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Dr Luke Wolfenden

Associate Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Lifestyle as medicine

Dr Luke Wolfenden's research into the modifiable risks of chronic health conditions and injury is helping the community to improve their overall wellbeing.  

Dr Luke Wolfenden 

Although chronic diseases and injuries are as common as they are costly, Dr Luke Wolfenden insists most are avoidable.

'Chronic diseases and injuries can be closely linked to lifestyle choices that are very often modifiable,' he asserts.

'So things like obesity, physical inactivity, excess alcohol consumption and smoking are all important risk factors, but they obviously don't have to be.'

'If we target and modify these risks we can reduce the number of people suffering needlessly.'

The behavioural scientist is working across multiple settings to encourage these lifestyle changes, enlisting the commitment of sporting clubs, childcare centres, schools, hospital services and outpatient clinics to implement chronic disease and injury prevention initiatives. Key to his success in translating research into practice is ongoing engagement processes with policy makers and practitioners.  This communication ensures evidence-based interventions are made both widely accessible and appropriate for different settings.

'Once we develop or identify effective programs, we conduct research to find the best way of supporting oragnisations in the community to adopt and implement them,' Wolfenden explains.

'This requires close consultation and collaboration with these organisations.'

Trashing the ash

Wolfenden first began addressing the lifestyle-related risk factors contributing to chronic disease in the early 2000s.  He specifically targeted tobacco use during the four years of his PhD candidateship, working with Hunter New England Population Health and staff at the John Hunter Hospital to improve the provision of smoking cessation care to surgical patients. Undertaking a randomised control trial of a new computer-based program to do so, Wolfenden and the team also succeeded in reducing patients' risks of postoperative complications.  The project was a finalist in the health service quality awards and has since been cited in clinical practice guidelines.  It was also adopted as part of routine pre-operative management of surgical patients at the hospital.

'We noticed patients often have to sit around in waiting rooms during their preoperative appointments, so this intervention sought to use that time to help them to stop smoking before they had surgery,' he discloses.

'This has proven therapeutic benefits as well as longer-term ones, such as the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease.'

Hospital receptionists are responsible for referring patients to Wolfenden's program, which initially provides a 20-minute computerised behavioural counselling session for those who screen positive for tobacco use. It also assesses patients' nicotine dependence and generates a prompt for preoperative clinical staff to identify them as smokers.

'These patients are prescribed with nicotine replacement therapy,' Wolfenden details.

'They're also equipped with other take-home strategies to help stave off the smoking urges once the surgery is over.'

Doctor without borders

After receiving his PhD in 2006, Wolfenden took off for a European backpacking tour. The avid traveller's planned break from researching was cut shorter than expected though, when he landed a lecturing and mentoring role with the UK'S Cochrane Collaboration in Oxford a couple of months into his sojourn.

'I applied for the job when I was running out of money,' he laughs.

'But it was great.'

'I was lucky enough to fly around Europe and undertake training workshops with authors who'd registered their interest in writing systematic reviews with the Collaboration.'

Taking on another senior position when he returned the following year, Wolfenden found himself managing the research of Australia's largest childhood obesity prevention program.  The $12 million initiative was a collaboration with the University of Newcastle, the Hunter New England Local Health District, NSW Health and the University of Sydney.  Wolfenden was a finalist in the NSW Public Health Sector Awards for his contribution to the program.  'Good for Kids. Good for Life' was also awarded the inaugural Australian National Preventive Health Agency Research Translation award, as well as quality and innovation awards from the NSW Government.

The intervention included supporting the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices to more than 400 schools, 350 childcare services, 200 sporting clubs, 30 community service organisations and Aboriginal communities.

 'We focused on promoting healthy eating and regular exercise in children up to 12 years,' Wolfenden advises.

Findings from 'Good for Kids. Good for Life' have since informed the development of strategies used to support the statewide roll-out of the NSW Ministry of Health's Healthy Children's Initiative Programs.

Move it and chew it

Wolfenden has continued to add to this body of work around obesity prevention, leading collaboration between the University of Newcastle and Hunter New England's Population Health on a raft of innovative studies, many funded by nationally competitive grants. Again focusing mainly on children, the team's efforts have seen the translation of health promotion strategies in educational and recreational settings across the Hunter, New England and Lower Mid North Coast regions.

'One of our current projects involves encouraging primary school canteens to sell more healthy foods,' Wolfenden reveals.

'Most don't comply with mandatory school canteen policies, often because they're not aware of the policy, are not confident in product classification, or are concerned about a decline in profits.'

'So we're providing training, support from dieticians and tips on how to reduce waste and mark foods appropriately so they don't get sold below cost.'

'We're also auditing their menus and getting principals onboard.'

Another of Wolfenden's current endeavours involves looking at novel ways to get young children to be more physically active. The National Health and Medical Research Council Career Development Fellow is aiming to create interventions for childcare services that are translatable, fundable and scalable.

'The kinds of approaches many of us have used up until now to encourage children to be active in childcare have been pretty equivocal – some have worked and some haven't,' he affirms.

'They also require ongoing investments to maintain staff skill levels and ensure ongoing implementation, so there's a sustainability issue from a health promotion perspective.'

Instead, Wolfenden is electing to trial a 'simpler intervention' in a number of childcare centres across the Hunter, cutting the typical 90-minute outdoor play period into several smaller 20-30 minute chunks.

'Research suggests children are naturally physical active during these sessions, but only during the first part,' he clarifies.

'So we want to change how childcare centres schedule them.'

'Breaking them up is an easy environment change that doesn't require training and can be effortlessly incorporated into childcare accreditation standards.'

Over the limit

Wolfenden is simultaneously working with the Australian Drug Foundation to help community sports clubs manage and sell alcohol responsibly. They conducted a randomised trial of the national 'Good Sports' program that encourages sporting clubs to create family-friendly cultures, ensuring they adhere to liquor licence legislations and remove happy hours and other drinking promotions where possible.

Good Sports is Australia's largest health in sports initiative for community sports clubs, working with more than 6,500 clubs across Australia to reduce risky drinking.  The Australian Drug Foundation received $19 million in the recent Federal Budget to support the important work of this program for another four years.

'We know alcohol is consumed excessively at sporting clubs, so that's why we've chosen to target these venues,' Wolfenden says.

Following the success of the trial, the team is now in the process of adding an online maintenance strategy to the program to support the improvements made by clubs as part of an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant.

Useable discoveries

In the not-so-distant future, Wolfenden looks set to focus on two more things - getting further evidence into practice, and understanding the barriers preventing community and clinical services from adopting evidence-based practice.

'I'll be developing strategies that address both,' he acknowledges.

'We need to make sure research can inform policy and practice.' 

'It's important that intervention trials are designed so they're suitable for population-wide dissemination and uptake.'

Dr Luke Wolfenden

Lifestyle as medicine

Dr Luke Wolfenden’s research into the modifiable risks of chronic health conditions and injury is helping the community to improve their overall wellbeing.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Research Interests and Expertise

I am a behavioural scientist. In 2013 I commenced a NHMRC Career Development Fellowship. I graduated with a PhD in behavioural medicine in 2006. Since submission of my PhD I have worked with internationally recognised research institutions such as the UK Cochrane Centre, and was an invited visiting Fellow at the World Health Organization.  Nationally, I have been primarily responsible for the evaluation of Australia’s largest ever child obesity prevention program (Good for Kids. Good for Life.) where I led a research collaboration between the Prevention Research Centres of the University of Sydney, Hunter New England Area Health Service and NSW Health

My research seeks to reduce the burden of chronic disease in the community. Over the past 5 years my work has focused on i) trialling interventions to reduce modifiable chronic disease risks in the community; ii) trialling dissemination and implementation strategies to increase the adoption of evidence based chronic disease prevention practices by organisations in the community; iii) conducting methodological research to facilitate the translation of research into practice.  

The research I conduct draws heavily on social-ecological and social cognitive perspectives of reducing chronic disease risks. The primary modifiable risks my research addresses are obesity, diet, physical inactivity, alcohol and tobacco use. My  research is typically settings based. I have conducted trials of health behaviour interventions or of population wide-dissemination and implementation strategies in hospitals, out-patient clinics, schools, child care centres, community organisations, and sports clubs. To ensure that the practice relevance of research outcomes and maximise the potential for successful translation, my work is informed through on-going engagement processes with end-users

Research Expertise
I am a behavioural scientist. My research seeks to reduce the burden of chronic disease in the community. Over the past 5 years my work has focused on: i) trialling interventions to reduce modifiable chronic disease risks in the community; ii) trialling dissemination and implementation strategies to increase the adoption of evidence based chronic disease prevention practices by organisations in the community; and iii) conducting methodological research to facilitate the translation of research into practice. The research I conduct draws heavily on social-ecological and social cognitive perspectives of reducing chronic disease risks. The primary modifiable risks my research addresses are obesity, diet, physical inactivity, alcohol and tobacco use. My research is typically settings based. I have conducted trials of health behaviour interventions or of population wide-dissemination and implementation strategies in hospitals, out-patient clinics, schools, child care centres, community organisations, and sports clubs. To ensure that the practice relevance of research outcomes and maximise the potential for successful translation, my work is informed through on-going engagement processes with end-users.

Collaborations
Associate Professor Wolfenden has collaborated academics, policy makers or practitioners from the following organisations: The World Health Organization The UK Cochrane Centre The Australian Drug Foundation University of Ottawa Yale University University of Newcastle University of Sydney Deakin University University of Melbourne University of Western Australia NSW Cancer Council Turning Point Hunter New England Population Health Hunter Institute of Mental Health Parenting Research Centre NSW Department of Education and Communities Catholic Schools Office NSW Family Services Inc NSW Office of Preventive Health NSW Ministry of Health

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Chronic disease
  • Dissemination
  • Early childhood
  • Health promotion
  • Implementation
  • Injury
  • Intervention
  • Nutrition
  • Obesity
  • Population Health
  • Preventive Medicine
  • Primary school
  • Public health
  • Tobacco
  • Translation
  • systematic reviews

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
160599 Policy and Administration not elsewhere classified 25
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 25
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/06/2013 -  Fellow - NHMRC University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/01/2013 -  Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/05/2009 - 1/05/2012 Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Wolfenden K, Wolfenden L, Egger G, 'Preventing and Managing Injury at the Clinical Level. In Egger G, Binns A, Rossner S.', Lifestyle Medicine: Managing disease of lifestyle in the 21st Century, McGraw-Hill, Sydney 253-263 (2011)

Journal article (130 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, Rowland BC, Dodds P, Gillham K, Yoong SL, et al., 'Improving availability, promotion and purchase of fruit and vegetable and non sugar-sweetened drink products at community sporting clubs: a randomised trial.', The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, 12 35 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0193-5
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Hills A, Nathan N, Robinson K, Fox D, Wolfenden L, 'Improvement in primary school adherence to the NSW Healthy School Canteen Strategy in 2007 and 2010', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 26 89-92 (2015)

Issue addressed Since 2005, a government-endorsed strategy guiding food sold in New South Wales school canteens has been in place. This study describes the changes in school cante... [more]

Issue addressed Since 2005, a government-endorsed strategy guiding food sold in New South Wales school canteens has been in place. This study describes the changes in school canteen food between 2007 and 2010 and characterises schools most likely to adhere to strategy guidelines. Methods Menus obtained from a cohort of primary and central schools in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales were audited using a traffic light system of classification. Energy dense, nutrient-poor or 'red' items are restricted; 'amber' are to be selected carefully and healthier 'green' items are encouraged. Results In 2007, 7% of schools had no red items on their menu. In 2010, this improved to 22% (P<0.05). In 2010, small schools (OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.25-3.05, P=0.003); lower socioeconomic schools (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.02-1.78, P=0.03); non-government (OR=1.7, 95% CI=1.22-2.23, P=0.001) and rural schools (OR=1.7, 95% CI=1.30-2.25, P<0.001) had higher odds of having red items on the menu. No significant change occurred in the proportion of green foods listed for sale between 2007 and 2010. Conclusions Proportion of schools adhering to strategy guidelines had increased slightly, however, most continue to list red items for regular sale. So what? For health policies to improve public health they need implementation. Findings suggest more work is required, particularly in small schools, rural schools and non-government schools.

