or information. The most common reasons for testing were 'check-up' and 'health maintenance'. Conclusions In this first report of associations of Vitamin D testing in the GP setting, we found that non-targeted Vitamin D testing (testing inconsistent with current guidelines) is widespread in GP trainees' practice. Adoption of more rational testing approaches is needed.

DOI 10.1111/jep.12322
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2015 Magin P, Dunbabin J, Goode S, Valderas JM, Levi C, D'Souza M, et al., 'Patients' responses to transient ischaemic attack symptoms: A cross-sectional questionnaire study in Australian general practices', British Journal of General Practice, 65 e24-e31 (2015) [C1]

©British Journal of General PracticeBackground Consensus guidelines for transient ischaemic attack (TIA) recommend urgent investigation and management, but delays in management o... [more]

©British Journal of General PracticeBackground Consensus guidelines for transient ischaemic attack (TIA) recommend urgent investigation and management, but delays in management occur and are attributable to patient and health system factors. Aim To establish general practice patients' anticipated responses to TIA symptoms, and associations of appropriate responses. Design and setting A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study in Australian general practices. Method Consecutive patients attending general practices completed questionnaires that contained the Stroke Action Test (STAT) adapted for TIA about demographic, health system use, and stroke risk factors. STAT elicits appropriate or inappropriate anticipated responses to 28 symptom complexes. Anticipated actions in-hours and out-of-hours were elicited. Associations of independent variables with adapted-STAT scores were tested with multiple linear regression. Results There were 854 participants (response rate 76.9%). Urgent healthcare-seeking responses to transient neurological symptoms ranged from 96.8% for right-sided weakness with dysphasia to 59.1% for sudden dizziness. Associations of higher adapted-STAT scores were older age, Indigenous status, previous after-hours services use, self-perception of health as poor, and familiarity with a stroke public awareness campaign. A personal or family history of stroke, smoking status, and time of event (in-hours/out-of-hours) were not significantly associated with adapted-STAT scores. Conclusion Most general practice attendees expressed intentions to seek health care urgently for most symptoms suggestive of TIA, with highest levels of urgency observed in high stroke-risk scenarios. Intentions were not associated with a number of major risk factors for TIA and might be improved by further educational interventions, either targeted or at population level.

DOI 10.3399/bjgp15X683125
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Chris Levi
2015 Holliday S, Morgan S, Tapley A, Dunlop A, Henderson K, van Driel M, et al., 'The Pattern of Opioid Management by Australian General Practice Trainees', Pain Medicine (United States), 16 1720-1731 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine.Objective: With escalating opioid prescribing come individual and public health harms. To inform quality improvement measures, understand... [more]

© 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine.Objective: With escalating opioid prescribing come individual and public health harms. To inform quality improvement measures, understanding of opioid prescribing is essential. We aimed to establish consultation-level prevalence and associations of opioid prescribing. Design: A cross-sectional secondary analysis from a longitudinal multisite cohort study of general practitioner (GP) vocational trainees: "Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training." Setting: Four of Australia's seventeen GP Regional Training Providers, during 2010-13. Subjects: GP trainees. Methods: Practice and trainee demographic data were collected as well as patient, clinical and educational data of 60 consecutive consultations of each trainee, each training term. Outcome factors were any opioid analgesic prescription and initial opioid analgesic prescription for a specific problem for the first time. Results: Overall, 645 trainees participated. Opioids comprised 4.3% prescriptions provided for 3.8% of patients. Most frequently prescribed were codeine (39.9%) and oxycodone (33.4%). Prescribing was for acute pain (29.3%), palliative care (2.6%) or other indications (68.1%). Most prescribing involved repeat prescriptions for pre-existing problems (62.7% of total). Other associations included older patients; prescriber and patient male gender; Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander status; rural and disadvantaged locations; longer consultations; and generation of referrals, follow-up, and imaging requests. Opioid initiation was more likely for new patients with new problems, but otherwise associations were similar. Trainees rarely reported addiction risk-mitigation strategies. Conclusions: Most opioids were prescribed as maintenance therapy for non-cancer pain. Demographic associations with opioid analgesic prescribing resemble those presenting for opioid dependency treatment. Our findings should inform measures by regulators and medical educators supporting multimodal pain management.

DOI 10.1111/pme.12820
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Adrian Dunlop
2015 Magin P, Goode S, Pond D, 'GPs, medications and older people: A qualitative study of general practitioners' approaches to potentially inappropriate medications in older people', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 34 134-139 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 ACOTA.Aim: To explore the prescribing, and the rationale for this prescribing, of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in older persons by Australian general pract... [more]

© 2014 ACOTA.Aim: To explore the prescribing, and the rationale for this prescribing, of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in older persons by Australian general practitioners (GPs). Methods: This was a qualitative study employing semistructured interviews and thematic analysis. GPs who had patients taking at least one PIM were invited to participate. PIMs were defined by the Beers criteria. Results: Twenty-two GPs from four regions in three Australian states participated. While none were aware of the Beers criteria, participant GPs displayed good knowledge of the potential adverse effects of these medications. They were comfortable with the continued prescription of the medications. This was based on often quite complex harm-benefit considerations of the biopsychosocial contexts of individual patients. Conclusions: The concept of 'appropriate' versus 'inappropriate' medications implicit in classification systems such as the Beers criteria is at odds with complex considerations informing decision-making prescribing PIMs in older persons.

DOI 10.1111/ajag.12150
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2015 Bonevski B, Magin P, Horton G, Bryant J, Randell M, Kimlin MG, 'An internet based approach to improve general practitioners' knowledge and practices: The development and pilot testing of the "ABC's of vitamin D" program', International Journal of Medical Informatics, 84 413-422 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2015.01.006
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Graeme Horton
2015 Jiwa M, Meng X, O'Shea C, Magin P, Dadich A, Pillai V, 'How do general practitioners manage patients with cancer symptoms? A video-vignette study', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C1]

Objectives: Determine how general practitioners (GPs) manage patients with cancer symptoms. Design: GPs reviewed 24 video-vignettes and case notes on patients with cancer symptoms... [more]

Objectives: Determine how general practitioners (GPs) manage patients with cancer symptoms. Design: GPs reviewed 24 video-vignettes and case notes on patients with cancer symptoms and indicated whether they would refer the patient and/or prescribe medication, and/or undertake further investigation. According to available guidelines, all cases warranted a referral to a specialist or further investigations. Setting: Australian primary care sector. Participants: 102 practising GPs participated in this study, including trainees. Interventions: The research was part of a larger randomised controlled trial testing a referral pro forma; however, this paper reports on management decisions made throughout the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures: This paper reports on how the participants would manage the patients depicted in each vignette. Results: In more than one-in-eight cases, the patient was not investigated or referred. Patient management varied significantly by cancer type (p<0.001). For two key reasons, colorectal cancer was the chosen referent category. First, it represents a prevalent type of cancer. Second, in this study, colorectal cancer symptoms were managed in a similar proportion of options-that is, prescription, referral or investigation. Compared with vignettes featuring colorectal cancer participants were less likely to manage breast, bladder, endometrial, and lung cancers with a 'prescription only' or 'referral only' option. They were less likely to manage prostate cancer with a 'prescription only', yet more likely to manage it with a 'referral with investigation'. With regard to pancreatic and cervical cancers, participants were more likely to manage these with a 'referral only' or a 'referral with investigation'. Conclusions: Some patients may receive a delayed cancer diagnosis, even when they present with typical cancer symptoms to a GP who can access relevant diagnostic tests.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008525
2015 Parkinson L, Magin PJ, Thomson A, Byles JE, Caughey GE, Etherton-Beer C, et al., 'Anticholinergic burden in older women: Not seeing the wood for the trees?', Medical Journal of Australia, 202 92-95 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, MJA.All right reserved.Objectives: To identify medicines contributing to and describe predictors of anticholinergic burden among community-dwelling older Australian women... [more]

© 2015, MJA.All right reserved.Objectives: To identify medicines contributing to and describe predictors of anticholinergic burden among community-dwelling older Australian women. Design, setting and participants: Retrospective longitudinal analysis of data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health linked to Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme medicines data from 1 January 2008 to 30 December 2010; for 3694 women born in 1921¿1926. Main outcome measures: Anticholinergic burden calculated from Anticholinergic Drug Scale (ADS) scores derived from ADS levels (0 to 3) for all medicines used by each woman, summed over each 6-month period (semester), medicines commonly used by women with high semester ADS scores (defined as 75th percentile of scores). Results: 1126 women (59.9%) used at least one medicine with anticholinergic properties. The median ADS score was 4 or 5 across all semesters. Most anticholinergic medicines used by women who had a high anticholinergic burden (ADS score, _ 9) had a low anticholinergic potency (ADS level 1). Increasing age, cardiovascular disease, and number of other medicines used were predictive of a higher anticholinergic burden. Conclusions: A high anticholinergic medicines burden in this group was driven by the use of multiple medicines with lower anticholinergic potency rather than the use of medicines with higher potency. This is a novel and important finding for clinical practice as doctors would readily identify the risk of a high anticholinergic burden for patients using high potency medicines, but may be less likely to identify this risk for users of multiple medicines with low anticholinergic potency.

