Miss Alix Hall

Research Associate

School of Medicine and Public Health (Health Behaviour Sciences)

Career Summary

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (32 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Yoong SL, Hall A, Williams CM, Skelton E, Oldmeadow C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Alignment of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane database of systematic reviews and the database of abstracts and reviews of effectiveness with global burden-of-disease data: A bibliographic analysis', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 69 708-714 (2015)

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burde... [more]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burden of disease. This study aims to assess if the volume of research output from systematic reviews proportionally aligns with burden of disease assessed using percentages of mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods: A cross-sectional audit of reviews published between January 2012 and August 2013 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) was undertaken. Percentages of mortality and DALYs were obtained from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. Standardised residual differences (SRD) based on percentages of mortality and DALYs were calculated, where conditions with SRD of more than or less than three were considered overstudied or understudied, respectively. Results: 1029 reviews from CDSR and 1928 reviews from DARE were examined. There was a significant correlation between percentage DALYs and systematic reviews published in CDSR and DARE databases (CDSR: r=0.68, p=0.001; DARE: r=0.60, p<0.001). There was no significant correlation between percentage mortality and number of systematic reviews published in either database (CDSR: r=0.34, p=0.14; DARE: r=0.22, p=0.34). Relative to percentage of mortality, mental and behavioural disorders, musculoskeletal conditions and other non-communicable diseases were overstudied. Maternal disorders were overstudied relative to percentages of mortality and DALYs in CDSR. Conclusions: The focus of systematic reviews is moderately correlated with DALYs. A number of conditions may be overstudied relative to percentage of mortality particularly in the context of health and medical reviews.

DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-205389
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Sang NM, Hall A, Huong TTT, Giang LM, Hinh ND, 'Validity and reliability of the Vietnamese Physician Professional Values Scale', Global Public Health, 10 S131-S148 (2015)

Physician values influence a physician¿s clinical practice and level of medical professionalism. Currently, there is no psychometrically valid scale to assess physician values in... [more]

Physician values influence a physician¿s clinical practice and level of medical professionalism. Currently, there is no psychometrically valid scale to assess physician values in Vietnam. This study assessed the initial validity and reliability of the Vietnamese Physician Professional Values Scale (VPPVS). Hartung¿s original Physician Values in Practice Scale (PVIPS) was translated from English into Vietnamese and adapted to reflect the cultural values of Vietnamese physicians. A sample of clinical experts reviewed the VPPVS to ensure face and content validity of the scale, resulting in a draft 37-item measure. A cross-sectional survey of 1086 physicians from Hanoi, Hue and Ho Chi Minh City completed a self-report survey, which included the draft of the VPPVS. Exploratory Factor Analysis was used to assess construct validity, resulting in 35 items assessing physician¿s professional values across five main factors: lifestyle, professionalism, prestige, management and finance. The final five-factor scale illustrated acceptable internal consistency, with Cronbach¿s alpha coefficients ranging from 0.73 to 0.86 and all item-total correlations >0.2. Limited floor or ceiling effects were found. This study supports the application of the VPPVS to measure medical professional values of Vietnamese physicians. Future studies should further assess the psychometric properties of the VPPVS using large samples.

DOI 10.1080/17441692.2014.981830
2015 Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Lynagh MC, Tzelepis F, D'Este C, 'What do haematological cancer survivors want help with? A cross-sectional investigation of unmet supportive care needs.', BMC Res Notes, 8 221 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1188-7
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'Development and psychometric evaluation of the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care measure with hematological cancer survivors', Cancer, 121 2383-2392 (2015) [E3]

BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome measures developed with cancer popu... [more]

BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome measures developed with cancer populations fail to address all 6 patient-centeredness dimensions. The Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure was developed on the basis of IOM recommendations, and the measure's validity, reliability, and floor and ceiling effects were examined. METHODS The development of the QPCCC measure included interviews with hematological cancer survivors and feedback from hematologists and cancer patients. To evaluate the measure's psychometric properties, hematological cancer survivors were identified via 2 cancer registries and were mailed the QPCCC measure. To examine test-retest reliability, a second QPCCC measure was mailed to survivors 7 to 14 days after they had returned the first measure. RESULTS Overall, 545 hematological cancer survivors completed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 10-factor structure with factor loadings>0.40. The subscales were labeled Treatment Delivery, Treatment Decision Making, Coordinated and Integrated Care, Emotional Support, Timely Care, Follow-Up Care, Respectful Communication, Patient Preferences and Values, Cancer Information, and Equitable Care. The QPCCC measure demonstrated acceptable internal consistency for all subscales (Cronbach's a=.73-.94). When test-retest reliability was assessed, 4 items demonstrated substantial agreement (¿>0.60), whereas 40 items showed moderate agreement (¿=0.41-0.60). Ceiling effects were present for 8 subscales. CONCLUSIONS The QPCCC measure has acceptable face and content validity, construct validity, and internal consistency. However, the measure's discriminant validity and test-retest reliability could be improved. The QPCCC measure could be used to improve patient-centered cancer care. Cancer 2015;121:2383-2392.

DOI 10.1002/cncr.29384
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'Development and psychometric evaluation of the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care measure with hematological cancer survivors', Cancer, 121 2383-2392 (2015)

BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome measures developed with cancer popu... [more]

BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome measures developed with cancer populations fail to address all 6 patient-centeredness dimensions. The Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure was developed on the basis of IOM recommendations, and the measure's validity, reliability, and floor and ceiling effects were examined. METHODS The development of the QPCCC measure included interviews with hematological cancer survivors and feedback from hematologists and cancer patients. To evaluate the measure's psychometric properties, hematological cancer survivors were identified via 2 cancer registries and were mailed the QPCCC measure. To examine test-retest reliability, a second QPCCC measure was mailed to survivors 7 to 14 days after they had returned the first measure. RESULTS Overall, 545 hematological cancer survivors completed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 10-factor structure with factor loadings>0.40. The subscales were labeled Treatment Delivery, Treatment Decision Making, Coordinated and Integrated Care, Emotional Support, Timely Care, Follow-Up Care, Respectful Communication, Patient Preferences and Values, Cancer Information, and Equitable Care. The QPCCC measure demonstrated acceptable internal consistency for all subscales (Cronbach's a=.73-.94). When test-retest reliability was assessed, 4 items demonstrated substantial agreement (¿>0.60), whereas 40 items showed moderate agreement (¿=0.41-0.60). Ceiling effects were present for 8 subscales. CONCLUSIONS The QPCCC measure has acceptable face and content validity, construct validity, and internal consistency. However, the measure's discriminant validity and test-retest reliability could be improved. The QPCCC measure could be used to improve patient-centered cancer care. Cancer 2015;121:2383-2392.

DOI 10.1002/cncr.29384
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2015 Yoong SL, Hall A, Williams CM, Skelton E, Oldmeadow C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Alignment of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane database of systematic reviews and the database of abstracts and reviews of effectiveness with global burden-of-disease data: A bibliographic analysis', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 69 708-714 (2015)

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burde... [more]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burden of disease. This study aims to assess if the volume of research output from systematic reviews proportionally aligns with burden of disease assessed using percentages of mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods: A cross-sectional audit of reviews published between January 2012 and August 2013 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) was undertaken. Percentages of mortality and DALYs were obtained from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. Standardised residual differences (SRD) based on percentages of mortality and DALYs were calculated, where conditions with SRD of more than or less than three were considered overstudied or understudied, respectively. Results: 1029 reviews from CDSR and 1928 reviews from DARE were examined. There was a significant correlation between percentage DALYs and systematic reviews published in CDSR and DARE databases (CDSR: r=0.68, p=0.001; DARE: r=0.60, p<0.001). There was no significant correlation between percentage mortality and number of systematic reviews published in either database (CDSR: r=0.34, p=0.14; DARE: r=0.22, p=0.34). Relative to percentage of mortality, mental and behavioural disorders, musculoskeletal conditions and other non-communicable diseases were overstudied. Maternal disorders were overstudied relative to percentages of mortality and DALYs in CDSR. Conclusions: The focus of systematic reviews is moderately correlated with DALYs. A number of conditions may be overstudied relative to percentage of mortality particularly in the context of health and medical reviews.

DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-205389
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Wiggers
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'The quality of patient-centred care: Haematological cancer survivors' perceptions', Psycho-Oncology, 24 796-803 (2015)

Objective Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care have failed to measure all six patient-centredness dimensions endorsed b... [more]

Objective Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care have failed to measure all six patient-centredness dimensions endorsed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). This study is the first to use the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure that covers all six IOM patient-centredness dimensions to examine haematological cancer survivors' perceptions of care and characteristics associated with perceived quality of care. Methods Haematological cancer survivors diagnosed in the last 6 years and aged 18-80 years were recruited from two Australian state population-based cancer registries. Survivors were mailed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Results Overall, 545 haematological cancer survivors completed the measure. Areas of care most commonly identified as delivered were hospital staff showing respect to survivors (93%) and making sure the correct treatment was received (93%). Aspects of care most frequently nominated as not delivered were hospital staff helping family and friends (34%) or the survivor (32%) to find other people with similar experiences to talk to. Characteristics associated with survivors perceiving higher quality care was delivered included being employed, having private health insurance, being younger, a Non-Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis and more recent diagnosis. Being depressed or stressed was associated with perceived lower quality of care. Conclusions Provision of peer support programs that allow haematological cancer survivors and families and friends to talk to others in similar situations could be improved. Using PROMs to identify areas where cancer survivors perceive improvements are needed is essential to quality improvement efforts.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3728
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Yoong SL, Hall A, Williams CM, Skelton E, Oldmeadow C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Alignment of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Database of Abstracts and Reviews of Effectiveness with global burden-of-disease data: a bibliographic analysis.', J Epidemiol Community Health, 69 708-714 (2015)
DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-205389
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Wiggers
2015 Lynagh MC, Clinton-McHarg T, Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, Stevenson W, Tiley C, Bisquera A, 'Are Australian clinicians monitoring medication adherence in hematological cancer survivors? Two cross-sectional studies.', Exp Hematol Oncol, 4 15 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s40164-015-0011-4
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-McHarg T, 'DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOMETRIC EVALUATION OF THE QUALITY OF PATIENT-CENTERED CANCER CARE MEASURE WITH HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER SURVIVORS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 10 254-255 (2014)
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Flora Tzelepis, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2014 Campbell HS, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Barker D, Turner D, Taylor-Brown J, 'Development and validation of the Short-Form Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SF-SUNS)', Supportive Care in Cancer, 22 1071-1079 (2014) [C1]

Purpose: The Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) is one of the only unmet needs measures that was developed and evaluated utilising a population-based sample of cancer survivors. A... [more]

Purpose: The Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) is one of the only unmet needs measures that was developed and evaluated utilising a population-based sample of cancer survivors. At 89 items, the current scale is quite burdensome. The current study aimed to develop a valid and reliable short version of this survey. Methods: A heterogeneous sample of 1,589 cancer survivors, aged 19 years or over at diagnosis, diagnosed with a histologically confirmed cancer in the previous 12 to 60 months, completed the SUNS. Using these data, we employed a combined theoretical and statistical method of reducing the number of items in the SUNS. The shortened survey was examined for construct validity, internal consistency, discriminant validity and floor and ceiling effects. Results: Fifty-nine items were removed. Construct validity closely reflected the original structure of the SUNS. However, all items from the Emotional health and Relationships domains loaded onto one factor. Cronbach's alpha for the final four domains were 0.85 or above, demonstrating strong internal consistency. Intra-class correlations of the three domains from the original survey (Financial concerns, Information and Access and continuity of care) and shortened survey were high (>0.9). Discriminant validity illustrated the short-form SUNS' ability to discriminate between those who had recently received treatment and those who had not. Conclusions: This study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the short-form SUNS (SF-SUNS). Future studies should confirm the test-retest reliability and predictive validity of the SF-SUNS utilising large, independent, population-based samples of cancer survivors. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-013-2061-7
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Hall A, D Este C, Tzelepis F, Lynagh M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Factors associated with haematological cancer survivors experiencing a high level of unmet need across multiple items of supportive care: a cross-sectional survey study', Supportive Care in Cancer, 22 2899-2909 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2264-6
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Marita Lynagh, Catherine Deste, Flora Tzelepis
2014 Hall A, D Este C, Tzelepis F, Lynagh M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Factors associated with haematological cancer survivors experiencing a high level of unmet need across multiple items of supportive care: a cross-sectional survey study', Supportive Care in Cancer, 22 2899-2909 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2264-6
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Flora Tzelepis
2014 Campbell SH, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Barker D, Turner D, Taylor-Brown J, Hall A, 'Measuring the unmet supportive care needs of cancer support persons: The development of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey - short form', European Journal of Cancer Care, 23 255-262 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/ecc.12138
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Campbell SH, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Barker D, Turner D, Taylor-Brown J, Hall A, 'Measuring the unmet supportive care needs of cancer support persons: The development of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey - short form', European Journal of Cancer Care, 23 255-262 (2014) [C1]

