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Dr Luke Wolfenden

Associate Professor and Career Development Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Lifestyle as medicine

Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden's research into the modifiable risks of chronic health conditions and injury is helping the community to improve their overall wellbeing.

Dr Luke Wolfenden

Although chronic diseases and injuries are as common as they are costly, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden insists most are avoidable.

'Chronic diseases and injuries can be closely linked to lifestyle choices that are very often modifiable,' he asserts.

'So things like obesity, physical inactivity, excess alcohol consumption and smoking are all important risk factors, but they obviously don't have to be.'

'If we target and modify these risks we can reduce the number of people suffering needlessly.'

The behavioural scientist is working across multiple settings to encourage these lifestyle changes, enlisting the commitment of sporting clubs, childcare centres, schools, hospital services and outpatient clinics to implement chronic disease and injury prevention initiatives. Key to his success in translating research into practice is ongoing engagement processes with policy makers and practitioners.  This communication ensures evidence-based interventions are made both widely accessible and appropriate for different settings.

'Once we develop or identify effective programs, we conduct research to find the best way of supporting oragnisations in the community to adopt and implement them,' Wolfenden explains.

'This requires close consultation and collaboration with these organisations.'

Trashing the ash

Wolfenden first began addressing the lifestyle-related risk factors contributing to chronic disease in the early 2000s.  He specifically targeted tobacco use during the four years of his PhD candidateship, working with Hunter New England Population Health and staff at the John Hunter Hospital to improve the provision of smoking cessation care to surgical patients. Undertaking a randomised control trial of a new computer-based program to do so, Wolfenden and the team also succeeded in reducing patients' risks of postoperative complications.  The project was a finalist in the health service quality awards and has since been cited in clinical practice guidelines.  It was also adopted as part of routine pre-operative management of surgical patients at the hospital.

'We noticed patients often have to sit around in waiting rooms during their preoperative appointments, so this intervention sought to use that time to help them to stop smoking before they had surgery,' he discloses.

'This has proven therapeutic benefits as well as longer-term ones, such as the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease.'

Hospital receptionists are responsible for referring patients to Wolfenden's program, which initially provides a 20-minute computerised behavioural counselling session for those who screen positive for tobacco use. It also assesses patients' nicotine dependence and generates a prompt for preoperative clinical staff to identify them as smokers.

'These patients are prescribed with nicotine replacement therapy,' Wolfenden details.

'They're also equipped with other take-home strategies to help stave off the smoking urges once the surgery is over.'

Doctor without borders

After receiving his PhD in 2006, Wolfenden took off for a European backpacking tour. The avid traveller's planned break from researching was cut shorter than expected though, when he landed a lecturing and mentoring role with the UK'S Cochrane Collaboration in Oxford a couple of months into his sojourn.

'I applied for the job when I was running out of money,' he laughs.

'But it was great.'

'I was lucky enough to fly around Europe and undertake training workshops with authors who'd registered their interest in writing systematic reviews with the Collaboration.'

Taking on another senior position when he returned the following year, Wolfenden found himself managing the research of Australia's largest childhood obesity prevention program.  The $12 million initiative was a collaboration with the University of Newcastle, the Hunter New England Local Health District, NSW Health and the University of Sydney.  Wolfenden was a finalist in the NSW Public Health Sector Awards for his contribution to the program.  'Good for Kids. Good for Life' was also awarded the inaugural Australian National Preventive Health Agency Research Translation award, as well as quality and innovation awards from the NSW Government.

The intervention included supporting the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices to more than 400 schools, 350 childcare services, 200 sporting clubs, 30 community service organisations and Aboriginal communities.

'We focused on promoting healthy eating and regular exercise in children up to 12 years,' Wolfenden advises.

Findings from 'Good for Kids. Good for Life' have since informed the development of strategies used to support the statewide roll-out of the NSW Ministry of Health's Healthy Children's Initiative Programs.

Move it and chew it

Wolfenden has continued to add to this body of work around obesity prevention, leading collaboration between the University of Newcastle and Hunter New England's Population Health on a raft of innovative studies, many funded by nationally competitive grants. Again focusing mainly on children, the team's efforts have seen the translation of health promotion strategies in educational and recreational settings across the Hunter, New England and Lower Mid North Coast regions.

'One of our current projects involves encouraging primary school canteens to sell more healthy foods,' Wolfenden reveals.

'Most don't comply with mandatory school canteen policies, often because they're not aware of the policy, are not confident in product classification, or are concerned about a decline in profits.'

'So we're providing training, support from dieticians and tips on how to reduce waste and mark foods appropriately so they don't get sold below cost.'

'We're also auditing their menus and getting principals onboard.'

Another of Wolfenden's current endeavours involves looking at novel ways to get young children to be more physically active. The National Health and Medical Research Council Career Development Fellow is aiming to create interventions for childcare services that are translatable, fundable and scalable.

'The kinds of approaches many of us have used up until now to encourage children to be active in childcare have been pretty equivocal – some have worked and some haven't,' he affirms.

'They also require ongoing investments to maintain staff skill levels and ensure ongoing implementation, so there's a sustainability issue from a health promotion perspective.'

Instead, Wolfenden is electing to trial a 'simpler intervention' in a number of childcare centres across the Hunter, cutting the typical 90-minute outdoor play period into several smaller 20-30 minute chunks.

'Research suggests children are naturally physical active during these sessions, but only during the first part,' he clarifies.

'So we want to change how childcare centres schedule them.'

'Breaking them up is an easy environment change that doesn't require training and can be effortlessly incorporated into childcare accreditation standards.'

Over the limit

Wolfenden is simultaneously working with the Australian Drug Foundation to help community sports clubs manage and sell alcohol responsibly. They conducted a randomised trial of the national 'Good Sports' program that encourages sporting clubs to create family-friendly cultures, ensuring they adhere to liquor licence legislations and remove happy hours and other drinking promotions where possible.

Good Sports is Australia's largest health in sports initiative for community sports clubs, working with more than 6,500 clubs across Australia to reduce risky drinking.  The Australian Drug Foundation received $19 million in the recent Federal Budget to support the important work of this program for another four years.

'We know alcohol is consumed excessively at sporting clubs, so that's why we've chosen to target these venues,' Wolfenden says.

Following the success of the trial, the team is now in the process of adding an online maintenance strategy to the program to support the improvements made by clubs as part of an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant.

Useable discoveries

In the not-so-distant future, Wolfenden looks set to focus on two more things - getting further evidence into practice, and understanding the barriers preventing community and clinical services from adopting evidence-based practice.

'I'll be developing strategies that address both,' he acknowledges.

'We need to make sure research can inform policy and practice.'

'It's important that intervention trials are designed so they're suitable for population-wide dissemination and uptake.'

Dr Luke Wolfenden

Lifestyle as medicine

Dr Luke Wolfenden’s research into the modifiable risks of chronic health conditions and injury is helping the community to improve their overall wellbeing.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Research Interests and Expertise

I am a behavioural scientist. In 2013 I commenced a NHMRC Career Development Fellowship. I graduated with a PhD in behavioural medicine in 2006. Since submission of my PhD I have worked with internationally recognised research institutions such as the UK Cochrane Centre, and was an invited visiting Fellow at the World Health Organization.  Nationally, I have been primarily responsible for the evaluation of Australia’s largest ever child obesity prevention program (Good for Kids. Good for Life.) where I led a research collaboration between the Prevention Research Centres of the University of Sydney, Hunter New England Area Health Service and NSW Health

My research seeks to reduce the burden of chronic disease in the community. Over the past 5 years my work has focused on i) trialling interventions to reduce modifiable chronic disease risks in the community; ii) trialling dissemination and implementation strategies to increase the adoption of evidence based chronic disease prevention practices by organisations in the community; iii) conducting methodological research to facilitate the translation of research into practice.  

The research I conduct draws heavily on social-ecological and social cognitive perspectives of reducing chronic disease risks. The primary modifiable risks my research addresses are obesity, diet, physical inactivity, alcohol and tobacco use. My  research is typically settings based. I have conducted trials of health behaviour interventions or of population wide-dissemination and implementation strategies in hospitals, out-patient clinics, schools, child care centres, community organisations, and sports clubs. To ensure that the practice relevance of research outcomes and maximise the potential for successful translation, my work is informed through on-going engagement processes with end-users

Research Expertise
I am a behavioural scientist. My research seeks to reduce the burden of chronic disease in the community. Over the past 5 years my work has focused on: i) trialling interventions to reduce modifiable chronic disease risks in the community; ii) trialling dissemination and implementation strategies to increase the adoption of evidence based chronic disease prevention practices by organisations in the community; and iii) conducting methodological research to facilitate the translation of research into practice. The research I conduct draws heavily on social-ecological and social cognitive perspectives of reducing chronic disease risks. The primary modifiable risks my research addresses are obesity, diet, physical inactivity, alcohol and tobacco use. My research is typically settings based. I have conducted trials of health behaviour interventions or of population wide-dissemination and implementation strategies in hospitals, out-patient clinics, schools, child care centres, community organisations, and sports clubs. To ensure that the practice relevance of research outcomes and maximise the potential for successful translation, my work is informed through on-going engagement processes with end-users.

Collaborations
Associate Professor Wolfenden has collaborated academics, policy makers or practitioners from the following organisations: The World Health Organization The UK Cochrane Centre The Australian Drug Foundation University of Ottawa Yale University University of Newcastle University of Sydney Deakin University University of Melbourne University of Western Australia NSW Cancer Council Turning Point Hunter New England Population Health Hunter Institute of Mental Health Parenting Research Centre NSW Department of Education and Communities Catholic Schools Office NSW Family Services Inc NSW Office of Preventive Health NSW Ministry of Health

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Chronic disease
  • Dissemination
  • Early childhood
  • Health promotion
  • Implementation
  • Injury
  • Intervention
  • Nutrition
  • Obesity
  • Population Health
  • Preventive Medicine
  • Primary school
  • Public health
  • Tobacco
  • Translation
  • systematic reviews

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 25
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
160599 Policy and Administration not elsewhere classified 25

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor and Career Deve University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/06/2013 -  Fellow - NHMRC University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/01/2013 -  Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/05/2009 - 1/05/2012 Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Wolfenden K, Wolfenden L, Egger G, 'Preventing and Managing Injury at the Clinical Level. In Egger G, Binns A, Rossner S.', Lifestyle Medicine: Managing disease of lifestyle in the 21st Century, McGraw-Hill, Sydney 253-263 (2011)

Journal article (193 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Skouteris H, Edwards S, Morris H, Cox R, Baur L, Wolfenden L, Huang TTK, 'Early childhood education and health working in partnership: the critical role early childhood educators can play in childhood obesity prevention', Early Child Development and Care, 1-5 (2017)

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupPreschool children¿s interest in popular culture is linked to many determinants of obesity development including bran... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupPreschool children¿s interest in popular culture is linked to many determinants of obesity development including branded energy-dense foods and sedentary play using digital technologies. In addition, highly packaged foods and throwaway toys reinforce unsustainable environmental habits encouraged by immersive marketing systems. Interrupting the effects of these systems demands multiple and diverse solutions. Our solution engages early childhood educators in obesity prevention by doing what they do best ¿ pedagogy, curricula and care. Assisting young children to interact with their interests and developing habits like Healthy eating, Active play and environmentally Sustainable practices (HAS) is unique methodology. We believe that building the capacity of educators to co-create HAS curricula using children¿s interests has the potential to develop life-long well-being and sustainability habits. HAS curricula aid in young children¿s development of agentic decision-making abilities through the transformation of everyday concepts into higher-order mature concepts.

DOI 10.1080/03004430.2016.1278370
2017 Metse AP, Wiggers J, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Freund M, Clancy R, et al., 'Efficacy of a universal smoking cessation intervention initiated in inpatient psychiatry and continued post-discharge: A randomised controlled trial.', Aust N Z J Psychiatry, 51 366-381 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/0004867417692424
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Richard Clancy, Kim Colyvas
2017 Delaney T, Wyse R, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Ball K, et al., 'Cluster randomised controlled trial of a consumer behaviour intervention to improve healthy food purchases from online canteens: study protocol.', BMJ Open, 7 e014569 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-014569
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2017 Tremain D, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Wye P, Bowman J, Dunlop A, et al., 'Modifiable health risk behaviours and attitudes towards behaviour change of clients attending community-based substance use treatment services', Drug and Alcohol Review, 36 369-377 (2017)

© 2016 The Authors Drug and Alcohol Review published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other DrugsIntroduction and... [more]

© 2016 The Authors Drug and Alcohol Review published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other DrugsIntroduction and Aims: Health risk behaviours, such as smoking, nutrition and physical inactivity, are significant contributors to chronic disease for people with substance use disorders. This study reports the prevalence of these behaviours amongst substance use treatment clients, their attitudes towards modifying such behaviours and the acceptability of receiving support to do so. Client characteristics associated with risk status and interest in modifying behaviours were examined. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken with clients of 15 community substance use treatment services within in New South Wales, Australia. Data for the study were collected via computer assisted telephone interviews. Results: Of those contactable and eligible, 386 (71%) clients completed the survey. Clients reported a high prevalence of smoking (80%), insufficient fruit and/or vegetable consumption (89%) and insufficient physical activity (31%). Overall, 51¿69% of clients reported considering modifying their health risk behaviours and 88¿97% thought it was acceptable to be provided preventive care to address such behaviours. Younger clients were more likely to smoke (18¿34 years (odds ratio [OR] = 4.6 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9, 11.3]); 35¿54 years (OR = 2.6 [95% CI = 1.2, 5.7])) and be interested in increasing vegetable consumption (18¿34 years (OR = 4.4 [95% CI = 1.3, 14.8]); 35¿54 years (OR = 8.0 [95% CI = 2.5, 25.4])) than older clients (=55 years). Discussion and Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of health risk behaviours amongst clients of community substance use treatment services. However, contrary to commonly cited barriers to care provision, clients are interested in modifying their risk behaviours and report that receiving preventive care to address these behaviours is acceptable. [Tremain D, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Wye P, Bowman J, Dunlop A, Gillham K, Bartlem K, McElwaine K, Gow B, Wiggers J. Modifiable health risk behaviours and attitudes towards behaviour change of clients attending community-based substance use treatment services. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:369¿377.].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12439
Co-authors John Wiggers, Kate Bartlem, Jenny Bowman, A Dunlop
2017 Wolfenden L, Yoong SL, Williams C, Grimshaw J, Durrheim DN, Gillham K, Wiggers J, 'Embedding researchers in health service organizations improves research translation and health service performance: The Australian Hunter New England Population Health example.', J Clin Epidemiol, (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.03.007
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2017 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Janssen LM, Wiggers J, Reilly K, Delaney T, et al., 'Multi-strategic intervention to enhance implementation of healthy canteen policy: a randomised controlled trial.', Implement Sci, 12 6 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0537-9
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Christopher Oldmeadow, Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2017 Jones J, Yoong SL, Wyse R, Ward DS, Wolfenden L, 'Improving the impact of obesity prevention interventions in the childcare setting: The need for a systematic application of implementation science.', J Paediatr Child Health, 53 211-213 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/jpc.13464
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2017 Dray J, Bowman J, Campbell E, Freund M, Hodder R, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Effectiveness of a pragmatic school-based universal intervention targeting student resilience protective factors in reducing mental health problems in adolescents', Journal of Adolescence, 57 74-89 (2017)

© 2017 The AuthorsWorldwide, 10¿20% of adolescents experience mental health problems. Strategies aimed at strengthening resilience protective factors provide a potential approac... [more]

© 2017 The AuthorsWorldwide, 10¿20% of adolescents experience mental health problems. Strategies aimed at strengthening resilience protective factors provide a potential approach for reducing mental health problems in adolescents. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a universal, school-based intervention targeting resilience protective factors in reducing mental health problems in adolescents. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in 20 intervention and 12 control secondary schools located in socio-economically disadvantaged areas of NSW, Australia. Data were collected from 3115 students at baseline (Grade 7, 2011), of whom 2149 provided data at follow up (Grade 10, 2014; enrolments in Grades 7 to 10 typically aged 12¿16 years; 50% male; 69.0% retention). There were no significant differences between groups at follow-up for three mental health outcomes: total SDQ, internalising problems, and prosocial behaviour. A small statistically significant difference in favour of the control group was found for externalising problems. Findings highlight the continued difficulties in developing effective, school-based prevention programs for mental health problems in adolescents. Trial registration ANZCTR (Ref no: ACTRN12611000606987).

DOI 10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.03.009
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray Uon, John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Wiggers
2017 Beck AK, Britton B, Baker A, Odelli C, Wratten C, Bauer J, et al., 'Preliminary report: training head and neck cancer dietitians in behaviour change counselling', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, 26 405-407 (2017)
DOI 10.1002/pon.4129
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker
2017 McCrabb S, Balogh Z, Baker AL, Harris IA, Attia J, Lott N, et al., 'Development of an online smoking cessation program for use in hospital and following discharge: Smoke-free recovery', BMJ Innovations, 3 115-122 (2017)

© 2017, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.Background Tobacco smoking can have negative health outcomes on recovery from surgery. Although it is recommended best practice ... [more]

© 2017, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.Background Tobacco smoking can have negative health outcomes on recovery from surgery. Although it is recommended best practice to provide patients with advice to quit and follow-up support, provision of postdischarge support is rare. Developing an online smoking cessation program may help address this gap. Objectives This paper describes the development and pretesting of an online smoking cessation program (smoke-free recovery, SFR) tailored to the orthopaedic trauma population for use while in hospital and post-discharge. Methods Drawing on the DoTTI framework for developing an online program, the following steps were followed for program development: (1) design and development; (2) testing early iteration; (3) testing for effectiveness and (4) integration and implementation. This article describes the first two stages of SFR program development. Results SFR is a 10-module online smoking cessation program tailored for patients with orthopaedic trauma. Of the participants who completed testing early iterations, none reported any difficulties orientating themselves to the program or understanding program content. The main themes were that it was ¿helpful¿, provision of ¿help to quit¿ was low and SFR increased thoughts of ¿staying quit post discharge¿. Conclusions This study found that a theory and evidence-based approach as the basis for an online smoking cessation program for patients with orthopaedic trauma was acceptable to users. A randomised controlled trial will be conducted to examine whether the online smoking cessation program is effective in increasing smoking cessation and how it can be integrated and implemented into hospital practice (stages three and four of the DoTTI framework).

DOI 10.1136/bmjinnov-2016-000126
Co-authors John Attia, Amanda Baker, Frans Henskens, Billie Bonevski, Zsolt Balogh, Mark Wallis
2017 McCrabb S, Baker AL, Attia J, Balogh ZJ, Lott N, Palazzi K, et al., 'Smoking, quitting and the provision of smoking cessation support: A survey of orthopaedic trauma patients.', J Orthop Trauma, (2017)
DOI 10.1097/BOT.0000000000000872
Co-authors Amanda Baker, John Attia, Zsolt Balogh, Billie Bonevski
2017 Seward K, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Finch M, Wyse R, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Measuring implementation behaviour of menu guidelines in the childcare setting: confirmatory factor analysis of a theoretical domains framework questionnaire (TDFQ).', Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 14 45 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0499-6
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2017 Hodder RK, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Nepal S, Dray J, et al., 'Systematic review of universal school-based 'resilience' interventions targeting adolescent tobacco, alcohol or illicit substance use: A meta-analysis.', Prev Med, 100 248-268 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.04.003
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray Uon, Serene Yoong
2017 Wyse R, Wiggers J, Delaney T, Ooi JY, Marshall J, Clinton-McHarg T, Wolfenden L, 'The price of healthy and unhealthy foods in Australian primary school canteens', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 41 45-47 (2017)

© 2016 The AuthorsObjective: To describe the price of Australian school canteen foods according to their nutritional value. Methods: Primary school canteen menus were collected a... [more]

© 2016 The AuthorsObjective: To describe the price of Australian school canteen foods according to their nutritional value. Methods: Primary school canteen menus were collected as part of a policy compliance randomised trial. For each menu item, dietitians classified its nutritional value; ¿green¿ (¿good sources of nutrients¿), ¿amber¿ (¿some nutritional value¿), ¿red¿ (¿lack adequate nutritional value¿) and assigned a food category (e.g. ¿Drinks¿, ¿Snacks¿). Pricing information was extracted. Within each food category, ANOVAs assessed differences between the mean price of ¿green¿, ¿amber¿ and ¿red¿ items, and post-hoc tests were conducted. Results: Seventy of the 124 invited schools participated. There were significant differences in the mean price of ¿green¿, ¿amber¿ and ¿red foods¿ across categories, with ¿green¿ items more expensive than ¿amber¿ items in main-meal categories (¿Sandwiches¿ +$0.43, ¿Hot Foods¿ +$0.71), and the reverse true for non-meal categories (¿Drinks¿ -$0.13, ¿Snacks¿ -$0.18, ¿Frozen Snacks¿ -$0.25^). Conclusion: Current pricing may not encourage the purchasing of healthy main-meal items by and for students. Further investigation of pricing strategies that enhance the public health benefit of existing school canteen policies and practices are warranted. Implications for Public Health: Providing support to canteen managers regarding healthy canteen policies may have a positive impact on public health nutrition.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12624
Co-authors John Wiggers, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rebecca Wyse
2017 Nathan N, Sutherland R, Beauchamp MR, Cohen K, Hulteen RM, Babic M, et al., 'Feasibility and efficacy of the Great Leaders Active StudentS (GLASS) program on children's physical activity and object control skill competency: A non-randomised trial.', J Sci Med Sport, (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.04.016
Co-authors David Lubans
2017 Hollis JL, Sutherland R, Williams AJ, Campbell E, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity levels in secondary school physical education lessons.', Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 14 52 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0504-0
Co-authors Jenna Hollis, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, John Wiggers
2017 Lee H, Mansell G, McAuley JH, Kamper SJ, Hübscher M, Moseley GL, et al., 'Causal mechanisms in the clinical course and treatment of back pain', Best Practice and Research: Clinical Rheumatology, (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd.In recent years, there has been increasing interest in studying causal mechanisms in the development and treatment of back pain. The aim of this article is to... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd.In recent years, there has been increasing interest in studying causal mechanisms in the development and treatment of back pain. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of our current understanding of causal mechanisms in the field. In the first section, we introduce key concepts and terminology. In the second section, we provide a brief synopsis of systematic reviews of mechanism studies relevant to the clinical course and treatment of back pain. In the third section, we reflect on the findings of our review to explain how understanding causal mechanisms can inform clinical practice and the implementation of best practice. In the final sections, we introduce contemporary methodological advances, highlight the key assumptions of these methods, and discuss future directions to advance the quality of mechanism-related studies in the back pain field.