DOI 10.1071/HE14098
2015 Wolfenden L, Ziersch A, Robinson P, Lowe J, Wiggers J, 'Reducing research waste and improving research impact', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 39 303-304 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12467
2015 Rowland BC, Wolfenden L, Dodds P, Kingsland M, Gillham KE, Wiggers JH, 'The impact of a hypothetical designated driver program on intended alcohol-related behavior: an RCT', HEALTH PROMOTION INTERNATIONAL, 30 7-15 (2015)
DOI 10.1093/heapro/dau075
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Yoong SL, Hall A, Williams CM, Skelton E, Oldmeadow C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Alignment of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane database of systematic reviews and the database of abstracts and reviews of effectiveness with global burden-of-disease data: A bibliographic analysis', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 69 708-714 (2015)

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burde... [more]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burden of disease. This study aims to assess if the volume of research output from systematic reviews proportionally aligns with burden of disease assessed using percentages of mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods: A cross-sectional audit of reviews published between January 2012 and August 2013 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) was undertaken. Percentages of mortality and DALYs were obtained from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. Standardised residual differences (SRD) based on percentages of mortality and DALYs were calculated, where conditions with SRD of more than or less than three were considered overstudied or understudied, respectively. Results: 1029 reviews from CDSR and 1928 reviews from DARE were examined. There was a significant correlation between percentage DALYs and systematic reviews published in CDSR and DARE databases (CDSR: r=0.68, p=0.001; DARE: r=0.60, p<0.001). There was no significant correlation between percentage mortality and number of systematic reviews published in either database (CDSR: r=0.34, p=0.14; DARE: r=0.22, p=0.34). Relative to percentage of mortality, mental and behavioural disorders, musculoskeletal conditions and other non-communicable diseases were overstudied. Maternal disorders were overstudied relative to percentages of mortality and DALYs in CDSR. Conclusions: The focus of systematic reviews is moderately correlated with DALYs. A number of conditions may be overstudied relative to percentage of mortality particularly in the context of health and medical reviews.

DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-205389
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, John Wiggers, Alix Hall
2015 Yoong SL, Clinton-McHarg T, Wolfenden L, 'Systematic reviews examining implementation of research into practice and impact on population health are needed', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, (2015)

Objectives: To examine the research translation phase focus (T1-T4) of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts... [more]

Objectives: To examine the research translation phase focus (T1-T4) of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE). Briefly, T1 includes reviews of basic science experiments; T2 includes reviews of human trials leading to guideline development; T3 includes reviews examining how to move guidelines into policy and practice; and T4 includes reviews describing the impact of changing health practices on population outcomes. Study Design and Setting: A cross-sectional audit of randomly selected reviews from CDSR (n=500) and DARE (n=500) was undertaken. The research translation phase of reviews, overall and by communicable disease, noncommunicable disease, and injury subgroups, were coded by two researchers. Results: A total of 898 reviews examined a communicable, noncommunicable, or injury-related condition. Of those, 98% of reviews within CDSR focused on T2, and the remaining 2% focused on T3. In DARE, 88% focused on T2, 8.7% focused on T1, 2.5% focused on T3, and 1.3% focused on T4. Almost all reviews examining communicable (CDSR 100%, DARE 93%), noncommunicable (CDSR 98%, DARE 87%), and injury (CDSR 95%, DARE 88%) were also T2 focused. Conclusion: Few reviews exist to guide practitioners and policy makers with implementing evidence-based treatments or programs.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2014.12.008
2015 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Rose B, Robertson K, Wiggers J, 'Benefits of policy support of a healthy eating initiative in schools.', Aust N Z J Public Health, 39 94-95 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12321
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Rowland BC, Wolfenden L, Dodds P, Kingsland M, Gillham KE, Wiggers JH, 'The impact of a hypothetical designated driver program on intended alcohol-related behavior: an RCT.', Health Promot Int, 30 7-15 (2015)
DOI 10.1093/heapro/dau075
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Pederson H, Okland T, Boyers LN, Karimkhani C, Rosenfeld RM, Nasser M, et al., 'Identifying otolaryngology systematic review research gaps: comparing Global Burden of Disease 2010 results with Cochrane Database of Systematic Review content.', JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg, 141 67-72 (2015)
DOI 10.1001/jamaoto.2014.2700
2015 Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, Rowland BC, Dodds P, Gillham K, Yoong SL, et al., 'Improving availability, promotion and purchase of fruit and vegetable and non sugar-sweetened drink products at community sporting clubs: a randomised trial.', Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 12 35 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0193-5
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Yoong SL, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse R, Jones J, Freund M, et al., 'Childcare Service Centers' Preferences and Intentions to Use a Web-Based Program to Implement Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Policies and Practices: A Cross-Sectional Study', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 17 (2015)
DOI 10.2196/jmir.3639
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2015 Bell AC, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Fitzgerald M, Morgan PJ, Jones J, et al., 'Child physical activity levels and associations with modifiable characteristics in centre-based childcare.', Aust N Z J Public Health, 39 232-236 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12314
Co-authors John Wiggers, Philip Morgan
2015 Rowland BC, Wolfenden L, Gillham K, Kingsland M, Richardson B, Wiggers J, 'Is alcohol and community sport a good mix? Alcohol management, consumption and social capital in community sports clubs', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 39 210-215 (2015)

Objective: Community sports clubs provide an important contribution to the health and wellbeing of individuals and the community; however, they have also been associated with risk... [more]

Objective: Community sports clubs provide an important contribution to the health and wellbeing of individuals and the community; however, they have also been associated with risky alcohol consumption. This study assessed whether a club's alcohol management strategies were related to risky alcohol consumption by members and levels of social capital, as measured in terms of participation in and perceived safety of the club. Method: A total of 723 sports club members from 33 community football clubs in New South Wales, Australia, completed a computer assisted telephone interview (CATI) and a management representative from each club also completed a CATI. The club representative reported on the club's implementation of 11 alcohol management practices, while club members reported their alcohol consumption and perceived levels of safety at the club and participation in the club. Results: A structural equation model identified having the bar open for more than four hours; having alcohol promotions; and serving intoxicated patrons were associated with increased risky alcohol consumption while at the club; which in turn was associated with lower levels of perceived club safety and member participation. Conclusion and implications: The positive contribution of community sports clubs to the community may be diminished by specific inadequate alcohol management practices. Changing alcohol management practices can reduce alcohol consumption, and possibly increase perceived aspects of social capital, such as safety and participation.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12280
2015 Britton B, Baker A, Bauer J, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, McElduff P, Carter G, 'Eating As Treatment: A stepped wedge multi-centre trial of a psycho-nutrition intervention to improve outcomes in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, 24 8-8 (2015)
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Patrick Mcelduff, Amanda Baker
2015 Finch M, Yoong SL, Thomson RJ, Seward K, Cooney M, Jones J, et al., 'A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of an implementation intervention to increase healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies, and practices in centre-based childcare services: study protocol.', BMJ Open, 5 e006706 (2015)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006706
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Rowland BC, Lecathelinais C, Gillham KE, et al., 'Tackling risky alcohol consumption in sport: a cluster randomised controlled trial of an alcohol management intervention with community football clubs.', J Epidemiol Community Health, (2015)
DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-204984
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2015 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, 'Educational interventions are effective in treating childhood obesity.', Br J Sports Med, (2015)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2015-094667
2015 Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Rowland B, Sidey M, McElduff P, Wiggers JH, 'Improving the implementation of responsible alcohol management practices by community sporting clubs: A randomised controlled trial.', Drug Alcohol Rev, 34 447-457 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12252
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, John Wiggers
2015 Yoong SL, Hall A, Williams CM, Skelton E, Oldmeadow C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Alignment of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane database of systematic reviews and the database of abstracts and reviews of effectiveness with global burden-of-disease data: A bibliographic analysis', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 69 708-714 (2015)

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burde... [more]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burden of disease. This study aims to assess if the volume of research output from systematic reviews proportionally aligns with burden of disease assessed using percentages of mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods: A cross-sectional audit of reviews published between January 2012 and August 2013 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) was undertaken. Percentages of mortality and DALYs were obtained from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. Standardised residual differences (SRD) based on percentages of mortality and DALYs were calculated, where conditions with SRD of more than or less than three were considered overstudied or understudied, respectively. Results: 1029 reviews from CDSR and 1928 reviews from DARE were examined. There was a significant correlation between percentage DALYs and systematic reviews published in CDSR and DARE databases (CDSR: r=0.68, p=0.001; DARE: r=0.60, p<0.001). There was no significant correlation between percentage mortality and number of systematic reviews published in either database (CDSR: r=0.34, p=0.14; DARE: r=0.22, p=0.34). Relative to percentage of mortality, mental and behavioural disorders, musculoskeletal conditions and other non-communicable diseases were overstudied. Maternal disorders were overstudied relative to percentages of mortality and DALYs in CDSR. Conclusions: The focus of systematic reviews is moderately correlated with DALYs. A number of conditions may be overstudied relative to percentage of mortality particularly in the context of health and medical reviews.

DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-205389
Co-authors John Wiggers, Christopher Oldmeadow, Alix Hall
2015 Yoong SL, Dodds P, Hure A, Clinton-Mcharg T, Skelton E, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Healthier options do not reduce total energy of parent intended fast food purchases for their young children: A randomised controlled trial', Nutrition and Dietetics, (2015)

Aim: This study aimed to assess the impact of including healthier options on fast food restaurant menus on total energy of parent-reported intended purchases and frequency to eat ... [more]

Aim: This study aimed to assess the impact of including healthier options on fast food restaurant menus on total energy of parent-reported intended purchases and frequency to eat at fast food outlets for young children. Methods: Parents from an existing health survey cohort were approached to participate. They were eligible to participate if they resided in the Hunter region in NSW, could understand English and had a child aged between 3 and 12 years. Parents were randomised using a random number function embedded in the computer assisted telephone interview software, to receive one of two hypothetical fast food menus: one with healthier options and the other without healthier options (standard menu). After receiving these menus, participants completed a second telephone survey. Parents reported intended food purchases for their nominated child and intended number of visits to the fast food outlet with the hypothetical menu. Results: There was no significant difference in total energy of parent-reported intended purchases for their child, between the standard menu with (n=101) and without (n=113) healthier options (P=0.60). There was also no difference in the frequency of intending to eat at the fast food restaurant between the two groups (P=0.80). Conclusions: The provision of healthier options in itself may not reduce the total energy of intended purchases of parents for young children at fast food restaurants.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12204
Co-authors Alexis Hure
2015 Rowland B, Tindall J, Wolfenden L, Gillham K, Ramsden R, Wiggers J, 'Alcohol management practices in community football clubs: Association with risky drinking at the club and overall hazardous alcohol consumption.', Drug Alcohol Rev, 34 438-446 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12210
2015 Britton B, McCarter K, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Bauer J, et al., 'Eating As Treatment (EAT) study protocol: a stepped-wedge, randomised controlled trial of a health behaviour change intervention provided by dietitians to improve nutrition in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy.', BMJ Open, 5 e008921 (2015)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008921
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter, Sean Halpin, Patrick Mcelduff
2015 Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, Rowland BC, Dodds P, Gillham K, Yoong SL, et al., 'Improving availability, promotion and purchase of fruit and vegetable and non sugar-sweetened drink products at community sporting clubs: a randomised trial.', Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 12 193 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0193-5
Co-authors John Wiggers
2015 Yoong SL, Hall A, Williams CM, Skelton E, Oldmeadow C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Alignment of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Database of Abstracts and Reviews of Effectiveness with global burden-of-disease data: a bibliographic analysis.', J Epidemiol Community Health, 69 708-714 (2015)
DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-205389
Co-authors John Wiggers, Christopher Oldmeadow, Alix Hall
2015 Yoong SL, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse R, Jones J, Freund M, et al., 'Childcare service centers' preferences and intentions to use a web-based program to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices: a cross-sectional study.', J Med Internet Res, 17 e108 (2015)
DOI 10.2196/jmir.3639
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse
2015 Yoong SL, Nathan NK, Wyse RJ, Preece SJ, Williams CM, Sutherland RL, et al., 'Assessment of the School Nutrition Environment. A Study in Australian Primary School Canteens', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, (2015)

Introduction: Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children's diets, as they offer structured opportunities for ongoing intervention. Modifications to... [more]

Introduction: Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children's diets, as they offer structured opportunities for ongoing intervention. Modifications to the school food environment can increase purchasing of healthier foods and improve children's diets. This study examines the availability of healthy food and drinks, implementation of pricing and promotion strategies in Australian primary school canteens, and whether these varied by school characteristics. Methods: In 2012 and 2013, canteen managers of primary schools in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales reported via telephone interview the pricing and promotion strategies implemented in their canteens to encourage healthier food and drink purchases. A standardized audit of canteen menus was performed to assess the availability of healthy options. Data were analyzed in 2014. Results: Overall, 203 (79%) canteen managers completed the telephone interview and 170 provided menus. Twenty-nine percent of schools had menus that primarily consisted of healthier food and drinks, and 11% did not sell unhealthy foods. Less than half reported including only healthy foods in meal deals (25%), labeling menus (43%), and having a comprehensive canteen policy (22%). A significantly larger proportion of schools in high socioeconomic areas (OR=3.0) and large schools (OR=4.4) had primarily healthy options on their menus. School size and being a Government school were significantly associated with implementation of some pricing and promotion strategies. Conclusions: There is a need to monitor canteen environments to inform policy development and research. Future implementation research to improve the food environments of disadvantaged schools in particular is warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.02.002
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Christopher M Williams
2015 Yoong SL, Clinton-Mcharg T, Wolfenden L, 'Systematic reviews examining implementation of research into practice and impact on population health are needed', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 68 788-791 (2015)

Objectives To examine the research translation phase focus (T1-T4) of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts ... [more]

Objectives To examine the research translation phase focus (T1-T4) of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE). Briefly, T1 includes reviews of basic science experiments; T2 includes reviews of human trials leading to guideline development; T3 includes reviews examining how to move guidelines into policy and practice; and T4 includes reviews describing the impact of changing health practices on population outcomes. Study Design and Setting A cross-sectional audit of randomly selected reviews from CDSR (n = 500) and DARE (n = 500) was undertaken. The research translation phase of reviews, overall and by communicable disease, noncommunicable disease, and injury subgroups, were coded by two researchers. Results A total of 898 reviews examined a communicable, noncommunicable, or injury-related condition. Of those, 98% of reviews within CDSR focused on T2, and the remaining 2% focused on T3. In DARE, 88% focused on T2, 8.7% focused on T1, 2.5% focused on T3, and 1.3% focused on T4. Almost all reviews examining communicable (CDSR 100%, DARE 93%), noncommunicable (CDSR 98%, DARE 87%), and injury (CDSR 95%, DARE 88%) were also T2 focused. Conclusion Few reviews exist to guide practitioners and policy makers with implementing evidence-based treatments or programs.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2014.12.008
2015 Williams CM, Nathan N, Delaney T, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, Preece S, et al., 'CAFE: a multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: protocol of a randomised controlled trial.', BMJ open, 5 e006969 (2015)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006969
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Christopher M Williams
2015 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Bonevski B, McElduff P, et al., 'Targeting multiple health risk behaviours among vocational education students using electronic feedback and online and telephone support: protocol for a cluster randomised trial', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 15 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1898-8
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Marita Lynagh, Kypros Kypri, Patrick Mcelduff, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul
2015 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye P, Lecathelinais C, McElwaine K, et al., 'Acceptability and Receipt of Preventive Care for Chronic-Disease Health Risk Behaviors Reported by Clients of Community Mental Health Services.', Psychiatr Serv, 66 857-864 (2015)
DOI 10.1176/appi.ps.201400360
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2014 Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Clinton-McHarg T, Waters E, Pettman TL, Steele E, Wiggers J, 'Exploring the pragmatic and explanatory study design on outcomes of systematic reviews of public health interventions: a case study on obesity prevention trials', Journal of public health (Oxford, England), 36 170-176 (2014)
DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdu006
Co-authors John Wiggers, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2014 Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Clinton-McHarg T, Waters E, Pettman TL, Steele E, Wiggers J, 'Exploring the pragmatic and explanatory study design on outcomes of systematic reviews of public health interventions: a case study on obesity prevention trials', Journal of public health (Oxford, England), 36 170-176 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdu006
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers
2014 Metse AP, Bowman JA, Wye P, Stockings E, Adams M, Clancy R, et al., 'Evaluating the efficacy of an integrated smoking cessation intervention for mental health patients: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.', Trials, 15 266 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-15-266
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Richard Clancy
2014 Dray J, Bowman J, Freund M, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, Hodder RK, Wiggers J, 'Improving adolescent mental health and resilience through a resilience-based intervention in schools: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.', Trials, 15 289 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-15-289
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Julia Dray Uon
2014 Dodds P, Wyse R, Jones J, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Williams A, et al., 'Validity of a measure to assess healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in Australian childcare services', BMC Public Health, 14 (2014) [C1]

Childcare services represent a valuable obesity prevention opportunity, providing access to a large portion of children at a vital point in their development. Few rigorously valid... [more]

Childcare services represent a valuable obesity prevention opportunity, providing access to a large portion of children at a vital point in their development. Few rigorously validated measures exist to measure healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in this setting, and no such measures exist that are specific to the childcare setting in Australia. Methods. This was a cross sectional study, comparing two measures (pen and paper survey and observation) of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services. Research assistants attended consenting childcare services (n = 42) across the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia and observed practices for one day. Nominated Supervisors and Room Leaders of the service also completed a pen and paper survey during the day of observation. Kappa statistics and proportion agreement were calculated for a total of 43 items relating to healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Results: Agreement ranged from 38%-100%. Fifty one percent of items showed agreement of greater than or equal to 80%. Items assessing the frequency with which staff joined in active play with children reported the lowest percent agreement, while items assessing availability of beverages such as juice, milk and cordial, as well as the provision of foods such as popcorn, pretzels and sweet biscuits, reported the highest percent agreement. Kappa scores ranged from -0.06 (poor agreement) to 1 (perfect agreement). Of the 43 items assessed, 27 were found to have moderate or greater agreement. Conclusions: The study found that Nominated Supervisors and Room Leaders were able to accurately report on a number of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Items assessing healthy eating practices tended to have higher kappa scores than those assessing physical activity related policies or practices. The tool represents a useful instrument for public health researchers and policy makers working in this setting. © 2014Dodds et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-572
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse
2014 Jones RA, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Parletta N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'School-based obesity prevention interventions: Practicalities and considerations', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 8 e497-e510 (2014) [C1]

Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vita... [more]

Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vitally important. Schools have an important role in the prevention of childhood obesity, however, their involvement can be limited by a number of constraints and barriers, which need to be considered when designing interventions. Members of the Prevention Stream of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network have extensive experience in implementing and evaluating school-based obesity prevention initiatives. Based on their collective experience and evidence from implementation research, the aim of this paper was to highlight six areas to consider when designing, implementing and evaluating obesity prevention initiatives in schools. Further, this paper aimed to provide guidance for overcoming some of the challenges and barriers faced in school-based obesity prevention research. The six key areas discussed include: design and analysis; school-community engagement; planning and recruitment; evaluation; implementation; and feedback and sustainability.

DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.10.004
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2014 Williams CM, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, 'Physical activity promotion in primary care has a sustained influence on activity levels of sedentary adults', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48 1069-1070 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093187
Co-authors Christopher M Williams
2014 Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Campbell E, Brennan L, Campbell KJ, Fletcher A, et al., 'Randomized controlled trial of a telephone-based intervention for child fruit and vegetable intake: Long-term follow-up', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 99 543-550 (2014) [C1]

Background: Telephone-based interventions can be effective in increasing child fruit and vegetable intake in the short term (<6 mo). The long-term efficacy of such interventions, ... [more]

Background: Telephone-based interventions can be effective in increasing child fruit and vegetable intake in the short term (<6 mo). The long-term efficacy of such interventions, however, is unknown. Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to determine whether the short-term (<6 mo) impact of a telephone-based intervention on children's fruit and vegetable intake was sustained over a longer term. A secondary aim of the study was to assess the long-term impact of the intervention on the intake of foods high in fat, salt, or sugar (noncore foods). Design: The study used a cluster randomized controlled trial design. Parents were recruited from Australian preschools between February and August 2010 and allocated to receive an intervention consisting of print materials and 4 telephone-counseling calls delivered over 1 mo or to a print information-only control group. The primary endpoint for the trial was the 18-mo postbaseline follow-up. Linear regression models were used to assess between-group differences in child consumption of fruit and vegetables and noncore foods by subscales of the Children's Dietary Questionnaire. Results: Fruit and vegetable subscale scores were significantly higher, indicating greater child fruit and vegetable intake, among children in the intervention group at the 12-mo (16.77 compared with 14.89; P < 0.01) but not the 18-mo (15.98 compared with 16.82; P = 0.14) follow-up. There were no significant differences between groups at either of the follow-up periods in the noncore food subscale score. Conclusion: Further research to identify effective maintenance strategies is required to maximize the benefits of telephone-based interventions on child diet. This trial was registered at http://www.anzctr.org. au/ as ACTRN12609000820202. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

DOI 10.3945/ajcn.113.071738
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Jenny Bowman
2014 Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Freund M, Jones J, Wiggers J, 'A cluster randomized trial of a multi-level intervention, delivered by service staff, to increase physical activity of children attending center-based childcare', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 58 9-16 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.10.004
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Philip Morgan, John Wiggers
2014 Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Nichols M, Allender S, Millar L, McElduff P, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of whole of community interventions to prevent excessive population weight gain', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 62 193-200 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.01.031
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Rebecca Wyse
2014 Dodds P, Wolfenden L, Chapman K, Wellard L, Hughes C, Wiggers J, 'The effect of energy and traffic light labelling on parent and child fast food selection: a randomised controlled trial', APPETITE, 73 23-30 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2013.10.013
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Wiggers
2014 Wolfenden L, Carruthers J, Wyse R, Yoong S, 'Translation of tobacco control programs in schools: Findings from a rapid review of systematic reviews of implementation and dissemination interventions', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 25 136-138 (2014) [C3]

Issue addressed: School-based programs targeting the prevention of tobacco use are a key strategy for reducing the overall tobacco-related mortality and morbidity in the community... [more]

Issue addressed: School-based programs targeting the prevention of tobacco use are a key strategy for reducing the overall tobacco-related mortality and morbidity in the community. While substantial research investment has resulted in the identification of various effective tobacco prevention interventions in schools, this research investment will not result in public health benefits, unless effectively disseminated and implemented. This rapid review aimed to identify effective implementation or dissemination interventions, targeting the adoption of school-based tobacco prevention programs. Methods: A systematic search was conducted to identify published systematic reviews that examined the effectiveness of implementation and dissemination strategies for facilitating the adoption of tobacco policies or programs in schools from 1992 to 2012. Results: The search yielded 1028 results, with one relevant systematic review being identified. The review included two controlled studies examining the implementation and dissemination of tobacco prevention programs and guidelines. The two randomised trials examined the delivery of active face-to-face training to implement a school-based curriculum compared with video-delivered or mail-based training. Improvements in the implementation of the programs were reported for the face-to-face training arm in both trials. Conclusions: Little rigorous evidence exists to guide the implementation and dissemination of tobacco prevention programs in schools. So what?: Few systematic reviews exist to inform the implementation of evidence-based tobacco prevention programs in schools. In the absence of a strong evidence base, health care policymakers and practitioners may need to draw on setting-based frameworks or parallel evidence from other settings to design strategies to facilitate the adoption of tobacco prevention initiatives.

DOI 10.1071/HE13089
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2014 Williams CM, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, 'Physical activity promotion in primary care has a sustained influence on activity levels of sedentary adults', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48 1069-1070 (2014)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093187
Co-authors Christopher M Williams
2014 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, McElduff P, Saunders JB, Saitz R, et al., 'Prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in hospital outpatients', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 144 270-273 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.08.014
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, John Attia, Natalie Johnson, Joanna Latter, Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, McElduff P, Saunders JB, Saitz R, et al., 'Prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in hospital outpatients', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 144 270-273 (2014) [C1]

Background: Few studies have examined the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in the hospital outpatient setting. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use a... [more]

Background: Few studies have examined the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in the hospital outpatient setting. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use among patients attending a broad range of outpatient clinics at a large public hospital in Australia. Methods: Adult hospital outpatients were invited to complete the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Consumption questions (AUDIT-C) using an iPad as part of a randomised trial testing the efficacy of alcohol electronic screening and brief intervention. Unhealthy alcohol use was defined as an AUDIT-C score =5 among men and =4 among women. Results: Sixty percent (3616/6070) of invited hospital outpatients consented, of whom 89% (3206/3616) provided information on their alcohol consumption (either reported they had not consumed any alcohol in the last 12 months or completed the AUDIT-C). The prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use was 34.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 33.0-36.3%). The prevalence among men aged 18-24 years, 25-39 years, 40-59 years and 60 years and older, was 74.4% (95% CI: 68.4-80.4%), 54.3% (95% CI: 48.7-59.8%), 44.1% (95% CI: 39.9-48.3%), and 27.0% (95% CI: 23.6-30.4%), respectively (43.1% overall; 95% CI: 40.8-45.5%). The prevalence among women aged 18-24 years, 25-39 years, 40-59 years, and 60 years and older, was 48.6% (95% CI: 39.2-58.1%), 36.9% (95% CI: 31.2-42.6%), 25.2% (95% CI: 21.5-29.0%) and 14.5% (95% CI: 11.7-17.3%), respectively (24.9% overall; 95% CI: 22.7-27.1%). Conclusion: A large number of hospital outpatients who are not currently seeking treatment for their drinking could benefit from effective intervention in this setting.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.08.014
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Joanna Latter, John Attia, Kypros Kypri, Natalie Johnson
2014 Bartlem KM, Bowman JA, Freund M, Wye PM, McElwaine KM, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Care provision to prevent chronic disease by community mental health clinicians', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 47 762-770 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.08.003
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2014 McElwaine KM, Freund M, Campbell EM, Knight J, Bowman JA, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Increasing preventive care by primary care nursing and allied health clinicians a non-randomized controlled trial', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 47 424-434 (2014) [C1]

Background: Although primary care nurse and allied health clinician consultations represent key opportunities for the provision of preventive care, it is provided suboptimally. Pu... [more]

Background: Although primary care nurse and allied health clinician consultations represent key opportunities for the provision of preventive care, it is provided suboptimally. Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of a practice change intervention in increasing primary care nursing and allied health clinician provision of preventive care for four health risks. Design: Two-group (intervention versus control), non-randomized controlled study assessing the effectiveness of the intervention in increasing clinician provision of preventive care. Setting/participants: Randomly selected clients from 17 primary healthcare facilities participated in telephone surveys that assessed their receipt of preventive care prior to (September 2009-2010, n=876) and following intervention (October 2011-2012, n=1,113). Intervention: The intervention involved local leadership and consensus processes, electronic medical record system modification, educational meetings and outreach, provision of practice change resources and support, and performance monitoring and feedback. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was differential change in client-reported receipt of three elements of preventive care (assessment, brief advice, referral/follow-up) for each of four behavioral risks individually (smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, alcohol overconsumption, physical inactivity) and combined. Logistic regression assessed intervention effectiveness. Results: Analyses conducted in 2013 indicated significant improvements in preventive care delivery in the intervention compared to the control group from baseline to follow-up for assessment of fruit and vegetable consumption (+23.8% vs -1.5%); physical activity (+11.1% vs -0.3%); all four risks combined (+16.9% vs -1.0%) and for brief advice for inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption (+19.3% vs -2.0%); alcohol overconsumption (+14.5% vs -8.9%); and all four risks combined (+14.3% vs +2.2%). The intervention was ineffective in increasing the provision of the remaining forms of preventive care. Conclusions: The intervention's impact on the provision of preventive care varied by both care element and risk type. Further intervention is required to increase the consistent provision of preventive care, particularly referral/follow-up.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.06.018
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Kypri K, Wolfenden L, Langley J, Hutchesson M, Voas R, 'Public, official, and industry submissions on a Bill to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age: A critical analysis', International Journal of Drug Policy, (2014) [C1]

Background: In 2005 a Bill was introduced to the New Zealand parliament to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age (MPA) from 18 to 20 years and submissions were invited from ... [more]

Background: In 2005 a Bill was introduced to the New Zealand parliament to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age (MPA) from 18 to 20 years and submissions were invited from interested parties. We sought to characterise and critique the arguments tendered for and against the proposal. Methods: We used template analysis to study written submissions on the Bill from 178 people and organisations in New Zealand. Independent raters coded submissions according to the source, whether for or opposed, and the arguments employed. Results: The most common sources of submissions were members of the public (28%), the alcohol industry (20%), and NGOs (20%). Overall, 40% opposed increasing the MPA, 40% were in favour, 4% supported a split MPA (18 years for on-premise, 20 years for off-premise), 7% were equivocal, and 8% offered no comment. The most common proponents of increasing the MPA were NGOs (36%) and members of the public (30%) and their arguments concerned the expected positive effects on public health (36%) and public disorder/property damage (16%), while 24% argued that other strategies should be used as well. The most common sources of opposition to increasing the MPA were the alcohol industry (50%) and the public (20%). It was commonly claimed that the proposed law change would be ineffective in reducing harm (22%), that other strategies should be used instead (16%), that it would infringe adult rights (15%), and that licensed premises are safe environments for young people (14%). There were noteworthy examples of NGOs and government agencies opposing the law change. The alcohol industry maximised its impact via multiple submissions appealing to individual rights while neglecting to report or accurately characterise the scientific evidence. Several health and welfare agencies presented confused logic and/or were selective in their use of scientific evidence. Conclusion: In contrast to the fragmented and inconsistent response from government and NGOs, the alcohol industry was organised and united, with multiple submissions from the sector with most at stake, namely the hospitality industry, and supporting submissions from the manufacturing, import, and wholesale sectors. Systematic reviews of research evidence should be routinely undertaken to guide the legislature and submissions should be categorised on the basis of pecuniary interest. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugpo.2014.05.001
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, Melinda Hutchesson
2014 Wolfenden L, Carruthers J, Wyse R, Yoong S, 'Translation of tobacco control programs in schools: findings from a rapid review of systematic reviews of implementation and dissemination interventions.', Health Promot J Austr, 25 136-138 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1071/HE13089
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2014 Yoong SL, Skelton E, Jones J, Wolfenden L, 'Do childcare services provide foods in line with the 2013 Australian Dietary guidelines? A cross-sectional study', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 38 595-596 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12312
2014 Bell AC, Davies L, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Francis JL, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, 'An implementation intervention to encourage healthy eating in centre-based child-care services: impact of the Good for Kids Good for Life programme', Public Health Nutrition, 1-10 (2014)

Objective: To determine the impact of an implementation intervention designed to introduce policies and practices supportive of healthy eating in centre-based child-care services.... [more]