DOI 10.5694/mja14.00336
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors L Parkinson, Dimity Pond, Julie Byles
2015 Dallas A, Magin P, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson K, Ball J, et al., 'Antibiotic prescribing for respiratory infections: a cross-sectional analysis of the ReCEnT study exploring the habits of early-career doctors in primary care.', Family Practice, 32 49-55 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmu069
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2015 Morgan S, Henderson KM, Tapley A, Scott J, Van Driel ML, Spike NA, et al., 'Travel Medicine Encounters of Australian General Practice Trainees - A Cross-Sectional Study', Journal of Travel Medicine, 22 375-382 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.Background Travel medicine is a common and challenging area of clinical practice and practitioners need up-to-date knowledge and e... [more]

© 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.Background Travel medicine is a common and challenging area of clinical practice and practitioners need up-to-date knowledge and experience in a range of areas. Australian general practitioners (GPs) play a significant role in the delivery of travel medicine advice. We aimed to describe the rate and nature of travel medicine consultations, including both the clinical and educational aspects of the consultations. Methods A cross-sectional analysis from an ongoing cohort study of GP trainees' clinical consultations was performed. Trainees contemporaneously recorded demographic, clinical, and educational details of consecutive patient consultations. Proportions of all problems/diagnoses managed in these consultations that were coded "travel-related" and "travel advice" were both calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Associations of a problem/diagnosis being "travel-related" or "travel advice" were tested using simple logistic regression within the generalized estimating equations (GEE) framework. Results A total of 856 trainees contributed data on 169,307 problems from 108,759 consultations (2010-2014). Travel-related and travel advice problems were managed at a rate of 1.1 and 0.5 problems per 100 encounters, respectively. Significant positive associations of travel-related problems were younger trainee and patient age; new patient to the trainee and practice; privately billing, larger, urban, and higher socioeconomic status practices; and involvement of the practice nurse. Trainees sought in-consultation information and generated learning goals in 34.7 and 20.8% of travel advice problems, respectively, significantly more than in non-travel advice problems. Significant positive associations of travel advice problems were seeking in-consultation information, generation of learning goals, longer consultation duration, and more problems managed. Conclusions Our findings reinforce the importance of focused training in travel medicine for GP trainees and adequate exposure to patients in the practice setting. In addition, our findings have implications more broadly for the delivery of travel medicine in general practice.

DOI 10.1111/jtm.12216
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Bajorek BV, Lemay KS, Magin PJ, Roberts C, Krass I, Armour CL, 'Preparing pharmacists to deliver a targeted service in hypertension management: Evaluation of an interprofessional training program', BMC Medical Education, 15 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Bajorek et al.Background: Non-adherence to medicines by patients and suboptimal prescribing by clinicians underpin poor blood pressure (BP) control in hypertension. In thi... [more]

© 2015 Bajorek et al.Background: Non-adherence to medicines by patients and suboptimal prescribing by clinicians underpin poor blood pressure (BP) control in hypertension. In this study, a training program was designed to enable community pharmacists to deliver a service in hypertension management targeting therapeutic adjustments and medication adherence. A comprehensive evaluation of the training program was undertaken. Methods: Tailored training comprising a self-directed pre-work manual, practical workshop (using real patients), and practice scenarios, was developed and delivered by an inter-professional team (pharmacists, GPs). Supported by practical and written assessment, the training focused on the principles of BP management, BP measurement skills, and adherence strategies. Pharmacists' experience of the training (expectations, content, format, relevance) was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. Immediate feedback was obtained via a questionnaire comprising Likert scales (1¿=¿"very well" to 7¿=¿"poor") and open-ended questions. Further in-depth qualitative evaluation was undertaken via semi-structured interviews several months post-training (and post service implementation). Results: Seventeen pharmacists were recruited, trained and assessed as competent. All were highly satisfied with the training; other than the 'amount of information provided' (median score¿=¿5, "just right"), all aspects of training attained the most positive score of '1'. Pharmacists most valued the integrated team-based approach, GP involvement, and inclusion of real patients, as well as the pre-reading manual, BP measurement workshop, and case studies (simulation). Post-implementation the interviews highlighted that comprehensive training increased pharmacists' confidence in providing the service, however, training of other pharmacy staff and patient recruitment strategies were highlighted as a need in future. Conclusions: Structured, multi-modal training involving simulated and inter-professional learning is effective in preparing selected community pharmacists for the implementation of new services in the context of hypertension management. This training could be further enhanced to prepare pharmacists for the challenges encountered in implementing and evaluating services in practice.

DOI 10.1186/s12909-015-0434-y
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 White JH, Patterson K, Jordan L-A, Magin P, Attia J, Sturm JW, 'The experience of urinary incontinence in stroke survivors: A follow-up qualitative study', CANADIAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY-REVUE CANADIENNE D ERGOTHERAPIE, 81 124-134 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0008417414527257
Co-authors John Attia
2014 White J, Dickson A, Magin P, Tapley A, Attia J, Sturm J, Carter G, 'Exploring the experience of psychological morbidity and service access in community dwelling stroke survivors: a follow-up study', DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, 36 1600-1607 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/09638288.2013.859748
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Attia, Gregory Carter
2014 Kerr KP, Mate KE, Magin PJ, Marley J, Stocks NP, Disler P, Pond CD, 'The prevalence of co-prescription of clinically relevant CYP enzyme inhibitor and substrate drugs in community-dwelling elderly Australians', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACY AND THERAPEUTICS, 39 383-389 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jcpt.12163
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Karen Kerr, Dimity Pond, Karen Mate
2014 Wilson J, Morgan S, Magin P, van Driel M, 'Fatigue - a rational approach to investigation', Australian Family Physician, 43 457-461 (2014) [C2]

Background: Fatigue is a common reason for presentation to the general practitioner. There is a wide range of possible diagnoses, some potentially serious, but somatic pathology i... [more]

Background: Fatigue is a common reason for presentation to the general practitioner. There is a wide range of possible diagnoses, some potentially serious, but somatic pathology is uncommon. Presentations of fatigue lead to high rates of test ordering, but abnormal results leading to significant diagnoses are uncommon. A number of guidelines for the assessment and investigation of fatigue have been developed, including in Australia. Objective: The objective of this article is to outline a rational approach to the investigation of fatigue, informed by the international literature and recently published Australian guidelines. Discussion: On the basis of current literature, we recommend the following practical approach to the patient presenting with fatigue: a comprehensive history and examination, consideration of a period of watchful waiting in the absence of red flags and judicious use of tests once the decision to investigate is made.

2014 Jiwa M, Meng X, O'Shea C, Magin P, Dadich A, Pillai V, 'Impact of referral letters on scheduling of hospital appointments: A randomised control trial', British Journal of General Practice, 64 (2014) [C1]

Background: Communication is essential for triage, but intervention trials to improve it are scarce. Referral Writer (RW), a referral letter software program, enables documentatio... [more]

Background: Communication is essential for triage, but intervention trials to improve it are scarce. Referral Writer (RW), a referral letter software program, enables documentation of clinical data and extracts relevant patient details from clinical software. Aim: To evaluate whether specialists are more confident about scheduling appointments when they receive more information in referral letters. Design and setting: Single-blind, parallel-groups, controlled design with a 1:1 randomisation. Australian GPs watched video vignettes virtually. Method: GPs wrote referral letters after watching vignettes of patients with cancer symptoms. Letter content was scored against a benchmark. The proportions of referral letters triagable by a specialist with confidence, and in which the specialist was confident the patient had potentially life-limiting pathology were determined. Categorical outcomes were tested with ¿2 and continuous outcomes with t-tests. A random-effects logistic model assessed the influence of group randomisation (RW versus control), GP demographics, clinical specialty, and specialist referral assessor on specialist confidence in the information provided. Results: The intervention (RW) group referred more patients and scored significantly higher on information relayed (mean difference 21.6 [95% confidence intervals {CI} = 20.1 to 23.2]). There was no difference in the proportion of letters for which specialists were confident they had sufficient information for appointment scheduling (RW 77.7% versus control 80.6%, P = 0.16). In the logistic model, limited agreement among specialists contributed substantially to the observed differences in appointment scheduling (P = 35% [95% CI 16% to 59%]). Conclusion: In isolation, referral letter templates are unlikely to improve the scheduling of specialist appointments, even when more information is relayed. ©British Journal of General Practice.