DOI 10.1016/j.berh.2017.04.001
Co-authors Christopher M Williams
2017 Nathan N, Wiggers J, Wyse R, Williams CM, Sutherland R, Yoong SL, et al., 'Factors associated with the implementation of a vegetable and fruit program in a population of Australian elementary schools.', Health Educ Res, 32 197-205 (2017)
DOI 10.1093/her/cyx038
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2017 Metse AP, Wiggers JH, Wye PM, Wolfenden L, Prochaska JJ, Stockings EA, et al., 'Smoking and Mental Illness: A Bibliometric Analysis of Research Output Over Time', NICOTINE & TOBACCO RESEARCH, 19 24-31 (2017)
DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntw249
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2016 Nathan N, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Reilly K, Delaney T, Janssen L, et al., 'Effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention to enhance implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: a randomised controlled trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0431-5
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Li K Chai, Serene Yoong
2016 McCarter K, Martinez U, Britton B, Baker A, Bonevski B, Carter G, et al., 'Smoking cessation care among patients with head and neck cancer: a systematic review', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012296
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Sean Halpin, Gregory Carter, Billie Bonevski
2016 Flatz A, Pfeifer N, Radtke T, Kriemler S, Klerings I, Wolfenden L, von Elm E, 'Interventions implemented through sporting organisations for promoting healthy behaviour or improving health outcomes', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2016)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012170
2016 Finch M, Jones J, Yoong S, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Effectiveness of centre-based childcare interventions in increasing child physical activity: A systematic review and meta-analysis for policymakers and practitioners', Obesity Reviews, 17 412-428 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 World Obesity.Context: The review describes the effectiveness of physical activity interventions implemented in centre-based childcare services and (i) examines characteri... [more]

© 2016 World Obesity.Context: The review describes the effectiveness of physical activity interventions implemented in centre-based childcare services and (i) examines characteristics of interventions that may influence intervention effects; (ii) describes the effects of pragmatic interventions and non-pragmatic interventions; (iii) assesses adverse effects; and (iv) describes cost-effectiveness of interventions Methods: Data sources were Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ERIC, CINAHL, SCOPUS and SPORTDISCUS. Studies selected included randomized controlled trials conducted in centre-based childcare including an intervention to increase objectively measured physical activity in children aged less than 6years. Data were converted into standardized mean difference (SMD) and analysed using a random effects model. Results: Overall interventions significantly improved child physical activity (SMD 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.12-0.76). Significant effects were found for interventions that included structured activity (SMD 0.53; 95% CI: 0.12-0.94), delivery by experts (SMD 1.26; 95% CI: 0.20-2.32) and used theory (SMD 0.76; 95% CI: 0.08-1.44). Non-pragmatic (SMD 0.80; 95% CI: 0.12-1.48) but not pragmatic interventions (SMD 0.10; 95% CI:-0.13-0.33) improved child physical activity. One trial reported adverse events, and no trials reported cost data. Conclusions: Intervention effectiveness varied according to intervention and trial design characteristics. Pragmatic trials were not effective, and information on cost and adverse effects was lacking. Evidence gaps remain for policymakers and practitioners regarding the effectiveness and feasibility of childcare-based physical activity interventions.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12392
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2016 Bartlem KM, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye PM, Barker D, McElwaine KM, et al., 'Effectiveness of an intervention in increasing the provision of preventive care by community mental health services: a non-randomized, multiple baseline implementation trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0408-4
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Patrick Mcelduff, Jenny Bowman, Kate Bartlem
2016 Sutherland RL, Campbell EM, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, et al., 'The Physical Activity 4 Everyone Cluster Randomized Trial: 2-Year Outcomes of a School Physical Activity Intervention Among Adolescents.', Am J Prev Med, 51 195-205 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2016.02.020
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors David Lubans, John Wiggers, Jenna Hollis, Christopher Oldmeadow, Philip Morgan
2016 Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Wiggers J, Nathan N, Yoong SL, 'Improving the translation of health promotion interventions using effectiveness-implementation hybrid designs in program evaluations', HEALTH PROMOTION JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 27 204-207 (2016)
DOI 10.1071/HE16056
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2016 Slattery C, Freund M, Gillham K, Knight J, Wolfenden L, Bisquera A, Wiggers J, 'Increasing smoking cessation care across a network of hospitals: an implementation study', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0390-x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2016 Hollis JL, Williams AJ, Sutherland R, Campbell E, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity levels in elementary school physical education lessons', Preventive Medicine, 86 34-54 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objective: To examine elementary school students' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) levels during physical education (PE) lessons. Methods: A syst... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objective: To examine elementary school students' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) levels during physical education (PE) lessons. Methods: A systematic search of nine electronic databases was conducted (PROSPERO2014:CRD42014009649). Studies were eligible if they were in English; published between 2005-April 2014; assessed MVPA levels in PE lessons of elementary school children (aged four-12 years); and used an objective MVPA measure. Two reviewers retrieved articles, assessed risk of bias, and performed data extraction. The findings were synthesised using a meta-analysis. Results: The search yielded 5132 articles. Thirteen studies from nine countries met the inclusion criteria. Eight studies measured MVPA through observational measures, five used accelerometry and one used heart rate monitoring. The percentage of PE lesson time spent in MVPA ranged between 11.4-88.5%. Meta-analysis of seven studies (direct observations; 4 accelerometers) found that children spent a mean (95% CI) 44.8 (28.2-61.4)% of PE lesson time in MVPA. When measured using direct observation and accelerometers, children spent 57.6 (47.3-68.2) and 32.6 (5.9-59.3)% of PE lesson time in MVPA, respectively. The review has limitations; the search strategy was restricted to studies in English; theses, dissertations and conference abstracts were excluded; and six studies that provided insufficient data were excluded from the meta-analysis. Conclusion: MVPA levels during elementary school PE lessons do not meet the United States Centre for Disease Control and Prevention and the United Kingdom's Association of Physical Education recommendation (50% of lesson time), but is higher than estimated in the previous review (34.2%). Interventions to increase MVPA in PE lessons are needed.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.11.018
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Philip Morgan, John Wiggers, David Lubans, Jenna Hollis
2016 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Ross K, Freund M, Wye P, McElwaine K, et al., 'Mental health clinician attitudes to the provision of preventive care for chronic disease risk behaviours and association with care provision', BMC Psychiatry, 16 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Bartlem et al.Background: Preventive care for chronic disease risk behaviours by mental health clinicians is sub-optimal. Little research has examined the association betw... [more]

© 2016 Bartlem et al.Background: Preventive care for chronic disease risk behaviours by mental health clinicians is sub-optimal. Little research has examined the association between clinician attitudes and such care delivery. This study aimed to explore: i) the attitudes of a multi-disciplinary group of community mental health clinicians regarding their perceived role, perception of client interest, and perceived self-efficacy in the provision of preventive care, ii) whether such attitudes differ by professional discipline, and iii) the association between these attitudes and clinician provision of such care. Method: A telephone survey was conducted with 151 Australian community mental health clinicians regarding their attitudes towards provision of assessment, advice and referral addressing smoking, nutrition, alcohol, and physical activity, and their reported provision of such care. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between attitudes and care delivery, and attitudinal differences by professional discipline. Results: Most clinicians reported that: their manager supported provision of preventive care; such care was part of their role; it would not jeopardise their practitioner-client relationships, clients found preventive care acceptable, and that they had the confidence, knowledge and skills to modify client health behaviours. Half reported that clients were not interested in changing their health behaviours, and one third indicated that the provision of preventive care negatively impacted on time available for delivery of acute care. The following attitudes were positively associated with the provision of preventive care: role congruence, client interest in change, and addressing health risk behaviours will not jeopardise the client-clinician relationship. Conclusions: Strategies are required to translate positive attitudes to improved client care and address attitudes which may hinder the provision of preventive care in community mental health.

DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0763-3
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2016 Metse AP, Wiggers J, Wye P, Moore L, Clancy R, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Smoking and environmental characteristics of smokers with a mental illness, and associations with quitting behaviour and motivation; a cross sectional study', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-2969-1
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Richard Clancy, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2016 Yoong SL, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Reilly K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'CAFE: a multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: a randomised controlled trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0453-z
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong
2016 O'Brien KM, Wiggers J, Williams A, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, et al., 'Randomised controlled trial of referral to a telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle programme for patients with knee osteoarthritis who are overweight or obese: a study protocol', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010203
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2016 Kingsland M, Wiggers JH, Vashum KP, Hodder RK, Wolfenden L, 'Interventions in sports settings to reduce risky alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm: a systematic review.', Systematic reviews, 5 12 (2016) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors John Wiggers
2016 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, 'Educational interventions are effective in treating childhood obesity: (PEDro synthesis)', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 50 130-+ (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2015-094667
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Christopher M Williams
2016 Paul C, Wolfenden L, Tzelepis F, Yoong S, Bowman J, Wye P, et al., 'Nicotine replacement therapy as a smoking cessation aid among disadvantaged smokers: What answers do we need?', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 35 785-789 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12362
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis
2016 Wolfenden L, Finch M, Wyse R, Clinton-McHarg T, Yoong SL, 'Time to focus on implementation: the need to re-orient research on physical activity in childcare services', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 40 209-210 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12518
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2016 Clinton-McHarg T, Yoong SL, Tzelepis F, Regan T, Fielding A, Skelton E, et al., 'Psychometric properties of implementation measures for public health and community settings and mapping of constructs against the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research: a systematic review', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0512-5
Co-authors Timothy Regan, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Flora Tzelepis, Serene Yoong
2016 Williams A, Wiggers J, O'Brien KM, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Campbell E, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of a lifestyle behavioural intervention for patients with low back pain, who are overweight or obese: study protocol', BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS, 17 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-0922-1
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2016 Milat AJ, Newson R, King L, Rissel C, Wolfenden L, Bauman A, et al., 'A guide to scaling up population health interventions.', Public health research & practice, 26 e2611604 (2016) [C1]
2016 Karimkhani C, Trikha R, Aksut B, Jones T, Boyers LN, Schlichte M, et al., 'Identifying gaps for research prioritisation: Global burden of external causes of injury as reflected in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.', Injury, 47 1151-1157 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.injury.2015.12.019
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2016 Sutherland R, Reeves P, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan N, et al., 'Cost effectiveness of a multi-component school-based physical activity intervention targeting adolescents: The 'Physical Activity 4 Everyone' cluster randomized trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author(s).Background: Few school-based interventions have been successful in reducing physical activity decline and preventing overweight and obesity in adolescent pop... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s).Background: Few school-based interventions have been successful in reducing physical activity decline and preventing overweight and obesity in adolescent populations. As a result, few cost effectiveness analyses have been reported. The aim of this paper is to report the cost and cost effectiveness of the Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1) intervention which was a multi-component intervention implemented in secondary schools located in low-income communities. Cost effectiveness was assessed using both the physical activity and weight status trial outcomes. Methods: Intervention and Study Design: The PA4E1 cluster randomised controlled trial was implemented in 10 Australian secondary schools (5 intervention: 5 control) and consisted of intervention schools receiving seven physical activity promotion strategies and six additional strategies that supported school implementation of the intervention components. Costs associated with physical activity strategies, and intervention implementation strategies within the five intervention schools were estimated and compared to the costs of usual physical activity practices of schools in the control group. The total cost of implementing the intervention was estimated from a societal perspective, based on the number of enrolled students in the target grade at the start of the intervention (Grade 7, n = 837). Economic Outcomes: The economic analysis outcomes were cost and incremental cost effectiveness ratios for the following: minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day gained, MET hours gained per person/day; Body Mass Index (BMI) unit avoided; and 10 % reduction in BMI z-score. Results: The intervention cost AUD $329,952 over 24 months, or AUD$394 per student in the intervention group. This resulted in a cost effectiveness ratio of AUD$56 ($35-$147) per additional minute of MVPA, AUD$1 ($0.6-$2.7) per MET hour gained per person per day, AUD$1408 ($788-$6,570) per BMI unit avoided, and AUD$563 ($282-$3,942) per 10 % reduction in BMI z-score. Conclusion: PA4E1 is a cost effective intervention for increasing the physical activity levels and reducing unhealthy weight gain in adolescence, a period in which physical activity typically declines. Additional modelling could explore the potential economic impact of the intervention on morbidity and mortality. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000382875.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0418-2
Co-authors John Wiggers, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2016 Wolfenden L, Milat AJ, Lecathelinais C, Skelton E, Clinton-McHarg T, Williams C, et al., 'A bibliographic review of public health dissemination and implementation research output and citation rates', Preventive Medicine Reports, 4 441-443 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The AuthorsThe aim of this study was to describe the research output and citation rates (academic impact) of public health dissemination and implementation research accord... [more]

© 2016 The AuthorsThe aim of this study was to describe the research output and citation rates (academic impact) of public health dissemination and implementation research according to research design and study type. A cross sectional bibliographic study was undertaken in 2013. All original data-based studies and review articles focusing on dissemination and implementation research that had been published in 10 randomly selected public health journals in 2008 were audited. The electronic database ¿Scopus¿ was used to calculate 5-year citation rates for all included publications. Of the 1648 publications examined, 216 were original data-based research or literature reviews focusing on dissemination and implementation research. Of these 72% were classified as descriptive/epidemiological, 26% were intervention and just 1.9% were measurement research. Cross-sectional studies were the most common study design (47%). Reviews, randomized trials, non-randomized trials and decision/cost-effectiveness studies each represented between 6 and 10% of all output. Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials and cohort studies were the most frequently cited study designs. The study suggests that publications that had the greatest academic impact (highest citation rates) made up only a small proportion of overall public health dissemination and implementation research output.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2016.08.006
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, Li K Chai, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2016 Wolfenden L, Grimshaw J, Williams CM, Yoong SL, 'Time to consider sharing data extracted from trials included in systematic reviews', Systematic Reviews, 5 (2016)

© 2016 The Author(s).Background: While the debate regarding shared clinical trial data has shifted from whether such data should be shared to how this is best achieved, the shari... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s).Background: While the debate regarding shared clinical trial data has shifted from whether such data should be shared to how this is best achieved, the sharing of data collected as part of systematic reviews has received little attention. In this commentary, we discuss the potential benefits of coordinated efforts to share data collected as part of systematic reviews. Main body: There are a number of potential benefits of systematic review data sharing. Shared information and data obtained as part of the systematic review process may reduce unnecessary duplication, reduce demand on trialist to service repeated requests from reviewers for data, and improve the quality and efficiency of future reviews. Sharing also facilitates research to improve clinical trial and systematic review methods and supports additional analyses to address secondary research questions. While concerns regarding appropriate use of data, costs, or the academic return for original review authors may impede more open access to information extracted as part of systematic reviews, many of these issues are being addressed, and infrastructure to enable greater access to such information is being developed. Conclusion: Embracing systems to enable more open access to systematic review data has considerable potential to maximise the benefits of research investment in undertaking systematic reviews.

DOI 10.1186/s13643-016-0361-y
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong
2016 Seward K, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Wiggers J, Wyse R, Jones J, et al., 'Multistrategy childcare-based intervention to improve compliance with nutrition guidelines versus usual care in long day care services: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010786
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2016 Tremain D, Freund M, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Dunlop A, et al., 'Provision of Chronic Disease Preventive Care in Community Substance Use Services: Client and Clinician Report', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 68 24-30 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors.Introduction: People with substance use problems have a higher prevalence of modifiable health risk behaviors. Routine clinician provision of preventive care m... [more]

© 2016 The Authors.Introduction: People with substance use problems have a higher prevalence of modifiable health risk behaviors. Routine clinician provision of preventive care may be effective in reducing such health behaviors. This study aimed to examine clinician provision of preventive care to clients of community substance use treatment services. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken with 386 clients and 54 clinicians of community substance use treatment services in one health district in New South Wales, Australia. Client- and clinician-reported provision of three elements of care (assessment, brief advice and referral) for three health risk behaviors (tobacco smoking, insufficient fruit and/or vegetable consumption and insufficient physical activity) was assessed, with associations with client characteristics examined. Results: Provision was highest for tobacco smoking assessment (90% client reported, 87% clinician reported) and brief advice (79% client reported, 80% clinician reported) and lowest for fruit and vegetable consumption (assessment 23%, brief advice 25%). Few clients reported being offered a referral (<. 10%). Assessment of physical activity and brief advice for all behaviors was higher for clients residing in rural/remote areas. Conclusion: Assessment and brief advice were provided to the majority of clients for smoking, but sub-optimally for the other behaviors. Further investigation of barriers to the provision of preventive care within substance use treatment settings is required, particularly for referral to ongoing support.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2016.05.006
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop, Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2016 Daly JB, Mackenzie LJ, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Roseby R, Wiggers JH, 'Interventions by Health care professionals who provide routine child health care to reduce tobacco smoke exposure in children a review and meta-Analysis', JAMA Pediatrics, 170 138-147 (2016) [C1]

Copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.IMPORTANCE Reducing child exposure to tobacco smoke is a public health priority. Guidelines recommend that health ... [more]

Copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.IMPORTANCE Reducing child exposure to tobacco smoke is a public health priority. Guidelines recommend that health care professionals in child health settings should address tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) in children. OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of interventions delivered by health care professionals who provide routine child health care in reducing TSE in children. DATA SOURCES A secondary analysis of 57 trials included in a 2014 Cochrane review and a subsequent extended searchwas performed. Controlled trials (published through June 2015) of interventions that focused on reducing child TSE, with no restrictions placed on who delivered the interventions,were identified. Secondary data extractionwas performed in August 2015. STUDY SELECTION Controlled trials of routine child health care delivered by health care professionals (physicians, nurses, medical assistants, health educators, and dieticians) that addressed the outcomes of interest (TSE reduction in children and parental smoking behaviors) were eligible for inclusion in this review and meta-Analysis. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS Study details and quality characteristicswere independently extracted by 2 authors. If outcome measures were sufficiently similar, meta-Analysis was performed using the random-effects model by DerSimonian and Laird. Otherwise, the results were described narratively. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome measurewas reduction in child TSE. Secondary outcomes of interest were parental smoking cessation, parental smoking reduction, and maternal postpartum smoking relapse prevention. RESULTS Sixteen studiesmet the selection criteria. Narrative analysis of the 6 trials that measured child TSE indicated no intervention effects relative to comparison groups. Similarly, meta-Analysis of 9 trials that measured parental smoking cessation demonstrated no overall intervention effect (n = 6399) (risk ratio 1.05; 95%CI, 0.74-1.50; P = .78). Meta-Analysis of the 3 trials that measured maternal postpartum smoking relapse prevention demonstrated a significant overall intervention effect (n = 1293) (risk ratio 1.53; 95%CI, 1.10-2.14; P = .01). High levels of study heterogeneity likely resulted from variability in outcome measures, length of follow up, intervention strategies, and unknown intervention fidelity. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Interventions delivered by health care professionals who provide routine child health care may be effective in preventing maternal smoking relapse. Further research is required to improve the effectiveness of such interventions in reducing child TSE and increasing parental smoking cessation. The findings of this meta-Analysis have policy and practice implications relating to interventions by routine pediatric health care professionals that aim to reduce child exposure to tobacco smoke.