Objective: To determine the impact of an implementation intervention designed to introduce policies and practices supportive of healthy eating in centre-based child-care services. Intervention strategies included staff training, resources, incentives, follow-up support, and performance monitoring and feedback. Design: A quasi-experimental design was used to assess change over 20 months in healthy eating policy and practice in intervention and comparison child-care services. Setting: The Hunter New England (HNE) region of New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Subjects: All centre-based child-care services (n 287) in the intervention region (HNE) were invited and 240 (91 % response rate) participated. Two hundred and ninety-six services in the rest of NSW were randomly selected as a comparison region and 191 participated (76 % response rate). A sub-analysis was conducted on those services that provided children food (n 196 at baseline and n 190 at follow-up). Ninety-six provided menus for analysis at baseline (HNE, n 36; NSW, n 50) and 102 provided menus at follow-up (HNE, n 50; NSW, n 52). Results: Services in the intervention region were significantly more likely to provide only plain milk and water for children (P = 0·018) and to engage parents in nutrition policy or programmes (P = 0·002). They were also more likely (P = 0·056) to have nutrition policy on home packed food. In addition, menus of services that provided lunch were significantly more likely to comply with healthy eating guidelines for sweetened drinks (P < 0·001), fruit (P < 0·001) and vegetables (P = 0·01). Conclusions: An implementation intervention was able to modify policy and practice in a large number of child-care services so that they were more supportive of healthy eating. Copyright © The Authors 2014.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980013003364
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers
2014 Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, 'Strengthening the rigour of population-wide, community-based obesity prevention evaluations', Public Health Nutrition, 17 407-421 (2014) [C1]

Abstract Objective The aim of the present study was to review the methodological literature regarding evaluation methods for complex public health interventions broadly and, based... [more]

Abstract Objective The aim of the present study was to review the methodological literature regarding evaluation methods for complex public health interventions broadly and, based on such methods, to critically reflect on the evaluation of contemporary community-based obesity prevention programmes. Design A systematic review of the methods and community-based literature was performed by one reviewer. Results The review identified that there is considerable scope to improve the rigour of community-based obesity prevention programmes through: prospective trial registration; the use of more rigorous research designs, particularly where routine databases including an objective measure of adiposity are available; implementing strategies to quantify and reduce the risk of selective non-participation bias; the development and use of validated instruments to assess intervention impacts; reporting of intervention process and context information; and more comprehensive analyses of trial outcomes. Conclusions To maximise the quality and utility of community-based obesity prevention evaluations, programme implementers and evaluators need to carefully examine the strengths and pitfalls of evaluation decisions and seek to maximise evaluation rigour in the context of political, resource and practical constraints. © The Authors 2012.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980012004958
Co-authors John Wiggers
2014 Wellard L, Chapman K, Wolfenden L, Dodds P, Hughes C, Wiggers J, 'Who is responsible for selecting children's fast food meals, and what impact does this have on energy content of the selected meals?', Nutrition and Dietetics, 71 172-177 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12106
Co-authors John Wiggers
2014 Wellard L, Chapman K, Wolfenden L, Dodds P, Hughes C, Wiggers J, 'Who is responsible for selecting children's fast food meals, and what impact does this have on energy content of the selected meals?', Nutrition and Dietetics, 71 172-177 (2014) [C1]

Aim: The present study aimed to: (i) document the role of parents in children's fast food meal selection; (ii) determine whether parental demographics, weight status or fast food ... [more]

Aim: The present study aimed to: (i) document the role of parents in children's fast food meal selection; (ii) determine whether parental demographics, weight status or fast food consumption frequency were associated with who selects children's fast food meals; and (iii) determine whether the total energy content of children's meals selected from a hypothetical fast food menu was associated with selection responsibility. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 477 parents of children aged 3-12 years in New South Wales, Australia, was conducted. Participants completed two computer-assisted telephone interviews. The first collected demographic and anthropometric data including height and weight. Participants were subsequently mailed a hypothetical fast food menu. The second interview asked who was responsible for selecting their children's fast food meals, and what items would be chosen. Energy content of the selections was examined. Results: Most parents (60%) stated that they shared meal selection responsibility with their children. Parents with higher education levels (P < 0.01) or younger children (P < 0.01) were more likely to take responsibility for meal selection. When parents stated that children were responsible, they chose fast food meals with significantly higher energy content than when responsibility was shared (P < 0.01). Conclusions: The present study shows that parents are influential in children's fast food intake. Parents should be encouraged to play an active role in assisting children to make healthier fast food choices, to reduce the impact of high-energy meals on their overall diets.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12106
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2014 Milat AJ, King L, Newson R, Wolfenden L, Rissel C, Bauman A, Redman S, 'Increasing the scale and adoption of population health interventions: experiences and perspectives of policy makers, practitioners, and researchers', HEALTH RESEARCH POLICY AND SYSTEMS, 12 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1478-4505-12-18
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2014 Ganann R, Fitzpatrick-Lewis D, Ciliska D, Peirson LJ, Warren RL, Fieldhouse P, et al., 'Enhancing nutritional environments through access to fruit and vegetables in schools and homes among children and youth: a systematic review', BMC Research Notes, 7 422-422 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1756-0500-7-422
2014 Jones RA, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Parletta N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'School-based obesity prevention interventions: Practicalities and considerations', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 8 e497-e510 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.10.004
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2014 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SL, Lecathelinais C, Bell AC, et al., 'Adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices by Australian primary schools: 2006 to 2013', Health Education Research, 30 262-271 (2014)

Despite significant investment in many countries, the extent of schools' adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices has not been widely reported. The aims of this artic... [more]

Despite significant investment in many countries, the extent of schools' adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices has not been widely reported. The aims of this article are to describe Australian schools' adoption of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices over an 8-year period and to determine if their adoption varies according to schools' size, geographic or socio-economic location. Between 2006 and 2013, a representative randomly selected cohort of primary schools (n = 476) in New South Wales, Australia, participated in four telephone interviews. Repeated measures logistic regression analyses using a Generalised Estimating Equation (GEE) framework were undertaken to assess change over time. The prevalence of all four of the healthy eating practices and one physical activity practice significantly increased, while the prevalence of one physical activity practice significantly decreased. The adoption of practices did not differ by school characteristics. Government investment can equitably enhance school adoption of some obesity prevention policies and practices on a jurisdiction-wide basis. Additional and/or different implementation strategies may be required to facilitate greater adoption of physical activity practices. Ongoing monitoring of school adoption of school policies and practices is needed to ensure the intended benefits of government investment are achieved.

DOI 10.1093/her/cyu068
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2014 Dodds P, Wyse R, Jones J, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Williams A, et al., 'Validity of a measure to assess healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in Australian childcare services.', BMC Public Health, 14 572 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-572
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2014 Wyse R, Campbell KJ, Brennan L, Wolfenden L, 'A cluster randomised controlled trial of a telephone-based intervention targeting the home food environment of preschoolers (The Healthy Habits Trial): the effect on parent fruit and vegetable consumption', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 11 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-014-0144-6
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2014 Jones J, Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Finch M, Yoong SL, Dodds P, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services.', BMJ Open, 4 e005312 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005312
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Patrick Mcelduff, John Wiggers
2014 Hodder RK, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Gillham K, Dray J, Wiggers J, 'Systematic review of universal school-based resilience interventions targeting adolescent tobacco, alcohol or illicit drug use: review protocol.', BMJ Open, 4 e004718 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004718
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2014 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Williams CM, 'Computer-tailored interventions to facilitate health behavioural change.', Br J Sports Med, (2014)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-093508
Co-authors Christopher M Williams
2014 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Williams CM, Delaney T, Reilly KL, Freund M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: study protocol.', Implement Sci, 9 147 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0147-3
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Christopher M Williams
2013 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Saunders JB, Saitz R, Attia J, Dunlop A, et al., 'The hospital outpatient alcohol project (HOAP): protocol for an individually randomized, parallel-group superiority trial of electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention versus screening alone for unhealthy alcohol use.', Addict Sci Clin Pract, 8 14 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1940-0640-8-14
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Natalie Johnson, John Attia, Kypros Kypri
2013 Williams CM, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, 'Physical activity promotion in primary care has a sustained influence on activity levels of sedentary adults', British Journal of Sports Medicine, (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093187
Co-authors Christopher M Williams
2013 Wolfenden L, McKeough A, Bowman J, Paolini S, Francis L, Wye P, Puhl R, 'Experimental investigation of parents and their children's social interaction intentions towards obese children', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 49 604-607 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jpc.12285
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Stefania Paolini
2013 Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Williams A, Dodds P, Gillham K, Wyse R, 'A randomised controlled trial of an active telephone-based recruitment strategy to increase childcare-service staff attendance at a physical activity and nutrition training workshop', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 24 224-226 (2013) [C1]

Issue addressed: Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a ke... [more]

Issue addressed: Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a key component of multi-strategy interventions to improve implementation of effective physical activity and nutrition promoting practices for obesity prevention in childcare services. This randomised controlled trial aimed to examine whether an active telephone-based strategy to invite childcare-service staff to attend a training workshop was effective in increasing the proportion of services with staff attending training, compared with a passive strategy. Methods: Services were randomised to an active telephone-based or a passive-recruitment strategy. Those in the active arm received an email invitation and one to three follow-up phone calls, whereas services in the passive arm were informed of the availability of training only via newsletters. The proportion of services with staff attending the training workshop was compared between the two arms. Results: One hundred and twenty-eight services were included in this study. A significantly larger proportion (52%) of services in the active arm compared with those in the passive-strategy arm (3.1%) attended training (d.f.=1, ¿2=34.3; P<0.001). Conclusions: An active, telephone-based recruitment strategy significantly increased the proportion of childcare services with staff attending training. Further strategies to improve staff attendance at training need to be identified and implemented. So what? Active-recruitment strategies including follow-up telephone calls should be utilised to invite staff to participate in training, in order to maximise the use of training as an implementation strategy for obesity prevention in childcare services. © 2013 Australian Health Promotion Association.