Few rigorous measures of unmet needs have been developed for cancer support persons. This study describes the development of a short version of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Su... [more]

Few rigorous measures of unmet needs have been developed for cancer support persons. This study describes the development of a short version of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey (SPUNS). Cancer survivors [n = 1589, 612 (52%) men, mean age of 62.5 years, SD 11.5] 1-5 years post diagnosis and recruited through three Canadian population-based cancer registries were asked to pass a survey package on to their principal support person. Surveys were returned by 1183 support persons. The survey included the long form of the SPUNS, which contains 78 items. Fifty-two items were deleted using a combination of expert opinion and statistical criteria. Analysis of the remaining items revealed a five-factor structure. The original factors were retained with the exception of a merging of the personal and emotional needs subscales. Cronbach's alpha co-efficients for all subscales were =0.87, and intraclass correlation of domain scores of the short and long versions of the SPUNS were high. The SPUNS short form was able to discriminate between support persons of survivors who had (n = 147), and those who had not received treatment in the past month (n = 969). At just 26 items, it is likely to have strong clinical and research applicability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/ecc.12138
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2014 Hall A, D'Este C, Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher R, Lynagh M, 'The Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) for haematological cancer survivors: a cross-sectional study assessing the relevance and psychometric properties', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-14-211
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Flora Tzelepis, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, Lynagh M, Tzelepis F, D'Este C, 'A COMPARISON OF THE UNMET NEEDS OF YOUNGER AND OLDER ADULT HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER SURVIVORS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 10 162-163 (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Marita Lynagh, Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-McHarg T, 'DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOMETRIC EVALUATION OF THE QUALITY OF PATIENT-CENTERED CANCER CARE MEASURE WITH HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER SURVIVORS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 10 254-255 (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2014 Sang NM, Hall A, Huong TTT, Giang LM, Hinh ND, 'Validity and reliability of the Vietnamese Physician Professional Values Scale', Global Public Health, (2014)

Physician values influence a physician¿s clinical practice and level of medical professionalism. Currently, there is no psychometrically valid scale to assess physician values in... [more]

Physician values influence a physician¿s clinical practice and level of medical professionalism. Currently, there is no psychometrically valid scale to assess physician values in Vietnam. This study assessed the initial validity and reliability of the Vietnamese Physician Professional Values Scale (VPPVS). Hartung¿s original Physician Values in Practice Scale (PVIPS) was translated from English into Vietnamese and adapted to reflect the cultural values of Vietnamese physicians. A sample of clinical experts reviewed the VPPVS to ensure face and content validity of the scale, resulting in a draft 37-item measure. A cross-sectional survey of 1086 physicians from Hanoi, Hue and Ho Chi Minh City completed a self-report survey, which included the draft of the VPPVS. Exploratory Factor Analysis was used to assess construct validity, resulting in 35 items assessing physician¿s professional values across five main factors: lifestyle, professionalism, prestige, management and finance. The final five-factor scale illustrated acceptable internal consistency, with Cronbach¿s alpha coefficients ranging from 0.73 to 0.86 and all item-total correlations >0.2. Limited floor or ceiling effects were found. This study supports the application of the VPPVS to measure medical professional values of Vietnamese physicians. Future studies should further assess the psychometric properties of the VPPVS using large samples.