DOI 10.3399/bjgp14X680509
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014 White JH, Attia J, Sturm J, Carter G, Magin P, 'Predictors of depression and anxiety in community dwelling stroke survivors: A cohort study', Disability and Rehabilitation, 36 1975-1982 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Informa UK Ltd.Purpose: Few longitudinal studies explore post-stroke patterns of psychological morbidity and factors contributing to their change over time. We aimed to ex... [more]

© 2014 Informa UK Ltd.Purpose: Few longitudinal studies explore post-stroke patterns of psychological morbidity and factors contributing to their change over time. We aimed to explore predictors of post-stroke depression (PSD) and post-stroke anxiety over a 12-month period. Methods: A prospective cohort study. Consecutively recruited stroke patients (n=134) participated in face-to-face interviews at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Primary outcome measures were depression and anxiety (measured via Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Independent variables included disability (Modified Rankin Scale), Quality-of-life (Assessment Quality-of-life), social support (Multi-dimensional Scale Perceived Social Support) and community participation (Adelaide Activities Profile (AAP)). Secondary outcomes were predictors of resolution and development of PSD and anxiety. Results: Anxiety (47%) was more common than depression (22%) at baseline. Anxiety (but not depression) scores improved over time. Anxiety post-stroke was positively associated with baseline PSD (p<0.0001), baseline anxiety (p<0.0001) and less disability (p=0.042). PSD was associated with baseline anxiety (p<0.0001), baseline depression (p=0.0057), low social support (p=0.0161) and low community participation (p<0.0001). The only baseline factor predicting the resolution of PSD (if depressed at baseline) was increased social support (p=0.0421). Factors that predicted the onset of depression (if not depressed at baseline) were low community participation (p=0.0015) and higher disability (p=0.0057). Conclusion: While more common than depression immediately post-stroke, anxiety attenuates while the burden of depression persists over 12 months. Clinical programs should assess anxiety and depression, provide treatment pathways for those identified, and address modifiable risk factors, especially social support and social engagement.Implications for RehabilitationPsychological distress post stroke is persisting.Multi-disciplinary teams that establish goals with patients promoting social and community engagement could assist in managing psychological morbidity.A shift towards promoting longer-term monitoring and management of stroke survivors must be undertaken, and should consider the factors that support and hinder psychological morbidity.

DOI 10.3109/09638288.2014.884172
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Attia, Gregory Carter
2014 Dabson AM, Magin PJ, Heading G, Pond D, 'Medical students' experiences learning intimate physical examination skills: A qualitative study', Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, 39-39 (2014) [C1]

Background: Intimate physical examination skills are essential skills for any medical graduate to have mastered to an appropriate level for the safety of his or her future patient... [more]

Background: Intimate physical examination skills are essential skills for any medical graduate to have mastered to an appropriate level for the safety of his or her future patients. Medical schools are entrusted with the complex task of teaching and assessing these skills for their students. The objectives of this study were to explore a range of medical students' experiences of learning intimate physical examination skills and to explore their perceptions of factors which impede or promote the learning of these skills. Methods: Individual semi-structured interviews (N = 16) were conducted with medical students in years two to five from the University of Newcastle, as part of a larger research project investigating how medical students develop their attitudes to gender and health. This was a self-selected sample of the entire cohort who were all invited to participate. A thematic analysis of the transcribed data was performed. Results: Students reported differing levels of discomfort with their learning experiences in the area of intimate physical examination and differing beliefs about the helpfulness of these experiences. The factors associated with levels of discomfort and the helpfulness of the experience for learning were: satisfaction with teaching techniques, dealing with an uncomfortable situation and perceived individual characteristics in both the patients and the students. The examination causing the greatest reported discomfort was the female pelvic examination by male students. Conclusions: Student discomfort with the experience of learning intimate physical examination skills may be common and has ongoing repercussions for students and patients. Recommendations are made of ways to modify teaching technique to more closely match students' perceived needs.

DOI 10.1186/1472-6920-14-39
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2014 Magin P, Morgan S, Henderson K, Tapley A, McElduff P, Pearlman J, et al., 'Family medicine trainees' clinical experience of chronic disease during training: a cross-sectional analysis from the registrars' clinical encounters in training study', BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12909-014-0260-7
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5
2014 Bajorek B, Magin P, Hilmer S, Krass I, 'A cluster-randomized controlled trial of a computerized antithrombotic risk assessment tool to optimize stroke prevention in general practice: a study protocol', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 14 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-14-55
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2014 Morgan S, Henderson K, Tapley A, Scott J, Thomson A, Spike N, et al., 'Problems managed by Australian general practice trainees: Results from the ReCEnT (Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training) study', Education for Primary Care, 25 140-148 (2014) [C1]

Background: Previous studies have found that general practitioner (GP) trainees (registrars) see a different spectrum of clinical problems compared to trainers, including less chr... [more]

Background: Previous studies have found that general practitioner (GP) trainees (registrars) see a different spectrum of clinical problems compared to trainers, including less chronic disease and more acute minor illness. Our aim was to describe the case mix of first-term Australian GP trainees. Methods: This was a cross-sectional analysis of trainee consultations. Descriptive analyses were used to report patient demographics and the number and type of problems managed. Results: Two-hundred-and-three trainees provided data on 36 182 consultations and 55 740 problems. Overall, 60.7% of patients seen were female and 56.2% were new to the trainee. Trainees managed a mean of 154.1 problems per 100 encounters. Problems managed most commonly were respiratory (23.9 per 100 encounters), general/unspecified (21.8) and skin (16.4). New problems comprised 51.5% of the total, and 22.4% of problems were chronic diseases. Conclusion: Trainees gain reasonably broad exposure overall in terms of patient demographics and problems managed. In comparison to established GPs, trainees managed the same mean number of problems, but the nature of problems managed was different, with more new patients, more new problems and less chronic disease. Our findings have significant implications for GP training in Australia. © 2014 Radcliffe Publishing Limited.

Citations Scopus - 6
2014 Dallas A, Van Driel M, Van De Mortel T, Magin P, 'Antibiotic prescribing for the future: Exploring the attitudes of trainees in general practice', British Journal of General Practice, 64 e561-e567 (2014) [C1]

© British Journal of General Practice.Background Antibiotic resistance is a public health concern worldwide. A high proportion of antibiotics are prescribed in primary care, ofte... [more]

© British Journal of General Practice.Background Antibiotic resistance is a public health concern worldwide. A high proportion of antibiotics are prescribed in primary care, often for conditions where there is no evidence of benefit. Without a change in these prescribing patterns, resistance will persist as a significant problem in the future. Little is known about how trainees in general practice perceive and develop their prescribing. Aim To explore the attitudes of trainees in general practice towards antibiotic use and resistance, and the perceived influences on their prescribing. Design and setting A qualitative study of 17 vocational trainees in general practice (GP registrars) in both rural and urban areas in Australia employing semistructured interviews and a focus group. Method Maximum variation purposive sampling of GP registrars from diverse backgrounds and training stages continued until thematic saturation was achieved. Topics of discussion included awareness of antibiotic resistance, use of evidence-based guidelines, and perceived influences on prescribing. Transcribed interviews were coded independently by two researchers. Data collection and analysis were concurrent and cumulative, using a process of iterative thematic analysis. Results Registrars were aware of the importance of evidence-based antibiotic prescribing and the impact of their decisions on resistance. Many expressed a sense of dissonance between their knowledge and behaviours. Contextual influences on their decisions included patient and system factors, diagnostic uncertainty, transitioning from hospital medicine, and the habits of, and relationship with, their supervisor. Conclusion Understanding how trainees in general practice perceive and develop antibiotic prescribing habits will enable targeted educational interventions to be designed and implemented at a crucial stage in training, working towards ensuring appropriate antibiotic prescribing in the future.