DOI 10.1071/HE13055
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2013 Wolfenden L, Kypri K, Britton B, James EL, Francis JL, Wyse R, 'Effects of Introductory Information on Self-Reported Health Behavior', EPIDEMIOLOGY, 24 170-172 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/EDE.0b013e3182788c98
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Kypros Kypri, Erica James
2013 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, 'Pre-service primary school teachers' experiences of physical education', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 37 294-294 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12056
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2013 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Nathan N, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of a school-based intervention to prevent decline in adolescent physical activity levels: study protocol for the 'Physical Activity 4 Everyone' trial', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 13 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-57
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Wiggers, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2013 Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Rowland BC, Gillham KE, Kennedy VJ, Ramsden RL, et al., 'Alcohol consumption and sport: a cross-sectional study of alcohol management practices associated with at-risk alcohol consumption at community football clubs', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-762
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Wiggers
2013 McElwaine KM, Freund M, Campbell EM, Knight J, Bowman JA, Doherty EL, et al., 'The delivery of preventive care to clients of community health services', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-13-167
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2013 Fletcher A, Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Bowman J, McElduff P, Duncan S, 'A randomised controlled trial and mediation analysis of the 'Healthy Habits', telephone-based dietary intervention for preschool children', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-43
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Jenny Bowman, Rebecca Wyse
2013 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Bell AC, Barker D, Wiggers J, 'Validity of a self-report survey tool measuring the nutrition and physical activity environment of primary schools', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-75
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Philip Morgan, John Wiggers
2013 Bell AC, Wolfenden L, Sutherland R, Coggan L, Young K, Fitzgerald M, et al., 'Harnessing the power of advertising to prevent childhood obesity', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-114
Co-authors John Wiggers
2013 Jones RA, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Parletta N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'School-based obesity prevention interventions: Practicalities and considerations', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, (2013) [C1]

Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vita... [more]

Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vitally important. Schools have an important role in the prevention of childhood obesity, however, their involvement can be limited by a number of constraints and barriers, which need to be considered when designing interventions. Members of the Prevention Stream of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network have extensive experience in implementing and evaluating school-based obesity prevention initiatives. Based on their collective experience and evidence from implementation research, the aim of this paper was to highlight six areas to consider when designing, implementing and evaluating obesity prevention initiatives in schools. Further, this paper aimed to provide guidance for overcoming some of the challenges and barriers faced in school-based obesity prevention research. The six key areas discussed include: design and analysis; school-community engagement; planning and recruitment; evaluation; implementation; and feedback and sustainability. © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity.

DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.10.004
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2013 Colin Bell A, Davies L, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Francis JL, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, 'An implementation intervention to encourage healthy eating in centre-based child-care services: Impact of the Good for Kids Good for Life programme', Public Health Nutrition, 18 1610-1619 (2013)

Objective To determine the impact of an implementation intervention designed to introduce policies and practices supportive of healthy eating in centre-based child-care services. ... [more]

Objective To determine the impact of an implementation intervention designed to introduce policies and practices supportive of healthy eating in centre-based child-care services. Intervention strategies included staff training, resources, incentives, follow-up support, and performance monitoring and feedback. Design A quasi-experimental design was used to assess change over 20 months in healthy eating policy and practice in intervention and comparison child-care services. Setting The Hunter New England (HNE) region of New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Subjects All centre-based child-care services (n 287) in the intervention region (HNE) were invited and 240 (91% response rate) participated. Two hundred and ninety-six services in the rest of NSW were randomly selected as a comparison region and 191 participated (76% response rate). A sub-analysis was conducted on those services that provided children food (n 196 at baseline and n 190 at follow-up). Ninety-six provided menus for analysis at baseline (HNE, n 36; NSW, n 50) and 102 provided menus at follow-up (HNE, n 50; NSW, n 52). Results Services in the intervention region were significantly more likely to provide only plain milk and water for children (P = 0·018) and to engage parents in nutrition policy or programmes (P = 0·002). They were also more likely (P = 0·056) to have nutrition policy on home packed food. In addition, menus of services that provided lunch were significantly more likely to comply with healthy eating guidelines for sweetened drinks (P < 0·001), fruit (P < 0·001) and vegetables (P = 0·01). Conclusions An implementation intervention was able to modify policy and practice in a large number of child-care services so that they were more supportive of healthy eating.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980013003364
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Campbell E, Campbell KJ, Wiggers JH, Brennan L, Fletcher AL, Bowman JA, et al., 'A cluster randomized controlled trial of a telephone-based parent intervention to increase preschoolers' fruit and vegetable consumption', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 96 102-110 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse
2012 Rowe SC, Wiggers JH, Wolfenden L, Francis JL, Freund MA, 'Evaluation of an educational policing strategy to reduce alcohol-related crime associated with licensed premises', Canadian Journal of Public Health, 103 S8-S14 (2012) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Wolfenden L, Bell C, Wiggers JH, Butler M, James EL, Chipperfield KM, 'Engaging parents in child obesity prevention: Support preferences of parents', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 48 E4-E6 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Erica James, John Wiggers
2012 Sawyer AL, Wolfenden L, Kennedy VJ, Kingsland M, Young KG, Tindall J, et al., 'Alcohol sponsorship of community football clubs: The current situation', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 23 70-72 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Young K, Kennedy V, Kingsland M, Sawyer A, Rowland B, Wiggers JH, Wolfenden L, 'Healthy food and beverages in senior community football club canteens in New South Wales, Australia', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 23 149-152 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Hardy LL, Grunseit A, Khambalia A, Bell C, Wolfenden L, Milat AJ, 'Co-occurrence of obesogenic risk factors among adolescents', Journal of Adolescent Health, 51 265-271 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2012 Rowe SC, Wiggers JH, Kingsland M, Nicholas C, Wolfenden L, 'Alcohol consumption and intoxication among people involved in police-recorded incidents of violence and disorder in non-metropolitan New South Wales', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36 33-40 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Wolfenden L, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Freund MA, Wiggers JH, Gillham K, 'Acceptability of proactive telephone recruitment to a telephone support service to encourage healthy eating, physical activity and weight loss', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36 295-296 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul
2012 Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, Rowland B, Kennedy V, Gillham K, Wiggers JH, 'Addressing alcohol use in community sports clubs: Attitudes of club representatives', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36 93-94 (2012) [C3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Wolfenden L, Wyse RJ, Britton BI, Campbell KJ, Hodder RK, Stacey FG, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged 5 years and under', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub2
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Erica James, Patrick Mcelduff, Rebecca Wyse
2012 Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, Bell AC, Wyse R, Morgan PJ, Butler MT, et al., 'Effectiveness of a multi-strategy intervention in increasing the implementation of vegetable and fruit breaks by Australian primary schools: A non-randomized controlled trial', BMC Public Health, 12 651 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-12-651
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Philip Morgan
2012 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Paul CL, Freund MA, Lecathelinais C, Wye PM, Gillham K, 'Increasing the use of preventative health services to promote healthy eating, physical activity and weight management: The acceptability and potential effectiveness of a proactive telemarketing approach', BMC Public Health, 12 953 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers
2012 Hodder RK, Freund MA, Bowman JA, Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Wye PM, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of a school-based resilience intervention to decrease tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use in secondary school students: Study protocol', BMC Public Health, 12 1009 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2012 Finch M, Wolfenden L, Falkiner M, Edenden D, Pond N, Hardy L, et al., 'Impact of a population based intervention to increase the adoption of multiple physical activity practices in centre based childcare services: A quasi experimental, effectiveness study', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 9 1-13 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors John Wiggers
2012 Kingsland M, Wiggers JH, Wolfenden L, 'Interventions in sports settings to reduce alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm: A systematic review protocol', BMJ Open, 2 1-5 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2011 Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Freund MA, Wyse R, Wiggers JH, 'A cluster randomised trial to evaluate a physical activity intervention among 3-5 year old children attending long day care services: Study protocol', BMC Public Health, 10 534 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-534
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Philip Morgan
2011 Wyse R, Campbell EM, Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, 'Associations between characteristics of the home food environment and fruit and vegetable intake in preschool children: A cross-sectional study', BMC Public Health, 11 938 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2011 McElwaine KM, Freund MA, Campbell EM, Knight JJ, Slattery C, Doherty E, et al., 'The effectiveness of an intervention in increasing community health clinician provision of preventive care: A study protocol of a non-randomised, multiple-baseline trial', BMC Health Services Research, 11 354 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-11-354
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2011 Wye PM, Bowman JA, Wiggers JH, Freund MA, Wolfenden L, Stockings EA, 'Treating nicotine dependence in mental health hospitals', Mental Health and Substance Use: Dual Diagnosis, 4 130-143 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17523281.2011.555077
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2011 Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Rowland BC, Tindall J, Gillham KE, McElduff P, et al., 'A cluster randomised controlled trial of a comprehensive accreditation intervention to reduce alcohol consumption at community sports clubs: Study protocol', BMJ Open, 1 e000328 (2011) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, John Wiggers
2011 Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, Butler M, Bell AC, Wyse R, Campbell EM, et al., 'Vegetable and fruit breaks in Australian primary schools: prevalence, attitudes, barriers and implementation strategies', Health Education Research, 26 722-731 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyr033
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2011 Wolfenden L, Neve M, Farrell L, Lecathelinais C, Bell C, Milat A, et al., 'Physical activity policies and practices of childcare centres in Australia', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 47 73-76 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2010.01738.x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, John Wiggers
2011 Innes-Hughes C, Hardy LL, Venugopal K, King LA, Wolfenden L, Rangan A, 'Children's consumption of energy-dense nutrient-poor foods, fruit and vegetables: Are they related? An analysis of data from a cross sectional survey', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 22 210-216 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Wolfenden L, Stojanovski E, Wiggers JH, Gillham K, Bowman JA, Richie C, 'Demographic, smoking, and clinical characteristics associated with smoking cessation care provided to patients preparing for surgery', Journal of Addictions Nursing, 22 171-175 (2011) [C1]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Elizabeth Stojanovski, Jenny Bowman
2011 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Campbell K, Brennan L, Fletcher A, et al., 'A pilot study of a telephone-based parental intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in 3-5-year-old children', Public Health Nutrition, 14 2245-2253 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2011 Wolfenden L, Hardy LL, Wiggers JH, Milat AJ, Bell C, Sutherland RL, 'Prevalence and socio-demographic associations of overweight and obesity among children attending child-care services in rural and regional Australia', Nutrition & Dietetics, 68 15-20 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-0080.2010.01487.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors John Wiggers
2010 Rowe SC, Wiggers JH, Wolfenden L, Francis JL, 'Establishments licensed to serve alcohol and their contribution to police-recorded crime in Australia: Further opportunities for harm reduction', Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 71 909-916 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors John Wiggers
2010 Wolfenden L, Brennan L, Britton B, 'Intelligent obesity interventions using Smartphones', Preventive Medicine, 51 519-520 (2010) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2010 Falkiner M, Wolfenden L, Bell C, Nathan NK, 'Obesity prevention and human service organisations: A survey of managers', Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 21-28 (2010) [C1]
2010 Falkiner M, Wolfenden L, Nathan NK, Francis JL, Rowe S, Bell C, 'Advice on healthy eating and physical activity where it is needed most: Empowering home-visiting human services to provide the right information at the right time to vulnerable families', Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 29-41 (2010) [C1]
2010 Wolfenden L, Falkiner M, Bell C, 'Addressing the burden of obesity among disadvantaged families', Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 11-20 (2010) [C1]
2010 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Tursan D'Espaignet E, Bell C, 'How useful are systematic reviews of child obesity interventions?', Obesity Reviews, 11 159-165 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2009.00637.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors John Wiggers
2010 Ganann R, Fitzpatrick-Lewis D, Ciliska D, Dobbins M, Krishnaratne S, Beyers J, et al., 'Community-based interventions for enhancing access to or consumption of fruit and vegetables (or both) among five to 18-year olds (Protocol)', The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 1-11 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008644
2010 Smith B, Grunseit A, Hardy LL, King L, Wolfenden L, Milat A, 'Parental influences on child physical activity and screen viewing time: A population based study', BMC Public Health, 10 1-11 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-593
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 17
2010 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Brennan L, Campbell KJ, Fletcher AL, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of a telephone-based intervention for parents to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in their 3- to 5-year-old children: Study protocol', BMC Public Health, 10 1-12 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-216
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse
2009 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Campbell EM, Knight JJ, Kerridge R, Spiegelman A, 'Providing comprehensive smoking cessation care to surgical patients: The case for computers', Drug and Alcohol Review, 28 60-65 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2008.00003.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 7
Co-authors John Wiggers
2009 Wolfenden L, Kypri K, Freund MA, Hodder R, 'Obtaining active parental consent for school-based research: A guide for researchers', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 33 270-275 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2009.00387.x
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Kypros Kypri
2008 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Campbell EM, Knight JJ, 'Pilot of a preoperative smoking cessation intervention incorporating post-discharge support from a Quitline', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 19 158-160 (2008) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Wiggers
2008 Wolfenden L, 'Smoke-free licensed premises: what will be the broader public health benefits?', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 32 88 (2008) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2008.00175.x
2008 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Campbell EM, Knight JJ, Kerridge R, Moore K, et al., 'Feasibility, acceptability, and cost of referring surgical patients for postdischarge cessation support from a quitline', Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 10 1105-1108 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14622200802097472
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors John Wiggers
2008 Tursan D'Espaignet E, Bulsara M, Wolfenden L, Byard RW, Stanley FJ, 'Trends in sudden infant death syndrome in Australia from 1980-2002', Forensic Science, Medicine and Pathology, 4 83-90 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12024-007-9011-y
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
2008 Knight J, Slattery C, Green S, Porter AJ, Valentine M, Wolfenden L, 'Smoke-free hospitals: An opportunity for public health', Journal of Public Health, 30 516 (2008) [C3]
DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdn085
Citations Web of Science - 1
2008 Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Wiggers JH, Walsh RA, Bailey LJ, 'Helping hospital patients quit: What the evidence supports and what guidelines recommend', Preventive Medicine, 46 346-357 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2007.12.003
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors John Wiggers
2008 Hopewell S, Wolfenden L, Clarke M, 'Reporting of adverse events in systematic reviews can be improved: survey results', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 61 597-602 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2007.10.005
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 27
2007 Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Knight J, Campbell E, 'Smoking and surgery: an opportunity for health improvement', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 31 386-387 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2007-00095.x
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2007 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Knight JJ, Campbell EM, 'Smoking and surgery: An opportunity for health improvement (Letter)', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 31 386-387 (2007) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2007.00095.x
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers
2007 Wolfenden L, Dalton A, Bowman JA, Knight JJ, Burrows S, Wiggers JH, 'Computerized assessment of surgical patients for tobacco use: accuracy and acceptability', Journal of Public Health, 29 183-185 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdm015
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2007 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, 'Addressing the health costs of the Iraq war: the role of health organisations', Medical Journal of Australia, 186 380-381 (2007) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers
2005 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Knight JJ, Campbell EM, Spigelman AD, Kerridge R, Moore K, 'Increasing smoking cessation care in a preoperative clinic: a randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 41 284-290 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2004.11.011
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 28
Co-authors John Wiggers
2005 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Knight JJ, Campbell EM, Rissel C, Kerridge R, et al., 'A programme for reducing smoking in pre-operative surgical patients: randomised controlled trial', Anaesthesia, 60 172-179 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2044.2004.04070.x
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 39
Co-authors John Wiggers
2004 Wolfenden L, Paul CL, Mitchell E, 'Managing Nicotine Dependence in NSW Hospital Patients', NSW Public Health Bulletin, 15 98-101 (2004) [C3]
Co-authors Chris Paul
2003 Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Walsh RA, Wiggers JH, 'Smoking cessation interventions for in-patients: a selective review with recommendations for hospital-based health professionals', Drug and Alcohol Review, 437-452 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230310001613967
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 28
Co-authors John Wiggers
Show 127 more journal articles