DOI 10.1080/17441692.2014.981830
Citations Web of Science - 1
2014 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'The quality of patient-centred care: Haematological cancer survivors' perceptions', Psycho-Oncology, (2014)

Objective: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care have failed to measure all six patient-centredness dimensions endorsed ... [more]

Objective: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care have failed to measure all six patient-centredness dimensions endorsed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). This study is the first to use the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure that covers all six IOM patient-centredness dimensions to examine haematological cancer survivors' perceptions of care and characteristics associated with perceived quality of care. Methods: Haematological cancer survivors diagnosed in the last 6 years and aged 18-80 years were recruited from two Australian state population-based cancer registries. Survivors were mailed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Results: Overall, 545 haematological cancer survivors completed the measure. Areas of care most commonly identified as delivered were hospital staff showing respect to survivors (93%) and making sure the correct treatment was received (93%). Aspects of care most frequently nominated as not delivered were hospital staff helping family and friends (34%) or the survivor (32%) to find other people with similar experiences to talk to. Characteristics associated with survivors perceiving higher quality care was delivered included being employed, having private health insurance, being younger, a Non-Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis and more recent diagnosis. Being depressed or stressed was associated with perceived lower quality of care. Conclusions: Provision of peer support programs that allow haematological cancer survivors and families and friends to talk to others in similar situations could be improved. Using PROMs to identify areas where cancer survivors perceive improvements are needed is essential to quality improvement efforts.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3728
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Bryant J, Passey ME, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'A systematic review of the quality of reporting in published smoking cessation trials for pregnant women: An explanation for the evidence-practice gap?', Implementation Science, 9 (2014) [C1]

Background: To facilitate translation of evidence into clinical practice, it is critical that clear, specific, and detailed information about interventions is provided in publicat... [more]

Background: To facilitate translation of evidence into clinical practice, it is critical that clear, specific, and detailed information about interventions is provided in publications to promote replication, appropriate aggregation in meta-analysis, and implementation. This study examined whether twenty elements of interventions deemed essential for such translational application were reported in sufficient detail in smoking cessation trials with pregnant women. Methods: Searches of electronic databases using MeSH terms and keywords identified peer-reviewed English language studies published between 2001 and 2012. Eligible studies reported a smoking cessation intervention targeted at pregnant women and met Cochrane's Effective Practice and Organization of Care group study design criteria. Each intervention arm of eligible studies was assessed against the developed twenty criteria. Results: Thirty relevant studies reported the findings of 45 intervention arms. The mode of delivery of the intervention was reported in 100% of intervention arms. Other well-reported criteria included reporting of the provider who delivered the intervention (96%), sample characteristics (80%), and the intervention setting (80%). Criteria not reported adequately included care provided to women who relapse (96% not reported), details about training given to providers (77% not reported), and the method of quit advice advised (76% not reported). No studies reported 100% of relevant criteria. Conclusions: Current standards of reporting of intervention content and implementation are suboptimal. The use of smoking cessation specific checklists for reporting of trials, standard reporting using behaviour change taxonomies, and the publication of protocols as supplements should be considered as ways of improving the specificity of reporting.

DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0094-z
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Passey ME, Bryant J, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'How will we close the gap in smoking rates for pregnant Indigenous women?', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 199 39-41 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.5694/mja12.11848
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Paul CL, Hall AE, Carey ML, Cameron EC, Clinton-McHarg T, 'Access to Care and Impacts of Cancer on Daily Life: Do They Differ for Metropolitan Versus Regional Hematological Cancer Survivors?', Journal of Rural Health, 29 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jrh.12020
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul
2013 Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Lynagh MC, Threlfall T, D'Este CA, 'Format and readability of an enhanced invitation letter did not affect participation rates in a cancer registry-based study: a randomized controlled trial', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, 66 85-94 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2012.07.016
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Hall A, Lynagh M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Supportive care needs of hematological cancer survivors: A critical review of the literature', Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology, 88 102-116 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2013.03.008
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Hall A, Campbell HS, Sanson-Fisher R, Lynagh M, D'Este C, Burkhalter R, Carey M, 'Unmet needs of Australian and Canadian haematological cancer survivors: a cross-sectional international comparative study', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, 22 2032-2038 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.3247
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Marita Lynagh
2012 Hall AE, Boyes AW, Bowman JA, Walsh RA, James EL, Girgis A, 'Young adult cancer survivors' psychosocial well-being: A cross-sectional study assessing quality of life, unmet needs, and health behaviors', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 1333-1341 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Allison Boyes, Erica James
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Hall AE, 'Cancer patients' willingness to answer survey questions about life expectancy', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 3335-3341 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-012-1477-9
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Lisa Mackenzie, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2012 Carey ML, Paul CL, Cameron EC, Lynagh MC, Hall AE, Tzelepis F, 'Financial and social impact of supporting a haematological cancer survivor', European Journal of Cancer Care, 21 169-176 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Marita Lynagh
2012 Lynagh MC, Bonevski B, Sanson-Fisher RW, Symonds IM, Scott A, Hall AE, Oldmeadow CJ, 'An RCT protocol of varying financial incentive amounts for smoking cessation among pregnant women', BMC Public Health, 12 1032 (2012) [C3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ian Symonds, Billie Bonevski, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Christopher Oldmeadow, Marita Lynagh
2011 Zucca AC, Boyes AW, Newling G, Hall AE, Girgis A, 'Travelling all over the countryside: Travel-related burden and financial difficulties reported by cancer patients in New South Wales and Victoria', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 19 298-305 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2011.01232.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Alison Zucca
2011 Paul CL, Carey ML, Hall AE, Lynagh MC, Sanson-Fisher RW, Henskens FA, 'Improving access to information and support for patients with less common cancers: hematologic cancer patients' views about web-based approaches', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 13 e112 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.1894
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Frans Henskens, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Marita Lynagh
Show 29 more journal articles