DOI 10.3399/bjgp14X681373
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2014 Thomson A, Morgan S, Henderson K, Tapley A, Spike N, Scott J, et al., 'Testing and screening for chlamydia in general practice: a cross-sectional analysis.', Aust N Z J Public Health, 38 542-547 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12261
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Jiwa M, Nichols P, Magin P, Pagey G, Meng X, Parsons R, Pillai V, 'Management of behavioural change in patients presenting with a diagnosis of dementia: A video vignette study with Australian general practitioners', BMJ Open, 4 (2014) [C1]

© 2014, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.Objective: To test the impact of feedback on the proposed management of standardised patients presenting with behavioural change... [more]

© 2014, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.Objective: To test the impact of feedback on the proposed management of standardised patients presenting with behavioural change with a diagnosis of dementia in Australian primary care. Materials and methods: A video vignette study was performed with Australian general practitioners (GPs) in 2013. Participants viewed six pairs of matched videos depicting people presenting changed behaviour in the context of a dementia diagnosis in two phases. In both phases GPs indicated their diagnosis and management. After phase 1, GPs were offered feedback on management strategies for the patients depicted. Analyses focused on identification of change in management between the two phases of the study. Factors impacting on the intention to coordinate care for such patients were tested in a questionnaire based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Results: Forty-five GPs completed the study. There was significant improvement in the proposed management of three of the six scenarios after the intervention. Older GPs were more likely to refer appropriately (OR=1.11 (1.01 to 1.23), p=0.04.). Overall referral to support agencies was more likely after the intervention (OR=2.52 (1.53 to 4.14), p<0.001). Older GPs were less likely to intend to coordinate care for such patients (OR=0.89 (0.81 to 0.98) p=0.02). Participants who felt confident about their ability to coordinate care were more likely to do so (OR=3.79 (1.08 to 13.32) p=0.04). Conclusions: The intervention described in this study promoted multidisciplinary management of patients with behavioural problems with a diagnosis of dementia. Increasing practitioner confidence in their ability to coordinate care may increase the proportion of GPs who will respond to patients and carers in this context. Older GPs may benefit in particular.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006054
2014 Jiwa M, Meng X, O'Shea C, Magin P, Dadich A, Pillai V, 'A randomised trial deploying a simulation to investigate the impact of hospital discharge letters on patient care in general practice.', BMJ Open, 4 e005475 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005475
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Clarey J, Lasserson D, Levi C, Parsons M, Dewey H, Barber PA, et al., 'Absolute cardiovascular risk and GP decision making in TIA and minor stroke.', Fam Pract, 31 664-669 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmu054
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Chris Levi
2013 McCowan C, Magin P, Clark SA, Guthrie B, 'An observational study of psychotropic drug use and initiation in older patients resident in their own home or in care', AGE AND AGEING, 42 51-56 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ageing/afs117
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2013 Magin P, Victoire A, Zhen XM, Furler J, Pirotta M, Lasserson DS, et al., 'Under-Reporting of Socioeconomic Status of Patients in Stroke Trials Adherence to Consort Principles', STROKE, 44 2920-2922 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.113.002414
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Chris Levi
2013 Magin P, Holliday S, Dunlop A, Ewald B, Dunbabin J, Henry J, et al., 'Discomfort sharing the general practice waiting room with mentally ill patients: a cross-sectional study', FAMILY PRACTICE, 30 190-196 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cms058
Co-authors Adrian Dunlop, Ben Ewald
2013 Farrell E, Magin P, Pirotta M, van Driel ML, 'Training in critical thinking and research An audit of delivery by regional training providers in Australia', Australian Family Physician, 42 221-224 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2013 Magin P, 'Appearance-related bullying and skin disorders', Clinics in Dermatology, 31 67-71 (2013) [C1]

Bullying encompasses verbal aggression, physical aggression, and social exclusion. It involves "harm-doing" that is carried out repeatedly, over time, and within a relationship, i... [more]

Bullying encompasses verbal aggression, physical aggression, and social exclusion. It involves "harm-doing" that is carried out repeatedly, over time, and within a relationship, involving a power imbalance between the bully and the bullied. Being bullied may have considerable adverse sequelae, including psychologic or psychiatric harm. Much bullying is appearance-related, and it would be surprising if some individuals with skin disease were not bullied given the high visibility of skin diseases. The limited evidence available does suggest that individuals with skin disease, particularly those with acne, psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis, are often bullied, which can adversely affect them psychologically. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2011.11.009
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2013 Pond CD, Mate KE, Phillips J, Stocks NP, Magin PJ, Weaver N, Brodaty H, 'Predictors of agreement between general practitioner detection of dementia and the revised Cambridge Cognitive Assessment (CAMCOG-R)', INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOGERIATRICS, 25 1639-1647 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1041610213000884
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Natasha Weaver, Karen Mate
2013 Cameron HE, Boreland FT, Morris JR, Lyle DM, Perkins DA, Magin PJ, et al., 'New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory Researcher Development Program 2005-07: modest investment, considerable outcomes', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 19 59-67 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Helen Cameron
2013 Holliday S, Magin P, Oldmeadow C, Attia J, Dunbabin J, Henry J, et al., 'An examination of the influences on New South Wales general practitioners regarding the provision of opioid substitution therapy', Drug and Alcohol Review, 32 495-503 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/dar.12046
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow, Adrian Dunlop
2013 Holliday S, Magin P, Dunbabin J, Oldmeadow C, Henry J-M, Lintzeris N, et al., 'An Evaluation of the Prescription of Opioids for Chronic Nonmalignant Pain by Australian General Practitioners', PAIN MEDICINE, 14 62-74 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1526-4637.2012.01527.x
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Adrian Dunlop, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Attia
2013 Magin P, Lasserson D, Parsons M, Spratt N, Evans M, Russell M, et al., 'Referral and triage of patients with transient ischemic attacks to an acute access clinic: Risk stratification in an Australian setting', International Journal of Stroke, 8 81-89 (2013) [C1]

Background: Transient ischemic attacks and minor stroke entail considerable risk of completed stroke but this risk is reduced by prompt assessment and treatment. Risk can be strat... [more]

Background: Transient ischemic attacks and minor stroke entail considerable risk of completed stroke but this risk is reduced by prompt assessment and treatment. Risk can be stratified according to the ABCD2 prediction score. Current guidelines suggest specialist assessment and treatment within 24h for high-risk event (ABCD2 score 4-7) and seven-days for low-risk event (ABCD2 score =3). Aims: The study aims to establish paths to care and outcomes for patients referred by general practitioners and emergency departments to an Australian acute access transient ischemic attack service. Methods: This is a prospective audit. Primary outcomes were time from event to referral, from referral to clinic appointment, and from event to appointment. ABCD2 score was calculated for each event. Time from event was modeled using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: There were 231 clinic attendees (general practitioner: 127; emergency department: 104). Mean time from event to referral was 9·2 days (SD 23·7, median 2), from referral to being seen in the clinic was 13·6 days (SD 19·0, median 7), and from event to being seen in the clinic was 17·2 days (SD 27·1, median 10). Of low-risk patients, 38·5% were seen within seven-days of event. Of high-risk patients, 36·7% were seen within one-day. ABCD2 score was not a significant predictor of any time interval from event to clinic attendance. There were no completed strokes prior to clinic attendance. Conclusions: Times from event to clinic assessment were in excess of current recommendations and risk stratification was suboptimal, though short-term outcomes were good. Improvements in referral mechanisms may enhance risk-stratification and triage. © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