Conference (26 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 McCarter K, Baker AL, Britton B, Beck A, Carter G, Bauer J, et al., 'PREVALENCE OF ALCOHOL USE AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS IN A SAMPLE OF HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS ABOUT TO UNDERGO RADIOTHERAPY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Sean Halpin, Patrick Mcelduff, Gregory Carter
2014 Dray J, Freund M, Bowman J, Campbell E, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Mental Health and Resilience in Adolescence: A resilience-based intervention', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine 2014; 21(S1): S203., Groningen, The Netherlands (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1007/s12529-014-9418-2
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Julia Dray Uon
2014 Metse A, Bowman J, Wye P, Stockings E, Adams M, Clancy R, et al., 'EVALUATING THE EFFICACY OF AN INTEGRATED SMOKING CESSATION INTERVENTION FOR MENTAL HEALTH PATIENTS: STUDY PROTOCOL FOR A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL.', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Richard Clancy
2014 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wolfenden L, Bonevski B, Wiggers J, 'PROACTIVE RECRUITMENT INTO EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS TARGETING CANCER RISK BEHAVIOURS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2014 McCarter K, Forbes E, Baker A, Britton B, Beck A, Carter G, et al., 'PREVALENCE OF TOBACCO SMOKING IN A SAMPLE OF HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS ABOUT TO UNDERGO RADIOTHERAPY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter, Billie Bonevski, Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Stain H, Hides L, Baker A, Jackson C, Lenroo R, Paulik-White G, et al., 'Social Well-being and Engaged Living (SWEL): results of a pilot trial and a RCT for re-engaging young Australians in education and work', EARLY INTERVENTION IN PSYCHIATRY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Amanda Baker, Helen Stain
2013 Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Tindall J, Rowland B, Gillham K, Dodds P, et al., 'REDUCING ALCOHOL-RELATED HARM IN SPORT: A CLUSTER RANDOMISED TRIAL WITH FOOTBALL CLUBS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, John Wiggers
2012 Bell C, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Freund MA, Jones J, Wiggers JH, 'Predictors of preschool age children's physical activity at long day care', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Philip Morgan
2012 Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Campbell K, Wiggers JH, Brennan L, Fletcher A, et al., 'A telephone-based parent intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in 3-5 year-old children: 12-month outcomes from the healthy habits cluster randomized trial', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Abstracts from the ICBM 2012 Meeting, Budapest, Hungary (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2012 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, 'A telephone-based intervention targeting preschool children can also increase the fruit and vegetable consumption of their parents after 12 months', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Abstracts from the ICBM 2012 Meeting, Budapest, Hungary (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2012 Baker AL, Beck AK, Carter GL, Bauer J, Wratten C, Bauer J, et al., 'Alcohol, tobacco use and readiness to change in an Australian sample of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology: Special Issue: Abstracts of the Joint Meeting of the COSA 39th Annual Scientific Meeting and IPOS 14th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology, Brisbane, Qld (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Patrick Mcelduff
2012 Beck AK, Baker AL, Britton B, Carter GL, Bauer J, Wratten C, et al., 'Therapeutic alliance between dietitians and patients with head and neck cancer: Relationship to quality of life and nutritional status following a dietitian delivered health behaviour intervention', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology: Special Issue: Abstracts of the Joint Meeting of the COSA 39th Annual Scientific Meeting and IPOS 14th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology, Brisbane, Qld (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter
2012 Britton B, Baker AL, Bauer J, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Beck AK, et al., 'Eat: A stepped wedge cluster randomised trial to improve nutrition in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology: Special Issue: Abstracts of the Joint Meeting of the COSA 39th Annual Scientific Meeting and IPOS 14th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology, Brisbane, Qld (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter, Patrick Mcelduff
2012 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Brennan L, 'Training interviewers to deliver a telephone-based behavioural family intervention encouraging fruit and vegetable consumption', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, NZ (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
2011 Finch M, Wolfenden L, Edenden D, Falkiner M, Pond N, Hardy L, et al., 'Impact of a population health physical activity practice change intervention in childcare services', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers
2011 James EL, Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Britton B, Campbell K, Hodder R, et al., 'Interventions to increase fruit and vegetable consumption amongst preschool aged children: A systematic review of randomised trials', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Erica James, Rebecca Wyse
2011 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Campbell K, Brennan L, Fletcher AL, et al., 'Efficacy of a telephone-based parent intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in 3-5 year olds: a cluster randomised trial', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2010 Innes-Hughes C, Hardy LL, Venugopal K, King L, Wolfenden L, Rangan A, 'Children's consumption of energy dense nutrient poor foods: Additional or replacement foods?', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
2010 Falkiner M, Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Francis L, Rowe S, Bell A, 'Empowering services to provide healthy eating and physical activity assistance to disadvantaged families', Australian Child Welfare Association (ACWA) Conference. Programme, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
2010 Hardy LL, Grunseit A, King L, Wolfenden L, Milat A, 'Associations between adolescents' physical activity and obesogenic health behaviours', Obesity Reviews, Stockholm, Sweden (2010) [E3]
2010 Hardy LL, Grunseit A, King L, Wolfenden L, Milat A, 'Reducing obesity in early childhood: Results from Romp and Chomp, an Australian community-wide intervention program', Obesity Reviews, Stockholm, Sweden (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.2009.28826
Citations Scopus - 81Web of Science - 65
2010 McKeough A, Wolfenden L, Bowman JA, Paolini S, 'Opportunities for friendship: An experimental comparison of overweight and healthy weight children', Obesity Reviews, Stockholm, Sweden (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Stefania Paolini
2009 Wyse R, Campbell EM, Wolfenden L, Hodder R, 'Policies and practices promoting physical activity in primary schools: A survey of principals from the Hunter New England area, NSW, Australia', 26th ACHPER International Conference: Creating Active Futures: Program & Abstracts, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
2009 Slattery C, Wolfenden L, Freund MA, Knight JJ, Gillham K, Wiggers JH, 'To assess the effectiveness of a multi-strategic clinical practice change intervention in increasing the provision of nicotine replacement therpay to nicotine dependent inpatients at a rural hospital', 3rd Rural Health Research Colloquium: Building a Healthier Future Through Research: Program and Abstract Book, Ballina, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers
2009 Bowman JA, Ritchie C, Wolfenden L, Gillham K, Stojanovski E, Wiggers JH, 'What influences the provision of smoking cessation care in a pre-operative hospital clinic setting?', Oceania Tobacco Control 2009, Darwin, NT (2009) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Elizabeth Stojanovski, Jenny Bowman
2009 Wolfenden L, Hutchesson MJ, Farrell L, Lecathelinais LC, Sutherland RL, Bell C, et al., 'Physical activity policies and practices in childcare centres: A population based study', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, John Wiggers
Show 23 more conferences