DOI 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.3342
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Lisa Mackenzie
2016 Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Morgan P, Abdul Razak L, Jones J, Finch M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of multiple periods of outdoor free-play to increase moderate-to-vigorous physical activity among 3 to 6 year old children attending childcare: study protocol', BMC Public Health, (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3604-x
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2016 Kool B, Ziersch A, Robinson P, Wolfenden L, Lowe JB, 'The 'Seven deadly sins' of rejected papers', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40 3-4 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12521
2016 Yoong SL, Dodds P, Hure A, Clinton-Mcharg T, Skelton E, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Healthier options do not reduce total energy of parent intended fast food purchases for their young children: A randomised controlled trial', Nutrition and Dietetics, 73 146-152 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia.Aim: This study aimed to assess the impact of including healthier options on fast food restaurant menus on total energy of parent-repor... [more]

© 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia.Aim: This study aimed to assess the impact of including healthier options on fast food restaurant menus on total energy of parent-reported intended purchases and frequency to eat at fast food outlets for young children. Methods: Parents from an existing health survey cohort were approached to participate. They were eligible to participate if they resided in the Hunter region in NSW, could understand English and had a child aged between 3 and 12 years. Parents were randomised using a random number function embedded in the computer assisted telephone interview software, to receive one of two hypothetical fast food menus: one with healthier options and the other without healthier options (standard menu). After receiving these menus, participants completed a second telephone survey. Parents reported intended food purchases for their nominated child and intended number of visits to the fast food outlet with the hypothetical menu. Results: There was no significant difference in total energy of parent-reported intended purchases for their child, between the standard menu with (n = 101) and without (n = 113) healthier options (P = 0.60). There was also no difference in the frequency of intending to eat at the fast food restaurant between the two groups (P = 0.80). Conclusions: The provision of healthier options in itself may not reduce the total energy of intended purchases of parents for young children at fast food restaurants.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12204
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Alexis Hure
2016 Wolfenden L, Regan T, Williams CM, Wiggers J, Kingsland M, Milat A, et al., 'Strategies to improve the implementation of workplace-based policies or practices targeting tobacco, alcohol, diet, physical activity and obesity', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2016 (2016)

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The primary aim of ... [more]

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The primary aim of this review is to determine the effectiveness of implementation strategies for policies, practices or programmes that aim to improve health behaviours or reduce unhealthy behaviours commonly associated with risk factors for chronic disease in the workplace. Specifically, this review will target interventions that address diet, physical inactivity, obesity, risky alcohol use and tobacco use. In addition, this review will determine: the effectiveness of implementation strategies on health behaviour outcomes (nutrition, physical activity, obesity, alcohol use and smoking); the cost-effectiveness of these strategies; the existence of adverse outcomes resulting from the implementation of these strategies.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012439
Co-authors John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Timothy Regan, Serene Yoong
2016 O'Brien KM, Williams A, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Campbell E, et al., 'Effectiveness of a healthy lifestyle intervention for low back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee: protocol and statistical analysis plan for two randomised controlled trials', BRAZILIAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL THERAPY, 20 477-489 (2016)
DOI 10.1590/bjpt-rbf.2014.0189
Co-authors John Attia, Serene Yoong, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2016 Hollis JL, Sutherland R, Campbell L, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Nathan N, et al., 'Effects of a 'school-based' physical activity intervention on adiposity in adolescents from economically disadvantaged communities: secondary outcomes of the 'Physical Activity 4 Everyone' RCT', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBESITY, 40 1486-1493 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2016.107
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Christopher Oldmeadow, Jenna Hollis, John Wiggers, David Lubans
2016 Wolfenden L, Jones J, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse RJ, Kingsland M, et al., 'Strategies to improve the implementation of healthy eating, physical activity and obesity prevention policies, practices or programmes within childcare services', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011779.pub2
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Flora Tzelepis, Rebecca Wyse
2016 Gilligan C, Wolfenden L, Foxcroft DR, Kingsland M, Williams AJ, Hodder RK, et al., 'Family-based prevention programs for alcohol use in young people', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2016 (2016)

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration.This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effectiveness of universal, selective a... [more]

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration.This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effectiveness of universal, selective and indicated family-based prevention programs in preventing alcohol use, or problem drinking, in school-aged children (up to 18 years of age). Specifically, on these outcomes, the review aims: To assess the effectiveness of universal family-based prevention programs for all children up to 18 years ('universal interventions'). To assess the effectiveness of selective family-based prevention programs for children up to 18 years at elevated risk of alcohol use or problem drinking ('selective interventions'). To assess the effectiveness of indicated family-based prevention programs for children up to 18 years currently consuming alcohol ('indicated interventions').

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012287
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Conor Gilligan
2016 Wolfenden L, Milat AJ, Lecathelinais C, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Bryant J, et al., 'What is generated and what is used: A description of public health research output and citation', European Journal of Public Health, 26 523-525 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.The aim of this short report was to describe the ... [more]

© 2016 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.The aim of this short report was to describe the output and citation rates of public health. Data-based publications and literature reviews from the year 2008, and their 5-year citation rates were extracted from 10 randomly selected public health journals. In total, 86.2% of publications were descriptive/epidemiological studies, 56.8% used cross-sectional (56.8%) designs and 77.8% were classified as research translation stage 2. Reviews and publications describing randomized controlled trials were the most highly cited, but were infrequently published. Strategies to address the discordance between public health research output and research citation may improve the impact of public health research.

DOI 10.1093/eurpub/ckw047
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Wiggers, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Amy Waller, Mariko Carey, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Yoong SL, Chai LK, Williams CM, Wiggers J, Finch M, Wolfenden L, 'Systematic review and meta-analysis of interventions targeting sleep and their impact on child body mass index, diet, and physical activity', Obesity, 24 1140-1147 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Obesity Society.Objective This review aimed to examine the impact of interventions involving an explicit sleep component on child body mass index (BMI), diet, and phys... [more]

© 2016 The Obesity Society.Objective This review aimed to examine the impact of interventions involving an explicit sleep component on child body mass index (BMI), diet, and physical activity. Methods A systematic search was undertaken in six databases to identify randomized controlled trials examining the impact of interventions with a sleep component on child BMI, dietary intake, and/or physical activity. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted assessing the impact of included interventions on child BMI. Results Of the eight included trials, three enforced a sleep protocol and five targeted sleep as part of multicomponent behavioral interventions either exclusively or together with nutrition and physical activity. Meta-analysis of three studies found that multicomponent behavioral interventions involving a sleep component were not significantly effective in changing child BMI (n = 360,-0.04 kg/m2 [-0.18, 0.11], I2 = 0%); however, only one study included in the meta-analysis successfully changed sleep duration in children. There were some reported improvements to adolescent diet, and only one trial examined the impact on child physical activity, where a significant effect was observed. Conclusions Findings from the included studies suggest that where improvements in child sleep duration were achieved, a positive impact on child BMI, nutrition, and physical activity was also observed.

DOI 10.1002/oby.21459
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Li K Chai, Serene Yoong
2016 Wiggers JH, Hacker A, Kingsland M, Lecathelinais C, Tindall J, Bowman JA, Wolfenden L, 'Facilitating police recording of the alcohol-related characteristics of assault incidents: A stepped wedge implementation trial', Drug and Alcohol Review, 35 30-39 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.Introduction and Aims: Enforcement of liquor licensing laws is limited by inadequate police information system... [more]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.Introduction and Aims: Enforcement of liquor licensing laws is limited by inadequate police information systems. This study aimed to: (i) determine the effectiveness of an intervention in facilitating police recording of the alcohol consumption characteristics of people involved in assaults; and (ii) describe such characteristics by geographic area and setting of alcohol consumption.Design and Methods: A stepped wedge trial was conducted across New South Wales, Australia. An intervention to facilitate police recording of alcohol consumption information for people involved in incidents was implemented. For people involved in an assault the proportion for which alcohol consumption information was recorded was assessed. The proportion of assaults that were alcohol related, the proportions of people that consumed alcohol prior to the assault, were intoxicated, and had consumed alcohol in various settings, are described.Results: Post-intervention, alcohol consumption information was recorded for 85-100% of people involved in an assault incident. The proportion of incidents recorded as alcohol-related increased significantly (26-44.5%; P<0.0001). The proportion of assaults classified as alcohol related was significantly greater in regional/rural areas (50-47%) than in metropolitan areas (38%). More people in metropolitan areas (54%) consumed alcohol on licensed premises prior to an assault than in regional/rural areas (39-42%), with approximately 70% of persons intoxicated regardless of setting of alcohol consumption. Twenty percent of premises accounted for 60% of assaults linked to licensed premises.Discussion and Conclusions: The intervention was effective in enhancing the recording of alcohol-related information for assault incidents. Such information could enhance targeted policing of liquor licensing laws. [Wiggers JH, Hacker A, Kingsland M, Lecathelinais C, Tindall J, Bowman JA, Wolfenden L. Facilitating police recording of the alcohol-related characteristics of assault incidents: A stepped wedge implementation trial. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;00:000-000].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12330
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2016 Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, Rowland B, Dodds P, Sidey M, Sherker S, Wiggers J, 'The impact of alcohol management practices on sports club membership and revenue', HEALTH PROMOTION JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 27 159-161 (2016)
DOI 10.1071/HE15124
Co-authors John Wiggers
2016 Wyse R, Yoong SL, Dodds P, Campbell L, Delaney T, Nathan N, et al., 'Online canteens: awareness, use, barriers to use, and the acceptability of potential online strategies to improve public health nutrition in primary schools.', Health promotion journal of Australia : official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals, (2016)
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse
2016 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Gillham K, Dray J, Wiggers J, 'Association between adolescent tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use and individual and environmental resilience protective factors.', BMJ Open, 6 e012688 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012688
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Julia Dray Uon
2016 James E, Freund M, Booth A, Duncan MJ, Johnson N, Short CE, et al., 'Comparative efficacy of simultaneous versus sequential multiple health behavior change interventions among adults: A systematic review of randomised trials', Preventive Medicine, 89 211-223 (2016) [C1]

© 2016.Background: Growing evidence points to the benefits of addressing multiple health behaviors rather than single behaviors. Purpose: This review evaluates the relative effec... [more]

© 2016.Background: Growing evidence points to the benefits of addressing multiple health behaviors rather than single behaviors. Purpose: This review evaluates the relative effectiveness of simultaneous and sequentially delivered multiple health behavior change (MHBC) interventions. Secondary aims were to identify: a) the most effective spacing of sequentially delivered components; b) differences in efficacy of MHBC interventions for adoption/cessation behaviors and lifestyle/addictive behaviors, and c) differences in trial retention between simultaneously and sequentially delivered interventions. Methods: MHBC intervention trials published up to October 2015 were identified through a systematic search. Eligible trials were randomised controlled trials that directly compared simultaneous and sequential delivery of a MHBC intervention. A narrative synthesis was undertaken. Results: Six trials met the inclusion criteria and across these trials the behaviors targeted were smoking, diet, physical activity, and alcohol consumption. Three trials reported a difference in intervention effect between a sequential and simultaneous approach in at least one behavioral outcome. Of these, two trials favoured a sequential approach on smoking. One trial favoured a simultaneous approach on fat intake. There was no difference in retention between sequential and simultaneous approaches. Conclusions: There is limited evidence regarding the relative effectiveness of sequential and simultaneous approaches. Given only three of the six trials observed a difference in intervention effectiveness for one health behavior outcome, and the relatively consistent finding that the sequential and simultaneous approaches were more effective than a usual/minimal care control condition, it appears that both approaches should be considered equally efficacious. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015027876.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.06.012
Co-authors Angela Booth, Mitch Duncan, Natalie Johnson, Frances Kaylambkin, Erica James
2016 Yoong SL, Jones J, Marshall J, Wiggers J, Seward K, Finch M, et al., 'A theory-based evaluation of a dissemination intervention to improve childcare cooks' intentions to implement nutritional guidelines on their menus', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0474-7
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2016 Yoong SL, Finch M, Nathan N, Wiggers J, Lecathelinais C, Jones J, et al., 'A longitudinal study assessing childcare services' adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 52 765-770 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians)Aim: Despite ongoing investments to improve the obesogenic environments of childcare se... [more]

© 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians)Aim: Despite ongoing investments to improve the obesogenic environments of childcare settings, little is known regarding how these services have changed their physical activity and nutrition-promoting practices. This study aims to describe changes in the proportion of Australian childcare services that have adopted best-practice healthy eating and physical activity practices between 2006 and 2013 and to assess whether adoption varied by socio-economic status and locality. Methods: A randomly selected sample of nominated supervisors (n = 358) from childcare services located in New South Wales, Australia, participated in a telephone survey in 2006, 2009, 2010 and 2013. Supervisors reported on their service's adoption of six practices: (i) having written nutrition and physical activity policies; (ii) staff trained in physical activity and nutrition in the past year; (iii) scheduled time for fundamental movement skills and (iv) outdoor play; (v) weekly or less screen time opportunities; and (vi) serving only non-sweetened beverages. Results: A significant increase in the prevalence of services adopting all but one practice, between 2006 and 2013 was identified. Ninety one percent of services adopted four or more practices, a significant increase from 38% in 2006. There were no differences in the proportion of services adopting each practice by locality and socio-economic status. Conclusions: Government investment in obesity prevention programmes can equitably improve childcare service's adoption of healthy eating and physical activity promoting practices on a jurisdiction-wide basis. The establishment of a routine system to monitor adoption of a broader range of practices by childcare services is warranted.

DOI 10.1111/jpc.13252
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2016 Reilly K, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Sutherland R, Wyse R, Yoong SL, 'Validity of four measures in assessing school canteen menu compliance with state-based healthy canteen policy', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 27 215-221 (2016) [C1]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2016.Issue addressed In order to assess the impact of healthy school canteen policies on food availability for students, valid methods o... [more]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2016.Issue addressed In order to assess the impact of healthy school canteen policies on food availability for students, valid methods of measuring compliance are needed that can be applied at scale. The aim of this study is to assess the validity and direct cost of four methods to assess policy compliance: 1) principal and 2) canteen manager self-report via a computer-assisted telephone interview; and 3) comprehensive and 4) quick menu audits by dietitians, compared with observations. Methods A cross-sectional study took place in the Hunter region of NSW, Australia, in a sample of 38 primary schools that had previously participated in a randomised controlled trial to improve healthy canteen policy compliance. Policy compliance was assessed using the four methods specified above. Percentage agreement, kappa, sensitivity and specificity compared with observations was calculated together with the direct time taken and costs of each method. Indirect costs (including set-up costs) for all measures have not been included. Results Agreement with observations was substantial for the quick menu audit (kappa=0.68), and moderate for the comprehensive menu audit (kappa=0.42). Principal and canteen manager self-report resulted in poor agreement and low specificity with the gold standard. The self-reported measures had the lowest cost, followed by the quick menu audit and lastly the comprehensive menu audit. Conclusion The quick menu audit represents a valid and potentially low-cost method of supporting policy implementation at scale. So what? This study demonstrates that a quick menu audit represents a valid measure of undertaking assessment of school canteen policy compliance at a population level.

DOI 10.1071/HE16053
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse
2016 Britton B, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Bauer J, Beck A, et al., 'Eating As Treatment (EAT): a stepped-wedge, randomised controlled trial of a health behaviour intervention provided by dietitians to improve nutrition in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, 25 65-65 (2016)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter
2016 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Nathan N, et al., ''Physical activity 4 everyone' school-based intervention to prevent decline in adolescent physical activity levels: 12 month (mid-intervention) report on a cluster randomised trial', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50 488-495 (2016) [C1]

Background: Adolescence is a recognised period of physical activity decline, particularly among low-income communities. We report the 12-month (midpoint) effects of a 2-year multi... [more]

Background: Adolescence is a recognised period of physical activity decline, particularly among low-income communities. We report the 12-month (midpoint) effects of a 2-year multicomponent physical activity intervention implemented in disadvantaged secondary schools. Methods: A cluster randomised trial was undertaken in 10 secondary schools located in disadvantaged areas in New South Wales, Australia. Students in Grade 7 were recruited, with follow-up in Grade 8. The intervention was guided by socioecological theory and included seven physical activity strategies, and six implementation adoption strategies. The primary outcome was mean minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day assessed using Actigraph GT3X accelerometers. Outcome data were analysed using repeated measures linear mixed models. Results: At baseline, 1150 (93%) students participated in the data collection (mean age 12 years, 48% boys) and 1050 (79%) students participated at 12-month follow-up. By the 12-month follow-up, the six implementation adoption strategies had been used to support schools to deliver four of the seven physical activity elements. There was a significant group-by-time interaction for mean minutes of MVPA per day in favour of the intervention group (adjusted difference between groups at follow-up=3.85 min, 95% CI (0.79 to 6.91), p=0.01), including significantly more vigorous physical activity (2.45 min, p=0.01), equating to 27 min more MVPA per week. Summary: At 12-month follow-up, the intervention had reduced the decline in physical activity among adolescents from disadvantaged schools. The intervention may assist students to meet physical activity guidelines.

DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-094523
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jenna Hollis, Philip Morgan, John Wiggers, David Lubans
2015 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Bisquera A, 'Characteristics of the home food environment that mediate immediate and sustained increases in child fruit and vegetable consumption: Mediation analysis from the Healthy Habits cluster randomised controlled trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Wyse et al.Background: The home food environment can influence the development of dietary behaviours in children, and interventions that modify characteristics of the home... [more]

© 2015 Wyse et al.Background: The home food environment can influence the development of dietary behaviours in children, and interventions that modify characteristics of the home food environment have been shown to increase children's fruit and vegetable consumption. However to date, interventions to increase children's fruit and vegetable consumption have generally produced only modest effects. Mediation analysis can help in the design of more efficient and effective interventions by identifying the mechanisms through which interventions have an effect. This study aimed to identify characteristics of the home food environment that mediated immediate and sustained increases in children's fruit and vegetable consumption following the 4-week Healthy Habits telephone-based parent intervention. Method: Analysis was conducted using 2-month (immediate) and 12-month (sustained) follow-up data from a cluster randomised control trial of a home food environment intervention to increase the fruit and vegetable consumption of preschool children. Using recursive path analysis, a series of mediation models were created to investigate the direct and indirect effects of immediate and sustained changes to characteristics of the home food environment (fruit and vegetable availability, accessibility, parent intake, parent providing behaviour, role-modelling, mealtime eating practices, child feeding strategies, and pressure to eat), on the change in children's fruit and vegetable consumption. Results: Of the 394 participants in the randomised trial, 357 and 329 completed the 2- and 12-month follow-up respectively. The final mediation model suggests that the effect of the intervention on the children's fruit and vegetable consumption was mediated by parent fruit and vegetable intake and parent provision of these foods at both 2- and 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Analysis of data from the Healthy Habits trial suggests that two environmental variables (parental intake and parent providing) mediate the immediate and sustained effect of the intervention, and it is recommended these variables be targeted in subsequent home food environment interventions to bring about immediate and sustained changes in child fruit and vegetable intake. Trial registration:ACTRN12609000820202 .

DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0281-6
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2015 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, McElduff P, Attia J, Saitz R, et al., 'Effect of telephone follow-up on retention and balance in an alcohol intervention trial', Preventive Medicine Reports, 2 746-749 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Authors.Objectives: Telephone follow-up is not currently recommended as a strategy to improve retention in randomized trials. The aims of this study were to estimate t... [more]

© 2015 The Authors.Objectives: Telephone follow-up is not currently recommended as a strategy to improve retention in randomized trials. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of telephone follow-up on retention, identify participant characteristics predictive of questionnaire completion during or after telephone follow-up, and estimate the effect of including participants who provided follow-up data during or after telephone follow-up on balance between randomly allocated groups in a trial estimating the effect of electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention on alcohol consumption in hospital outpatients with hazardous or harmful drinking. Method: Trial participants were followed up 6. months after randomization (June-December 2013) using e-mails containing a hyperlink to a web-based questionnaire when possible and by post otherwise. Telephone follow-up was attempted after two written reminders and participants were invited to complete the questionnaire by telephone when contact was made. Results: Retention before telephone follow-up was 62.1% (520/837) and 82.8% (693/837) afterward: an increase of 20.7% (173/837). Therefore, 55% (95% CI 49%-60%) of the 317 participants who had not responded after two written reminders responded during or after the follow-up telephone call. Age. <. 55. years, a higher AUDIT-C score and provision of a mobile/cell phone number were predictive of questionnaire completion during or after telephone follow-up. Balance between randomly allocated groups was present before and after inclusion of participants who completed the questionnaire during or after telephone follow-up. Conclusion: Telephone follow-up improved retention in this randomized trial without affecting balance between the randomly allocated groups.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.08.016
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Natalie Johnson, Kypros Kypri, A Dunlop, Joanna Latter, Patrick Mcelduff, John Attia
2015 Jones J, Wyse R, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, Wiggers J, Marshall J, et al., 'Effectiveness of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services: a randomised controlled trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 10 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-015-0340-z
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Jenna Hollis, Patrick Mcelduff, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2015 Pederson H, Okl T, Boyers LN, Karimkhani C, Rosenfeld RM, Nasser M, et al., 'Identifying otolaryngology systematic review research gaps: Comparing global burden of disease 2010 results with cochrane database of systematic review content', JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, 141 67-72 (2015) [C1]

Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.IMPORTANCE: Burden of disease should inform research prioritization. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether systematic re... [more]

Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.IMPORTANCE: Burden of disease should inform research prioritization. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether systematic reviews and protocols published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) appropriately reflect disease burden for otolaryngologic conditions as measured by the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2010 project. DESIGN: Two investigators independently assessed 10 otolaryngologic conditions in CDSR for systematic review and protocol representation from March to June 2014. The otolaryngologic diseases were matched to their respective GBD 2010 disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) to assess their correlation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Relationship of CDSR representation (based on systematic reviews and protocols) with percentage of total 2010 DALYs, 2010 DALY rank, and DALY percentage change from 1990 to 2010 for 10 otolaryngologic conditions. RESULTS: All 10 otolaryngologic conditions were represented by at least 1 systematic review in CDSR. The number of reviews and protocols in CDSR was well matched with GBD 2010 disability metrics for only 1 disease, mouth cancer. Upper respiratory infections, otitis media, thyroid cancer, and cleft lip and cleft palate were overrepresented in CDSR, and esophageal cancer, "other hearing loss," nasopharynx cancer, larynx cancer, and "cancer of other part of pharynx and oropharynx" were underrepresented. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: The representation of otolaryngologic conditions in CDSR correlates poorly with DALY metrics. The results of this study may guide future research prioritization and allocation of funds.

