Dr Elise Mansfield

Post Doctoral Research Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Post Doctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Herrmann A, Mansfield E, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher R, Zdenkowski N, 'Wilfully out of sight? A literature review on the effectiveness of cancer-related decision aids and implementation strategies.', BMC Med Inform Decis Mak, 16 36 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12911-016-0273-8
Co-authors Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Waller A, Turon H, Mansfield E, Clark K, Hobden B, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Assisting the bereaved: A systematic review of the evidence for grief counselling', Palliative Medicine, 30 132-148 (2016) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2015.Background: Supporting people after bereavement is a priority area for many health services. Investment in bereavement care must be supported by a rigorous e... [more]

© The Author(s) 2015.Background: Supporting people after bereavement is a priority area for many health services. Investment in bereavement care must be supported by a rigorous evidence-base. Aim: To examine the (1) relative proportion of descriptive, measurement and intervention research in grief counselling and (2) quality and effectiveness of intervention studies. Design: Systematic review of studies published in the area of grief counselling. Data sources: MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library and PsycINFO databases were searched for studies published between 2000 and 2013. Eligible papers were categorised into descriptive, measurement, review, commentaries and intervention studies. Intervention studies were assessed against the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care methodological criteria, and papers meeting criteria were assessed for quality. The impact of interventions on grief, psychological morbidity and quality of life was examined. Results: A total of 126 data-based papers, including 47 descriptive, 3 measurement and 76 grief counselling intervention studies were included. Only 59% (n = 45) of intervention studies met Effective Practice and Organisation of Care design criteria. Overall, study quality was poor, with the majority of interventions showing a risk of bias in several key areas. The three studies that met all criteria showed mixed effectiveness. Conclusion: Grief counselling interventions require a strong rationale for design, and a systematic approach to development and evaluation. Descriptive research efforts should inform this process, focusing on homogeneity in sample, identification of risk factors for complicated grief and the impact of extraneous factors on intervention effects. Interventions should include comparisons to usual care, as well as replication to confirm positive findings.

DOI 10.1177/0269216315588728
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2015 Regan T, Carey M, Bryant J, Waller A, Mansfield E, Sitas F, Tracey E, 'Prevalence and correlates of current smoking among medical oncology outpatients', Psycho-Oncology, 24 1258-1264 (2015) [C1]

Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Background Continued smoking following a cancer diagnosis has adverse impacts on cancer treatmen... [more]

Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Background Continued smoking following a cancer diagnosis has adverse impacts on cancer treatment and puts individuals at risk of secondary cancers. Data on the prevalence and correlates of smoking among cancer patients are critical for successfully targeting smoking cessation interventions. Aims To explore among a sample of medical oncology outpatients (a) the prevalence of self-reported current smoking and (b) the demographic and psychosocial factors associated with self-reported smoking. Methods A heterogeneous sample of cancer patients aged 18 years or over was recruited from 1 of 11 medical oncology treatment centres across Australia. Patients completed a survey assessing the following: smoking status; socio-demographic, disease and treatment characteristics; time since diagnosis; anxiety; and depression. Factors associated with self-reported smoking were examined using a univariate and multivariate mixed-effects logistic regression. Results A total of 1379 patients returned surveys and 1338 were included in the analysis. The prevalence of current smoking was 10.9% (n=146). After adjusting for treatment centre, patients aged 65 years and older and those without health concession cards were significantly less likely to smoke. Patients diagnosed with lung cancer and those without private health insurance were more likely to smoke. Discussion A minority of cancer patients reported continued smoking at an average time of 13 months post-diagnosis. Patients, who are younger, have been diagnosed with lung cancer and have lower socioeconomic status are at-risk groups and represent important targets for smoking cessation advice and intervention.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3893
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amy Waller, Mariko Carey, Timothy Regan
2015 Bryant J, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Mansfield E, Regan T, Bisquera A, 'Missed opportunities: General practitioner identification of their patients' smoking status', BMC Family Practice, 16 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central.Background: In order to provide smoking cessation support to their patients in line with clinical practice guidelines, general pract... [more]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central.Background: In order to provide smoking cessation support to their patients in line with clinical practice guidelines, general practitioners must first ascertain whether their patients' use tobacco. This study examined (i) the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of general practitioner detection of smoking, and (ii) the general practitioner and patient characteristics associated with detection of tobacco use. Methods: Eligible patients completed a touchscreen computer survey while waiting for an appointment with their general practitioner. Patients self-reported demographic characteristics, medical history, and current smoking status. Following the patient's consultation, their general practitioner was asked to indicate whether the patient was a current smoker (yes/no/unsure/not applicable). Smoking prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values (with 95% confidence intervals) were calculated using patient self-report of smoking status as the gold standard. Generalised estimating equations were used to examine the general practitioner and patient characteristics associated with detection of tobacco use. Results: Fifty-one general practitioners and 1,573 patients in twelve general practices participated. Patient self-report of smoking was 11.3% compared to general practitioner estimated prevalence of 9.5%. Sensitivity of general practitioner assessment was 66% [95% CI 59-73] while specificity was 98% [95% CI 97-98]. Positive predictive value was 78% [95% CI 71-85] and negative predictive value was 96% [95% CI 95-97]. No general practitioner factors were associated with detection of smoking. Patients with a higher level of education or who responded 'Other ' were less likely to be detected as smokers than patients who had completed a high school or below level of education. Conclusion: Despite the important role general practitioners play in providing smoking cessation advice and support, a substantial proportion of general practitioners do not know their patient's smoking status. This represents a significant missed opportunity in the provision of preventive healthcare. Electronic waiting room assessments may assist general practitioners in improving the identification of smokers.

DOI 10.1186/s12875-015-0228-7
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Timothy Regan
2015 Carey M, Noble N, Mansfield E, Waller A, Henskens F, Sanson-Fisher R, 'The role of ehealth in optimizing preventive care in the primary care setting', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17 (2015) [C1]

Modifiable health risk behaviors such as smoking, overweight and obesity, risky alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition contribute to a substantial proportion... [more]

Modifiable health risk behaviors such as smoking, overweight and obesity, risky alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition contribute to a substantial proportion of the world's morbidity and mortality burden. General practitioners (GPs) play a key role in identifying and managing modifiable health risk behaviors. However, these are often underdetected and undermanaged in the primary care setting. We describe the potential of eHealth to help patients and GPs to overcome some of the barriers to managing health risk behaviors. In particular, we discuss (1) the role of eHealth in facilitating routine collection of patient-reported data on lifestyle risk factors, and (2) the role of eHealth in improving clinical management of identified risk factors through provision of tailored feedback, point-of-care reminders, tailored educational materials, and referral to online self-management programs. Strategies to harness the capacity of the eHealth medium, including the use of dynamic features and tailoring to help end users engage with, understand, and apply information need to be considered and maximized. Finally, the potential challenges in implementing eHealth solutions in the primary care setting are discussed. In conclusion, there is significant potential for innovative eHealth solutions to make a contribution to improving preventive care in the primary care setting. However, attention to issues such as data security and designing eHealth interfaces that maximize engagement from end users will be important to moving this field forward.

DOI 10.2196/jmir.3817
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Amy Waller, Frans Henskens
2015 Cooper PS, Wong ASW, Fulham WR, Thienel R, Mansfield E, Michie PT, Karayanidis F, 'Theta frontoparietal connectivity associated with proactive and reactive cognitive control processes', NeuroImage, 108 354-363 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Cognitive control involves both proactive and reactive processes. Paradigms that rely on reactive control have shown that frontoparietal oscillatory synchroni... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Cognitive control involves both proactive and reactive processes. Paradigms that rely on reactive control have shown that frontoparietal oscillatory synchronization in the theta frequency band is associated with interference control. This study examines whether proactive control is also associated with connectivity in the same frontoparietal theta network or involves a distinct neural signature. A task-switching paradigm was used to differentiate between proactive and reactive control processes, involved in preparing to switch or repeat a task and resolving post-target interference, respectively. We confirm that reactive control is associated with frontoparietal theta connectivity. Importantly, we show that proactive control is also associated with theta band oscillatory synchronization but in a different frontoparietal network. These findings support the existence of distinct proactive and reactive cognitive control processes that activate different theta frontoparietal oscillatory networks.