DOI 10.1111/ijs.12014
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Neil Spratt, Chris Levi
2012 Kreijkamp-Kaspers S, Bell-Syer Sally EM, Magin PJ, Bell-Syer Sophie V, Van Driel Mieke L, 'Oral antifungal medication for toenail onychomycosis', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 8 (2012) [C3]
2012 Bonevski B, Girgis A, Magin PJ, Horton GL, Brozek I, Armstrong B, 'Prescribing sunshine: A cross-sectional survey of 500 Australian general practitioners' practices and attitudes about vitamin D', International Journal of Cancer, 130 2138-2145 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Graeme Horton, Billie Bonevski
2012 Holliday SM, Magin PJ, Dunbabin JS, Ewald BD, Henry J-M, Goode SM, et al., 'Waiting room ambience and provision of opioid substitution therapy in general practice', Medical Journal of Australia, 196 391-394 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ben Ewald, Adrian Dunlop
2012 Freed GL, Spike N, Magin PJ, Morgan S, Fitzgerald MN, Brooks P, 'The paediatric clinical experiences of general practice registrars', Australian Family Physician, 41 529-533 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2012 Joyce T, Higgins IJ, Magin PJ, Goode SM, Pond CD, Stone TE, et al., 'The experiences of nurses with mental health problems: Colleagues' perspectives', Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, 26 324-332 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Teresa Stone, Dimity Pond, Isabel Higgins
2012 Magin PJ, Pond CD, Smith WT, Goode SM, Paterson NE, 'Reliability of skin-type self-assessment: Agreement of adolescents' repeated Fitzpatrick skin phototype classification ratings during a cohort study', Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 26 1396-1399 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Wayne Smith
2012 White JH, Gray KR, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter G, Pollack M, 'Exploring the experience of post-stroke fatigue in community dwelling stroke survivors: A prospective qualitative study', Disability and Rehabilitation, 34 1376-1384 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Gregory Carter, John Attia
2012 White JH, Miller B, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Pollack M, 'Access and participation in the community: A prospective qualitative study of driving post-stroke', Disability and Rehabilitation, 34 831-838 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
Co-authors John Attia
2012 Mate KE, Pond CD, Magin PJ, Goode SM, McElduff P, Stocks NP, 'Diagnosis and disclosure of a memory problem is associated with quality of life in community based older Australians with dementia', International Psychogeriatrics, 24 1962-1971 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Karen Mate
2012 Pond CD, Brodaty H, Stocks NP, Gunn J, Marley JE, Disler P, et al., 'Ageing in general practice (AGP) trial: A cluster randomised trial to examine the effectiveness of peer education on GP diagnostic assessment and management of dementia', BMC Family Practice, 13 1-9 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Graeme Horton, Karen Mate, Dimity Pond
2012 Morgan S, Magin PJ, Henderson KM, Goode SM, Scott J, Bowe SJ, et al., 'Study protocol: The registrar clinical encounters in training (ReCEnT) study', BMC Family Practice, 13 50 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
2012 Furler J, Magin PJ, Pirotta M, Van Driel M, 'Participant demographics reported in 'Table 1' of randomised controlled trials: A case of 'inverse evidence'?', International Journal for Equity in Health, 11 1-4 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2012 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter GL, Pollack M, 'Trajectories of psychological distress after stroke', Annals of Family Medicine, 10 435-442 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Gregory Carter, John Attia
2011 Magin PJ, Pond CD, Smith WT, Watson AB, Goode SM, 'Correlation and agreement of self-assessed and objective skin disease severity in a cross-sectional study of patients with acne, psoriasis, and atopic eczema', International Journal of Dermatology, 50 1486-1490 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-4632.2011.04883.x
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Wayne Smith, Dimity Pond
2011 Magin PJ, Marshall MJ, Goode SM, Cotter GL, Pond CD, Zwar NA, 'How generalisable are results of studies conducted in practice-based research networks? A cross-sectional study of general practitioner demographics in two New South Wales networks', Medical Journal of Australia, 195 210-213 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2011 Bayley SA, Magin PJ, Sweatman JM, Regan CM, 'Effects of compulsory rural vocational training for Australian general practitioners: a qualitative study', Australian Health Review, 35 81-85 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/AH09853
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2011 Magin PJ, May J, McElduff P, Goode SM, Adams J, Cotter GL, 'Occupational violence in general practice: A whole-of-practice problem. Results of a cross-sectional study', Australian Health Review, 35 75-80 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/ah10874
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Jenny May
2011 Bonevski B, Magin PJ, Horton GL, Foster M, Girgis A, 'Response rates in GP surveys: Trialling two recruitment strategies', Australian Family Physician, 40 427-430 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 43
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Graeme Horton
2011 Sylvester S, Magin PJ, Sweeney KP, Morgan S, Henderson K, 'Procedural skills in general practice vocational training: What should be taught?', Australian Family Physician, 40 50-54 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2011 Jiwa M, Ping-Delfos WCS, Ross J, Shaw T, Magin PJ, 'Communities of practice: Quality improvement or research in general practice', Australian Family Physician, 40 72-75 (2011) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2011 Magin PJ, Adams J, 'Occupational violence', Australian Family Physician, 40 893 (2011) [C3]
2011 Joyce TA, Higgins IJ, Magin PJ, Goode SM, Pond CD, Stone TE, et al., 'Nurses' perceptions of a mental health education programme for Australian nurses', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 20 247-252 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00737.x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Isabel Higgins, Teresa Stone, Dimity Pond
2011 Magin PJ, Adams J, Heading G, Pond CD, ''Perfect skin', the media and patients with skin disease: A qualitative study of patients with acne, psoriasis and atopic eczema', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 17 181-185 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/PY10047
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2010 Stone L, Valentine N, Farrell E, Magin P, Pirotta M, 'Academic support', Australian Doctor, 23 (2010)
2010 Magin PJ, Loiselle A, 'The GP's role in acute stroke management', Medicine Today, 11 8-15 (2010) [C1]
2010 Pond CD, Brodaty H, Gunn J, Stocks N, Disler P, Mate KE, et al., 'GP identification of dementia: effect of gender, age and size of practice', Alzheimer's & Dementia, 6 S364-S365 (2010) [C3]
Co-authors Karen Mate, Dimity Pond
2010 Magin PJ, Pirotta M, Farrell E, Van Driel M, 'General practice research: Training and capacity building', Australian Family Physician, 39 265 (2010) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2010 Sweeney KP, Magin PJ, Pond CD, 'Patient attitudes: Training students in general practice', Australian Family Physician, 39 676-682 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2010 Magin PJ, Joyce TA, Adams J, Goode SM, Cotter GL, 'General practice as a fortress: Occupational violence and general practice receptionists', Australian Family Physician, 39 854-856 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2010 Magin PJ, Pond CD, Smith WT, Goode SM, 'Acne's relationship with psychiatric and psychological morbidity: Results of a school-based cohort study of adolescents', Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 24 58-64 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1468-3083.2009.03354.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Wayne Smith, Dimity Pond
2010 Magin PJ, Sullivan J, 'Suicide attempts in people taking isotretinoin for acne', British Medical Journal, 341 1060-1061 (2010) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
2010 Magin PJ, Bayley S, Sweatman J, Regan CM, 'GP rural registrars' experiences of occupational violence: A qualitative study', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 18 249-250 (2010) [C2]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2010.01162.x
Citations Web of Science - 1
2010 Magin PJ, Heading G, Adams J, Pond CD, 'Sex and the skin: A qualitative study of patients with acne, psoriasis and atopic eczema', Psychology, Health and Medicine, 15 454-462 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13548506.2010.484463
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2009 Magin PJ, Sibbritt DW, Bailey KA, 'The relationship between psychiatric illnesses and skin disease: A longitudinal analysis of young Australian women', Archives of Dermatology, 145 896-902 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1001/archdermatol.2009.155
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
2009 White JH, Magin PJ, Pollack MR, 'Stroke patients' experience with the Australian health system: A qualitative study', Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 76 81-89 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2009 Magin PJ, Adams J, Heading GS, Pond CD, 'Patients with skin disease and their relationships with their doctors: A qualitative study of patients with acne, psoriasis and eczema', Medical Journal of Australia, 190 62-64 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2009 Richards CE, Magin PJ, Callister R, 'Is your prescription of distance running shoes evidence-based?', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 43 159-162 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bjsm.2008.046680
Citations Scopus - 73Web of Science - 53
Co-authors Robin Callister
2009 Magin PJ, Joyce TA, Adams J, Goode SM, Cotter GL, 'Receptionists' experiences of occupational violence in general practice: A qualitative study', British Journal of General Practice, 59 578-583 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.3399/bjgp09x453783
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2009 Magin PJ, Adams J, Heading G, Pond CD, Smith WT, 'The psychological sequelae of psoriasis: Results of a qualitative study', Psychology, Health and Medicine, 14 150-161 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13548500802512294
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Wayne Smith
2008 Magin PJ, Adams J, Joy E, Ireland M, Heaney SE, Darab SK, 'General practitioners' assessment of risk of violence in their practice: results from a qualitative study', Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 14 385-390 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2753.2007.00874.x
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
2008 Magin PJ, Adams J, Sibbritt DW, Joy E, Ireland M, 'Effects of occupational violence on Australian general practitioners' provision of home visits and after-hours care: a cross-sectional study', Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 14 336-342 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2753.2007.00864.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2008 Furler J, Cleland J, Del Mar C, Hanratty B, Kadam U, Lasserson D, et al., 'Leaders, leadership and future primary care clinical research', BMC Family Practice, 9 1-6 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-9-52
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2008 White JH, Mackenzie LA, Magin PJ, Pollack MR, 'The occupational experience of stroke survivors in a community setting', OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 28 160-167 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.3928/15394492-20080901-05
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
2008 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Pollack MR, Sturm J, Levi CR, 'Exploring poststroke mood changes in community-dwelling stroke survivors: A qualitative study', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 89 1701-1707 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2007.12.048
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Chris Levi, John Attia
2008 Magin PJ, Adams J, Joy E, Ireland M, Heaney SE, Darab S, 'Violence in general practice: Perceptions of cause and implications for safety', Canadian Family Physician, 54 1278-1284 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
2008 Magin PJ, Furler JS, Van DML, 'The Brisbane International Initiative: fostering leadership and international collaboration in primary care research', Medical Journal of Australia, 189 100-102 (2008) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2008 May JA, Cooper RJ, Magin PJ, Critchley A, 'Integrated models or mayhem? Lessons learnt from three integrated primary health care entities in regional New South Wales', Australian Health Review, 32 595-604 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/AH080595
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jenny May
2008 Magin PJ, Adams J, Heading G, Pond CD, Smith WT, 'Experiences of appearance-related teasing and bullying in skin diseases and their psychological sequelae: Results of a qualitative study', Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 22 430-436 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2007.00547.x
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Wayne Smith, Dimity Pond
2008 Van Driel ML, Magin PJ, Del Mar CB, 'Journal impact factor and its importance for AFP', Australian Family Physician, 37 770-773 (2008) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 6
2008 Dwan KM, Magin PJ, 'The desire for research in general practice', Australian Family Physician, 37 871-873 (2008) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 2
2008 Magin PJ, Pond CD, Smith WT, Watson AB, Goode SM, 'A cross-sectional study of psychological morbidity in patients with acne, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis in specialist dermatology and general practices', Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 22 1435-1444 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1468-3083.2008.02890.x
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Wayne Smith, Dimity Pond
2007 Rumsey S, Hokin B, Magin PJ, Pond CD, 'Macrocytosis: An Australian general practice perspective', Australian Family Physician, 36 571-572 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2007 Magin PJ, Adams J, Joy E, 'Occupational violence in general practice', Australian Family Physician, 36 955-957 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2007 Horton GL, Magin PJ, 'Healthy patients, healthy plant: Green recommendations for GP health promotion', Australian Family Physician, 36 1006-1008 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Graeme Horton
2007 Magin PJ, Adams J, 'Complementary and alternative medicines: Use in skin diseases', Expert Review of Dermatology, 41-49 (2007) [C1]
2006 Magin PJ, Pond CD, Baines SK, Goode SM, 'Hyperlipidaemia: a pilot of a multidisciplinary intervention in general practice', Asia Pacific Family Medicine, 5 online (2006) [C1]
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Surinder Baines
2006 Magin PJ, Adams J, Ireland M, Joy E, Heaney SE, Darab S, 'The response of general practitioners to the threat of violence in their practices: results from a qualitative study', Family Practice, 23 273-278 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmi119
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 24
2006 Magin PJ, Adams J, Pond CD, Smith WT, 'Topical and oral CAM in acne: A review of the empirical evidence and a consideration of its context', Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 14 62-76 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ctim.2005.10.007
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Wayne Smith, Dimity Pond
2006 Magin PJ, Adams J, Heading GS, Pond CD, Smith WT, 'Complementary and alternative medicine therapies in acne, psoriasis, and atopic eczema: results of a qualitative study of patients' experiences and perceptions', Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 12 451-457 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1089/acm.2006.12.451
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Wayne Smith, Dimity Pond
2006 Magin PJ, Adams J, Heading G, Pond CD, Smith WT, 'The causes of acne: a qualitative study of patient perceptions of acne causation and their implications for acne care', Dermatology Nursing, 18 344-349, 370 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors Wayne Smith, Dimity Pond
2006 Magin PJ, Adams J, Heading G, Pond CD, Smith WT, 'Psychological sequelae of acne vulgaris: Results of a qualitative study', Canadian Family Physician, 52 978-979 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 54
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Wayne Smith
2005 Magin PJ, Adams J, Sibbritt DW, Joy E, Ireland M, 'Experiences of occupational violence in Australian urban general practice: A cross-sectional study of GPs', Medical Journal of Australia, 183 352-356 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 52Web of Science - 46
2005 Magin PJ, Adams J, Ireland M, Heaney S, Darab S, 'After hours care: A qualitative study of GPs' perceptions of risk of violence and effect on service provision', Australian Family Physician, 34 91-92 (2005)