Report (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Wolfenden L, Paul C, Yoong S, Tzelpis F, Bowman J, Wiggers J, 'Evidence Brief: Access to Nicotine Replacement Therapy: Issues for Disadvantage Population Groups. Australian National Preventive Health Agency, 2014 (in press)', Australian National Preventive Health Agency (2014)
2013 Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Gillham K, Bell C, Sutherland R, et al., 'Good for Kids. Good for Life: Evaluation report 2006-2010: Evaluation Report', Ministry of Health, 134 (2013)
2012 Wiggers J, Tindall J, Wolfenden L, Weir S, Gillham K, 'Australian Defence Force: Alcohol Management Strategy ¿ data Review Activity Final Report (ADFAMS)', Australian Drug Foundation, 25 (2012)
2012 Mathers C, Pujari S, Stevens G, d'Espaignet ET, Wolfenden L, 'WHO Global Report: Tobacco Attributable Mortality', World Health Organization, 396 (2012)
Show 1 more report
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 38
Total funding $11,811,311

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $350,732

Scheduling frequent opportunities for outdoor play – a simple approach to increase physical activity in childcare$350,732

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1400149
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20154 grants / $123,800

An online consumer intervention in primary school canteens$42,500

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Ms Tessa Delaney, Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500605
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Healthy eating intervention for disadvantaged schools$42,500

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Mrs Kathryn Reilly
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500701
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Improving parents' skills to reduce adolescent alcohol use$20,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Doctor Conor Gilligan, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Ms Julie Rae
Scheme Research Funds
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500833
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Improving parents skills to reduce adolescent alcohol use$18,800

Funding body: Australian Drug Foundation

Funding body Australian Drug Foundation
Project Team Doctor Conor Gilligan, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Ms Karen Gillham
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500866
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20145 grants / $588,784

Evaluation of a tailored online hospital and post-discharge smoking cessation program for orthopaedic trauma surgery patients$364,658

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Billie Bonevski, Professor Zsolt Balogh, Professor Amanda Baker, Professor Ian Harris, Professor John Attia, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran, Dr Johnson George, Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300686
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Population Health Post Doctoral Fellowship$122,245

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Ms Karen Gillham
Scheme Postdoctoral Position
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301173
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

A randomized trial of an implementation intervention to facilitate the adoption of a state-wide healthy canteen policy$57,132

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400725
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Develop and evaluate a three-year strategic plan addressing sun exposure, skin cancer prevention and vitamin D$25,000

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Amy Waller, Mrs Elizabeth Tracey, Miss Alix Hall
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400744
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Improving radiotherapy outcomes with smoking cessation: Pilot trial in had and neck cancer patients$19,749

Funding body: Calvary Mater Newcastle

Funding body Calvary Mater Newcastle
Project Team Mr Ben Britton, Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Chris Wratten, Conjoint Professor Gregory Carter, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Alison Beck, Doctor Craig Sadler, Associate Professor Judith Bauer
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400766
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20138 grants / $1,773,320

A randomised trial of an intervention to maintain alcohol management practices in community sporting clubs$514,708

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Dr Bosco Rowland, Ms Karen Gillham, Ms Jennifer Tindall, Ms Maree Sidey
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201199
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Preventing chronic disease in Australia through applied intervention research$397,724

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Career Development Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200518
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Moving from policy to practice: A randomised trial of an implementation intervention to facilitate the adoption of a statewide healthy canteen policy$390,113

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Megan Freund, Ms Karen Gillham, Doctor Libby Campbell, Ms Rachel Sutherland, Ms Nicole Nathan
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201168
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A randomised trial of an intervention to maintain alcohol management practices in community sporting clubs$235,000

Funding body: Australian Drug Foundation

Funding body Australian Drug Foundation
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Dr Bosco Rowland, Ms Karen Gillham, Ms Jennifer Tindall, Ms Maree Sidey
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300712
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Moving from policy to practice: A randomised trial of an implementation intervention to facilitate the adoption of a statewide healthy canteen policy$127,998

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Megan Freund, Ms Karen Gillham, Doctor Libby Campbell, Ms Rachel Sutherland, Ms Nicole Nathan
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300710
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Scholarship Top-Up Jannah Jones - Creating environments supportive of child obesity prevention: the effectiveness of an intensive population based dissemination intervention$67,777

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Ms Jannah Jones
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300709
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

A randomised trial of an intervention to maintain alcohol management practices in community sporting clubs$30,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Dr Bosco Rowland, Ms Karen Gillham, Ms Jennifer Tindall, Ms Maree Sidey
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1400833
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

PULSE Early Career Researcher Award 2012$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300572
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20124 grants / $3,665,119

Evaluating the efficacy of an integrated smoking cessation intervention for mental health patients: a randomised controlled trial$1,466,787

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Jennifer Bowman, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Paula Wye, Associate Professor Judith Prochaska, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Libby Campbell
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100130
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Eating As Treatment (EAT): A stepped wedge, randomised control trial of a health behaviour change intervention provided by dietitians to improve nutrition in head and neck cancer patients undergoing r$1,136,556

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Amanda Baker, Conjoint Professor Gregory Carter, Associate Professor Judith Bauer, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Chris Wratten, Mr Ben Britton
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100093
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Creating childcare environments supportive of child obesity prevention: The effectiveness of an intensive population based dissemination intervention$662,778

Funding body: ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)

Funding body ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Libby Campbell, Ms Karen Gillham, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Paula Wye, Ms Meghan Finch, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Rebecca Wyse, Dr Sze Yoong, Ms Jannah Jones
Scheme Preventive Health Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1101031
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Randomised controlled trial of a telephone delivered social well-being and engaged living (SWEL) intervention for disengaged youth at risk of mental health and other adverse outcomes in urban and rura$398,998

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Dr Leanne Hides, Dr Helen Stain, Dr Chris Jackson, Professor Rhoshel Lenroot, Dr Georgie Paulik
Scheme Call for Research (Mental Health)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200052
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20112 grants / $711,950

The effectiveness of a clinical practice change intervention in increasing, on a health service wide basis, community health clinician adherence to preventive care guidelines$591,239

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Associate Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Paula Wye
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000537
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The effectiveness of a clinical practice change intervention in increasing, on a health service wide basis, community health clinician adherence to preventive care guidelines$120,711

Funding body: Health Reform Transitional Organisation - Northern

Funding body Health Reform Transitional Organisation - Northern
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Associate Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Paula Wye
Scheme NHMRC Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100784
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20104 grants / $2,881,917

Effectiveness of a resilience intervention in reducing smoking and alcohol consumption among secondary school students$1,432,750

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Associate Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Megan Freund
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190175
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Healthy Schools, Healthy Futures$1,420,000

Funding body: nib Foundation

Funding body nib Foundation
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Associate Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Megan Freund
Scheme National Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000225
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase child physical activity during attendance at childcare$24,547

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Megan Freund
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900142
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

A multi-national examination of the impact of smoke free legislation on adolescent tobacco use and second hand tobacco smoke exposure$4,620

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000494
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20098 grants / $1,670,689

Supporting parents to increase children's consumption of fruits and vegetables: a randomised controlled trial of a telephone based intervention$586,101

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Early Career Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189545
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Reducing alcohol misuse: The efficacy of a comprehensive accreditation intervention in community sports clubs$446,964

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Dr Robin Room, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Dr Bosco Rowland, Dr Jane Mallick, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Mr Michael Livingston, Ms Karen Gillham
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189163
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Reducing alcohol misuse: The efficacy of a comprehensive accreditation intervention in community sports clubs$113,622

Funding body: Australian Drug Foundation

Funding body Australian Drug Foundation
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Dr Robin Room, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Dr Bosco Rowland, Dr Jane Mallick, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Mr Michael Livingston, Ms Karen Gillham
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189604
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Reducing alcohol misuse: The efficacy of a comprehensive accreditation intervention in community sports clubs$113,622

Funding body: Hunter New England Area Health Service

Funding body Hunter New England Area Health Service
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Dr Robin Room, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Dr Bosco Rowland, Dr Jane Mallick, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Mr Michael Livingston, Ms Karen Gillham
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189605
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Supporting parents to increase children's consumption of fruits and vegetables: a randomised controlled trial of a telephone based intervention$86,951

Funding body: Hunter New England Area Health Service

Funding body Hunter New England Area Health Service
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190370
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Supporting parents to increase children's consumption of fruits and vegetables: a randomised controlled trial of a telephone based intervention$36,068

Funding body: Hunter New England Area Health Service

Funding body Hunter New England Area Health Service
Project Team Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190253
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

The effectiveness of a brief smoking cessation intervention with booked surgical patients in a public hospital$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Dr R Kerridge
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189819
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20082 grants / $45,000

Upgrade of computer equipment for the computer assisted telephone generalised electronic system$25,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Conjoint Professor Afaf Girgis, Conjoint Professor David Durrheim, Associate Professor Jennifer Bowman, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Conjoint Associate Professor Raoul Walsh, Dr Edouard Tursan D'Espaignet, Ms Lyn Francis, Doctor Frank Tuyl, Associate Professor Erica James, Doctor Allison Boyes, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Libby Campbell
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188548
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Providing telephone support to parents to improve child fruit and vegetable intake$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Professor John Wiggers, Associate Professor Jennifer Bowman
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189064
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current11

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD4.28

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Moving from Policy to Practice: A Randomised Controlled Trial of an Implementation Intervention to Facilitate the Adoption of a State-Wide Healthy Canteen Policy
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Improving Population Wide Implementation of Healthy Food Policy in Primary Schools
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD A Randomised Trial of Web-Based Intervention in Sustaining Best-Practise Alcohol Management Practices at Community Sports Clubs
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD An Intervention to Improve Implementation of Nutrition Guidelines in Childcare Services
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Effectiveness of a Clinical Practice Change Intervention in Improving Screening and Referral of Head and Neck Cancer Patients for Distress
Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Increasing the Provision of Preventive Care Delivered by Community Health Drug and Alcohol Clinicians
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Creating Childcare Environments Supportive of Child Obesity Prevention: The Effectiveness of an Intensive Population Based Dissemination Intervention
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2010 PhD A Comprehensive Accreditation Intervention to Reduce Alcohol Consumption at Community Sports Clubs
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2008 PhD Physical Activity Levels of Children Attending Long Day Care
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2008 PhD Increasing the Implementation of Vegetable and Fruit Breaks in Australian Primary Schools
Behavioural Science, Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2008 PhD Increasing the Implementation of Vegetable and Fruit Breaks in Australian Primary Schools
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2013 PhD Increasing the Fruit and Vegetables Consumption of Preschool Children
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2011 PhD Opportunities for Reducing Alcohol-Related Crime in Non-Metropolitan Areas of Australia
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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News

Philip Morgan

Acclaim for researchers

July 29, 2013

University of Newcastle researchers have won two awards at the National Preventative Health Awards presented at the National Preventive Health Symposium at Parliament House in Canberra.

Grants for creativity

Creative Industries

June 28, 2013

A study concerning Creativity and Cultural Production in the Hunter Region was announced today as one of six University of Newcastle projects awarded highly prestigious Australian Research Council Linkage Project Grants worth a total of $1.8 million.

Dr Luke Wolfenden

Position

Associate Professor
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email luke.wolfenden@newcastle.edu.au
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