DOI 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.12.028
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Patrick Cooper, Frini Karayanidis, Renate Thienel, Pat Michie, Aaron Wong
2012 Mansfield EL, Karayanidis F, Cohen MX, 'Switch-related and general preparation processes in task-switching: Evidence from multivariate pattern classification of EEG data', Journal of Neuroscience, 32 18253-18258 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Frini Karayanidis
2011 Mansfield EL, Karayanidis F, Jamadar S, Heathcote AJ, Forstmann BU, 'Adjustments of response threshold during task switching: A model-based functional magnetic resonance imaging study', Journal of Neuroscience, 31 14688-14692 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2390-11.2011
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Andrew Heathcote, Frini Karayanidis
2009 Karayanidis F, Mansfield EL, Galloway KL, Smith JL, Provost AL, Heathcote AJ, 'Anticipatory reconfiguration elicited by fully and partially informative cues that validly predict a switch in task', Cognitive Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience, 9 202-215 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.3758/cabn.9.2.202
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Frini Karayanidis, Andrew Heathcote, Alexander Provost
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Conference (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Turon H, Waller A, Mansfield E, Sanson-Fisher R, 'HOW GOOD IS THE QUALITY OF EVIDENCE FOR GRIEF COUNSELLING? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Carey M, Bryant J, Mansfield E, Bisquera A, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, 'CORRELATES OF THE DETECTION OF CANCER RISK FACTORS BY GENERAL PRACTITIONERS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2013 Mansfield EL, Karayanidis F, Heathcote A, Forstmann BU, 'INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN RESPONSE CAUTION ADJUSTMENT: EVIDENCE FROM A MODEL-BASED NEUROSCIENCE APPROACH', PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Frini Karayanidis, Andrew Heathcote
2012 Mansfield EL, Forstmann B, Heathcote AJ, Karayanidis F, 'Fronto-striatal involvement in strategic adjustments of response caution: A combined DWI and ERP study', Front. Hum. Neurosci. Conference Abstract: ACNS-2012 Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Conference (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Andrew Heathcote, Frini Karayanidis
2012 Karayanidis F, Mansfield EL, Cohen MX, 'Distinct switch-related and task-related preparation in cue-target interval revealed by EEG spatial multivariate pattern analysis', Combined Abstracts of 2012 Australian Psychology Conferences (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Frini Karayanidis
2010 Karayanidis F, Mansfield EL, 'Increasing the requirement for top-down control in task-switching: ERP evidence from a voluntary task-switching paradigm', Combined Abstracts of 2010 Australian Psychology Conferences (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Frini Karayanidis
2008 Mansfield EL, Smith JL, Galloway KL, Karayanidis F, 'Ready, set, switch: B. Source analysis of ERP components of task-set reconfiguration', Clinical EEG and Neuroscience (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Frini Karayanidis
2008 Galloway KL, Smith JL, Mansfield EL, Karayanidis F, 'Ready, set, switch: A. ERP evidence for activation and inhibition components of task-set reconfiguration', Clinical EEG and Neuroscience (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Frini Karayanidis
2008 Smith JL, Mansfield EL, Galloway KL, Karayanidis F, 'Identifying components of task-set reconfiguration using ERP and BESA', International Journal of Psychophysiology (2008) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2008.05.053
Co-authors Frini Karayanidis
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $37,500

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20141 grants / $37,500

Improving uptake of colorectal cancer screening among primary care attendees$37,500

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Ms Natalie Dodd, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Elise Mansfield, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1401420
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.4

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Improving Uptake of Colorectal Screening Among Primary Care Attendees
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Dr Elise Mansfield

Position

Post Doctoral Research Fellow
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email elise.mansfield@newcastle.edu.au
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