Background: Workplace violence in general practice has been found to be an important problem in the United Kingdom. No research has been undertaken in this area in Australian urba... [more]

Background: Workplace violence in general practice has been found to be an important problem in the United Kingdom. No research has been undertaken in this area in Australian urban practice. Method: Four focus groups involved 18 urban general practitioners and over 9 hours of taped responses were transcribed. The transcripts were coded and subjected to thematic analysis. Results: General practitioners expressed a wide range of risks relating to the provision of after hours care. This makes them apprehensive about participating in it. Those who had experienced violence, or perceived its risk, had limited their participation in after hours care; sometimes completely. Discussion: Structures may be needed to support provision of after hours general practice services.

Citations Scopus - 17
2005 Magin PJ, Adams J, Heading GS, Pond CD, Smith WT, 'Patients' perceptions of isotretinoin, depression and suicide--a qualitative study', Australian Family Physician, 34 795-797 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Wayne Smith
2005 Magin PJ, Adams J, Ireland M, Heaney SE, Darab SK, 'After hours care: a qualitative study of gp's perceptions of risk of violence and effect on service provision', Australian Family Physician, 34 91-92 (2005) [C1]
2005 Magin PJ, Pond CD, Smith WT, Watson A, 'A systematic review of the evidence for 'myths and misconceptions' in acne management: diet face-washing and sunlight', Family Practice, 22 62-70 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmh715
Citations Scopus - 52Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Wayne Smith, Dimity Pond
2005 Magin PJ, Pond CD, Smith WT, 'Isotretinoin, depression and suicide: a review of the evidence', British Journal of General Practice, 55 134-138 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Wayne Smith
2005 Magin PJ, Shah NC, Regan CM, Pond CD, Bissett KE, 'A literature in medicine elective: undergraduate medical students' performance of a literature in medicine elective task during a general practice clinical attachment', Focus on Health Professional Education, 6 19-20 (2005) [C1]
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2004 Adams J, Magin PJ, Ireland M, 'Violence in general practice', Australian Family Physician, 33 294 (2004) [C1]
2002 Levi CR, Magin PJ, Nair BR, 'Primary stroke prevention: refining the "high risk" approach', The Medical Journal of Australia, 176 303-304 (2002) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Chris Levi
Show 134 more journal articles