DOI 10.1001/jamaoto.2014.2700
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2015 Hills A, Nathan N, Robinson K, Fox D, Wolfenden L, 'Improvement in primary school adherence to the NSW Healthy School Canteen Strategy in 2007 and 2010', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 26 89-92 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Australian Health Promotion Association.Issue addressed Since 2005, a government-endorsed strategy guiding food sold in New South Wales school canteens has been in place. ... [more]

© 2015 Australian Health Promotion Association.Issue addressed Since 2005, a government-endorsed strategy guiding food sold in New South Wales school canteens has been in place. This study describes the changes in school canteen food between 2007 and 2010 and characterises schools most likely to adhere to strategy guidelines. Methods Menus obtained from a cohort of primary and central schools in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales were audited using a traffic light system of classification. Energy dense, nutrient-poor or 'red' items are restricted; 'amber' are to be selected carefully and healthier 'green' items are encouraged. Results In 2007, 7% of schools had no red items on their menu. In 2010, this improved to 22% (P<0.05). In 2010, small schools (OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.25-3.05, P=0.003); lower socioeconomic schools (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.02-1.78, P=0.03); non-government (OR=1.7, 95% CI=1.22-2.23, P=0.001) and rural schools (OR=1.7, 95% CI=1.30-2.25, P<0.001) had higher odds of having red items on the menu. No significant change occurred in the proportion of green foods listed for sale between 2007 and 2010. Conclusions Proportion of schools adhering to strategy guidelines had increased slightly, however, most continue to list red items for regular sale. So what? For health policies to improve public health they need implementation. Findings suggest more work is required, particularly in small schools, rural schools and non-government schools.

DOI 10.1071/HE14098
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2015 Wolfenden L, Ziersch A, Robinson P, Lowe J, Wiggers J, 'Reducing research waste and improving research impact', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 39 303-304 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12467
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Dray J, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Freund M, Hodder R, Wiggers J, 'Systematic review of universal resilience interventions targeting child and adolescent mental health in the school setting: Review protocol', Systematic Reviews, (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Dray et al. Background: The mental health of children and adolescents is a key area of health concern internationally. Previous empirical studies suggest that resilience m... [more]

© 2015 Dray et al. Background: The mental health of children and adolescents is a key area of health concern internationally. Previous empirical studies suggest that resilience may act as a protective mechanism towards the development of mental health problems. Resilience refers to the ability to employ a collection of protective factors to return to or maintain positive mental health following disadvantage or adversity. Schools represent a potential setting within which protective factors of all children and adolescents may be fostered through resilience-focussed interventions. Despite this potential, limited research has investigated the effectiveness of universal school-based resilience-focussed interventions on mental health outcomes in children and adolescents. The objective of the present review is to assess the effects of universal school-based resilience-focussed interventions, relative to a comparison group, on mental health outcomes in children and adolescents. Methods/design: Eligible studies will be randomised (including cluster-randomised) controlled trials of universal interventions explicitly described as resilience-focussed or comprising strategies to strengthen a minimum of three internal protective factors, targeting children aged 5 to 18 years, implemented within schools, and reporting a mental health outcome. Screening for studies will be conducted across six electronic databases: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC), Excerpta Medica database (EMBASE), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). Two reviewers will retrieve eligible articles, assess risk of bias, and extract data. Where studies are sufficiently homogenous and reported outcomes are amenable for pooled synthesis, meta-analysis will be performed. Narrative description will be used to synthesise trial outcome data where data cannot be combined or heterogeneity exists. Discussion: This review will aid in building an evidence base for the effectiveness of universal school-based resilience-focussed interventions and in doing so provide an opportunity to better inform the development of interventions to potentially prevent mental health problems in child and adolescent populations. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42015025908

DOI 10.1186/s13643-015-0172-6
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Julia Dray Uon, Jenny Bowman
2015 Rowland BC, Wolfenden L, Dodds P, Kingsland M, Gillham KE, Wiggers JH, 'The impact of a hypothetical designated driver program on intended alcohol-related behavior: an RCT', HEALTH PROMOTION INTERNATIONAL, 30 7-15 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/heapro/dau075
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Yoong SL, Hall A, Williams CM, Skelton E, Oldmeadow C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Alignment of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane database of systematic reviews and the database of abstracts and reviews of effectiveness with global burden-of-disease data: A bibliographic analysis', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 69 708-714 (2015) [C1]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burde... [more]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burden of disease. This study aims to assess if the volume of research output from systematic reviews proportionally aligns with burden of disease assessed using percentages of mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods: A cross-sectional audit of reviews published between January 2012 and August 2013 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) was undertaken. Percentages of mortality and DALYs were obtained from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. Standardised residual differences (SRD) based on percentages of mortality and DALYs were calculated, where conditions with SRD of more than or less than three were considered overstudied or understudied, respectively. Results: 1029 reviews from CDSR and 1928 reviews from DARE were examined. There was a significant correlation between percentage DALYs and systematic reviews published in CDSR and DARE databases (CDSR: r=0.68, p=0.001; DARE: r=0.60, p<0.001). There was no significant correlation between percentage mortality and number of systematic reviews published in either database (CDSR: r=0.34, p=0.14; DARE: r=0.22, p=0.34). Relative to percentage of mortality, mental and behavioural disorders, musculoskeletal conditions and other non-communicable diseases were overstudied. Maternal disorders were overstudied relative to percentages of mortality and DALYs in CDSR. Conclusions: The focus of systematic reviews is moderately correlated with DALYs. A number of conditions may be overstudied relative to percentage of mortality particularly in the context of health and medical reviews.

DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-205389
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong, Alix Hall, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2015 Finch M, Yoong SL, Thomson RJ, Seward K, Cooney M, Jones J, et al., 'A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of an implementation intervention to increase healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies, and practices in centre-based childcare services: Study protocol', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C3]

© 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.Background: Promotion of healthy eating and physical activity in early childhood is recommended as a global chronic disease prev... [more]

© 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.Background: Promotion of healthy eating and physical activity in early childhood is recommended as a global chronic disease prevention strategy. Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to provide children with opportunities to improve healthy eating and physical activity. Evidence to inform implementation of childcare obesity prevention guidelines into routine practice in childcare, however, is lacking. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of an intervention, delivered to childcare staff, aiming to increasing service implementation of healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices. Methods and analysis: A pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial will be undertaken with 165 childcare services in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia. Services will be randomised to receive either a 10-month evidence-based performance review intervention with other resources to support practice change, or to a waitlist control group. The primary trial outcome is the proportion of services implementing all of the following recommended healthy eating and physical activity promoting practices: written nutrition, physical activity and small screen recreation policies; providing information to families regarding healthy eating (including breastfeeding), physical activity and small screen time; providing twice weekly healthy eating learning experiences to children; providing water and only plain milk to children; providing fundamental movement skills activities for children every day; and limiting and using electronic screen time more for educational purposes and learning experiences. Effectiveness will be assessed using a telephone interview of practice implementation with childcare staff at baseline and 12 months following baseline. Ethics and dissemination: The study was approved by the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee and the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee. Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000972628.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006706
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2015 Yoong SL, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse R, Jones J, Freund M, et al., 'Childcare Service Centers' Preferences and Intentions to Use a Web-Based Program to Implement Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Policies and Practices: A Cross-Sectional Study', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 17 (2015)
DOI 10.2196/jmir.3639
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2015 Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, Rowland BC, Dodds P, Gillham K, Yoong SL, et al., 'Improving availability, promotion and purchase of fruit and vegetable and non sugar-sweetened drink products at community sporting clubs: A randomised trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12 (2015) [C1]

© Wolfenden et al.Background: Amateur sporting clubs represent an attractive setting for health promotion. This study assesses the impact of a multi-component intervention on the... [more]

© Wolfenden et al.Background: Amateur sporting clubs represent an attractive setting for health promotion. This study assesses the impact of a multi-component intervention on the availability, promotion and purchase of fruit and vegetable and non sugar -sweetened drink products from community sporting club canteens. We also assessed the impact the intervention on sporting club revenue from the sale of food and beverages. Method: A repeat cross-sectional, parallel group, cluster randomized controlled trial was undertaken with amateur community football clubs in New South Wales, Australia. The intervention was conducted over 2.5 winter sporting seasons and sought to improve the availability and promotion of fruit and vegetables and non sugar-sweetened drinks in sporting club canteens. Trial outcomes were assessed via telephone surveys of sporting club representatives and members. Results: Eighty five sporting clubs and 1143 club members participated in the study. Relative to the control group, at follow-up, clubs allocated to the intervention were significantly more likely to have fruit and vegetable products available at the club canteen (OR = 5.13; 95% CI 1.70-15.38), were more likely to promote fruit and vegetable selection using reduced pricing and meal deals (OR = 34.48; 95% CI 4.18-250.00) and members of intervention clubs were more likely to report purchase of fruit and vegetable (OR = 2.58 95% CI; 1.08-6.18) and non sugar -sweetened drink (OR = 1.56; 95% CI 1.09-2.25) products. There was no significant difference between groups in the annual club revenue from food and non-alcoholic beverage sales. Conclusion: The findings demonstrate that the intervention can improve the nutrition environment of sporting clubs and the purchasing behaviour of members. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12609000224224.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0193-5
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2015 Rowland BC, Wolfenden L, Gillham K, Kingsland M, Richardson B, Wiggers J, 'Is alcohol and community sport a good mix? Alcohol management, consumption and social capital in community sports clubs', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 39 210-215 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.Objective: Community sports clubs provide an important contribution to the health and wellbeing of individuals and the community; ho... [more]

© 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.Objective: Community sports clubs provide an important contribution to the health and wellbeing of individuals and the community; however, they have also been associated with risky alcohol consumption. This study assessed whether a club's alcohol management strategies were related to risky alcohol consumption by members and levels of social capital, as measured in terms of participation in and perceived safety of the club. Method: A total of 723 sports club members from 33 community football clubs in New South Wales, Australia, completed a computer assisted telephone interview (CATI) and a management representative from each club also completed a CATI. The club representative reported on the club's implementation of 11 alcohol management practices, while club members reported their alcohol consumption and perceived levels of safety at the club and participation in the club. Results: A structural equation model identified having the bar open for more than four hours; having alcohol promotions; and serving intoxicated patrons were associated with increased risky alcohol consumption while at the club; which in turn was associated with lower levels of perceived club safety and member participation. Conclusion and implications: The positive contribution of community sports clubs to the community may be diminished by specific inadequate alcohol management practices. Changing alcohol management practices can reduce alcohol consumption, and possibly increase perceived aspects of social capital, such as safety and participation.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12280
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Rowland B, Sidey M, Mcelduff P, Wiggers JH, 'Improving the implementation of responsible alcohol management practices by community sporting clubs: A randomised controlled trial', Drug and Alcohol Review, 34 447-457 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/dar.12252
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, John Wiggers
2015 Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Rowland BC, Lecathelinais C, Gillham KE, et al., 'Tackling risky alcohol consumption in sport: A cluster randomised controlled trial of an alcohol management intervention with community football clubs', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, (2015) [C1]

Background An increased prevalence of risky alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm has been reported for members of sporting groups and at sporting venues compared with non-... [more]

Background An increased prevalence of risky alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm has been reported for members of sporting groups and at sporting venues compared with non-sporting populations. While sports clubs and venues represent opportune settings to implement strategies to reduce such risks, no controlled trials have been reported. The purpose of the study was to examine the effectiveness of an alcohol management intervention in reducing risky alcohol consumption and the risk of alcohol-related harm among community football club members. Method A cluster randomised controlled trial of an alcohol management intervention was undertaken with non-elite, community football clubs and their members in New South Wales, Australia. Risky alcohol consumption (5+ drinks) at the club and risk of alcohol-related harm using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) were measured at baseline and postintervention. Results Eighty-eight clubs participated in the trial (n=43, Intervention; n=45, Control) and separate cross-sectional samples of club members completed the baseline (N=1411) and postintervention (N=1143) surveys. Postintervention, a significantly lower proportion of intervention club members reported: risky alcohol consumption at the club (Intervention: 19%; Control: 24%; OR: 0.63 (95% CI 0.40 to 1.00); p=0.05); risk of alcohol-related harm (Intervention: 38%; Control: 45%; OR: 0.58 (95% CI 0.38 to 0.87); p<0.01); alcohol consumption risk (Intervention: 47%; Control: 55%; OR: 0.60 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.87); p<0.01) and possible alcohol dependence (Intervention: 1%; Control: 4%; OR: 0.20 (95% CI 0.06 to 0.65); p<0.01). Conclusions With large numbers of people worldwide playing, watching and sports officiating, enhancing club-based alcohol management interventions could make a substantial contribution to reducing the burden of alcohol misuse in communities.

DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-204984
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Wiggers, Patrick Mcelduff
2015 Yoong SL, Clinton-Mcharg T, Wolfenden L, 'Systematic reviews examining implementation of research into practice and impact on population health are needed', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 68 788-791 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objectives To examine the research translation phase focus (T1-T4) of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and D... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objectives To examine the research translation phase focus (T1-T4) of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE). Briefly, T1 includes reviews of basic science experiments; T2 includes reviews of human trials leading to guideline development; T3 includes reviews examining how to move guidelines into policy and practice; and T4 includes reviews describing the impact of changing health practices on population outcomes. Study Design and Setting A cross-sectional audit of randomly selected reviews from CDSR (n = 500) and DARE (n = 500) was undertaken. The research translation phase of reviews, overall and by communicable disease, noncommunicable disease, and injury subgroups, were coded by two researchers. Results A total of 898 reviews examined a communicable, noncommunicable, or injury-related condition. Of those, 98% of reviews within CDSR focused on T2, and the remaining 2% focused on T3. In DARE, 88% focused on T2, 8.7% focused on T1, 2.5% focused on T3, and 1.3% focused on T4. Almost all reviews examining communicable (CDSR 100%, DARE 93%), noncommunicable (CDSR 98%, DARE 87%), and injury (CDSR 95%, DARE 88%) were also T2 focused. Conclusion Few reviews exist to guide practitioners and policy makers with implementing evidence-based treatments or programs.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2014.12.008
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2015 Wolfenden L, Finch M, Nathan N, Weaver N, Wiggers J, Yoong SL, et al., 'Factors associated with early childhood education and care service implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in Australia: a cross-sectional study', Translational Behavioral Medicine, 5 327-334 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Society of Behavioral Medicine.Many early childhood education and care (ECEC) services fail to implement recommended policies and practices supportive of healthy eating a... [more]

© 2015, Society of Behavioral Medicine.Many early childhood education and care (ECEC) services fail to implement recommended policies and practices supportive of healthy eating and physical activity. The purpose of this study was to assess whether certain theoretically-based factors are associated with implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in a sample of ECEC services. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with Service Managers of ECEC services. The survey assessed the operational characteristics, policy, and practice implementation, and 13 factors were suggested by Damschroder¿s Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to impede or promote implementation. Logistic regression analyses found a significant association between implementation factor score and full implementation (OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.18¿1.61; p = <0.01), indicating that for every one point increase in implementation score, ECEC services were 38¿% more likely to be fully implementing the policies and practices. The findings highlight the opportunities for improving implementation of obesity prevention interventions in this setting by developing interventions that address such factors.

DOI 10.1007/s13142-015-0319-y
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Natasha Weaver, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse
2015 Wolfenden L, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, 'Local implementation of obesity policy', The Lancet, 386 1039 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)00141-5
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2015 McCarter KL, Britton B, Baker A, Halpin S, Beck A, Carter G, et al., 'Interventions to improve screening and appropriate referral of patients with cancer for distress: Systematic review protocol', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008277
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Sean Halpin, Amanda Baker
2015 Williams C, Nathan N, Wyse R, yoong S, delaney T, Wiggers JH, et al., 'Strategies for enhancing the implementation of school-based policies or practices targeting risk factors for chronic disease (protocol)', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (2015)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011677
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2015 Britton B, McCarter K, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Bauer J, et al., 'Eating As Treatment (EAT) study protocol: a stepped-wedge, randomised controlled trial of a health behaviour change intervention provided by dietitians to improve nutrition in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy.', BMJ open, 5 e008921 (2015) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Sean Halpin, Patrick Mcelduff, Amanda Baker
2015 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Bonevski B, McElduff P, et al., 'Targeting multiple health risk behaviours among vocational education students using electronic feedback and online and telephone support: Protocol for a cluster randomised trial Health behavior, health promotion and society', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al.Background: Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges are the primary provider of vocational education in Australia. Most TAFE students are young adul... [more]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al.Background: Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges are the primary provider of vocational education in Australia. Most TAFE students are young adults, a period when health risk behaviours become established. Furthermore, high rates of smoking, risky alcohol consumption, inadequate fruit and vegetable intake and insufficient physical activity have been reported in TAFE students. There have been no intervention studies targeting multiple health risk behaviours simultaneously in this population. The proposed trial will examine the effectiveness of providing TAFE students with electronic feedback regarding health risk behaviours and referral to a suite of existing online and telephone services addressing smoking, risky alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable intake, and physical activity levels. Methods/Design: A two arm, parallel, cluster randomised trial will be conducted within TAFE campuses in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. TAFE classes will be randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition (50 classes per condition). To be eligible, students must be: enrolled in a course that runs for more than 6 months; aged 16 years or older; and not meet Australian health guideline recommendations for at least one of the following: smoking, alcohol consumption, fruit and/or vegetable intake, or physical activity. Students attending intervention classes, will undertake via a computer tablet a risk assessment for health risk behaviours, and for behaviours not meeting Australian guidelines be provided with electronic feedback about these behaviours and referral to evidence-based online programs and telephone services. Students in control classes will not receive any intervention. Primary outcome measures that will be assessed via online surveys at baseline and 6 months post-recruitment are: 1) daily tobacco smoking; 2) standard drinks of alcohol consumed per week; 3) serves of fruit consumed daily; 4) serves of vegetables consumed daily; and 5) metabolic equivalent minutes of physical activity per week. Discussion: Proactive enrolment to existing online and telephone services has the potential to address modifiable determinants of disease. This trial will be the first to examine a potentially scalable intervention targeting multiple health risk behaviours among students in the vocational training setting.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1898-8
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Philip Morgan, Kypros Kypri, Billie Bonevski, Patrick Mcelduff, John Wiggers, Clare Collins
2015 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SL, Lecathelinais C, Bell AC, et al., 'Adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices by Australian primary schools: 2006 to 2013', HEALTH EDUCATION RESEARCH, 30 262-271 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyu068
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2015 Yoong SL, Nathan NK, Wyse RJ, Preece SJ, Williams CM, Sutherland RL, et al., 'Assessment of the School Nutrition Environment: A Study in Australian Primary School Canteens', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 49 215-222 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Introduction Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children's diets, as they offer structured opportuni... [more]

© 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Introduction Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children's diets, as they offer structured opportunities for ongoing intervention. Modifications to the school food environment can increase purchasing of healthier foods and improve children's diets. This study examines the availability of healthy food and drinks, implementation of pricing and promotion strategies in Australian primary school canteens, and whether these varied by school characteristics. Methods In 2012 and 2013, canteen managers of primary schools in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales reported via telephone interview the pricing and promotion strategies implemented in their canteens to encourage healthier food and drink purchases. A standardized audit of canteen menus was performed to assess the availability of healthy options. Data were analyzed in 2014. Results Overall, 203 (79%) canteen managers completed the telephone interview and 170 provided menus. Twenty-nine percent of schools had menus that primarily consisted of healthier food and drinks, and 11% did not sell unhealthy foods. Less than half reported including only healthy foods in meal deals (25%), labeling menus (43%), and having a comprehensive canteen policy (22%). A significantly larger proportion of schools in high socioeconomic areas (OR=3.0) and large schools (OR=4.4) had primarily healthy options on their menus. School size and being a Government school were significantly associated with implementation of some pricing and promotion strategies. Conclusions There is a need to monitor canteen environments to inform policy development and research. Future implementation research to improve the food environments of disadvantaged schools in particular is warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.02.002
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2015 Rowland B, Tindall J, Wolfenden L, Gillham K, Ramsden R, Wiggers J, 'Alcohol management practices in community football clubs: Association with risky drinking at the club and overall hazardous alcohol consumption', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 34 438-446 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/dar.12210
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Rose B, Robertson K, Wiggers J, 'Benefits of policy support of a healthy eating initiative in schools', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 39 94-95 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12321
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye P, Lecathelinais C, McElwaine K, et al., 'Acceptability and receipt of preventive care for chronic-disease health risk behaviors reported by clients of community mental health services', Psychiatric Services, 66 857-864 (2015) [C1]

Objective: Compared with the general population, people with a mental illness have a greater prevalence of behaviors that contribute to higher chronic disease rates. Mental health... [more]

Objective: Compared with the general population, people with a mental illness have a greater prevalence of behaviors that contribute to higher chronic disease rates. Mental health clinical guidelines recommend preventive care to address such behaviors; however, little information is available about whether clients consider preventive care acceptable or about the prevalence of such care in mental health services. This article describes acceptability and receipt of assessment, advice, and referral for smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, harmful alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity, as reported by community mental health service clients. The association between preventive care, diagnosis, and number of clinical appointments was examined. Methods: A cross-sectional telephone interview was conducted with clients (N=558) of community mental health services in Australia. Results: Although preventive care was highly acceptable to clients (86%297%), receipt of preventive care was low. Client receipt of risk assessment ranged from 26% (assessment of fruit or vegetable intake) to 76% (assessment of alcohol consumption). The proportion of clients at risk of and assessed for unhealthy behavior who then received brief advice ranged from 69% (fruit or vegetable intake) to 85% (physical activity), whereas only 38% (alcohol consumption) to 49% (smoking) received any referral. A greater number of mental health appointments were associated with higher prevalence of preventive care, as were diagnoses of diabetes or respiratory conditions and not having a schizophrenia diagnosis. Conclusions: Practice change strategies are required to increase the delivery of routine preventive care within mental health services if clients are to benefit from clinical guidelines.