Conference (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Hall A, Nguyen S, Tran H, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, 'PATIENTS PERCEPTIONS OF WHAT MAY HAVE CAUSED THEIR CANCER: A CROSS-SECTIONAL INVESTIGATION OF VIETNAMESE RADIOTHERAPY CANCER PATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2014 Hall A, Tzelepis F, Lynagh M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, 'PREVALENCE AND ASSOCIATES OF THE TOP HIGH/VERY HIGH UNMET NEEDS OF AUSTRALIAN HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER SURVIVORS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2014 Hall AE, Paul C, Bryant J, Lynagh M, Rowlings P, Enjeti AK, et al., 'TO ADHERE OR NOT TO ADHERE: RATES AND FACTORS IMPACTING ON MEDICATION ADHERENCE IN HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER PATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Chris Paul
2013 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Carey M, Paul C, Clinton-McHarg T, 'Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Quality of Patient-Centred Cancer Care Measure', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Hall A, Lynagh M, Sanson-Fisher R, Tzelepis F, D'Este C, 'Unmet Needs: What do Hematological Cancer Survivors Want Help With?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Flora Tzelepis, Catherine Deste
2013 Hall A, D'Este C, Tzelepis F, Lynagh M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) for Hematological Cancer Survivors: A Psychometric Assessment', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Flora Tzelepis, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Lynagh MC, Bonevski B, Sanson-Fisher R, Symonds I, Scott A, Hall A, Oldmeadow C, 'Should we pay pregnant smokers to quit? Preliminary findings of a feasibility trial.', Journal of Smoking Cessation, Sydney (2013) [E3]
DOI 10.1017/jsc.2013.26
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Ian Symonds, Billie Bonevski
2011 Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Hall AE, 'Who should make disclosure decisions? Cancer patients' preferences for life expectancy disclosure', Psycho-Oncology, Antalya, Turkey (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Lisa Mackenzie
2009 Hall AE, Boyes AW, Bowman JA, Zucca AC, Girgis A, ''The young ones': Psychosocial wellbeing and service utilisation of young cancer survivors', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Gold Coast, QLD (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2009.01252.x
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Allison Boyes, Alison Zucca
2009 Zucca AC, Boyes AW, Girgis A, Hall AE, 'Travel all over the countryside: Travelling for cancer treatment in NSW and Victoria', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Gold Coast, QLD (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2009.01252.x
Co-authors Alison Zucca, Allison Boyes
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $45,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20142 grants / $45,000

Develop and evaluate a three-year strategic plan addressing sun exposure, skin cancer prevention and vitamin D$25,000

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Amy Waller, Mrs Elizabeth Tracey, Miss Alix Hall
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400744
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Quality of cancer care from the patient perspective: An international comparison study$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Dr Megumi Uchida, Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Alison Zucca, Miss Alix Hall, Miss Lisa Mackenzie
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400058
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.25

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2013 PhD Patient Perceptions of Potentially Threatening Interventions
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Miss Alix Hall

Position

Research Associate
Mon-Fri: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Health Behaviour Sciences

Contact Details

Email alix.hall@newcastle.edu.au
Phone Monday-Friday:(02)40420641

Office

Room Monday to Friday: W4-088 HMRI building
Building HMRI Building
Location Rankin Park

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