Conference (74 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Holliday S, Dunlop A, Hayes C, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson K, et al., 'THE EVALUATION OF A BRIEF EDUCATIONAL PAIN MANAGEMENT INTERVENTION AMONGST AUSTRALIAN GENERAL PRACTICE REGISTRARS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Adrian Dunlop
2015 Levi C, Lasserson D, Davey A, Quain D, Dewey H, Cadilhac D, et al., 'Investigation and management of transient ischemic attacks and minor strokes presenting in general practice compared to emergency departments - INSIST cohort study findings', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Levi, Neil Spratt
2015 Levi C, Davey A, Lasserson D, Parsons M, Barber AP, Dewey H, et al., 'Presentation patterns of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and minor stroke, compared with those of stroke/TIA mimics', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Levi, Mark Parsons
2015 Delcourt C, Magin P, Parsons M, Jordan L-A, Young A, Quain D, Levi C, 'TRANSIENT, Tele-Response for Acute traNSIent neurological symptoms and evENTs. Project update', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Chris Levi
2015 Whiting G, Stocks N, Magin P, Morgan S, Henderson K, Tapley A, 'General practice registrars' clinical experience of dermatology during training: a cross-sectional analysis from the registrar clinical encounters in training study', AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY (2015) [E3]
2015 Kerr KP, Mate KE, Prince B, Pond D, Magin PJ, 'Effects of general practitioner education on the prescription of anticholinergic medications.' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Karen Mate, Karen Kerr, Dimity Pond
2015 Magin P, Najib N, Tapley A, Lasserson D, Quain D, Dewey H, et al., 'A comparison of rural and urban health-seeking behaviour and processes of care in patients with transient ischemic attack and minor stroke', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Chris Levi
2015 Pagram HA, Levi C, Magin P, 'Recovery from ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack: The role of stress', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Levi
2014 Paterson N, Pond C, Magin P, 'Self Prescription in GPs and GP registrars: who, why and why not', 2014 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts. (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2014 Kerr KP, Mate KE, Williams E, Pond D, Magin PJ, 'Factors associated with a high anticholinergic burden in elderly Australians with and without dementia', ASCEPT-MPGPCR Joint Scientific Meeting (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Karen Mate, Karen Kerr, Dimity Pond
2014 Holliday S, Magin P, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson K, Dunlop A, et al., 'WHICH, WHAT AND WHO: A DESCRIPTION OF OPIOID ANALGESIC, ANXIOLYTIC AND HYPNOTIC PRESCRIBING BY GENERAL PRACTITIONER REGISTRARS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Adrian Dunlop
2013 Ridd M, Penfold C, Morris R, Sullivan S, Santer M, Roberts A, et al., 'Risk factors for the onset and persistence of childhood eczema: birth cohort study', BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY (2013) [E3]
2013 Kerr KP, Mate KE, Williams E, Pond D, Magin PJ, 'Anticholinergic load in community dwelling elderly Australians with dementia', ASCEPT Annual Scientific Meeting (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Karen Mate, Dimity Pond, Karen Kerr
2013 Dickson A, White J, Magin P, Attia J, Sturm J, Carter G, et al., 'Exploring the experience of psychological morbidity and service access in community dwelling stroke survivors: A qualitative follow up study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Gregory Carter, John Attia
2012 Pond CD, Brodaty H, Stocks NP, Gunn J, Disler P, Paterson NE, et al., 'Improving general practitioner identification rates of dementia: The effectiveness of medical detailing plus audit', IPA 2012: International Psychigeriatric Association International Meeting Abstracts (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Natasha Weaver, Karen Mate, Dimity Pond
2012 Paterson NE, Pond CD, Magin PJ, 'The experience of personal illness: A qualitative study of Australian GPs', Family Medicine (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2012 Paterson NE, Pond CD, Magin PJ, 'Using qualitative data to inform questionnaire design', 2012 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2012 Kerr KP, Mate KE, Pond CD, Magin PJ, Stocks N, Marley JE, Disler P, 'Prescribing in the elderly - cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme inhibitors and substrates', ASCEPT-APSA 2012 Oral Abstracts (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Karen Mate, Dimity Pond, Karen Kerr
2012 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter GL, McElduff P, Pollack MR, 'Trajectories of psychological distress: A longitudinal cohort study', Neurorehabilitation & Neural Repair: WCNR 2012 Oral Abstracts (2012) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia, Gregory Carter
2012 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter GL, McElduff P, Pollack MR, 'Exploring post stroke changes in community dwelling stroke survivors: A mixed methods longitudinal cohort study', Neurorehabilitation & Neural Repair: WCNR 2012 Oral Abstracts (2012) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia, Gregory Carter
2012 Mate KE, Kerr KP, Pond CD, Magin PJ, 'Potentially inappropriate medications in the elderly - A case study', Symposium Program. Interprofessional Education for Quality Use of Medicines (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Karen Mate, Karen Kerr
2012 Kerr KP, Mate KE, Pond CD, Magin PJ, 'An ACE inhibitor and a Sartan - Is there a place for this combination? A real-life case study for students in the health professions', Symposium Program. Interprofessional Education for Quality Use of Medicines (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Karen Kerr, Karen Mate, Dimity Pond
2012 Holliday S, Magin PJ, Dunbabin JS, Oldmeadow CJ, Henry J-M, Lintzeris N, et al., 'Motivating factors amongst NSW general practitioners regarding the prescription of opioid substitution therapy', Drug and Alcohol Review (2012) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow, Adrian Dunlop
2012 Pond CD, Mate KE, Phillips J, Goode SM, Paterson NE, Magin PJ, et al., 'A particularly difficult diagnosis to make: Factors that facilitate GP diagnosis of dementia', 2012 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Karen Mate, Dimity Pond
2012 Convery PJ, Pond CD, Higgins IJ, Iliffe S, Chenoweth L, Magin PJ, et al., 'Evaluation of a new nurse-led approach to dementia detection and care in primary care', 2012 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Michael Hazelton, Isabel Higgins, Dimity Pond, Ashley Kable
2011 Pond CD, Brodaty H, Stocks N, Paterson NE, Magin PJ, Gunn J, et al., 'The attitudes of Australian general practitioners to breaking news of dementia: A qualitative and quantitative exploration', Alzheimer's and Dementia (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Karen Mate
2011 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter GL, Fitzgerald MN, et al., 'Post-stroke depression and anxiety: A longitudinal cohort study', Journal of Neurology (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Gregory Carter, John Attia
2011 Holliday S, Magin PJ, Dunlop AJ, Dunbabin JS, Henry J, Goode SM, et al., 'Opioid analgesics in chronic non-cancer pain: A quality use of medicines study', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia, Adrian Dunlop
2011 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter GL, Fitzgerald MN, et al., 'Post-stroke depression and anxiety: A longitudinal cohort study', Cerebrovascular Diseases (2011) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia, Gregory Carter
2011 Russell ML, Evans MK, Royan AT, Magin PJ, Lasserson D, Attia JR, et al., 'Referral and triage of patients with TIAs to an acute access clinic: Risk-stratification performance in an Australian setting', International Journal of Stroke (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Neil Spratt, John Attia, Mark Parsons, Chris Levi
2011 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter GL, Pollack MR, 'Trajectories of psychological distress after stroke: A longitudinal, mixed methods cohort study', Stroke Society of Australasia Annual Scientific Meeting 2011 (SSA-ASM) (2011) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia, Gregory Carter
2011 Pond CD, Goode SM, Mate KE, Magin PJ, Brodaty H, Brodaty H, Marley JE, 'GP evaluation of a dementia education project', 2011 PHC Research Conference Abstracts (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Karen Mate
2011 Paterson NE, Pond CD, Magin PJ, 'GPs' experience of personal illness', 2011 PHC Research Conference Abstracts (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2011 Pond CD, Convery PJ, Goode SM, Magin PJ, Goodman C, Iliffe S, et al., 'Development of a nurse-led dementia care model in general practice', 2011 PHC Research Conference Abstracts (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Isabel Higgins
2011 Dunbabin JS, Holliday SM, Magin PJ, Dunlop AJ, Ewald BD, Goode SM, Henry J, 'Discomfort with mental illness in general practice waiting rooms: A cross-sectional study', 2011 PHC Research Conference Abstracts (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Adrian Dunlop, Ben Ewald
2010 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Pollack MR, 'Exploring goal setting in stroke survivors: a prospective study', Cerebrovascular Diseases: European Stroke Conference (2010) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia
2010 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, McElduff P, Pollack MR, 'Exploring post-stroke mood changes in community-dwelling stroke survivors: a prospective qualitative study', Cerebrovascular Diseases: European Stroke Conference (2010) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia
2010 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, McElduff P, Pollack MR, 'Exploring post-stroke mood changes in community-dwelling stroke survivors: a longitudinal cohort study', Cerebrovascular Diseases: European Stroke Conference (2010) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia
2010 White J, Miller B, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, 'Access and participation in the community: A prospective cohort qualitative study of driving post-stroke', Cerebrovascular Diseases: European Stroke Conference (2010) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia
2010 Convery PJ, Pond CD, Goode SM, Magin PJ, 'A pilot study of nurse led dementia screening in primary care', 2010 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2010 Mate KE, Pond CD, Swain J, Goode SM, Magin PJ, 'The relationship of GP diagnosis of dementia with patient depression and quality of life measures', 2010 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Karen Mate, Dimity Pond
2010 Paterson NE, Pond CD, Magin PJ, 'GPs' experience of personal illness', 2010 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2010 Pond CD, Mate KE, Swain J, Goode SM, Magin PJ, Brodaty H, et al., 'Dementia detection in general practice: Clinical diagnosis or brief screening instrument?', 2010 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Karen Mate, Dimity Pond
2010 Magin PJ, Morgan S, Henderson KM, Bowe S, Goode SM, Furler J, Jackel J, 'GP registrars' consultation duration: associations and implications', GP10. Abstracts (2010) [E3]
2010 Paterson NE, Pond CD, Magin PJ, 'GPs experience of mental illness: Barriers to help seeking', GP10. Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2010 Van Driel M, Magin PJ, Farrell E, Jiwa M, Spurling G, 'OK, so I have a clinical question: where to next?', GP10. Abstracts (2010) [E3]
2010 Goode SM, Magin PJ, Pond CD, May JA, Marshall M, Zwar N, et al., 'Practice-based research networks (PBRNs): A comparison of different models', 2010 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Jenny May
2010 Holliday SM, Dunlop AJ, Magin PJ, Goode SM, Henry J, Dunbabin JS, Ewald BD, 'Does GP care of drug & alcohol patients cause distress to other patients? A cross-sectional waiting room study', 2010 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Ben Ewald, Adrian Dunlop
2010 Joyce TA, Higgins IJ, Magin PJ, Goode SM, Stone TE, Pond CD, et al., 'Up the creek without a paddle', 36th International Conference 2010: Australian College of Mental Health Nurses. Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Teresa Stone, Dimity Pond, Isabel Higgins
2010 Holliday SM, Dunlop AJ, Magin PJ, Goode SM, Henry J, Dunbabin JS, Ewald BD, 'Patient experiences of GP waiting rooms: A cross-sectional study', GP10. Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Adrian Dunlop, Ben Ewald
2010 Holliday S, Magin P, Dunlop A, Ewald B, Henry J, Goode S, Dunbabin J, 'DOES PRESCRIBING OPIATE SUBSTITUTION THERAPY DISTRESS A GENERAL PRACTITIONER'S OTHER PATIENTS? A CROSS-SECTIONAL WAITING ROOM STUDY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Adrian Dunlop, Ben Ewald
2009 Goode SM, Magin PJ, Pond CD, 'The effects of the closure of a primary health care clinic: Preliminary baseline results', 2009 General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference: Abstracts and Presentations (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2009 Magin PJ, Van Driel M, Furler J, Pirotta M, 'Research quality assessment: How should primary care respond to the challenge?', 2009 General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference: Abstracts and Presentations (2009) [E3]
2009 Morgan S, Magin PJ, 'ReCEnT Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training: Using longitudinal patient encounter data to enhance learning', 2009 General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference: Abstracts and Presentations (2009) [E3]
2009 Morris J, Perkins D, Lyle D, Boreland F, Magin PJ, Zwar N, et al., 'The Researcher Developer Program: An investigation of participant experiences in NSW and ACT 2005-2007', 2009 General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference: Abstracts and Presentations (2009) [E3]
2009 Broom A, Magin PJ, 'Finding and appraising evidence in literature', Complementary and Alternative Medicine Research Conference. Workshops (2009) [E3]
2009 Magin PJ, Horton GL, 'ECG who am I?: An educational tool to promote ECG and dermatological systematic interpretive skills', General Practice Education and Training Annual Convention. Abstracts (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Graeme Horton
2009 Morgan S, Magin PJ, 'The General Practice Registrar Clinical Encounter (GPRICE) Study - Using longitudinal patient encounter data to enhance learning', General Practice Education and Training Annual Convention. Abstracts (2009) [E3]
2009 Morgan S, Regan C, Magin PJ, 'Not the Jane Austen Book CLub - using (non-medical) literature in general practice training', General Practice Education and Training Annual Convention. Abstracts (2009) [E3]
2009 Swain J, Magin PJ, Dollard M, 'Predictors of occupational violence experience among GP registrars', General Practice Education and Training Annual Convention. Abstracts (2009) [E3]
2009 Pond CD, Magin PJ, Paterson NE, Horton GL, Goode SM, Swain J, et al., 'Diagnosing dementia in general practice: A team approach?', National Dementia Research Forum 2009 (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Graeme Horton, Dimity Pond, Karen Mate
2009 Magin PJ, 'General practice as a fortress: Results of a qualitative study of occupational violence in gernal practice receptionists', SAPC ASM 09 - Poster Programme (2009) [E3]
2009 McGill K, Rowley E, Magin PJ, Hazell T, Cook L, 'MindPlay: A way of decreasing the stigma of mental illness through drama', The 2nd ArtsHealth Conference Proceedings (2009) [E3]
2009 May JA, Magin PJ, 'Occupational violence: A study of the general practice team', 2009 General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference: Abstracts and Presentations (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny May
2009 Holliday SM, Dunlop AJ, Magin PJ, Ewald BD, Henry J, Goode SM, Dunbabin JS, 'The waiting room ambience in general practice (WRAP) study: Patients attitudes to aspects of their experience in GPs' waiting rooms', Drug and Alcohol Review (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00123.x
Co-authors Ben Ewald, Adrian Dunlop
2008 Furler J, Magin PJ, 'Early postdoctoral and post-Masters researchers', 2008 General Practice & Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2008) [E3]
2008 Magin PJ, Adams J, Heading GS, Pond CD, 'Skin patients and their doctors - an uneasy relationship: Results of a qualitative study', 2008 General Practice & Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2008 Magin PJ, Pond CD, Robertson VJ, Bridges-Webb C, Birden H, 'The educational and resource needs of primary health care early career researchers', 2008 General Practice & Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2008 White JH, Magin PJ, Pollack MR, Attia JR, Sturm J, 'The long-term experience of altered mood in community dwelling stroke survivors: Methodology and preliminary findings of a longitudinal qualitative study', 2008 General Practice & Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2008) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia
2008 Horton GL, Magin PJ, 'ECG who am I? An enjoyable and interactive learning activity', AMEE 2008 Final Abstract Book (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Graeme Horton
2008 May JA, Magin PJ, 'Occupational violence in Australian general practice: Its not just about the doctor', Wonca Asia Pacific Regional Conference combined with the RACGP Annual Scientific Convention: Abstract Guide (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny May
2007 Magin PJ, Pond CD, Smith WT, Watson AB, Goode SM, 'Psychological morbidity in patients with acne, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond, Wayne Smith
2006 Adams (Ext) J, Magin PJ, Joy E, 'Occupational violence in Australian urban general practice', Be the Future (2006) [E3]
2006 Magin PJ, Pond CD, Smith (Ext) DW, Adams (Ext) J, Watson A, Heading GS, 'Psychological sequalae of skin disease: acne, psoriasis and atopic eczema', NSW Researcher Development Program Forum (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Dimity Pond
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 14
Total funding $2,058,041