DOI 10.1176/appi.ps.201400360
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers
2015 Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, Rowland BC, Dodds P, Gillham K, Yoong SL, et al., 'Improving availability, promotion and purchase of fruit and vegetable and non sugar-sweetened drink products at community sporting clubs: a randomised trial.', The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, 12 35 (2015)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2015 Colin Bell A, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Fitzgerald M, Morgan PJ, Jones J, et al., 'Child physical activity levels and associations with modifiable characteristics in centre-based childcare', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 39 232-236 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.Objective: To describe children's physical activity levels during childcare and associations with modifiable characteristics. Method... [more]

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.Objective: To describe children's physical activity levels during childcare and associations with modifiable characteristics. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 328 preschool children (43% girls; age 3-5 years) and 145 staff from 20 long day care centres in the Hunter Region of NSW, Australia. Pedometers assessed child physical activity levels. Centre characteristics and staff attitudes and behaviours towards children's physical activity were assessed using surveys, interviews and observational audit. Results were analysed using descriptive statistics and linear regression. Results: Over the measurement period, average step count of children was 15.8 (SD=6.8) steps/minute. Four-year-olds had the highest step counts (16.4, SD=7.1, p=0.03) with no differences by sex. Step counts were significantly higher in centres that had a written physical activity policy (+3.8 steps/minute, p=0.03) and where staff led structured physical activity (+3.7 steps/minute, p<0.001) and joined in active play (+2.9 steps/minute, p=0.06). Conclusions: Written physical activity policy, structured staff-led physical activity and staff joining in active play were associated with higher levels of physical activity. Implications: Childcare physical activity interventions should consider including strategies to encourage written physical activity policies and support structured staff led physical activities.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12314
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Philip Morgan, John Wiggers
2015 Colin Bell A, Davies L, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Francis JL, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, 'An implementation intervention to encourage healthy eating in centre-based child-care services: Impact of the Good for Kids Good for Life programme', Public Health Nutrition, 18 1610-1619 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1368980013003364
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 7
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Williams CM, Nathan N, Delaney T, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, Preece S, et al., 'CAFÉ: A multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: Protocol of a randomised controlled trial', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C1]

Introduction: A number of jurisdictions internationally have policies requiring schools to implement healthy canteens. However, many schools have not implemented such policies. On... [more]

Introduction: A number of jurisdictions internationally have policies requiring schools to implement healthy canteens. However, many schools have not implemented such policies. One reason for this isthat current support interventions cannot feasibly be delivered to large numbers of schools. A promising solution to support population-wide implementation of healthy canteen practices is audit and feedback. The effectiveness of this strategy has, however, not previously been assessed in school canteens. This study aims to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an audit and feedback intervention, delivered by telephone and email, in increasing the number of school canteens that have menus complying with a government healthy-canteen policy. Methods and analysis: Seventy-two schools, across the Hunter New England Local Health District in New South Wales Australia, will be randomised to receive the multicomponent audit and feedback implementation intervention or usual support. The intervention will consist of between two and four canteen menu audits over 12 months. Each menu audit will be followed by two modes of feedback: a written feedback report and a verbal feedback/support via telephone. Primary outcomes, assessed by dieticians blind to group status and as recommended by the Fresh Tastes @ School policy, are: (1) the proportion of schools with a canteen menu containing foods or beverages restricted for sale, and; (2) the proportion of schools that have a menu which contains more than 50% of foods classified as healthy canteen items. Secondary outcomes are: the proportion of menu items in each category ('red', 'amber' and 'green'), canteen profitability and cost-effectiveness. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval has been obtained by from the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee and the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee. The findings will be disseminated in usual forums, including peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006969
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong
2015 Yoong SL, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse R, Jones J, Freund M, et al., 'Childcare service centers' preferences and intentions to use a web-based program to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices:a cross-sectional study', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17 (2015) [C1]

Background: Overweight and obesity is a significant public health problem that impacts a large number of children globally. Supporting childcare centers to deliver healthy eating ... [more]

Background: Overweight and obesity is a significant public health problem that impacts a large number of children globally. Supporting childcare centers to deliver healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices is a recommended strategy for obesity prevention, given that such services provide access to a substantial proportion of children during a key developmental period. Electronic Web-based interventions represent a novel way to support childcare service providers to implement such policies and practices. Objective: This study aimed to assess: (1) childcare centers' current use of technology, (2) factors associated with intention to use electronic Web-based interventions, and (3) Web-based features that managers rated as useful to support staff with implementing healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices. Methods: A computer-Assisted telephone interview (CATI) was conducted with service managers from long day care centers and preschools. The CATI assessed the following: (1) childcare center characteristics, (2) childcare centers' use of electronic devices, (3) intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program-Assessed using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) with ratings between 1 (strongly disagree) and 7 (strongly agree), and (4) features rated as useful to include in a Web-based program. Results: Overall, 214 service centers out of 277 (77.3%) consented to participate. All service centers except 2 reported using computers (212/214, 99.1%), whereas 40.2% (86/214) used portable tablets. A total of 71.9% (151/210) of childcare service managers reported a score of 6 or more for intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, intention to use the program was significantly associated with perceived ease of use (P=.002, odds ratio [OR] 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.2) and perceived usefulness (P<.001, OR 28,95% CI 8.0-95.2). Features reported by service managers as useful or very useful for a Web-based program included decision-support tools to support staff with menu planning (117/129, 90.7%), links to relevant resources (212/212, 100%), updated information on guidelines (208/212, 98.1%), and feedback regarding childcare center performance in relation to other childcare centers (212/212, 100%). Conclusions: Childcare service managers reported high intention to use a Web-based program and identified several useful features to support staff to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Further descriptive and intervention research examining the development and use of such a program to support childcare centers with the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices is warranted.

DOI 10.2196/jmir.3639
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2015 Beck AK, Baker A, Britton B, Wratten C, Bauer J, Wolfenden L, Carter G, 'Fidelity considerations in translational research: Eating As Treatment - a stepped wedge, randomised controlled trial of a dietitian delivered behaviour change counselling intervention for head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy', Trials, 16 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Beck et al.Background: The confidence with which researchers can comment on intervention efficacy relies on evaluation and consideration of intervention fidelity. Accordin... [more]

© 2015 Beck et al.Background: The confidence with which researchers can comment on intervention efficacy relies on evaluation and consideration of intervention fidelity. Accordingly, there have been calls to increase the transparency with which fidelity methodology is reported. Despite this, consideration and/or reporting of fidelity methods remains poor. We seek to address this gap by describing the methodology for promoting and facilitating the evaluation of intervention fidelity in The EAT (Eating As Treatment) project: a multi-site stepped wedge randomised controlled trial of a dietitian delivered behaviour change counselling intervention to improve nutrition (primary outcome) in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Methods/Design: In accordance with recommendations from the National Institutes of Health Behaviour Change Consortium Treatment Fidelity Workgroup, we sought to maximise fidelity in this stepped wedge randomised controlled trial via strategies implemented from study design through to provider training, intervention delivery and receipt. As the EAT intervention is designed to be incorporated into standard dietetic consultations, we also address unique challenges for translational research. Discussion: We offer a strong model for improving the quality of translational findings via real world application of National Institutes of Health Behaviour Change Consortium recommendations. Greater transparency in the reporting of behaviour change research is an important step in improving the progress and quality of behaviour change research. Trial registration number:ACTRN12613000320752(Date of registration 21 March 2013)

DOI 10.1186/s13063-015-0978-5
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter
2015 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Williams CM, 'Computer-tailored interventions to facilitate health behavioural change.', Br J Sports Med, 49 1478-1479 (2015) [C2]
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-093508
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Christopher M Williams
2014 Yoong SLI, Wolfenden L, Clinton-McHarg T, Waters E, Pettman TL, Steele E, Wiggers J, 'Exploring the pragmatic and explanatory study design on outcomes of systematic reviews of public health interventions: a case study on obesity prevention trials', Journal of public health (Oxford, England), 36 170-176 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdu006
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2014 Metse AP, Bowman JA, Wye P, Stockings E, Adams M, Clancy R, et al., 'Evaluating the efficacy of an integrated smoking cessation intervention for mental health patients: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.', Trials, 15 266 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-15-266
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Richard Clancy, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2014 Dray J, Bowman J, Freund M, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, Hodder RK, Wiggers J, 'Improving adolescent mental health and resilience through a resilience-based intervention in schools: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.', Trials, 15 289 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-15-289
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2014 Dodds P, Wyse R, Jones J, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Williams A, et al., 'Validity of a measure to assess healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in Australian childcare services', BMC Public Health, 14 (2014) [C1]

Childcare services represent a valuable obesity prevention opportunity, providing access to a large portion of children at a vital point in their development. Few rigorously valid... [more]

Childcare services represent a valuable obesity prevention opportunity, providing access to a large portion of children at a vital point in their development. Few rigorously validated measures exist to measure healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in this setting, and no such measures exist that are specific to the childcare setting in Australia. Methods. This was a cross sectional study, comparing two measures (pen and paper survey and observation) of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services. Research assistants attended consenting childcare services (n = 42) across the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia and observed practices for one day. Nominated Supervisors and Room Leaders of the service also completed a pen and paper survey during the day of observation. Kappa statistics and proportion agreement were calculated for a total of 43 items relating to healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Results: Agreement ranged from 38%-100%. Fifty one percent of items showed agreement of greater than or equal to 80%. Items assessing the frequency with which staff joined in active play with children reported the lowest percent agreement, while items assessing availability of beverages such as juice, milk and cordial, as well as the provision of foods such as popcorn, pretzels and sweet biscuits, reported the highest percent agreement. Kappa scores ranged from -0.06 (poor agreement) to 1 (perfect agreement). Of the 43 items assessed, 27 were found to have moderate or greater agreement. Conclusions: The study found that Nominated Supervisors and Room Leaders were able to accurately report on a number of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Items assessing healthy eating practices tended to have higher kappa scores than those assessing physical activity related policies or practices. The tool represents a useful instrument for public health researchers and policy makers working in this setting. © 2014Dodds et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-572
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2014 Delaney T, Williams C, Wyse R, Yoong SL, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, 'Identifying social influences on the implementation of canteen practices in primary schools', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, 8 24-24 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2014.10.042
2014 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Williams CM, Delaney T, Reilly KL, Freund M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: study protocol.', Implement Sci, 9 147 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0147-3
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2014 Williams CM, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, 'Physical activity promotion in primary care has a sustained influence on activity levels of sedentary adults', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48 1069-1070 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093187
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher M Williams
2014 Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Campbell E, Brennan L, Campbell KJ, Fletcher A, et al., 'Randomized controlled trial of a telephone-based intervention for child fruit and vegetable intake: Long-term follow-up', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 99 543-550 (2014) [C1]

Background: Telephone-based interventions can be effective in increasing child fruit and vegetable intake in the short term (<6 mo). The long-term efficacy of such interventions, ... [more]

Background: Telephone-based interventions can be effective in increasing child fruit and vegetable intake in the short term (<6 mo). The long-term efficacy of such interventions, however, is unknown. Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to determine whether the short-term (<6 mo) impact of a telephone-based intervention on children's fruit and vegetable intake was sustained over a longer term. A secondary aim of the study was to assess the long-term impact of the intervention on the intake of foods high in fat, salt, or sugar (noncore foods). Design: The study used a cluster randomized controlled trial design. Parents were recruited from Australian preschools between February and August 2010 and allocated to receive an intervention consisting of print materials and 4 telephone-counseling calls delivered over 1 mo or to a print information-only control group. The primary endpoint for the trial was the 18-mo postbaseline follow-up. Linear regression models were used to assess between-group differences in child consumption of fruit and vegetables and noncore foods by subscales of the Children's Dietary Questionnaire. Results: Fruit and vegetable subscale scores were significantly higher, indicating greater child fruit and vegetable intake, among children in the intervention group at the 12-mo (16.77 compared with 14.89; P < 0.01) but not the 18-mo (15.98 compared with 16.82; P = 0.14) follow-up. There were no significant differences between groups at either of the follow-up periods in the noncore food subscale score. Conclusion: Further research to identify effective maintenance strategies is required to maximize the benefits of telephone-based interventions on child diet. This trial was registered at http://www.anzctr.org. au/ as ACTRN12609000820202. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

DOI 10.3945/ajcn.113.071738
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2014 Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Freund M, Jones J, Wiggers J, 'A cluster randomized trial of a multi-level intervention, delivered by service staff, to increase physical activity of children attending center-based childcare', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 58 9-16 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.10.004
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Philip Morgan, John Wiggers
2014 Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Nichols M, Allender S, Millar L, McElduff P, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of whole of community interventions to prevent excessive population weight gain', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 62 193-200 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.01.031
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Dodds P, Wolfenden L, Chapman K, Wellard L, Hughes C, Wiggers J, 'The effect of energy and traffic light labelling on parent and child fast food selection: a randomised controlled trial', APPETITE, 73 23-30 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2013.10.013
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 18
Co-authors John Wiggers
2014 Wolfenden L, Carruthers J, Wyse R, Yoong S, 'Translation of tobacco control programs in schools: Findings from a rapid review of systematic reviews of implementation and dissemination interventions', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 25 136-138 (2014) [C3]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2014.Issue addressed: School-based programs targeting the prevention of tobacco use are a key strategy for reducing the overall tobacco-... [more]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2014.Issue addressed: School-based programs targeting the prevention of tobacco use are a key strategy for reducing the overall tobacco-related mortality and morbidity in the community. While substantial research investment has resulted in the identification of various effective tobacco prevention interventions in schools, this research investment will not result in public health benefits, unless effectively disseminated and implemented. This rapid review aimed to identify effective implementation or dissemination interventions, targeting the adoption of school-based tobacco prevention programs. Methods: A systematic search was conducted to identify published systematic reviews that examined the effectiveness of implementation and dissemination strategies for facilitating the adoption of tobacco policies or programs in schools from 1992 to 2012. Results: The search yielded 1028 results, with one relevant systematic review being identified. The review included two controlled studies examining the implementation and dissemination of tobacco prevention programs and guidelines. The two randomised trials examined the delivery of active face-to-face training to implement a school-based curriculum compared with video-delivered or mail-based training. Improvements in the implementation of the programs were reported for the face-to-face training arm in both trials. Conclusions: Little rigorous evidence exists to guide the implementation and dissemination of tobacco prevention programs in schools. So what?: Few systematic reviews exist to inform the implementation of evidence-based tobacco prevention programs in schools. In the absence of a strong evidence base, health care policymakers and practitioners may need to draw on setting-based frameworks or parallel evidence from other settings to design strategies to facilitate the adoption of tobacco prevention initiatives.

DOI 10.1071/HE13089
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2014 Bartlem KM, Bowman JA, Freund M, Wye PM, McElwaine KM, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Care provision to prevent chronic disease by community mental health clinicians', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 47 762-770 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Background People with a mental illness have higher prevalence of behavioral risks for chronic disease than the general population.... [more]

© 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Background People with a mental illness have higher prevalence of behavioral risks for chronic disease than the general population. Despite recommendations regarding the provision of preventive care by mental health services, limited research has examined the extent to which such care is provided.Purpose To examine mental health clinician provision of care for preventable chronic disease risks, and whether such care was associated with the availability of practice support strategies.Methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken of 151 community mental health clinicians in New South Wales, Australia regarding the provision of three elements of preventive care (i.e., assessment, brief advice, and referral/follow-up) for four health risk behaviors (i.e., tobacco smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, harmful alcohol consumption, and inadequate physical activity). Clinicians reported the availability of 16 strategies to support such care delivery. Data were collected in 2010 and analyzed in 2012-2013.Results Preventive care provision varied by both care element and risk behavior. Optimal care (each care element provided to at least 80% of clients for all health behaviors) was provided by few clinicians: assessment (8.6%), brief advice (24.5%), and referral/follow-up (9.9%). Less than half of clinicians reported more than four support strategies were available (44.4%). The availability of five or more strategies was associated with increased optimal preventive care.Conclusions The provision of preventive care focused on chronic disease prevention in community mental health services is suboptimal. Interventions to increase the routine provision of such care should involve increasing the availability of evidence-based strategies to support care provision.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.08.003
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2014 McElwaine KM, Freund M, Campbell EM, Knight J, Bowman JA, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Increasing preventive care by primary care nursing and allied health clinicians a non-randomized controlled trial', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 47 424-434 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Background: Although primary care nurse and allied health clinician consultations represent key opportunities for the provision of ... [more]

© 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Background: Although primary care nurse and allied health clinician consultations represent key opportunities for the provision of preventive care, it is provided suboptimally. Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of a practice change intervention in increasing primary care nursing and allied health clinician provision of preventive care for four health risks. Design: Two-group (intervention versus control), non-randomized controlled study assessing the effectiveness of the intervention in increasing clinician provision of preventive care. Setting/participants: Randomly selected clients from 17 primary healthcare facilities participated in telephone surveys that assessed their receipt of preventive care prior to (September 2009-2010, n=876) and following intervention (October 2011-2012, n=1,113). Intervention: The intervention involved local leadership and consensus processes, electronic medical record system modification, educational meetings and outreach, provision of practice change resources and support, and performance monitoring and feedback. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was differential change in client-reported receipt of three elements of preventive care (assessment, brief advice, referral/follow-up) for each of four behavioral risks individually (smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, alcohol overconsumption, physical inactivity) and combined. Logistic regression assessed intervention effectiveness. Results: Analyses conducted in 2013 indicated significant improvements in preventive care delivery in the intervention compared to the control group from baseline to follow-up for assessment of fruit and vegetable consumption (+23.8% vs -1.5%); physical activity (+11.1% vs -0.3%); all four risks combined (+16.9% vs -1.0%) and for brief advice for inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption (+19.3% vs -2.0%); alcohol overconsumption (+14.5% vs -8.9%); and all four risks combined (+14.3% vs +2.2%). The intervention was ineffective in increasing the provision of the remaining forms of preventive care. Conclusions: The intervention's impact on the provision of preventive care varied by both care element and risk type. Further intervention is required to increase the consistent provision of preventive care, particularly referral/follow-up.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.06.018
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Wiggers, Kate Bartlem, Jenny Bowman, Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Kypri K, Wolfenden L, Langley J, Hutchesson M, Voas R, 'Public, official, and industry submissions on a Bill to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age: A critical analysis', International Journal of Drug Policy, (2014) [C1]

Background: In 2005 a Bill was introduced to the New Zealand parliament to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age (MPA) from 18 to 20 years and submissions were invited from ... [more]

Background: In 2005 a Bill was introduced to the New Zealand parliament to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age (MPA) from 18 to 20 years and submissions were invited from interested parties. We sought to characterise and critique the arguments tendered for and against the proposal. Methods: We used template analysis to study written submissions on the Bill from 178 people and organisations in New Zealand. Independent raters coded submissions according to the source, whether for or opposed, and the arguments employed. Results: The most common sources of submissions were members of the public (28%), the alcohol industry (20%), and NGOs (20%). Overall, 40% opposed increasing the MPA, 40% were in favour, 4% supported a split MPA (18 years for on-premise, 20 years for off-premise), 7% were equivocal, and 8% offered no comment. The most common proponents of increasing the MPA were NGOs (36%) and members of the public (30%) and their arguments concerned the expected positive effects on public health (36%) and public disorder/property damage (16%), while 24% argued that other strategies should be used as well. The most common sources of opposition to increasing the MPA were the alcohol industry (50%) and the public (20%). It was commonly claimed that the proposed law change would be ineffective in reducing harm (22%), that other strategies should be used instead (16%), that it would infringe adult rights (15%), and that licensed premises are safe environments for young people (14%). There were noteworthy examples of NGOs and government agencies opposing the law change. The alcohol industry maximised its impact via multiple submissions appealing to individual rights while neglecting to report or accurately characterise the scientific evidence. Several health and welfare agencies presented confused logic and/or were selective in their use of scientific evidence. Conclusion: In contrast to the fragmented and inconsistent response from government and NGOs, the alcohol industry was organised and united, with multiple submissions from the sector with most at stake, namely the hospitality industry, and supporting submissions from the manufacturing, import, and wholesale sectors. Systematic reviews of research evidence should be routinely undertaken to guide the legislature and submissions should be categorised on the basis of pecuniary interest. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugpo.2014.05.001
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Kypros Kypri
2014 Yoong SL, Skelton E, Jones J, Wolfenden L, 'Do childcare services provide foods in line with the 2013 Australian Dietary guidelines? A cross-sectional study', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 38 595-596 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12312
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2014 Williams CM, Williams A, O¿Brien K, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, 'Preventative care strategies for common risk factors of chronic disease and musculoskeletal pain in patients waiting for specialist consultation', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, 8 115-115 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2014.10.207
Co-authors John Wiggers
2014 Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, 'Strengthening the rigour of population-wide, community-based obesity prevention evaluations', Public Health Nutrition, 17 407-421 (2014) [C1]

Abstract Objective The aim of the present study was to review the methodological literature regarding evaluation methods for complex public health interventions broadly and, based... [more]

Abstract Objective The aim of the present study was to review the methodological literature regarding evaluation methods for complex public health interventions broadly and, based on such methods, to critically reflect on the evaluation of contemporary community-based obesity prevention programmes. Design A systematic review of the methods and community-based literature was performed by one reviewer. Results The review identified that there is considerable scope to improve the rigour of community-based obesity prevention programmes through: prospective trial registration; the use of more rigorous research designs, particularly where routine databases including an objective measure of adiposity are available; implementing strategies to quantify and reduce the risk of selective non-participation bias; the development and use of validated instruments to assess intervention impacts; reporting of intervention process and context information; and more comprehensive analyses of trial outcomes. Conclusions To maximise the quality and utility of community-based obesity prevention evaluations, programme implementers and evaluators need to carefully examine the strengths and pitfalls of evaluation decisions and seek to maximise evaluation rigour in the context of political, resource and practical constraints. © The Authors 2012.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980012004958
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2014 Wellard L, Chapman K, Wolfenden L, Dodds P, Hughes C, Wiggers J, 'Who is responsible for selecting children's fast food meals, and what impact does this have on energy content of the selected meals?', Nutrition and Dietetics, 71 172-177 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Dietitians Association of Australia.Aim: The present study aimed to: (i) document the role of parents in children's fast food meal selection; (ii) determine whether parent... [more]

© 2014 Dietitians Association of Australia.Aim: The present study aimed to: (i) document the role of parents in children's fast food meal selection; (ii) determine whether parental demographics, weight status or fast food consumption frequency were associated with who selects children's fast food meals; and (iii) determine whether the total energy content of children's meals selected from a hypothetical fast food menu was associated with selection responsibility. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 477 parents of children aged 3-12 years in New South Wales, Australia, was conducted. Participants completed two computer-assisted telephone interviews. The first collected demographic and anthropometric data including height and weight. Participants were subsequently mailed a hypothetical fast food menu. The second interview asked who was responsible for selecting their children's fast food meals, and what items would be chosen. Energy content of the selections was examined. Results: Most parents (60%) stated that they shared meal selection responsibility with their children. Parents with higher education levels (P < 0.01) or younger children (P < 0.01) were more likely to take responsibility for meal selection. When parents stated that children were responsible, they chose fast food meals with significantly higher energy content than when responsibility was shared (P < 0.01). Conclusions: The present study shows that parents are influential in children's fast food intake. Parents should be encouraged to play an active role in assisting children to make healthier fast food choices, to reduce the impact of high-energy meals on their overall diets.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12106
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers
2014 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, McElduff P, Saunders JB, Saitz R, et al., 'Prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in hospital outpatients', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 144 270-273 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Background: Few studies have examined the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in the hospital outpatient setting. Our aim was to estimate the prevalen... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Background: Few studies have examined the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in the hospital outpatient setting. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use among patients attending a broad range of outpatient clinics at a large public hospital in Australia. Methods: Adult hospital outpatients were invited to complete the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Consumption questions (AUDIT-C) using an iPad as part of a randomised trial testing the efficacy of alcohol electronic screening and brief intervention. Unhealthy alcohol use was defined as an AUDIT-C score =5 among men and =4 among women. Results: Sixty percent (3616/6070) of invited hospital outpatients consented, of whom 89% (3206/3616) provided information on their alcohol consumption (either reported they had not consumed any alcohol in the last 12 months or completed the AUDIT-C). The prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use was 34.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 33.0-36.3%). The prevalence among men aged 18-24 years, 25-39 years, 40-59 years and 60 years and older, was 74.4% (95% CI: 68.4-80.4%), 54.3% (95% CI: 48.7-59.8%), 44.1% (95% CI: 39.9-48.3%), and 27.0% (95% CI: 23.6-30.4%), respectively (43.1% overall; 95% CI: 40.8-45.5%). The prevalence among women aged 18-24 years, 25-39 years, 40-59 years, and 60 years and older, was 48.6% (95% CI: 39.2-58.1%), 36.9% (95% CI: 31.2-42.6%), 25.2% (95% CI: 21.5-29.0%) and 14.5% (95% CI: 11.7-17.3%), respectively (24.9% overall; 95% CI: 22.7-27.1%). Conclusion: A large number of hospital outpatients who are not currently seeking treatment for their drinking could benefit from effective intervention in this setting.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.08.014
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors A Dunlop, Kypros Kypri, John Attia, Patrick Mcelduff, Natalie Johnson, Joanna Latter
2014 Milat AJ, King L, Newson R, Wolfenden L, Rissel C, Bauman A, Redman S, 'Increasing the scale and adoption of population health interventions: experiences and perspectives of policy makers, practitioners, and researchers', HEALTH RESEARCH POLICY AND SYSTEMS, 12 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1478-4505-12-18
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 19
2014 Jones RA, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Parletta N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'School-based obesity prevention interventions: Practicalities and considerations', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 8 e497-e510 (2014) [C1]

© 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity.Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore w... [more]

© 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity.Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vitally important. Schools have an important role in the prevention of childhood obesity, however, their involvement can be limited by a number of constraints and barriers, which need to be considered when designing interventions. Members of the Prevention Stream of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network have extensive experience in implementing and evaluating school-based obesity prevention initiatives. Based on their collective experience and evidence from implementation research, the aim of this paper was to highlight six areas to consider when designing, implementing and evaluating obesity prevention initiatives in schools. Further, this paper aimed to provide guidance for overcoming some of the challenges and barriers faced in school-based obesity prevention research. The six key areas discussed include: design and analysis; school-community engagement; planning and recruitment; evaluation; implementation; and feedback and sustainability.

DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.10.004
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2014 Ganann R, Fitzpatrick-Lewis D, Ciliska D, Peirson LJ, Warren RL, Fieldhouse P, et al., 'Enhancing nutritional environments through access to fruit and vegetables in schools and homes among children and youth: a systematic review', BMC Research Notes, 7 422-422 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1756-0500-7-422
Citations Scopus - 4
2014 Wyse R, Campbell KJ, Brennan L, Wolfenden L, 'A cluster randomised controlled trial of a telephone-based intervention targeting the home food environment of preschoolers (The Healthy Habits Trial): the effect on parent fruit and vegetable consumption', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 11 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-014-0144-6
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2014 Jones J, Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Finch M, Yoong SL, Dodds P, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services.', BMJ Open, 4 e005312 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005312
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Wiggers, Patrick Mcelduff, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse
2014 Hodder RK, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Gillham K, Dray J, Wiggers J, 'Systematic review of universal school-based resilience interventions targeting adolescent tobacco, alcohol or illicit drug use: review protocol.', BMJ Open, 4 e004718 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004718
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Julia Dray Uon
2013 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Saunders JB, Saitz R, Attia J, Dunlop A, et al., 'The hospital outpatient alcohol project (HOAP): protocol for an individually randomized, parallel-group superiority trial of electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention versus screening alone for unhealthy alcohol use.', Addict Sci Clin Pract, 8 14 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1940-0640-8-14
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors A Dunlop, Kypros Kypri, Natalie Johnson, John Attia, Patrick Mcelduff
2013 Wolfenden L, McKeough A, Bowman J, Paolini S, Francis L, Wye P, Puhl R, 'Experimental investigation of parents and their children's social interaction intentions towards obese children', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 49 604-607 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jpc.12285
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Stefania Paolini
2013 Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Williams A, Dodds P, Gillham K, Wyse R, 'A randomised controlled trial of an active telephone-based recruitment strategy to increase childcare-service staff attendance at a physical activity and nutrition training workshop', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 24 224-226 (2013) [C1]

Issue addressed: Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a ke... [more]

Issue addressed: Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a key component of multi-strategy interventions to improve implementation of effective physical activity and nutrition promoting practices for obesity prevention in childcare services. This randomised controlled trial aimed to examine whether an active telephone-based strategy to invite childcare-service staff to attend a training workshop was effective in increasing the proportion of services with staff attending training, compared with a passive strategy. Methods: Services were randomised to an active telephone-based or a passive-recruitment strategy. Those in the active arm received an email invitation and one to three follow-up phone calls, whereas services in the passive arm were informed of the availability of training only via newsletters. The proportion of services with staff attending the training workshop was compared between the two arms. Results: One hundred and twenty-eight services were included in this study. A significantly larger proportion (52%) of services in the active arm compared with those in the passive-strategy arm (3.1%) attended training (d.f.=1, ¿2=34.3; P<0.001). Conclusions: An active, telephone-based recruitment strategy significantly increased the proportion of childcare services with staff attending training. Further strategies to improve staff attendance at training need to be identified and implemented. So what? Active-recruitment strategies including follow-up telephone calls should be utilised to invite staff to participate in training, in order to maximise the use of training as an implementation strategy for obesity prevention in childcare services. © 2013 Australian Health Promotion Association.

DOI 10.1071/HE13055
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse
2013 Wolfenden L, Kypri K, Britton B, James EL, Francis JL, Wyse R, 'Effects of Introductory Information on Self-Reported Health Behavior', EPIDEMIOLOGY, 24 170-172 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/EDE.0b013e3182788c98
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Erica James, Kypros Kypri, Rebecca Wyse
2013 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, 'Pre-service primary school teachers' experiences of physical education', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 37 294-294 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12056
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2013 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Nathan N, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of a school-based intervention to prevent decline in adolescent physical activity levels: study protocol for the 'Physical Activity 4 Everyone' trial', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 13 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-57
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, John Wiggers
2013 Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Rowland BC, Gillham KE, Kennedy VJ, Ramsden RL, et al., 'Alcohol consumption and sport: a cross-sectional study of alcohol management practices associated with at-risk alcohol consumption at community football clubs', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-762
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors John Wiggers
2013 McElwaine KM, Freund M, Campbell EM, Knight J, Bowman JA, Doherty EL, et al., 'The delivery of preventive care to clients of community health services', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-13-167
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2013 Fletcher A, Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Bowman J, McElduff P, Duncan S, 'A randomised controlled trial and mediation analysis of the 'Healthy Habits', telephone-based dietary intervention for preschool children', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-43
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Rebecca Wyse, Patrick Mcelduff
2013 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Bell AC, Barker D, Wiggers J, 'Validity of a self-report survey tool measuring the nutrition and physical activity environment of primary schools', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-75
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Philip Morgan, John Wiggers
2013 Bell AC, Wolfenden L, Sutherland R, Coggan L, Young K, Fitzgerald M, et al., 'Harnessing the power of advertising to prevent childhood obesity', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-114
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Bell C, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan P, Freund M, Jones J, Wiggers J, 'Predictors of preschool age children's physical activity at long day care', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15 S111-S111 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2012.11.271
2012 Campbell E, Campbell KJ, Wiggers JH, Brennan L, Fletcher AL, Bowman JA, et al., 'A cluster randomized controlled trial of a telephone-based parent intervention to increase preschoolers' fruit and vegetable consumption', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 96 102-110 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2012 Rowe SC, Wiggers JH, Wolfenden L, Francis JL, Freund MA, 'Evaluation of an educational policing strategy to reduce alcohol-related crime associated with licensed premises', Canadian Journal of Public Health, 103 S8-S14 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Wolfenden L, Bell C, Wiggers JH, Butler M, James EL, Chipperfield KM, 'Engaging parents in child obesity prevention: Support preferences of parents', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 48 E4-E6 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Erica James, John Wiggers
2012 Sawyer AL, Wolfenden L, Kennedy VJ, Kingsland M, Young KG, Tindall J, et al., 'Alcohol sponsorship of community football clubs: The current situation', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 23 70-72 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Young K, Kennedy V, Kingsland M, Sawyer A, Rowland B, Wiggers JH, Wolfenden L, 'Healthy food and beverages in senior community football club canteens in New South Wales, Australia', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 23 149-152 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Hardy LL, Grunseit A, Khambalia A, Bell C, Wolfenden L, Milat AJ, 'Co-occurrence of obesogenic risk factors among adolescents', Journal of Adolescent Health, 51 265-271 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 13
2012 Rowe SC, Wiggers JH, Kingsland M, Nicholas C, Wolfenden L, 'Alcohol consumption and intoxication among people involved in police-recorded incidents of violence and disorder in non-metropolitan New South Wales', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36 33-40 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Wolfenden L, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Freund MA, Wiggers JH, Gillham K, 'Acceptability of proactive telephone recruitment to a telephone support service to encourage healthy eating, physical activity and weight loss', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36 295-296 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, John Wiggers
2012 Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, Rowland B, Kennedy V, Gillham K, Wiggers JH, 'Addressing alcohol use in community sports clubs: Attitudes of club representatives', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36 93-94 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Wolfenden L, Wyse RJ, Britton BI, Campbell KJ, Hodder RK, Stacey FG, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged 5 years and under', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub2
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Erica James, Rebecca Wyse, Patrick Mcelduff
2012 Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, Bell AC, Wyse R, Morgan PJ, Butler MT, et al., 'Effectiveness of a multi-strategy intervention in increasing the implementation of vegetable and fruit breaks by Australian primary schools: A non-randomized controlled trial', BMC Public Health, 12 651 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-12-651
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Philip Morgan, John Wiggers
2012 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Paul CL, Freund MA, Lecathelinais C, Wye PM, Gillham K, 'Increasing the use of preventative health services to promote healthy eating, physical activity and weight management: The acceptability and potential effectiveness of a proactive telemarketing approach', BMC Public Health, 12 953 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Wiggers, Chris Paul
2012 Hodder RK, Freund MA, Bowman JA, Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Wye PM, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of a school-based resilience intervention to decrease tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use in secondary school students: Study protocol', BMC Public Health, 12 1009 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2012 Finch M, Wolfenden L, Falkiner M, Edenden D, Pond N, Hardy L, et al., 'Impact of a population based intervention to increase the adoption of multiple physical activity practices in centre based childcare services: A quasi experimental, effectiveness study', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 9 1-13 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 20
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Kingsland M, Wiggers JH, Wolfenden L, 'Interventions in sports settings to reduce alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm: A systematic review protocol', BMJ Open, 2 1-5 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Wiggers
2011 Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Freund MA, Wyse R, Wiggers JH, 'A cluster randomised trial to evaluate a physical activity intervention among 3-5 year old children attending long day care services: Study protocol', BMC Public Health, 10 534 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-534
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Philip Morgan, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse
2011 Wyse R, Campbell EM, Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, 'Associations between characteristics of the home food environment and fruit and vegetable intake in preschool children: A cross-sectional study', BMC Public Health, 11 938 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 48
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2011 McElwaine KM, Freund MA, Campbell EM, Knight JJ, Slattery C, Doherty E, et al., 'The effectiveness of an intervention in increasing community health clinician provision of preventive care: A study protocol of a non-randomised, multiple-baseline trial', BMC Health Services Research, 11 354 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-11-354
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Patrick Mcelduff
2011 Wye PM, Bowman JA, Wiggers JH, Freund MA, Wolfenden L, Stockings EA, 'Treating nicotine dependence in mental health hospitals', Mental Health and Substance Use: Dual Diagnosis, 4 130-143 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17523281.2011.555077
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2011 Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Rowland BC, Tindall J, Gillham KE, McElduff P, et al., 'A cluster randomised controlled trial of a comprehensive accreditation intervention to reduce alcohol consumption at community sports clubs: Study protocol', BMJ Open, 1 e000328 (2011) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, John Wiggers
2011 Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, Butler M, Bell AC, Wyse R, Campbell EM, et al., 'Vegetable and fruit breaks in Australian primary schools: prevalence, attitudes, barriers and implementation strategies', Health Education Research, 26 722-731 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyr033
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse
2011 Wolfenden L, Neve M, Farrell L, Lecathelinais C, Bell C, Milat A, et al., 'Physical activity policies and practices of childcare centres in Australia', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 47 73-76 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2010.01738.x
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 14
Co-authors John Wiggers, Melinda Hutchesson
2011 Innes-Hughes C, Hardy LL, Venugopal K, King LA, Wolfenden L, Rangan A, 'Children's consumption of energy-dense nutrient-poor foods, fruit and vegetables: Are they related? An analysis of data from a cross sectional survey', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 22 210-216 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4
2011 Wolfenden L, Stojanovski E, Wiggers JH, Gillham K, Bowman JA, Richie C, 'Demographic, smoking, and clinical characteristics associated with smoking cessation care provided to patients preparing for surgery', Journal of Addictions Nursing, 22 171-175 (2011) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2011 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Campbell K, Brennan L, Fletcher A, et al., 'A pilot study of a telephone-based parental intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in 3-5-year-old children', Public Health Nutrition, 14 2245-2253 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Rebecca Wyse
2011 Wolfenden L, Hardy LL, Wiggers JH, Milat AJ, Bell C, Sutherland RL, 'Prevalence and socio-demographic associations of overweight and obesity among children attending child-care services in rural and regional Australia', Nutrition & Dietetics, 68 15-20 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-0080.2010.01487.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors John Wiggers
2010 Rowe SC, Wiggers JH, Wolfenden L, Francis JL, 'Establishments licensed to serve alcohol and their contribution to police-recorded crime in Australia: Further opportunities for harm reduction', Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 71 909-916 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors John Wiggers
2010 Hinkley T, Wolfenden L, Sugiyami T, Porter C, Zask A, Bundy A, 'Physical activity in early childhood: Characteristics, influences and interventions', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 12 e168-e169 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2009.10.353
2010 Wolfenden L, Neve M, Farrell L, Lecathelinais C, Sutherland R, Bell C, et al., 'How supportive are childcare services policies and practices to child physical activity?', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 12 e169-e170 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2009.10.355
2010 Wolfenden L, Brennan L, Britton B, 'Intelligent obesity interventions using Smartphones', Preventive Medicine, 51 519-520 (2010) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2010 Falkiner M, Wolfenden L, Bell C, Nathan NK, 'Obesity prevention and human service organisations: A survey of managers', Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 21-28 (2010) [C1]
2010 Falkiner M, Wolfenden L, Nathan NK, Francis JL, Rowe S, Bell C, 'Advice on healthy eating and physical activity where it is needed most: Empowering home-visiting human services to provide the right information at the right time to vulnerable families', Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 29-41 (2010) [C1]
2010 Wolfenden L, Falkiner M, Bell C, 'Addressing the burden of obesity among disadvantaged families', Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 11-20 (2010) [C1]
2010 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Tursan D'Espaignet E, Bell C, 'How useful are systematic reviews of child obesity interventions?', Obesity Reviews, 11 159-165 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2009.00637.x
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors John Wiggers
2010 Ganann R, Fitzpatrick-Lewis D, Ciliska D, Dobbins M, Krishnaratne S, Beyers J, et al., 'Community-based interventions for enhancing access to or consumption of fruit and vegetables (or both) among five to 18-year olds (Protocol)', The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 1-11 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008644
2010 Smith B, Grunseit A, Hardy LL, King L, Wolfenden L, Milat A, 'Parental influences on child physical activity and screen viewing time: A population based study', BMC Public Health, 10 1-11 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-593
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 29
2010 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Brennan L, Campbell KJ, Fletcher AL, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of a telephone-based intervention for parents to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in their 3- to 5-year-old children: Study protocol', BMC Public Health, 10 1-12 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-216
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Rebecca Wyse
2009 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Campbell EM, Knight JJ, Kerridge R, Spiegelman A, 'Providing comprehensive smoking cessation care to surgical patients: The case for computers', Drug and Alcohol Review, 28 60-65 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2008.00003.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
Co-authors John Wiggers
2009 Wolfenden L, Kypri K, Freund MA, Hodder R, 'Obtaining active parental consent for school-based research: A guide for researchers', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 33 270-275 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2009.00387.x
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Kypros Kypri
2008 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Campbell EM, Knight JJ, 'Pilot of a preoperative smoking cessation intervention incorporating post-discharge support from a Quitline', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 19 158-160 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 5
Co-authors John Wiggers
2008 Wolfenden L, 'Smoke-free licensed premises: what will be the broader public health benefits?', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 32 88 (2008) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2008.00175.x
2008 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Campbell EM, Knight JJ, Kerridge R, Moore K, et al., 'Feasibility, acceptability, and cost of referring surgical patients for postdischarge cessation support from a quitline', Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 10 1105-1108 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14622200802097472
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
Co-authors John Wiggers
2008 Tursan D'Espaignet E, Bulsara M, Wolfenden L, Byard RW, Stanley FJ, 'Trends in sudden infant death syndrome in Australia from 1980-2002', Forensic Science, Medicine and Pathology, 4 83-90 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12024-007-9011-y
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 8
2008 Knight J, Slattery C, Green S, Porter AJ, Valentine M, Wolfenden L, 'Smoke-free hospitals: An opportunity for public health', Journal of Public Health, 30 516 (2008) [C3]
DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdn085
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2008 Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Wiggers JH, Walsh RA, Bailey LJ, 'Helping hospital patients quit: What the evidence supports and what guidelines recommend', Preventive Medicine, 46 346-357 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2007.12.003
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors John Wiggers
2008 Hopewell S, Wolfenden L, Clarke M, 'Reporting of adverse events in systematic reviews can be improved: survey results', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 61 597-602 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2007.10.005
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 30
2007 Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Knight J, Campbell E, 'Smoking and surgery: an opportunity for health improvement', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 31 386-387 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2007-00095.x
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2007 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Knight JJ, Campbell EM, 'Smoking and surgery: An opportunity for health improvement (Letter)', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 31 386-387 (2007) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2007.00095.x
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers
2007 Wolfenden L, Dalton A, Bowman JA, Knight JJ, Burrows S, Wiggers JH, 'Computerized assessment of surgical patients for tobacco use: accuracy and acceptability', Journal of Public Health, 29 183-185 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdm015
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2007 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, 'Addressing the health costs of the Iraq war: the role of health organisations', Medical Journal of Australia, 186 380-381 (2007) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2005 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Knight JJ, Campbell EM, Spigelman AD, Kerridge R, Moore K, 'Increasing smoking cessation care in a preoperative clinic: a randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 41 284-290 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2004.11.011
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 33
Co-authors John Wiggers
2005 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Knight JJ, Campbell EM, Rissel C, Kerridge R, et al., 'A programme for reducing smoking in pre-operative surgical patients: randomised controlled trial', Anaesthesia, 60 172-179 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2044.2004.04070.x
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 47
Co-authors John Wiggers
2004 Wolfenden L, Paul CL, Mitchell E, 'Managing Nicotine Dependence in NSW Hospital Patients', NSW Public Health Bulletin, 15 98-101 (2004) [C3]
Co-authors Chris Paul
2004 Wolfenden L, Freund M, Campbell E, Wiggers J, Paul C, Mitchell E, 'Managing nicotine dependence in NSW hospital patients', NSW Public Health Bulletin, 15 98-99 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/NB04023
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers
2003 Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Walsh RA, Wiggers JH, 'Smoking cessation interventions for in-patients: a selective review with recommendations for hospital-based health professionals', Drug and Alcohol Review, 437-452 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230310001613967
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 32
Co-authors John Wiggers
Show 190 more journal articles