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $344,047

HMRI MRSP Infrastructure (12-16) Brain and Mental Health Program – Stroke and Brain Injury$344,047

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Neil Spratt, Professor Mark Parsons, Doctor Frederick Walker, Doctor Coralie English, Professor Michael Nilsson, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Doctor Andrew Bivard, Associate Professor Jane Maguire, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin, Associate Professor Sarah Johnson, Professor John Attia
Scheme NSW MRSP Infrastructure Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600733
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20151 grants / $26,694

The impact of changes in the anticholinergic load of medication regimens on the cognitive status and quality of life of people with dementia.$26,694

Funding body: The Mason Foundation

Funding body The Mason Foundation
Project Team Doctor Karen Mate, Doctor Karen Kerr, Professor Dimity Pond, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin
Scheme Medical and Scientific Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1400836
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20122 grants / $1,168,379

An international comparison of systems of care, risk stratification and outcomes in TIA and minor stroke$1,149,593

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin, Dr Daniel Lasserson, Dr Jose Valderas, Associate Professor Helen Dewey, Professor Peter Barber, Professor Peter Rothwell, Doctor Neil Spratt, Dr Dominique Cadilhac, Professor Valery Feigin
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1100258
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Development of a clinical tool to assess anticholinergic medicines overload in general practice$18,786

Funding body: Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP)

Funding body Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Parker Magin, Conjoint Associate Professor Lynne Parkinson, Doctor Allison Thomson
Scheme Research Grant for a Pilot Study
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200624
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20101 grants / $23,025

Minor stroke and Transient Ischaemic Attack pathways of care: a pilot of a cohort study based in general practice$23,025

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Professor Mark Parsons, Dr Daniel Lasserson, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000933
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20082 grants / $209,187

Dementia Collaborative Research Centre$161,744

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Professor Dimity Pond, Professor Isabel Higgins, Professor Michael Hazelton, Associate Professor Ashley Kable, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin, Doctor Jill Phillips
Scheme Dementia Collaborative Research Centres Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G0188513
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Healing the healer - a peer based mentorship intervention$47,443

Funding body: Beyond Blue Ltd

Funding body Beyond Blue Ltd
Project Team Professor Dimity Pond, Doctor Teresa Joyce, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin, Professor Isabel Higgins, Conjoint Professor Teri Stone, Mrs Susan Goode
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0188948
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20071 grants / $9,087

Occupational violence in general practice: a cross-sectional study of GPs and general practice staff$9,087

Funding body: Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP)

Funding body Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP)
Project Team Doctor Jennifer May, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin
Scheme Family Medical Care, Education and Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0187852
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20051 grants / $83,506

PHC RED Researcher Development Program (RDP)$83,506

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Professor Dimity Pond, Dr Gaynor Heading, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin, Doctor David Brookman, Doctor Nayan Shah
Scheme Primary Health Care Research Evaluation and Development (PHCRED) Strategy
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0184128
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20041 grants / $11,000

A general practice based collaborative intervention for treating war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder$11,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Dimity Pond, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin, Doctor Rosemary Webster, Ms Val Clark
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0183477
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20032 grants / $155,296

The psychological sequelae of skin disease in Australian general practice: psoriasis, atopic eczema, and acne.$85,296

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Parker Magin
Scheme Scholarships - Primary Health Postgraduate Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0182293
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

After Hours Medical Care and Personal Safety Needs of Urban General Practitioners$70,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Malcolm Ireland, Dr Jonathan Adams, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0181785
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20022 grants / $27,820

Managing hyperlipidaemia: a multidisciplinary intervention in general practice.$21,820

Funding body: Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP)

Funding body Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Parker Magin
Scheme Cardiovascular Research Grants in General Practice
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo G0180973
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

The Psychological Sequelae of Skin Disease: Acne, Psoriasis and Atopic Eczema$6,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Conjoint Professor Parker Magin
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo G0182663
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current6

Total current UON EFTSL

Masters0.3
PhD0.5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 Masters Development of Consensus Guide for Dementia in Primary Care
M Philosophy (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 Masters International Comparison of Transient Ischaemic Attack Management and Output - Newcastle, Auckland, Oxford
M Philosophy (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Medical Students, Gender and Patient-Centredness
PhD (General Practice), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2008 PhD The Attitudes of Australian Medical Students to the Inclusion of the Topic of 'Health Impacts of Climate Change' in the Medical School Curriculum
PhD (General Practice), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2008 PhD GPs Experience of Personal Illness and the Implications for Help-Seeking
PhD (General Practice), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2007 PhD Influence of Shoe Design on Running Mechanics
PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 Masters The Effects of a Primary Care Clinic Closure on Patients: A Prospective Observational Study
M Philosophy (ComMed&ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Exploring the Long-Term Experience of Psychological Morbidity in Community-Dwelling Stroke Survivors
PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2008 Masters The "Lived Experience" of Long-Term Stroke Survivors in Newcastle, Australia
M MedSc (Occupat Therapy) [R], Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Conjoint Professor Parker Magin

Position

Conjoint Professor
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

General Practice

Contact Details

Email parker.magin@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4968 6734
Fax (02) 4968 6727

Office

Room NEWA113
Building Newbolds Administration
Location Other

,
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