Conference (90 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Britton B, McCarter K, Beck A, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, et al., 'EATING AS TREATMENT (EAT): A HEALTH BEHAVIOR CHANGE INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE TREATMENT OUTCOMES FOR HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS UNDERGOING RADIOTHERAPY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter
2016 Finch M, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTIONS IN CENTRE BASED CHILDCARE: META-ANALYSIS OF OUTCOME EFFECTS BY INTERVENTION CHARACTERISTICS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2016 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Bonevski B, McElduff P, et al., 'A PILOT CLUSTER RANDOMISED TRIAL OF ELECTRONIC FEEDBACK, ONLINE AND TELEPHONE SUPPORT ON MULTIPLE HEALTH BEHAVIOURS AMONG VOCATIONAL EDUCATION STUDENTS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Billie Bonevski, Kypros Kypri, Philip Morgan, Marita Lynagh, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul
2016 Bailey J, Metse AP, Wiggers J, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Prochaska JJ, et al., 'Smoking and mental illness: a bibliometric analysis of research output over time', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2016 Metse AP, Wiggers J, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Freund M, Clancy R, et al., 'An integrated smoking intervention for mental health patients: a randomised controlled trial', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (2016)
Co-authors Richard Clancy, Jenny Bowman, Kim Colyvas
2016 Wolfenden L, Chan C, Powell RMBJ, Presseau J, Milat A, Francis L, et al., 'Advancing the science of implementation research to improve health: Key challenges and potential solutions', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
2016 Small T, Kingsland M, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Sherker S, et al., 'THE FEASIBILITY AND ACCEPTABILITY OF A WEB-BASED INTERVENTION TO SUSTAIN RESPONSIBLE ALCOHOL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN COMMUNITY SPORTING CLUBS: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2016 Tremain D, Freund M, Wye P, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Dunlop A, et al., 'DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT CLINICIAN BARRIERS TO THE PROVISION OF REFERRAL TO TELEPHONE HELPLINES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors A Dunlop, Jenny Bowman
2016 Tremain D, Freund M, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Dunlop A, et al., 'CLINICIAN PROVISION OF PREVENTIVE CARE FOR MODIFIABLE BEHAVIOURAL HEALTH RISK BEHAVIOURS WITHIN SUBSTANCE USE TREATMENT SERVICES: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, A Dunlop
2016 Sutherland R, Hollis J, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan N, et al., 'EFFECTS OF A SCHOOL-BASED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION ON ADIPOSITY IN ADOLESCENTS FROM ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED COMMUNITIES: 'PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 4 EVERYONE' RCT.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2016 Finch M, Nathan N, Yoong S, Sutherland R, Seward K, Reilly K, et al., 'SUPPORTING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF STATE NUTRITION GUIDELINES AND POLICIES IN SCHOOLS AND CHILDCARE: APPLICATION OF THE THEORETICAL DOMAINS FRAMEWORK', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2016 Yoong S, Nathan N, Finch M, Sutherland R, Seward K, Reilly K, et al., 'IMPLEMENTING STATE NUTRITION GUIDELINES AND POLICIES IN SCHOOLS AND CENTRE BASED CHILDCARE: BARRIERS AND ENABLERS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2016 Finch M, Seward K, Yoong S, Wyse B, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'APPLICATION OF THEORETICAL DOMAINS FRAMEWORK TO INFORM AN INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE IMPLEMENTATION OF FOOD SERVICE NUTRITION GUIDELINES BY CENTRE BASED CHILDCARE SERVICES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2016 Nathan N, Yoong S, Reilly K, Delaney T, Janssen L, Sutherland R, et al., 'THEORY-INFORMED INTERVENTIONS TO INCREASE IMPLEMENTATION OF A MANDATORY HEALTHY FOOD POLICY IN SCHOOLS. APPLICATION OF THE THEORETICAL DOMAINS FRAMEWORK.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2016 Yoong S, Fielding A, Finch M, Seward K, Gillham K, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'IMPLEMENTING STATE NUTRITION GUIDELINES AND POLICIES IN CHILDCARE: BARRIERS AND ENABLERS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2016 Tremain D, Freund M, Wye P, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Dunlop A, et al., 'INCREASING THE PROVISION OF PREVENTIVE CARE TO COMMUNITY DRUG AND ALCOHOL CLIENTS: A PILOT STUDY.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors A Dunlop, Jenny Bowman
2016 Jones J, Wyse R, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, Wiggers J, Marshall J, et al., 'AN INTERVENTION TO FACILITATE THE IMPLEMENTATION OF OBESITY PREVENTION POLICIES AND PRACTICES IN CHILDCARE SERVICES: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Jenna Hollis, Rebecca Wyse, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Serene Yoong
2016 Wyse R, Yoong SL, Dodds P, Campbell L, Delaney T, Nathan N, et al., 'THE POTENTIAL OF ONLINE CANTEENS TO DELIVER PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION INTERVENTIONS TO SCHOOL COMMUNITIES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2016 Williams A, Wiggers J, O'Brien K, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Campbell E, et al., 'A TELEPHONE-BASED LIFESTYLE BEHAVIOURAL INTERVENTION FOR OVERWEIGHT OR OBESE PATIENTS WITH LOW BACK PAIN.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2016 O'Brien K, Wiggers I, Williams A, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Campbell E, et al., 'A WEIGHT MANAGEMENT AND HEALTHY LIFESTYLE PROGRAM FOR OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE PATIENTS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2016 McCrabb S, Bonevskil B, Attia J, Baker A, Lott N, Balogh Z, et al., 'INTERNET USE AMONG ORTHOPAEDIC TRAUMA PATIENTS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Zsolt Balogh, John Attia, Amanda Baker
2016 Hodder RK, Freund N, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Nepal S, Dray J, et al., 'ARE UNIVERSAL SCHOOL-BASED PROTECTIVE FACTOR INTERVENTIONS EFFECTIVE IN REDUCING ADOLESCENT SUBSTANCE USE? RESULTS FROM A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, Serene Yoong, Jenny Bowman
2016 McCarter K, Britton B, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Bauer J, et al., 'CO-OCCURRING DEPRESSION, TOBACCO AND ALCOHOL USE IN A SAMPLE OF HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS UNDERGOING RADIOTHERAPY', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker
2016 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Dray J, et al., 'EFFECTIVENESS OF A SCHOOL-BASED PROTECTIVE FACTOR INTERVENTION IN REDUCING ADOLESCENT TOBACCO, ALCOHOL AND ILLICIT SUBSTANCE USE', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray Uon, John Attia
2016 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, Dray J, et al., 'EFFECTIVENESS OF A UNIVERSAL SCHOOL-BASED INTERVENTION IN REDUCING ADOLESCENT TOBACCO, ALCOHOL AND ILLICIT SUBSTANCE USE WITHIN STUDENT SUBGROUPS: EXPLORATORY ASSESSMENT', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors John Attia, Julia Dray Uon, Jenny Bowman, Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Metse AP, Wiggers J, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Prochaska JJ, Stockings E, et al., 'SMOKING AND MENTAL ILLNESS: A BIBLIOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF RESEARCH OUTPUT OVER TIME', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Jenny Bowman
2016 Nathan N, Sutherland R, Gillham K, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'CREATING HEALTHY ACTIVE LEADERS FOR KIDS (CHALK): PRINCIPALS AND TEACHERS ACCEPTABILITY OF A TEACHER'S HEALTH INITIATIVE', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
2016 Nathan N, Yoong S, Williams C, Reilly K, Delaney T, Sutherland R, et al., 'INCREASING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A STATE-WIDE HEALTHY CANTEEN POLICY: RESULTS OF THREE RANDOMISED-CONTROLLED TRIALS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2016 Wyse R, Campbell L, Campbell KJ, Wiggers J, Brennan L, Fletcher A, et al., 'SUSTAINING INCREASES IN CHILDREN'S FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION: 5-YEAR DATA FROM THE HEALTHY HABITS CLUSTER RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Rebecca Wyse
2016 Britton B, Beck A, McCarter K, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, et al., 'EATING AS TREATMENT (EAT): A HEALTH BEHAVIOR CHANGE INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE TREATMENT OUTCOMES FOR HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS UNDERGOING RADIOTHERAPY', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter
2016 Britton B, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Bauer J, Beck A, et al., ''HEADS UP': A PILOT STUDY OF A BEHAVIOR CHANGE INTERVENTION FOR HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS UNDERGOING RADIOTHERAPY', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter
2016 Beck A, Britton B, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Bauer J, et al., 'USING BEHAVIOR CHANGE COUNSELLING TO FACILITATE HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS' ENGAGEMENT WITH DIETETIC INTERVENTION ...', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker
2016 McCarter K, Britton B, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Bauer J, et al., 'IMPROVING SCREENING AND REFERRAL OF HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS FOR PSYCHOSOCIAL DISTRESS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter
2016 Britton B, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Bauer J, Beck A, et al., 'REDUCING MALNUTRITION IN HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS UNDERGOING RADIOTHERAPY', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter
2016 McCrabb S, Bonevski B, Attia J, Baker A, Lott N, Balogh Z, et al., 'ANXIETY, DEPRESSION AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE AMONG ORTHOPAEDIC TRAUMA PATIENTS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Zsolt Balogh, Billie Bonevski, Amanda Baker, John Attia
2016 Sutherland RR, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 4 EVERYONE' CLUSTER RCT: 24-MONTH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OUTCOMES OF A SCHOOL-BASED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION TARGETING ADOLESCENTS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2016 Small T, Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Rowland B, Sherker S, et al., 'SUSTAINABILITY OF RESPONSIBLE ALCOHOL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN COMMUNITY SPORTS CLUBS: A 6 YEAR FOLLOW-UP STUDY', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
2016 Metse AP, Wiggers J, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Freund M, Clancy R, et al., 'AN INTEGRATED SMOKING CESSATION INTERVENTION FOR MENTAL HEALTH PATIENTS: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Richard Clancy, Kim Colyvas
2016 Sutherland R, Reeves P, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan N, et al., 'IS A SCHOOL-BASED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION TARGETING SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS COST EFFECTIVE?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2016 Small T, Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Rowland B, Sherker S, et al., 'Sustaining alcohol management practices in community sports clubs: A 3 year follow-up', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers
2016 Small T, Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Rowland B, Sherker S, et al., 'Sustaining alcohol management practices in community sports clubs: A 3 year follow-up', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers
2016 Small T, Kingsland M, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Sherker S, et al., 'Feasibility of a web-based intervention for sustaining alcohol management practices in sports clubs', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2016 Small T, Kingsland M, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Sherker S, et al., 'Feasibility of a web-based intervention for sustaining alcohol management practices in sports clubs', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (2016)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2015 Sutherland RL, Campbell L, Lubans D, Morgan P, Oakley A, Nathan N, et al., 'Mid-intervention findings from the Physical Activity 4 Every1 trial: a cluster RCT in secondary schools located in low-income communities' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, John Wiggers
2015 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Tzelepis F, Kingsland M, Fielding A, Skelton E, 'Reliable and valid measures for evaluating public health research implementation', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Flora Tzelepis
2015 Wolfenden L, Jones J, Wyse R, Finch M, Yoong S, Dodds P, et al., 'Improving implementation of evidence-based obesity prevention policies and practices in childcare services: Findings from a series of RCTs conducted by the Hunter New England Population Health Research Group', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Patrick Mcelduff
2015 Wolfenden L, Nathan NR, Yoong S, Rose B, Aikman V, Williams C, et al., 'Improving implementation of NSW healthy canteen policy: Findings from a series of RCTs conducted by the Hunter New England Population Health Research Group', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER (2015) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong
2015 Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Integrated population health research and practice: Impact on translational research', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER (2015) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Britton B, Baker A, Bauer J, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, McElduff P, Carter G, 'Eating As Treatment: A stepped wedge multi-centre trial of a psycho-nutrition intervention to improve outcomes in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Patrick Mcelduff
2015 McCarter K, Wolfenden L, Baker A, Britton B, Beck A, Carter G, et al., 'A CLINICAL PRACTICE CHANGE INTERVENTION TO INCREASE DIETITIAN PROVISION OF DEPRESSION SCREENING AND REFERRAL FOR HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Sean Halpin
2015 McCarter K, Baker A, Britton B, Carter G, Beck A, Bauer J, et al., 'CONTINUED TOBACCO SMOKING, ALCOHOL USE AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS IN A SAMPLE OF HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS ABOUT TO UNDERGO RADIOTHERAPY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Sean Halpin, Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker
2014 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SL, Lecathelinais C, Bell AC, et al., 'Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Australian Primary Schools 2006-2013: How Far Have We Really Come?', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & HEALTH (2014)
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2014 Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Nathan N, Lecathelinais C, Dodds P, et al., 'ASSESSING CHANGES IN THE ADOPTION OF OBESITY PREVENTION PRACTICES IN AUSTRALIAN CHILDCARE SERVICES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2014 Britton B, Baker A, Bauer J, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Beck A, et al., 'EAT: RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL TO IMPROVE NUTRITION IN HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS UNDERGOING RADIOTHERAPY', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter
2014 Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Wiggers J, 'THE FEASIBILITY OF USING ELECTRONIC INTERVENTIONS TO SUPPORT CHILDCARE SERVICES' IMPLEMENTATION OF OBESITY PREVENTION PROGRAMS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2014 Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Nicholas M, Allender S, Millar L, McElduff P, 'POPULATION-BASED, WHOLE OF COMMUNITY INTERVENTIONS TO PREVENT POPULATION WEIGHT GAIN: A META-ANALYSIS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2014 Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, Rowland B, Dodds P, Gillhan K, Young SL, et al., 'IMPROVING THE AVAILABILITY, PROMOTION AND PURCH ASE OF HEALTHY FOODS FROM COMMUNITY SPORTING CLUB CANTEENS: RCT', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
2014 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Gillham K, Dray J, Wiggers J, 'ADOLESCENT TOBACCO, ALCOHOL AND ILLICIT DRUG USE: DOES RESILIENCE MATTER?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, Jenny Bowman
2014 Wolfenden L, Finch M, Yoong SL, Nathan N, Waever N, Jones J, et al., 'FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE IMPLEMENTATION OF OBESITY PREVENTION PRACTICES IN AUSTRALIAN CHILDCARE SERVICES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse
2014 Wiggers JH, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SZ, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'OBESITY PREVENTION POLICIES AND PRACTICES IN AUST RALIAN PRIMARY SCHOOLS 2006-2013: HOW FAR HAVE WE COME?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2014 Wiggers JH, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Gillham K, Lecathelinais C, 'REDUCING ALCOHOL RELATED VIOLENCE IN A CITY ENTERTAINMENT PRECINCT: IMPACT OF A REGULATORY INTERVENTION', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
2014 Wyse RJ, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Brennan L, Campbell KJ, Fletcher A, et al., 'LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP OF A TELEPHONE-BASED INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE PRESCHOOLERS' HEALTHY EATING: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Jenny Bowman
2014 McCarter K, Baker AL, Britton B, Beck A, Carter G, Bauer J, et al., 'PREVALENCE OF ALCOHOL USE AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS IN A SAMPLE OF HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS ABOUT TO UNDERGO RADIOTHERAPY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter, Patrick Mcelduff, Sean Halpin
2014 Dray J, Freund M, Bowman J, Campbell E, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Mental Health and Resilience in Adolescence: A resilience-based intervention', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine 2014; 21(S1): S203. (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1007/s12529-014-9418-2
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2014 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Nathan N, et al., 'Objectively Measured Sedentary Behavior in Secondary School Physical Education Lessons', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & HEALTH (2014)
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, John Wiggers
2014 Metse A, Bowman J, Wye P, Stockings E, Clancy R, Terry M, et al., 'EVALUATING THE EFFICACY OF AN INTEGRATED SMOKING CESSATION INTERVENTION FOR MENTAL HEALTH PATIENTS: STUDY PROTOCOL.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Richard Clancy
2014 Metse A, Bowman J, Wye P, Stockings E, Adams M, Clancy R, et al., 'EVALUATING THE EFFICACY OF AN INTEGRATED SMOKING CESSATION INTERVENTION FOR MENTAL HEALTH PATIENTS: STUDY PROTOCOL FOR A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL.', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Richard Clancy
2014 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wolfenden L, Bonevski B, Wiggers J, 'PROACTIVE RECRUITMENT INTO EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS TARGETING CANCER RISK BEHAVIOURS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, John Wiggers, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul
2014 McCarter K, Forbes E, Baker A, Britton B, Beck A, Carter G, et al., 'PREVALENCE OF TOBACCO SMOKING IN A SAMPLE OF HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS ABOUT TO UNDERGO RADIOTHERAPY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Patrick Mcelduff, Amanda Baker, Sean Halpin, Billie Bonevski
2014 Stain H, Hides L, Baker A, Jackson C, Lenroo R, Paulik-White G, et al., 'Social Well-being and Engaged Living (SWEL): results of a pilot trial and a RCT for re-engaging young Australians in education and work', EARLY INTERVENTION IN PSYCHIATRY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Amanda Baker, Helen Stain
2013 Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Rowland B, Gillham K, Dodds P, et al., 'REDUCING ALCOHOL-RELATED HARM IN SPORT: A CLUSTER RANDOMISED TRIAL WITH FOOTBALL CLUBS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Patrick Mcelduff
2012 Bell C, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Freund MA, Jones J, Wiggers JH, 'Predictors of preschool age children's physical activity at long day care', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Philip Morgan
2012 Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Campbell K, Wiggers JH, Brennan L, Fletcher A, et al., 'A telephone-based parent intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in 3-5 year-old children: 12-month outcomes from the healthy habits cluster randomized trial', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Abstracts from the ICBM 2012 Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Jenny Bowman
2012 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, 'A telephone-based intervention targeting preschool children can also increase the fruit and vegetable consumption of their parents after 12 months', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Abstracts from the ICBM 2012 Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2012 Baker AL, Beck AK, Carter GL, Bauer J, Wratten C, Bauer J, et al., 'Alcohol, tobacco use and readiness to change in an Australian sample of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology: Special Issue: Abstracts of the Joint Meeting of the COSA 39th Annual Scientific Meeting and IPOS 14th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Patrick Mcelduff
2012 Beck AK, Baker AL, Britton B, Carter GL, Bauer J, Wratten C, et al., 'Therapeutic alliance between dietitians and patients with head and neck cancer: Relationship to quality of life and nutritional status following a dietitian delivered health behaviour intervention', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology: Special Issue: Abstracts of the Joint Meeting of the COSA 39th Annual Scientific Meeting and IPOS 14th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Patrick Mcelduff
2012 Britton B, Baker AL, Bauer J, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Beck AK, et al., 'Eat: A stepped wedge cluster randomised trial to improve nutrition in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology: Special Issue: Abstracts of the Joint Meeting of the COSA 39th Annual Scientific Meeting and IPOS 14th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Patrick Mcelduff
2012 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Brennan L, 'Training interviewers to deliver a telephone-based behavioural family intervention encouraging fruit and vegetable consumption', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2011 Finch M, Wolfenden L, Edenden D, Falkiner M, Pond N, Hardy L, et al., 'Impact of a population health physical activity practice change intervention in childcare services', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2011) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers
2011 James EL, Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Britton B, Campbell K, Hodder R, et al., 'Interventions to increase fruit and vegetable consumption amongst preschool aged children: A systematic review of randomised trials', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Erica James, Rebecca Wyse, Patrick Mcelduff
2011 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Campbell K, Brennan L, Fletcher AL, et al., 'Efficacy of a telephone-based parent intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in 3-5 year olds: a cluster randomised trial', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2010 Innes-Hughes C, Hardy LL, Venugopal K, King L, Wolfenden L, Rangan A, 'Children's consumption of energy dense nutrient poor foods: Additional or replacement foods?', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
2010 Falkiner M, Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Francis L, Rowe S, Bell A, 'Empowering services to provide healthy eating and physical activity assistance to disadvantaged families', Australian Child Welfare Association (ACWA) Conference. Programme (2010) [E3]
2010 Hardy LL, Grunseit A, King L, Wolfenden L, Milat A, 'Associations between adolescents' physical activity and obesogenic health behaviours', Obesity Reviews (2010) [E3]
2010 Hardy LL, Grunseit A, King L, Wolfenden L, Milat A, 'Reducing obesity in early childhood: Results from Romp and Chomp, an Australian community-wide intervention program', Obesity Reviews (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.2009.28826
Citations Scopus - 114Web of Science - 95
2010 McKeough A, Wolfenden L, Bowman JA, Paolini S, 'Opportunities for friendship: An experimental comparison of overweight and healthy weight children', Obesity Reviews (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Stefania Paolini, Jenny Bowman
2009 Wyse R, Campbell EM, Wolfenden L, Hodder R, 'Policies and practices promoting physical activity in primary schools: A survey of principals from the Hunter New England area, NSW, Australia', 26th ACHPER International Conference: Creating Active Futures: Program & Abstracts (2009) [E3]
2009 Slattery C, Wolfenden L, Freund MA, Knight JJ, Gillham K, Wiggers JH, 'To assess the effectiveness of a multi-strategic clinical practice change intervention in increasing the provision of nicotine replacement therpay to nicotine dependent inpatients at a rural hospital', 3rd Rural Health Research Colloquium: Building a Healthier Future Through Research: Program and Abstract Book (2009) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers
2009 Bowman JA, Ritchie C, Wolfenden L, Gillham K, Stojanovski E, Wiggers JH, 'What influences the provision of smoking cessation care in a pre-operative hospital clinic setting?', Oceania Tobacco Control 2009 (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Elizabeth Stojanovski
2009 Wolfenden L, Hutchesson MJ, Farrell L, Lecathelinais LC, Sutherland RL, Bell C, et al., 'Physical activity policies and practices in childcare centres: A population based study', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, John Wiggers
Show 87 more conferences

Report (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Stockings E, Wolfenden L, Bartlem K, Gilligan C, Hodder R, Kingsland M, Wiggers J, 'Systematic Review and Recommendations Final Report: The efficacy of multi-setting community-based alcohol and other drug (AOD) interventions for reducing population-level harms', The Alcohol and Drug Foundation, 69 (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers
2016 Yoong S, Tzelepis F, Wiggers J, Oldmeadow C, Kheng Chai L, Paul C, et al., 'Systematic Review: Prevalence of smoking-proxy electronic inhaling systems (SEIS) use and its association with tobacco initiation in youth', World Health Organisation, 41 (2016)
Co-authors Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2015 Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Kingsland M, 'Good Sports Program Criteria Review: Core & Safe Transport Program', Australian Drug Foundation, 63 (2015)
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Yoong S, Wolfenden L, Tursan d¿Espaignet E, Wiggers J, 'Tobacco Use and Surgical Outcomes: Evidence Brief', World Health Organization., 18 (2015)
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Kingsland M, 'Good Sports Program Criteria Healthy Eating Program', Australian Drug Foundation, 41 (2015)
Co-authors John Wiggers
2014 Wolfenden L, Paul C, Yoong S, Tzelpis F, Bowman J, Wiggers J, 'Evidence Brief: Access to Nicotine Replacement Therapy: Issues for Disadvantage Population Groups. Australian National Preventive Health Agency, 2014 (in press)', Australian National Preventive Health Agency (2014)
2014 Wolfenden L, Paul C, Tzelepis F, Yoong S, Bowman J, Wye P, et al., 'Effectiveness, Access to and Use of Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) by Disadvantaged Smokers: Evidence Review', Australian National Preventive Health Agency, 17 (2014)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Chris Paul
2013 Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Gillham K, Bell C, Sutherland R, et al., 'Good for Kids. Good for Life: Evaluation report 2006-2010: Evaluation Report', Ministry of Health, 134 (2013)
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Wiggers J, Tindall J, Wolfenden L, Weir S, Gillham K, 'Australian Defence Force: Alcohol Management Strategy ¿ data Review Activity Final Report (ADFAMS)', Australian Drug Foundation, 25 (2012)
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Mathers C, Pujari S, Stevens G, d'Espaignet ET, Wolfenden L, 'WHO Global Report: Tobacco Attributable Mortality', World Health Organization, 396 (2012)
Show 7 more reports
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 74
Total funding $18,904,895

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


201711 grants / $2,547,867

A randomised controlled trial of an online intervention to improve healthy food purchases from primary school canteens$730,149

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Kylie Ball, Professor Karen Campbell, Professor Chris Rissel, Doctor Rebecca Wyse
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1600079
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A randomised trial of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of a state-wide school physical activity policy$586,396

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Adrian Bauman, Professor Chris Rissel, Ms Nicole Nathan
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1600792
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Addressing foundational impediments to the translation of chronic disease prevention interventions in community settings$476,728

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Career Development Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1600414
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Improving the translation of community cardiovascular disease prevention research$200,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Future Leader Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1600587
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Evaluation of the Life Education program New South Wales$200,000

Funding body: Health Administration Corporation

Funding body Health Administration Corporation
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Mrs Rebecca Hodder, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Ms Nicole Nathan, Professor Jennifer Bowman
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701028
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Increasing the implementation of a mandatory primary school physical activity policy$177,197

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Ms Nicole Nathan
Scheme Translating Research into Practice (TRIP) Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600651
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A randomised trial of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of a state-wide school physical activity policy$74,800

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Adrian Bauman, Professor Chris Rissel, Ms Nicole Nathan
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1600958
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

DVCRI Research Support for CDF$60,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme NHMRC CDF Support
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1700663
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

A randomised trial of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of a state-wide school physical activity policy$30,000

Funding body: NSW Office of Preventative Health

Funding body NSW Office of Preventative Health
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Adrian Bauman, Professor Chris Rissel, Ms Nicole Nathan
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1600957
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Head and neck cancer patient experience of EAT: A new dietitian-delivered health behaviour intervention$7,597

Funding body: Calvary Mater Newcastle

Funding body Calvary Mater Newcastle
Project Team Miss Kristen McCarter, Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Sean Halpin, Doctor Ben Britton, Doctor Alison Beck, Conjoint Professor Gregory Carter, Doctor Chris Wratten, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Associate Professor Judith Bauer
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700913
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Health technology evaluation$5,000

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Project Team Professor John Attia, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Vijay Varadharajan, Dr Craig Dalton, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Searles, Ms Jane Gray
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701038
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

201611 grants / $4,965,408

Community prevention of cancer: building the evidence base for translation into policy and practice$2,203,987

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Adrian Bauman, Professor Chris Rissel, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran
Scheme Program Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1500708
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

A randomised controlled trial of a web-based, organisational systems change intervention to increase childcare service adherence to dietary guidelines$1,062,746

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Dr Vicki Flood, Professor Chris Rissel, Doctor Serene Yoong
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1500172
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Implementation trial of multicomponent school-based physical activity and healthy nutrition $990,779

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team

Wiggers John, Sutherland Rachel, Campbell Libby, Wolfenden Luke, Oldmeadow Christopher, Searles Andrew, Lubans David, Nathan Nicole, Morgan Phillip

Scheme Translational Research Grant Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

Scheduling frequent opportunities for outdoor play – a simple approach to increase physical activity in childcare$355,956

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Serene Yoong
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1400149
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The effectiveness of strategies to scale the implementation of community chronic disease prevention interventions$118,004

Funding body: The Sax Institute

Funding body The Sax Institute
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Serene Yoong, Doctor Christopher Williams, Ms Melanie Kingsland, Professor John Wiggers, Mr Andrew Milat, Professor Chris Rissel, Ms Karen Gillham, Ms Kathryn Chapman, Professor Adrian Bauman
Scheme Australian Prevention Partnership Centre
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600445
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Research to gather baseline data regarding operations and provision of healthy food and drinks of licensed school canteens$78,030

Funding body: Health Administration Corporation

Funding body Health Administration Corporation
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Rebecca Wyse, Ms Tessa Delaney, Doctor Serene Yoong, Ms Rachel Sutherland, Ms Nicole Nathan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600903
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Strategies for scaling up the implementation of evidence-based interventions in social welfare: A systematic review$53,696

Funding body: The Campbell Collaboration

Funding body The Campbell Collaboration
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Ms Bianca Albers, Professor Aron Shlonsky
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600871
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

Systematic review of multi-setting community based AOD interventions$40,000

Funding body: Australian Drug Foundation

Funding body Australian Drug Foundation
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Miss Melanie Kingsland
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600709
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Good Sports Junior Program Evaluation$36,210

Funding body: Australian Drug Foundation

Funding body Australian Drug Foundation
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Ms Melanie Kingsland
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600819
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Australian Defence Force Annual Alcohol Survey Data Analysis and Reporting$21,000

Funding body: Department of Defence

Funding body Department of Defence
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Ms Melanie Kingsland, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Conor Gilligan
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600807
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Teachers Health Program in Schools$5,000

Funding body: Teachers Mutual Bank

Funding body Teachers Mutual Bank
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Ms Nicole Nathan
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600904
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20159 grants / $1,210,672

A practice change intervention to increase the provision of antenatal care addressing maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy: a stepped-wedge trial$779,672

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Professor Elizabeth Elliott, Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor John Attia, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Chris Rissel
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1500584
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A practice change intervention to increase the provision of antenatal care addressing maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy: a stepped-wedge trial$168,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Professor Elizabeth Elliott, Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor John Attia, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Chris Rissel
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1500682
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

A practice change intervention to increase the provision of antenatal care addressing maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy: a stepped-wedge trial$80,000

Funding body: NSW Office of Preventative Health

Funding body NSW Office of Preventative Health
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Professor Elizabeth Elliott, Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor John Attia, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Chris Rissel
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1500683
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

An online consumer intervention in primary school canteens$42,500

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Ms Tessa Delaney, Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1500605
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Healthy eating intervention for disadvantaged schools$42,500

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Mrs Kathryn Reilly
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1500701
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

A practice change intervention to increase the provision of antenatal care addressing maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy: a stepped-wedge trial$40,000

Funding body: Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education

Funding body Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Professor Elizabeth Elliott, Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor John Attia, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Chris Rissel
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1500681
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Improving parents' skills to reduce adolescent alcohol use$20,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Doctor Conor Gilligan, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Ms Julie Rae
Scheme Research Funds
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500833
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

A web-based, organisational system intervention to increase childcare service adherence to dietary guidelines: a pilot study$19,200

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
Project Team

Yoong Serene, Wolfenden Luke, Wiggers John

Scheme HCRA Implementation Flagship program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Improving parents skills to reduce adolescent alcohol use$18,800

Funding body: Australian Drug Foundation

Funding body Australian Drug Foundation
Project Team Doctor Conor Gilligan, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Ms Karen Gillham
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1500866
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20145 grants / $604,266

Evaluation of a tailored online hospital and post-discharge smoking cessation program for orthopaedic trauma surgery patients$370,818

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Billie Bonevski, Professor Zsolt Balogh, Professor Amanda Baker, Professor Ian Harris, Professor John Attia, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran, Dr Johnson George, Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1300686
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Population Health Post Doctoral Fellowship$122,245

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Ms Karen Gillham
Scheme Postdoctoral Position
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301173
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

A randomized trial of an implementation intervention to facilitate the adoption of a state-wide healthy canteen policy$71,454

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1400725
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Develop and evaluate a three-year strategic plan addressing sun exposure, skin cancer prevention and vitamin D$20,000

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Amy Waller, Mrs ELIZABETH Tracey, Miss Alix Hall
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1400744
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Improving radiotherapy outcomes with smoking cessation: Pilot trial in had and neck cancer patients$19,749

Funding body: Calvary Mater Newcastle

Funding body Calvary Mater Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Ben Britton, Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Chris Wratten, Conjoint Professor Gregory Carter, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Alison Beck, Doctor Craig Sadler, Associate Professor Judith Bauer
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400766
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

201316 grants / $1,961,169

A randomised trial of an intervention to maintain alcohol management practices in community sporting clubs$554,637

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Dr Bosco Rowland, Ms Karen Gillham, Ms Jennifer Tindall, Ms Maree Sidey
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1201199
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Moving from policy to practice: A randomised trial of an implementation intervention to facilitate the adoption of a statewide healthy canteen policy$416,263

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Megan Freund, Ms Karen Gillham, Doctor Libby Campbell, Ms Rachel Sutherland, Ms Nicole Nathan
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1201168
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Preventing chronic disease in Australia through applied intervention research$415,218

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Career Development Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1200518
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A randomised trial of an intervention to maintain alcohol management practices in community sporting clubs$235,000

Funding body: Australian Drug Foundation

Funding body Australian Drug Foundation
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Dr Bosco Rowland, Ms Karen Gillham, Ms Jennifer Tindall, Ms Maree Sidey
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1300712
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Moving from policy to practice: A randomised trial of an implementation intervention to facilitate the adoption of a statewide healthy canteen policy$127,998

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Megan Freund, Ms Karen Gillham, Doctor Libby Campbell, Ms Rachel Sutherland, Ms Nicole Nathan
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1300710
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Scholarship Top-Up Jannah Jones - Creating environments supportive of child obesity prevention: the effectiveness of an intensive population based dissemination intervention$90,649

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Ms Jannah Jones
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1300709
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

A randomised trial of an intervention to maintain alcohol management practices in community sporting clubs$30,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Dr Bosco Rowland, Ms Karen Gillham, Ms Jennifer Tindall, Ms Maree Sidey
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1400833
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Strategies to increase adoption of obesity prevention and public health trials$13,637

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Finch Meghan, Yoong Serene, Wolfenden Luke, Nathan Nicole, Wiggers John

Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Electronic-based interventions to support preschools in their implementation of obesity prevention$13,588

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Yoong Serene, Wolfenden Luke, Dodds Pennie, Finch Meghan, Williams Christopher M, Wyse Rebecca, Wiggers John

Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

PULSE Early Career Researcher Award 2012$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300572
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

The feasibility of a telephone-based intervention in reducing the prevalence of overweight and obesity in booked surgical$9,882

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Freund Megan, Wiggers John, Wolfenden Luke, Bowman Jenny, Wye Paula, Campbell Libby, Gillham Karen

Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

A pilot trial of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of a state-wide healthy canteen policy$9,841

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Nathan Nicole, Wiggers John, Freund Megan, Gillham Karen, Sutherland Rachel, Williams Christopher Wolfenden, Luke, White, Jim

Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

TAFE students’ use of online and telephone support for smoking, nutrition, alcohol and physical activity (SNAP) behaviours: a cohort study.$9,788

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

11. Tzelepis F, Paul C, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Lynagh M, Morgan P, Turon T, Chapman K, Collins C, Cox P, Ann Hill M, Bonevski B, McElduff P, Wolfenden L, Barker D, Courtney R, Guillaumier A, Searles A.

Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Systematic review of school-based resilience interventions targeting adolescent tobacco, alcohol and other drug use. $8,250

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Hodder Rebecca, Freund Meghan, Wolfenden Luke.

Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Intervention to improve the implementation of healthy eating, physical activity and obesity prevention interventions in childcare services: A systematic review.$8,250

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Wolfenden Luke, Williams Chris, Yoong Serere, Wyse Rebecca

Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Interventions in sports settings to reduce alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm: A systematic review$8,168

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Kingsland Melanie, Wiggers John, Wolfenden Luke

Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20124 grants / $3,685,866

Evaluating the efficacy of an integrated smoking cessation intervention for mental health patients: a randomised controlled trial$1,466,787

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Jennifer Bowman, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Paula Wye, Associate Professor Judith Prochaska, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Libby Campbell
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1100130
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Eating As Treatment (EAT): A stepped wedge, randomised control trial of a health behaviour change intervention provided by dietitians to improve nutrition in head and neck cancer patients undergoing r$1,156,300

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Amanda Baker, Conjoint Professor Gregory Carter, Associate Professor Judith Bauer, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Chris Wratten, Doctor Ben Britton
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1100093
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Creating childcare environments supportive of child obesity prevention: The effectiveness of an intensive population based dissemination intervention$662,778

Funding body: ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)

Funding body ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Libby Campbell, Ms Karen Gillham, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Paula Wye, Ms Meghan Finch, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Rebecca Wyse, Dr Sze Yoong, Ms Jannah Jones
Scheme Preventive Health Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1101031
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Randomised controlled trial of a telephone delivered social well-being and engaged living (SWEL) intervention for disengaged youth at risk of mental health and other adverse outcomes in urban and rura$400,001

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Dr Leanne Hides, Dr Helen Stain, Dr Chris Jackson, Professor Rhoshel Lenroot, Dr Georgie Paulik
Scheme Call for Research (Mental Health)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1200052
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20114 grants / $741,950

The effectiveness of a clinical practice change intervention in increasing, on a health service wide basis, community health clinician adherence to preventive care guidelines$591,239

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Paula Wye
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1000537
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The effectiveness of a clinical practice change intervention in increasing, on a health service wide basis, community health clinician adherence to preventive care guidelines$120,711

Funding body: Health Reform Transitional Organisation - Northern

Funding body Health Reform Transitional Organisation - Northern
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Paula Wye
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1100784
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Facilitating health behaviour research translation in community settings.$15,000

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Freund M, Wye P, Campbell L, Finch M, Wyse R, Sanson-Fisher R, Henskens F, Carey M, Paul C, Clinton-McHarg T, Tzelepis T, Bonevski B, Boyes A, Bryant J.

Scheme Visiting Scholar
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Dissemination and implementation research in childcare services: a systematic review and pilot survey. $15,000

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Wolfenden Lyke, Wiggers John, Finch Meghan, Wyse Rebecca

Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20104 grants / $1,471,917

Effectiveness of a resilience intervention in reducing smoking and alcohol consumption among secondary school students$1,432,750

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Megan Freund
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G0190175
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase child physical activity during attendance at childcare$24,547

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Megan Freund
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900142
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

The use of healthy weight Smartphone applications$10,000

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Wolfenden L, Brennan L.

Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

A multi-national examination of the impact of smoke free legislation on adolescent tobacco use and second hand tobacco smoke exposure$4,620

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000494
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20098 grants / $1,670,780

Supporting parents to increase children's consumption of fruits and vegetables: a randomised controlled trial of a telephone based intervention$586,101

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Early Career Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0189545
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Reducing alcohol misuse: The efficacy of a comprehensive accreditation intervention in community sports clubs$446,964

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Dr Robin Room, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Dr Bosco Rowland, Dr Jane Mallick, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Mr Michael Livingston, Ms Karen Gillham
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G0189163
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Reducing alcohol misuse: The efficacy of a comprehensive accreditation intervention in community sports clubs$113,622

Funding body: Australian Drug Foundation

Funding body Australian Drug Foundation
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Dr Robin Room, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Dr Bosco Rowland, Dr Jane Mallick, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Mr Michael Livingston, Ms Karen Gillham
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G0189604
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Reducing alcohol misuse: The efficacy of a comprehensive accreditation intervention in community sports clubs$113,622

Funding body: Hunter New England Area Health Service

Funding body Hunter New England Area Health Service
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Dr Robin Room, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Dr Bosco Rowland, Dr Jane Mallick, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Mr Michael Livingston, Ms Karen Gillham
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G0189605
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Supporting parents to increase children's consumption of fruits and vegetables: a randomised controlled trial of a telephone based intervention$86,951

Funding body: Hunter New England Area Health Service

Funding body Hunter New England Area Health Service
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0190370
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Supporting parents to increase children's consumption of fruits and vegetables: a randomised controlled trial of a telephone based intervention$36,159

Funding body: Hunter New England Area Health Service

Funding body Hunter New England Area Health Service
Project Team Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0190253
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

The effectiveness of a brief smoking cessation intervention with booked surgical patients in a public hospital$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Dr R Kerridge
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189819
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20082 grants / $45,000

Upgrade of computer equipment for the computer assisted telephone generalised electronic system$25,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Conjoint Professor Afaf Girgis, Conjoint Professor David Durrheim, Professor Jennifer Bowman, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Conjoint Associate Professor Raoul Walsh, Dr Edouard Tursan d'Espaignet, Ms Lyn Francis, Doctor Frank Tuyl, Associate Professor Erica James, Doctor Allison Boyes, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Libby Campbell
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188548
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Providing telephone support to parents to improve child fruit and vegetable intake$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Jennifer Bowman
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189064
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed4
Current10

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD2.82

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Acceptability, Feasibility and Potential Effectiveness of a Secondary School Nutrition Intervention PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Scheduling frequent opportunities for outdoor play - a simple approach to increasing physical activity in childcare PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD The efficacy of an online public health nutrition intervention on improving healthy food purchases from primary school canteens PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Improving Population Wide Implementation of Healthy Food Policy in Primary Schools PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD A Randomised Trial of Web-Based Intervention in Sustaining Best-Practise Alcohol Management Practices at Community Sports Clubs PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD An Intervention to Improve Implementation of Nutrition Guidelines in Childcare Services PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Effectiveness of a Clinical Practice Change Intervention in Improving Screening and Referral of Head and Neck Cancer Patients for Distress PhD (Clinical Psychology), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Increasing the Provision of Preventive Care Delivered by Community Health Drug and Alcohol Clinicians PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Creating Childcare Environments Supportive of Child Obesity Prevention PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2008 PhD Improving the Effectiveness and Implementation of Physical Activity Interventions Delivered in Childcare PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Increasing the Implementation of Vegetable and Fruit Breaks in Australian Primary Schools PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Reducing Risky Drinking and Alcohol-Related Harm in the Sports Setting PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Increasing the Fruit and Vegetables Consumption of Preschool Children PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2011 PhD Opportunities for Reducing Alcohol-Related Crime in Non-Metropolitan Areas of Australia PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

UON Heart Foundation 2017 Research Funding

December 5, 2016

Five UON health researchers have been awarded highly competitive Heart Foundation Australia funding to investigate the causes, treatment and prevention of heart, stroke and blood vessel disease.

UON awarded over $5.6 million in NHMRC funding

October 27, 2016

The University of Newcastle (UON) is delighted to announce the following successful researchers in the latest round of National Health and Medical Research Council funding. With the help of this funding, our researchers aim to tackle a range of health-related issues that impact our communities.

NHMRC

NHMRC funding success 2016

November 10, 2015

Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden has been awarded more than $1,687,000 in NHMRC funding commencing in 2016. A Project Grant: A randomised controlled trial of a web-based, organisational systems change intervention to increase childcare service adherence to dietary guidelines and a Partnership Project: Web-based systems intervention to support implementation of dietary guidelines in childcare services.

Philip Morgan

Acclaim for researchers

July 29, 2013

University of Newcastle researchers have won two awards at the National Preventative Health Awards presented at the National Preventive Health Symposium at Parliament House in Canberra.

Grants for creativity

Creative Industries

June 28, 2013

A study concerning Creativity and Cultural Production in the Hunter Region was announced today as one of six University of Newcastle projects awarded highly prestigious Australian Research Council Linkage Project Grants worth a total of $1.8 million.

Dr Luke Wolfenden

Position

Associate Professor and Career Development Fellow
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email luke.wolfenden@newcastle.edu.au
Link Twitter
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